WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer future directions

  1. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  2. Future directions in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Dunn, Barbara K; Greenwald, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Prevention of cancer remains the most promising strategy for reducing both its incidence and the mortality due to this disease. For more than four decades, findings from epidemiology, basic research and clinical trials have informed the development of lifestyle and medical approaches to cancer prevention. These include selective oestrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, the 5-α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride for prostate cancer, and the development of vaccines for viruses that are associated with specific cancers. Future directions include genetic, proteomic and other molecular approaches for identifying pathways that are associated with cancer initiation and development, as well as refining the search for immunologically modifiable causes of cancer. PMID:23151603

  3. Future Directions in Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Orchard-Webb

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a major disease burden that is essentially incurable at present. However significant understanding of the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer has been achieved through sequencing. This is allowing the rational design of therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to introduce the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer, explain the current state of molecular therapy and provide examples of the ongoing developments. These include improvements in chemotherapy, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines, immune checkpoint antibodies, and oncolytics.

  4. Prostate Cancer Registries: Current Status and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Gandaglia, G; Bray, F.; Cooperberg, MR; Karnes, RJ; Leveridge, MJ; Moretti, K; Murphy, DG; Penson, DF; Miller, DC

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 European Association of Urology. Context: Disease-specific registries that enroll a considerable number of patients play a major role in prostate cancer (PCa) research. Objective: To evaluate available registries, describe their strengths and limitations, and discuss the potential future role of PCa registries in outcomes research. Evidence acquisition: We performed a literature review of the Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. The search strategy included the terms prostate...

  5. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Baskar, Kuo Ann Lee, Richard Yeo, Kheng-Wei Yeoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed.

  6. Lung cancer screening: history, current perspectives, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divakar; Newman, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has remained the leading cause of death worldwide among all cancers. The dismal 5-year survival rate of 16% is in part due to the lack of symptoms during early stages and lack of an effective screening test until recently. Chest X-ray and sputum cytology were studied extensively as potential screening tests for lung cancer and were conclusively proven to be of no value. Subsequently, a number of studies compared computed tomography (CT) with the chest X-ray. These studies did identify lung cancer in earlier stages. However, they were not designed to prove a reduction in mortality. Later trials have focused on low-dose CT (LDCT) as a screening tool. The largest US trial – the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) – enrolled approximately 54,000 patients and revealed a 20% reduction in mortality. While a role for LDCT in lung cancer screening has been established, the issues of high false positive rates, radiation risk, and cost effectiveness still need to be addressed. The guidelines of the international organizations that now include LDCT in lung cancer screening are reviewed. Other methods that may improve earlier detection such as positron emission tomography, autofluorescence bronchoscopy, and molecular biomarkers are also discussed. PMID:26528348

  7. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  8. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, David; Pernia Leal, Manuel; Garcia, Irene; Garcia-Martin, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases) and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis) that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  9. Imaging in primary penile cancer: current status and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochhar, Rohit; Taylor, Ben [Christie, NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sangar, Vijay [Christie, NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Urology, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Penile cancer is a rare neoplasm in the developed world. Clinical assessment often results in inaccurate staging and radiological techniques have a key role in staging and postoperative assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depicts penile anatomy in detail and is the most accurate technique for local staging and postoperative follow-up. MRI and ultrasound (US), although helpful for assessment of lymph nodes, are not reliable enough for accurate nodal staging. US-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), however, remains a valuable tool to confirm metastases in suspicious inguinal nodes. Lymphoscintigraphy with dynamic sentinel node biopsy (DSNB) is a promising technique used to predict occult lymph node metastases. Novel imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) and nanoparticle enhanced MRI have high sensitivity and specificity for lymph node metastases but their availability is limited and clinical utility is not fully established. The radiologist needs to be familiar with the normal penile anatomy, imaging appearances of pre- and post-treatment penile cancer, and the advantages and limitations of the available imaging techniques. This review highlights the above points and presents a systematic approach to make the best use of imaging in the management of patients with penile cancer. (orig.)

  10. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A;

    2007-01-01

    of rectal cancer. As a result of these efforts, a European company is starting production of the new Papillon RT-50 machine, which will be available shortly. In addition, the ICONE group is planning an observational study on contact X-ray and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (CONTEM) for curative treatment...... old. To address this problem, the International Contact Radiotherapy Evaluation (ICONE) group was formed at a meeting in Liverpool in 2005 with the aim of developing a new contact X-ray unit and to establish clinical protocols that would enable the new machine to safely engage in the treatment...

  11. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer: implications for future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etel R. P. Gimba

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been developed trying to understand the complex molecular mechanisms involved in oncogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Current biotechnological methodologies, especially genomic studies, are adding important aspects to this area. The construction of extensive DNA sequence data and gene expression profiles have been intensively explored to search for candidate biomarkers to evaluate PCa. The use of DNA micro-array robotic systems constitutes a powerful approach to simultaneously monitor the expression of a great number of genes. The resulting gene expressing profiles can be used to specifically describe tumor staging and response to cancer therapies. Also, it is possible to follow PCa pathological properties and to identify genes that anticipate the behavior of clinical disease. The molecular pathogenesis of PCa involves many contributing factors, such as alterations in signal transduction pathways, angiogenesis, adhesion molecules expression and cell cycle control. Also, molecular studies are making clear that many genes, scattered through several different chromosomal regions probably cause predisposition to PCa. The discovery of new molecular markers for PCa is another relevant advance resulting from molecular biology studies of prostate tumors. Interesting tissue and serum markers have been reported, resulting in many cases in useful novelties to diagnostic and prognostic approaches to follow-up PCa. Finally, gene therapy comes as an important approach for therapeutic intervention in PCa. Clinical trials for PCa have been demonstrating that gene therapy is relatively safe and well tolerated, although some improvements are yet to be developed.

  12. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  13. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  14. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning

  15. Cognitive training programs for childhood cancer patients and survivors: A critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Katie; Sands, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    A robust literature has developed documenting neurocognitive late effects in survivors of leukemia and central nervous system (CNS) tumors, the most frequent cancer diagnoses of childhood. Patterns of late effects include deficits in attention and concentration, working memory, processing speed, and executive function, as well as other domains. As childhood cancer survivors are living longer, ameliorating deficits both in broad and specific neurocognitive domains has been increasingly recognized as an endeavor of paramount importance. Interventions to improve cognitive functioning were first applied to the field of pediatric oncology in the 1990s, based on strategies used effectively with adults who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Compilation and modification of these techniques has led to the development of structured cognitive training programs, with the effectiveness and feasibility of such interventions currently an active area of research. Consequently, the purpose of this critical review is to: (1) review cognitive training programs intended to remediate or prevent neurocognitive deficits in pediatric cancer patients and survivors, (2) critically analyze training program strengths and weaknesses to inform practice, and (3) provide recommendations for future directions of clinical care and research. PMID:26070928

  16. Reduction in the risk of prostate cancer: future directions after the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, E David; Andriole, Gerald L; Marberger, Michael; Rittmaster, Roger S

    2010-03-01

    The landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) generated interest in the potential health benefits and cost of reducing prostate cancer risk--specifically, the potential role of 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. However, the PCPT raised several unanswered questions, including the cause and significance of the increased incidence of high-grade tumors associated with finasteride. In the present study, we review the PCPT findings and unanswered questions, next steps in this field, and ongoing prostate cancer prevention trials addressing these unanswered questions. Particular emphasis is placed on the design of the second large-scale trial of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, the REduction by DUtasteride of prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial. PMID:20035983

  17. Therapeutic Rationales, Progresses, Failures, and Future Directions for Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) have several therapeutic options with good prognosis. However, survival of patients with high-risk, advanced PCa is significantly less than patients with early-stage, organ-confined disease. Testosterone and other androgens have been directly linked to PCa progression since 1941. In this review, we chronicle the discoveries that led to modern therapeutic strategies for PCa. Specifically highlighted is the biology of androgen receptor (AR), the nuclear receptor transcription factor largely responsible for androgen-stimulated and castrate-recurrent (CR) PCa. Current PCa treatment paradigms can be classified into three distinct but interrelated categories: targeting AR at pre-receptor, receptor, or post-receptor signaling. The continuing challenge of disease relapse as CR and/or metastatic tumors, destined to occur within three years of the initial treatment, is also discussed. We conclude that the success of PCa therapies in the future depends on targeting molecular mechanisms underlying tumor recurrence that still may affect AR at pre-receptor, receptor, and post-receptor levels. PMID:27019626

  18. Rectal cancer: future directions and priorities for treatment, research and policy in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher; Ehrenberg, Nieves; Frizelle, Frank; Sarfati, Diana; Balasingam, Adrian; Pearse, Maria; Parry, Susan; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Bissett, Ian

    2014-06-06

    New Zealand has one of the highest incidences of rectal cancer in the world, and its optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach. A National Rectal Cancer Summit was convened in August 2013 to discuss management of rectal cancer in the New Zealand context, to highlight controversies and discuss domestic priorities for the future. This paper summarises the priorities for treatment, research and policy for rectal cancer services in New Zealand identified as part of the Summit in August. The following priorities were identified: - Access to high-quality information for service planning, review of outcomes, identification of inequities and gaps in provision, and quality improvement; - Engagement with the entire sector, including private providers; - Focus on equity; - Emerging technologies; - Harmonisation of best practice; - Importance of multidisciplinary team meetings. In conclusion, improvements in outcomes for patients with rectal cancer in New Zealand will require significant engagement between policy makers, providers, researchers, and patients in order to ensure equitable access to high quality treatment, and strategic incorporation of emerging technologies into clinical practice. A robust clinical information framework is required in order to facilitate monitoring of quality improvements and to ensure that equitable care is delivered.

  19. Integrating a Narrative Medicine Telephone Interview with Online Life Review Education for Cancer Patients: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille; Cleary, James F.; Aeschlimann, Elizabeth; Causier, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We describe an online narrative and life review education program for cancer patients and the results of a small implementation test to inform future directions for further program development and full-scale evaluation research. The intervention combined three types of psycho-oncology narrative interventions that have been shown to help patients address emotional and existential issues: 1) a physician-led dignity-enhancing telephone interview to elicit the life narrative and delivery of an ed...

  20. Vitamin B6 and colorectal cancer: Current evidence and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ma, Jing; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.; Lee, Jung Eun; Giovannucci, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains the third most common cancer in both women and men worldwide. Identifying modifiable dietary factors is crucial in developing primary prevention strategies. Vitamin B6 is involved in more than 100 coenzyme reactions, and may influence colorectal cancer risk in multiple ways including through its role in one-carbon metabolism related DNA synthesis and methylation and by reducing inflammation, cell proliferation, and oxidative stress. Observational studies of dietary o...

  1. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy with Sipuleucel-T: Current Standards and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao X; Fong, Lawrence; Small, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer, specifically metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), remains a therapeutic challenge. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge; APC8015) was approved by the FDA in 2010 for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC patients, and it remains the only FDA-approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer of any indication to date. Given the continued need to improve therapeutics in patients with advanced prostate cancer, as well as recent enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy, there is a wide range of ongoing trials evaluating combinations of sipuleucel-T with other therapeutics. Additional trials are aiming to expand the application of sipuleucel-T to prostate cancer patients beyond the mCRPC setting. Ongoing challenges include understanding the full mechanism of action of sipuleucel-T, optimizing the sequence of sipuleucel-T in relation to other therapies for mCRPC in clinical practice, and the identification of surrogate markers to predict survival benefit in clinical trials.

  2. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-08-19

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols.

  3. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S.; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  4. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in cervical cancer: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Kundu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma cervix is one of the most common cancers amongst Indian women. Though treatment strategies continue to evolve, there are no established predictive biomarkers of prognosis or therapeutic response. Novel imaging techniques using magnetic resonance (MR and positron emission tomography (PET can facilitate time resolved spatial evaluation of biological characteristics (perfusion, permeability, cellularity, proliferation, oxygenation, and apoptosis thereby serving as early surrogate biomarkers for prognosis and therapeutic response. Several of these imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET are now being evaluated for gynecological oncology, with the majority of work being performed on cervical tumors. PUBMED database was searched for this review from January 1966 till February 2011. This review examines the basic principles of functional MR imaging for cervical cancer and its current status as a diagnostic and predictive biomarker for cervical cancer.

  6. Cost-Effective Screening for Breast Cancer Worldwide: Current State and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarvazyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Affordability of healthcare is highly limited by its skyrocketing cost. Access to screening and diagnostic medical equipment and medicine in developing countries is inadequate for the majority of the population. There is a tremendous worldwide need to detect breast cancer at its earliest stage. These needs must be balanced by the ability of countries to provide breast cancer screening technology to their populations. We reviewed the diagnostic accuracy, procedure cost and cost-effectiveness of currently available technique for breast screening and diagnosis including clinical breast examination, mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, biopsy and a new modality for cancer diagnostics termed elasticity imaging that has emerged in the last decade. Clinical results demonstrate that elasticity imaging even in its simplest and least sophisticated versions, like tactile imaging, has significant diagnostic potential comparable and exceeding that of conventional imaging techniques. In view of many countries with limited resources, effective yet less expensive modes of screening must be considered worldwide. The tactile imaging is one method that has the potential to provide cost-effective breast cancer screening and diagnostics.

  7. Current Status of CTCs as Liquid Biopsy in Lung Cancer and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs have garnered a lot of attention in the past few decades. Isolation of these rare cells form the billions of blood cells has been a challenge until recent times. With the advent of new sensitive technologies that permit live cell isolation and downstream genomic analysis, the existing paradigm of CTC research has evolved to explore clinical utility of these cells. CTCs have been identified as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in many solid tumors, including lung cancer. As a means of liquid biopsy, CTCs could play a major role in the development of personalized medicine and targeted therapies. This review discusses the state of various isolation strategies, cell separation techniques and key studies that illustrate the application of liquid biopsy to lung cancer.

  8. Breast cancer prevention with anti-estrogens: review of the current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Julka, P K

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential for reducing the incidence of breast cancer by modifying or changing the reversible risk factors like dietary modifications, modifications in the sedentary life habits, etc. One of such methods which has gained popularity now is chemoprevention. Many agents have been evaluated in the chemoprevention setting in females with increased risk of breast cancers. Metformin, NSAIDS, Bisphosphonates, and statins were evaluated by various investigators with variable results. One of the agents that have been proven to be beneficial in this setting is the anti-estrogens. A major disadvantage of chemoprevention is that unlike prophylactic mastectomy it can never reduce the risk to near zero although it reduces the risk significantly. Another issue is the compliance as chemoprevention with anti-estrogens will need to be continued for 5 years while surgery is a one-time procedure. Another disadvantage is the possible side effects peculiar to each drug used which may not be a significant concern in prophylactic mastectomy group. All these factors must also be kept in mind and properly explained to the patient before starting chemoprevention using anti-estrogens. Here in this review we intend to look into the large randomized controlled trials to quantify the present status of chemoprevention with anti-estrogens. PMID:26439380

  9. Combined-modality treatment for anal cancer. Current strategies and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, J.W. Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Rabeneck, Daniela; Weiss, Christian

    2010-07-15

    Background: concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC) is the treatment of choice for anal carcinoma. The most appropriate radiation (RT) dose, fractionation, techniques, and the most effective chemotherapy regimen (agents, number of neoadjuvant, concomitant, adjuvant cycles) remain to be established. Material and methods: this review article focuses on recent randomized trials designed to improve standard 5-FU/MMC-based CRT through the inclusion of (induction, concurrent, maintenance) cisplatin, and describes developments in combining RT with other chemotherapeutic drugs and targeted therapies. Computerized bibliographic searches of PubMed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO/ASTRO/ESTRO meetings. Results: based on results of three recent randomized phase III trials, neither induction chemotherapy (RTOG 98-11, ACCORD 03) or maintenance chemotherapy with 5-FU/cisplatin (ACT II) nor RT dose escalation (ACCORD 03) improved the outcome of concurrent 5-FU/MMC-CRT. A randomized phase II trial (EORTC 22011-40014) compared concurrent 5-FU/MMC-CRT with cisplatin/MMC-CRT. The response rate of cisplatin/MMC-CRT was promising, but compliance to this regimen was limited. Current phase I/II studies are evaluating the use of capecitabine, oxalipatin, and the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) inhibitor cetuximab. Conclusion: concurrent 5-FU/MMC-CRT without induction or maintenance chemotherapy remains the standard of care for anal cancer patients. (orig.)

  10. Local microwave hyperthermia and irradiation in cancer therapy: preliminary observations and directions for future clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.A.; Kopecky, W.; Venkata Rao, D.; Baglan, R.; Mann, J.

    1981-06-01

    This report outlies the preliminary experience at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology with hyperthermia and irradiation. Twenty-nine lesions were treated with 400 rad fractions given every 72 hours (twice weekly) for a total dose of 2000 to 4000 rad followed by hyperthermia (2450 MHz or 915 MHz microwaves, 42.0/sup 0/ to 43/sup 0/C, 90 minutes, every 72 hours.) in addition, 6 lesions were treated with three doses of 500 rad followed by hyperthermia and 12 with irradiation alone (three doses of 600, 700 or 800 rad every 72 h). In the lesions treated with 2000 to 4000 rad and heat, nine of 12 recurrent epidermoid carcinomas of the head and neck showed complete regression (75%) and one more than 50% response. Four of five metastatic melanoma nodules showed complete regression of the tumors and one over 80% response. Of nine recurrent adenocarcinoma of the breast nodules in the chest wall treated with 3200 to 4000 rad, five lesions exhibited complete regression and two others about 80%. Four of five metastatic melanoma nodules and three soft tissue sarcomas had complete tumor regression. Of the six lesions treated with 1500 rad and hyperthermia, two metastatic melanomas showed complete regression (CR), and three tumors exhibited partial regression. Despite the fact that the majority of the patients had been previously treated with definitive radiotherapy, the retreatment with moderate doses of irradiation and heat has been well tolerated. Of the 35 sites treated, four (11%) developed blisters, seven (20%) erythema only, three (8%) moist desquamation and 27 (77%) dry desquamation. There has been one instance of severe necrosis of soft tissues in the upper neck, in a patient previously treated with 5000 rad and surgery. Additional clinical trials are warranted to assess the potential value of hyperthermia alone or combined with irradiation in the treatment of selected cancer patients.

  11. Future directions of MDSplus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, G., E-mail: gabriele.manduchi@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Fredian, T., E-mail: twf@psfc.mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Stillerman, J., E-mail: jas@psfc.mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • This paper describes the directions in the evolution of the MDSplus data system. • It describes three Use Cases in data streaming. • It shows the performance of MDSplus in local and remote data streaming. • It describes the main concepts in decoupling data access. • It presents the last features and tools. - Abstract: The first version of MDSplus was released in 1991 for VAX/VMS. Since then MDSplus has been progressively adopted in an increasing number of fusion experiments and its original implementation has been extended during these years to cover new requirements and toward a multi-platform implementation. Currently MDSplus is in use at more than 30 laboratories and is being used both for pulsed applications as well as for continuous data streaming for long lasting experiments. Thanks to its large user base, it has been possible to collect requirements driving the evolution of the system toward improved usability and better performance. An important recent feature of the MDSplus is its ability of handling a continuous stream of data, which is readily available as soon at it has been stored in the pulse files. Current development is oriented toward an improved modularity of MDSplus and the integration of new functionality. Improved modularity is achieved by moving away from monolithic implementation toward a plug-ins approach. This has already been achieved recently for the management of remote data access, where the original TCP/IP implementation can now be integrated with new user-provided network protocols. Following a similar approach, work is in progress to let new back-ends be integrated in the MDSplus data access layer. By decoupling the MDSplus data management from the disk data file format it is possible to integrate new solutions such as data cloud without affecting the user Application Programming Interface.

  12. UROLOGIC ROBOTS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Mozer, Pierre; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    International audience PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in urology has gained immense popularity with the daVinci system, but a lot of research teams are working on new robots. The purpose of this study is to review current urologic robots and present future development directions. RECENT FINDINGS: Future systems are expected to advance in two directions: improvements of remote manipulation robots and developments of image-guided robots. SUMMARY: The final goal of rob...

  13. Future directions in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cancer treatment has evolved progressively over the years as a joint result of improvements in technology and better understanding of the biological responses of neoplastic and normal cells to cytotoxic agents. Although major therapeutic 'breakthroughs' are unlikely absent the discovery of exploitable fundamental differences between cancer cells and their normal homologs, further incremental improvements in cancer treatment results can confidently be expected as we apply existing knowledge better and take advantage of new research insights. Areas in which I can foresee significant improvements (in approximate chronological order) are as follows: better physical radiation dose distributions; more effective radiation and chemoradiation protocols based on radiobiological principles; more rational use of radiation adjuvants based on biologic criteria; use of novel targets and vectors for systemic radionuclide therapy; use of genetic markers of radiosensitivity to determine radiation dose tolerances; and use of radiation as a modulator of therapeutic gene expression. Radiation research has contributed greatly to the efficacy of radiation oncology as it is now practised but has even greater potential for the future

  14. Urologic robots and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Pierre; Stoianovici, Dan; 10.1097/MOU.0b013e32831cc1ba

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in urology has gained immense popularity with the daVinci system, but a lot of research teams are working on new robots. The purpose of this study is to review current urologic robots and present future development directions. RECENT FINDINGS: Future systems are expected to advance in two directions: improvements of remote manipulation robots and developments of image-guided robots. SUMMARY: The final goal of robots is to allow safer and more homogeneous outcomes with less variability of surgeon performance, as well as new tools to perform tasks on the basis of medical transcutaneous imaging, in a less invasive way, at lower costs. It is expected that improvements for a remote system could be augmented in reality, with haptic feedback, size reduction, and development of new tools for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery. The paradigm of image-guided robots is close to clinical availability and the most advanced robots are presented with end-use...

  15. Optimizing therapy for radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer: Current state of the art and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Dadu, R.; Cabanillas, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer are cured with standard primary treatments including surgery, radioactive iodine and TSH suppression. A small proportion of patients who develop radioactive iodine-refractory metastatic disease have few treatment options. Recent discovery of the molecular mechanisms that contribute to thyroid cancer tumorigenesis and its progression have revealed key targets that are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In the last decade se...

  16. Future directions in combined modality therapy for rectal cancer: reevaluating the role of total mesorectal excision after chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solanki AA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abhishek A Solanki,1 Daniel T Chang,2 Stanley L Liauw11Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Most patients who develop rectal cancer present with locoregionally advanced (T3 or node-positive disease. The standard management of locoregionally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (nCRT, followed by radical resection (low-anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection with total mesorectal excision. Approximately 15% of patients can have a pathologic complete response (pCR at the time of surgery, indicating that some patients can have no detectable residual disease after nCRT. The actual benefit of surgery in this group of patients is unclear. It is possible that omission of surgery in these patients, termed selective nonoperative management, can limit the toxicities associated with standard, multimodal combined modality therapy without compromising disease control. In this review, we discuss the clinical experiences to date using selective nonoperative management and various attempts at escalation of nCRT to improve the number of patients who have a pCR. We also explore several clinical, laboratory, imaging, histopathologic, and genetic biomarkers that have been tested as tools to predict which patients are most likely to have a pCR after nCRT.Keywords: rectal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, nonoperative management, organ preservation

  17. Future directions of electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In biological science, there are still many interesting and fundamental yet difficult questions, such as those in neuroscience, remaining to be answered. Structural and functional studies of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells, are essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of many fundamental biological processes. Technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of structural studies of biological components, such as membrane proteins. While X-ray crystallography has been the main method of structure analysis of proteins including membrane proteins, electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze structures of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer, which is close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium-cooled specimen stages, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution better than 3 Å. Such high-resolution structural analysis of membrane proteins by electron crystallography opens up the new research field of structural physiology. Considering the fact that the structures of integral membrane proteins in their native membrane environment without artifacts from crystal contacts are critical in understanding their physiological functions, electron crystallography will continue to be an important technology for structural analysis. In this chapter, I will present several examples to highlight important advantages and to suggest future directions of this technique.

  18. Future directions in VLBI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, A. R.

    Three technology areas are examined to measure their impact on VLBI and the capa bilities that may be offered to VLBI practioners in the near future: VLBI Standard Interface: An international committee has recently agr eed on a standard interface definition for all future VLBI data systems. This s hould, at long last, allow interoperability between various VLBI data systems. New Recording Technologies: Courtesy of large investments by the co mputer industry, moderately priced high-data rate digital recorders that may be suitable for VLBI are on the near horizon. Small arrays of these machines, appr opriately interfaced, promise to support 1-8 Gbps recording over the next few ye ars at an attractive price. e-VLBI: With the advent of optical fiber being laid at a prodigious rate, real-time (or near-real time) VLBI on an international scale is close to b eing a technical possibility. However, questions remain about costs to lease th e necessary bandwidth and to lay the 'last mile' of fiber to remote antennas.

  19. Future direction in airline marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussy, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The rapid growth and broadening of the air travel market, coupled with a more sophisticated consumer, will dramatically change airline marketing over the next decade. Discussed is the direction this change is likely to take and its implications for companies within the industry. New conceptualization approaches are required if the full potential of this expanding market is to be fully realized. Marketing strategies are developed that will enable various elements of the travel industry to compete not only against each other but also with other products that are competing for the consumer's discretionary income.

  20. Marine ice profiling : future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, J.R.; Fissel, D.B. [ASL Environmental Sciences Inc., Sidney, BC (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    High sampling-frequency ice profiling tools are needed to characterize ice covers for the purposes of offshore development and climate-change studies. This paper reviewed the contribution that upward-looking sonars moored on the sea floor have made towards the qualitative and quantitative understandings of ocean ice covers, with particular reference to the IPS4 Ice Profiler developed by ASL Environmental Sciences Inc. This water column profiler enables quasi-continuous measurements of ice draft along curvilinear tracks to accuracies as great as 0.05 m. This paper provided a description of both the instrument and measurement methodology, including an outline of the steps involved in the extraction of ice drafts from range information. The IPS4 has been used to acquire and store data from more than 100 deployments in polar and sub-polar ice-infested regions. The acquired data on ice properties is used to characterize platform and operations design, planning, navigation support and for scientific ice and climate studies. The combined application of the IPS4 and a sister instrument specialized for shallow water environments has resulted in new deployment methodologies in addition to simple ice draft measurements of the ice undersurface and draft statistics. These include the detection of unconsolidated ice content in lower portions of ice keels or loose ice under ice covers in shallow waters. The development of new generation IPS5 instrumentation is guided by perceived future needs in both conventional draft profiling and in new applications. The IPS5 will offer users improved access to better, more complete, information on ice and other components of the upper ocean and freshwater environments. This paper also reviewed ASL's vision of this instrumentation and progress toward prototype construction. ASL is also finalizing the design and manufacture of a plastic pressure case to address corrosion problems associated with long term deployments. The new instrument

  1. Mitochondria and Cancer: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Verschoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The area of mitochondrial genomics has undergone unprecedented growth over the past several years. With the advent of the age of omics, investigations have reached beyond the nucleus to encompass the close biological communication and finely coordinated interactions between mitochondria and their nuclear cell mate. Application of this holistic approach, to all metabolic interactions within the cell, is providing a more complete understanding of the molecular transformation of the cell from normal to malignant behavior, before histopathological indications are evident. In this review the surging momentum in mitochondrial science, as it relates to cancer, is described in three progressive perspectives: (1 Past: the historical contributions to current directions of research; (2 Present: Contemporary findings, results and approaches to mitochondria and cancer, including the role of next generation sequencing and proteomics; (3 Future: Based on the present body of knowledge, the potential assets and benefits of mitochondrial research are projected into the near future.

  2. Future directions of ecosystem science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill; Galvin, Kathleen A.

    1990-01-01

    , and global--have not replaced one another (Clark and Holling 1985). Instead, the effects are superimposed, creating what some perceive as impending global environmental crisis (Clark 1989, MacNeill 1989, WCED 1987). Public demands are developing for economic, political, social, and environmental efforts directed toward creating a state of global sustainability.

  3. The far future of exoplanet direct characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jean; Léger, Alain; Fridlund, Malcolm; White, Glenn J; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Lammer, Helmut; Liseau, René; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Franck; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lunine, Jonathan; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    We describe future steps in the direct characterization of habitable exoplanets subsequent to medium and large mission projects currently underway and investigate the benefits of spectroscopic and direct imaging approaches. We show that, after third- and fourth-generation missions have been conducted over the course of the next 100 years, a significant amount of time will lapse before we will have the capability to observe directly the morphology of extrasolar organisms.

  4. Geography and the Anthropocene 3: Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Noel Castree

    2014-01-01

    This and two companion papers (The Anthropocene and Geography I: The back story and The Anthropocene and Geography III: Future Directions) consider the relevance of '˜the Anthropocene'™ to present and future research in Geography. Along with the concept of 'planetary boundaries'™, the idea that humanity has entered a new geological epoch of its own making is currently attracting considerable attention -“ both within and beyond the world of Earth surface science from whence both notions origin...

  5. Biology Education Research: Lessons and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Susan R.; Nielsen, Natalie R.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2013-01-01

    This feature draws on a 2012 National Research Council report to highlight some of the insights that discipline-based education research in general—and biology education research in particular—have provided into the challenges of undergraduate science education. It identifies strategies for overcoming those challenges and future directions for biology education research.

  6. [Future directions of anticancer drug development in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawai, Koji; Tsuruo, Takashi; Tsukagoshi, Shigeru; Aiba, Keisuke; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Ikeda, Tadashi; Nakamura, Seigo; Tamura, Tomohide; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Isonishi, Seiji; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hirose, Masaru; Katsura, Jun

    2008-02-01

    At the 13th Oncology Forum, future directions of anticancer drug development in Japan were discussed. Development of anticancer drugs in the 1990s was based on the concept of total cell kill, but now development of molecular targeted drugs becomes the mainstream. Unfortunately, molecular targeted drugs and antibody agents are mostly foreign products and translational research in Japan is poor as it stands now. As future directions of anticancer drug development, international collaborative development is considered essential, but there are various obstacles to the conduct of international collaborative studies. Companies, medical institutions and regulatory agencies must make collaborative efforts to overcome these obstacles. As future development of anticancer agents in individual cancer regions in Japan is considered, gastric cancer therapy is progressing considerably with the advent of S-1 and in the future, development of multi-agent combination therapy including molecular targeted agents is expected. Much progress in colon cancer therapy has been made owing to accumulation of evidence in recent years. Multi-agent chemotherapy combined with antibody agent, which is advancing overseas, is introduced to Japan. Clinical development of combination therapy with a high therapeutic index, including compounds discovered in Japan, is expected in the future. Although conventionally hormone therapy has been considered as first-line treatment of breast cancer and used in combination with chemotherapy, with the advent of antibody agents in recent years, HER2 sensitivity has greatly affected the algorithm of treatment. Future development of molecular targeted drugs and individualised diagnosis using cDNA array, etc. are likely to advance individualisation of treatment. On the other hand, large-scale clinical trials are required to prove a small difference in adjuvant therapy, etc. and accordingly international studies are becoming indispensable. For urological cancers

  7. Quantum information and physics: Some future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Preskill, John

    2000-01-01

    I consider some promising future directions for quantum information theory that could influence the development of 21st century physics. Advances in the theory of the distinguishability of superoperators may lead to new strategies for improving the precision of quantum-limited measurements. A better grasp of the properties of multi-partite quantum entanglement may lead to deeper understanding of strongly-coupled dynamics in quantum many-body systems, quantum field theory, and quantum gravity.

  8. Black raspberries in cancer clinical trials: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Stoner, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Black raspberries (BRB) inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models, including in vivo models of oral, esophageal, colon, breast and skin cancer. Promising preclinical results have led to clinical evaluations in cancer patients or patients at increased risk for cancer development. OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical investigations targeting cancer or precancerous lesions with BRB and discuss future directions. METHODS A thorough literature search was conducted through December 1, 2015 to identify all published studies evaluating BRB in cancer focused clinical trials. RESULTS Research investigating BRB in clinical settings report positive effects on preneoplastic lesions or cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and colon. BRB treatment resulted in: histologic regression of oral intraepithelial neoplasia associated with improved histologic grade and significantly reduced loss of heterozygosity at tumor suppressor gene loci, modulated genes linked to RNA processing and growth factor recycling; in the colon, BRB inhibited FAP-associated polyp progression, demethylated tumor suppressor genes and improved plasma cytokine profiles; in Barrett’s patients, BRB consumption increased tissue levels of GST-pi and decreased 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS The precise dose, duration and optimum mode of BRB delivery for cancer inhibition remains to be fully elucidated. Common themes across studies support that BRB are anti-proliferative, anti- inflammatory, reduce oxidative stress and restore tumor suppressive activity. Future directions are included in the conclusions section.

  9. Future directions of dam safety in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verzeni, Gerard [Hydro Quebec, QC, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Gerard Verzeni, former director of the dam safety & environment at Hydro-Quebec introduced the future directions of dam safety in Canada. New and numerous challenges are emerging for the dam safety community. Measurable effects of climate changes illustrate that hydraulic forecasts would change drastically. Loads with times and amplitudes which are different from the actual knowledge will apply on dams. The development of new types of dams using recent technologies raises several issues, for example the longevity of such installations. The installations are becoming old and soon will require complete renovation and update for regulation and standards compliance. Concrete dams already need efforts and investment to maintain then in a safe state. Various factors will influence these challenges such as human resources in the dam safe community. In these conditions, it is important that organizations like CDA play an important role in providing support and reference and in being a driver for the whole industry.

  10. Universal Digital Library-Future research directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BALAKRISHNAN N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper starts with a description of the present status of the Digital Library of India Initiative. As part of this initiative large corpus of scanned text is available in many Indian languages and has stimulated a vast amount of research in Indian language technology briefly described in this paper. Other than the Digital Library of India Initiative which is part of the Million Books to the Web Project initiated by Prof Raj Reddy of Carnegie Mellon University, there are a few more initiatives in India towards taking the heritage of the country to the Web. This paper presents the future directions for the Digital Library of India Initiative both in terms of growing collection and the technical challenges in managing such large collection poses.

  11. Physical literacy: importance, assessment and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Susan; Collins, Dave; Button, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Physical literacy (PL) has become a major focus of physical education, physical activity and sports promotion worldwide. PL is a multifaceted conceptualisation of the skills required to fully realise potentials through embodied experience. Substantial financial investments in PL education by governments are underpinned by a wide range of anticipated benefits, including expectations of significant future savings to healthcare, improved physical and psychological well-being of the population, increased work-force productivity and raised levels of expertise in sport and exercise participation. However, disappointingly, scientific evidence showing the efficacy of PL interventions to successfully meet such high expectation is limited. We suggest that contradictions in research findings are due largely to limitations in movement assessment batteries and consequent discrepancies between measurements used to assess the immediate outcomes of PL programmes. Notably, there is no robust empirical tool for evidencing skill learning in the physical movement component of PL, education and this presents a serious limitation to the design of, and claims that can be made for, such interventions. Considering the parameters of proficient PL skills and the limitations of current evaluation instruments, possible future directions for developing empirical measures of PL movement skills are presented. PMID:24898813

  12. Biomarkers in Pediatric ARDS: Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E Orwoll

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is common among mechanically ventilated children, and accompanies up to 30% of all PICU deaths. Though ARDS diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, biological markers of acute lung damage have been extensively studied in adults and children. Biomarkers of inflammation, alveolar epithelial and capillary endothelial disruption, disordered coagulation, and associated derangements measured in the circulation and other body fluids such as brochoalveolar lavage have improved our understanding of pathobiology of ARDS. The biochemical signature of ARDS has been increasingly well described in adult populations, and this has led to the identification of molecular phenotypes to augment clinical classifications. However, there is a paucity of data from pediatric ARDS patients. Biomarkers and molecular phenotypes have the potential to identify patients at high risk of poor outcomes, and perhaps inform the development of targeted therapies for specific groups of patients. Additionally, because of the lower incidence of and mortality from ARDS in pediatric patients relative to adults and lack of robust clinical predictors of outcome, there is an ongoing interest in biological markers as surrogate outcome measures. The recent definition of pediatric ARDS (pARDS provides additional impetus for measurement of established and novel biomarkers in future pediatric studies in order to further characterize this disease process. This chapter will review the currently available literature and discuss potential future directions for investigation into biomarkers in ARDS among children.

  13. Cogan's syndrome: present and future directions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Grainne

    2009-08-01

    Cogan\\'s syndrome, typified by the combination of interstitial keratitis and immune-mediated sensorineural hearing loss, is a rare condition, and commonly associated with a diagnostic delay. Using a standard search protocol, we review the literature to date, focusing on a number of key areas pertaining to diagnosis, presentation and treatment. Using a case illustration of atypical disease which led to fulminant aortic regurgitation, we highlight the need for continued and collaborative research in order to identify negative prognostic factors and thus tailor therapeutic regimens. Atypical Cogan\\'s syndrome is more commonly associated with systemic manifestations than typical disease, and may be refractory to immunosuppressive treatment. We discuss the application of laboratory (e.g antibodies targeting inner ear antigens) and radiological (PET-CT) aids to disease confirmation and detection of sub-clinical vascular inflammation. As illustrated by the included case description, some patients remain refractory to intense immunosuppression and delineation of adverse prognostic factors which may direct treatment, perhaps including the use of PET-CT, will contribute in the future to improving patient outcomes.

  14. Geospatial Brokering - Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    An important feature of many brokers is to facilitate straightforward human access to scientific data while maintaining programmatic access to it for system solutions. Standards-based protocols are critical for this, and there are a number of protocols to choose from. In this discussion, we will present a web application solution that leverages certain protocols - e.g., OGC CSW, REST, and OpenSearch - to provide programmatic as well as human access to geospatial resources. We will also discuss managing resources to reduce duplication yet increase discoverability, federated search solutions, and architectures that combine human-friendly interfaces with powerful underlying data management. The changing requirements witnessed in brokering solutions over time, our recent experience participating in the EarthCube brokering hack-a-thon, and evolving interoperability standards provide insight to future technological and philosophical directions planned for geospatial broker solutions. There has been much change over the past decade, but with the unprecedented data collaboration of recent years, in many ways the challenges and opportunities are just beginning.

  15. [Corticobasal syndrome: recent advances and future directions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Ikuko

    2012-04-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder described by Rebeiz et al. It is characterized by progressive, asymmetric, cortical (eg, apraxia, alien limb phenomena, cortical sensory loss, and myoclonus), and extrapyramidal (eg, rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, and tremor) dysfunction. However, CBD has many clinical phenotypes, and the features used for predicting CBD have low sensitivity. Therefore, the term corticobasal syndrome (CBS) has been used to characterize such clinical features, whereas the term CBD is used to refer to the pathological disorder. The most frequent causes of CBS are CBD, followed by Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology (sporadic and familial), Pick's disease, Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with fused in sarcoma-positive inclusions, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (GRN) genes. The topography of neurodegeneration dictates the clinical syndrome not according to the underlying pathology. Researchers have attempted to develop fluid biomarkers or imaging analysis for diagnosing CBS. The aim of this review was to highlight recent advances in CBS diagnosis and discuss future directions.

  16. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedrick Valisa E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a knowledge gap requiring future research. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on currently available dietary biomarkers, including novel biomarkers of specific foods and dietary components, and assess the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the markers. This review revealed several biomarkers in need of additional validation research; research is also needed to produce sensitive, specific, cost-effective and noninvasive dietary biomarkers. The emerging field of metabolomics may help to advance the development of food/nutrient biomarkers, yet advances in food metabolome databases are needed. The availability of biomarkers that estimate intake of specific foods and dietary components could greatly enhance nutritional research targeting compliance to national recommendations as well as direct associations with disease outcomes. More research is necessary to refine existing biomarkers by accounting for confounding factors, to establish new indicators of specific food intake, and to develop techniques that are cost-effective, noninvasive, rapid and accurate measures of nutritional status.

  17. Future directions in fatigue and safety research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Y Ian; Horrey, William J; Popkin, Stephen M; Folkard, Simon; Howarth, Heidi D; Courtney, Theodore K

    2011-03-01

    Fatigue is regarded as a major contributor to workplace and highway morbidity and mortality. While the scientific literature is replete with studies that can be traced back more than a hundred years, much remains to be done to improve our knowledge of and ability to alleviate the consequences of fatigue. Moreover, given the dramatic transformation of modern work systems due to a global and 24/7 economy, there is increasing urgency in improving our understanding of fatigue as a safety risk factor, its etiology and management. As a result, a Hopkinton Conference was organized to review the state of knowledge in the area and define future directions for research aimed at preventing or mitigating the consequences of fatigue. The Hopkinton Conference paradigm brings together leading experts on a key research area to define scientific gaps and research needs, and serves as a stimulus for further collaboration. Over the course of several months prior to the conference, participants draft state-of-the-art reviews covering various aspects of the research topic. In this case, five working groups were formed, each charged with developing collaborative manuscripts in a given topic area of interest, as follows: the Link Between Fatigue and Safety, Demographic Issues in Fatigue, Predicting Fatigue, Technological Approaches in the Management of Fatigue, and Organizational Factors in the Management of Fatigue. The participants then convened for a 2 day conference at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in Hopkinton to review, debate, and revise the draft manuscripts; examine global issues; and discuss research priorities. The output from this collective effort is captured in this special issue of Accident Analysis and Prevention. PMID:21130212

  18. Future options ofanti-angiogenic cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yihai Cao

    2016-01-01

    In human patients, drugs that block tumor vessel growth are widely used to treat a variety of cancer types. Many rigorous phase 3 clinical trials have demonstrated signiifcant survival beneifts; however, the addition of an anti-angio-genic component to conventional therapeutic modalities has generally produced modest survival beneifts for cancer patients. Currently, it is unclear why these clinically available drugs targeting the same angiogenic pathways produce dissimilar effects in preclinical models and human patients. In this article, we discuss possible mechanisms of various anti-angiogenic drugs and the future development of optimized treatment regimens.

  19. Future of Bacterial Therapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial therapy of cancer has a centuries-long history and was first-line therapy at the hospital in New York City that would become Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under Dr. William B. Coley. However, after Coley's death in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer ceased in the clinic until the present century. Clinical trials have been recently carried out for strains of the obligate anaerobe Clostridium novyi with the toxin gene deleted, and on an attenuated strain of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), which is a facultative anaerobe that can grow in viable, as well as necrotic, areas of tumors, unlike Clostridium, which can only grow in the hypoxic areas. Our laboratory has developed the novel strain S. typhimurium A1-R that is effective against all tumor types in clinically-relevant mouse models, including patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models. This chapter suggests future clinical applications for S. typhimurium A1-R.

  20. ESDIS DOI System, Approach, and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchoo, L.; James, N.

    2013-12-01

    that has the data product description. Even though the development and maintenance of DOI landing pages would be the responsibility of the DAACs, ESDIS in consultation with the data providers is currently developing the landing page guidelines that specifies the key data product descriptive elements to be included on each data product's landing page. This poster will describe in detail the unique process and system currently implemented by ESDIS for registering DOIs. In addition, the paper will summarize some of the early implementation shortcomings and how they were addressed, as well as the future directions of the ESDIS DOI system/process.

  1. Palliative radiotherapy: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Hertan, Lauren; Jones, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    For nearly 100 years, palliative radiotherapy has been a time-efficient, effective treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced cancer in any area where local tumors are causing symptoms. Short courses including a single fraction of radiotherapy may be effective for symptom relief with minimal side effects and maximization of convenience for patient and family. With recent advances in imaging, surgery, and other local therapies as well as systemic cancer therapies, palliative radiotherapy has been used frequently in patients who may not yet have symptoms of advanced or metastatic cancer. In this setting, more prolonged radiotherapy courses and advanced radiotherapy techniques including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be useful in obtaining local control and durable palliative responses. This review will explore the use of radiotherapy across the spectrum of patients with advanced and metastatic cancer and delineate an updated, rational approach for the use of palliative radiotherapy that incorporates symptoms, prognosis, and other factors into the delivery of palliative radiotherapy. PMID:25499634

  2. The far future of exoplanet direct characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Jean; Fridlund, Malcolm; White, Glenn; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Lammer, Helmut; Liseau, Rene; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Roettgering, Huub; Selsis, Franck; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lunine, Jonathan; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    In this outlook we describe what could be the next steps of the direct characterization of habitable exoplanets after first the medium and large mission projects and investigate the benefits of the spectroscopic and direct imaging approaches. We show that after third and fourth generation missions foreseeable for the next 100 years, we will face a very long era before being able to see directly the morphology of extrasolar organisms.

  3. Implementation of proteomics for cancer research: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Parisa; Shahrokni, Armin; Ranjbar, Mohammad R Nezami

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of the death, accounts for about 13% of all annual deaths worldwide. Many different fields of science are collaborating together studying cancer to improve our knowledge of this lethal disease, and find better solutions for diagnosis and treatment. Proteomics is one of the most recent and rapidly growing areas in molecular biology that helps understanding cancer from an omics data analysis point of view. The human proteome project was officially initiated in 2008. Proteomics enables the scientists to interrogate a variety of biospecimens for their protein contents and measure the concentrations of these proteins. Current necessary equipment and technologies for cancer proteomics are mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, nanotechnology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we provide a brief review on proteomics and its application in cancer research. After a brief introduction including its definition, we summarize the history of major previous work conducted by researchers, followed by an overview on the role of proteomics in cancer studies. We also provide a list of different utilities in cancer proteomics and investigate their advantages and shortcomings from theoretical and practical angles. Finally, we explore some of the main challenges and conclude the paper with future directions in this field. PMID:24761843

  4. Learning Analytics: Challenges and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatko Lukarov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, learning analytics (LA has attracted a great deal of attention in technology-enhanced learning (TEL research as practitioners, institutions, and researchers are increasingly seeing the potential that LA has to shape the future TEL landscape. Generally, LA deals with the development of methods that harness educational data sets to support the learning process. This paper provides a foundation for future research in LA. It provides a systematic overview on this emerging field and its key concepts through a reference model for LA based on four dimensions, namely data, environments, context (what?, stakeholders (who?, objectives (why?, and methods (how?. It further identifies various challenges and research opportunities in the area of LA in relation to each dimension.

  5. Leadership: current theories, research, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Bruce J; Walumbwa, Fred O; Weber, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    This review examines recent theoretical and empirical developments in the leadership literature, beginning with topics that are currently receiving attention in terms of research, theory, and practice. We begin by examining authentic leadership and its development, followed by work that takes a cognitive science approach. We then examine new-genre leadership theories, complexity leadership, and leadership that is shared, collective, or distributed. We examine the role of relationships through our review of leader member exchange and the emerging work on followership. Finally, we examine work that has been done on substitutes for leadership, servant leadership, spirituality and leadership, cross-cultural leadership, and e-leadership. This structure has the benefit of creating a future focus as well as providing an interesting way to examine the development of the field. Each section ends with an identification of issues to be addressed in the future, in addition to the overall integration of the literature we provide at the end of the article.

  6. Neutrino oscillations: Recent results and future directions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Raychaudhuri

    2000-01-01

    A brief introduction to the phenomena of vacuum neutrino oscillations and resonant flavour conversion is presented with a heavy pedagogic leaning. Variants of these ideas, e.g., neutrino helicity flip in a magnetic field, violation of the equivalence principle, etc. are outlined. A few vexing issues pertaining to the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations are discussed. Expectations from some of the future experiments are summarized.

  7. Coronary CT: clinical indications and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has started its implementation in cardiology with calcium quantification of coronary plaques in the study without contrast, using the calcium score, demonstrating an important independent predictor of future cardiac events. The examination with intravenous contrast, coronary angiography, appeared later as a noninvasive method for evaluation of anatomy and obstructive coronary disease, characterizing the degree of stenosis and the presence of non calcified atherosclerotic plaques, assessing not only the lumen, but also the vessel wall. With the advent of new machines with more detectors and higher temporal resolution has been a reduction in radiation dose and the possibility of new applications. (author)

  8. Lactic Acidosis: Current Treatments and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Jeffrey A; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-09-01

    Mortality rates associated with severe lactic acidosis (blood pHreduce mortality. This failure has been attributed to both reduction in serum calcium concentration and generation of excess carbon dioxide with intracellular acidification. In animal studies, hyperventilation and infusion of calcium during sodium bicarbonate administration improves cardiovascular function, suggesting that this approach could allow expression of the positive aspects of sodium bicarbonate. Other buffers, such as THAM or Carbicarb, or dialysis might also provide base with fewer untoward effects. Examination of these therapies in humans is warranted. The cellular injury associated with lactic acidosis is partly due to activation of NHE1, a cell-membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. In animal studies, selective NHE1 inhibitors improve cardiovascular function, ameliorate lactic acidosis, and reduce mortality, supporting future research into their possible use in humans. Two main mechanisms contribute to lactic acid accumulation in sepsis and low-flow states: tissue hypoxia and epinephrine-induced stimulation of aerobic glycolysis. Targeting these mechanisms could allow for more specific therapy. This Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case presents a patient with acute lactic acidosis and describes current and future approaches to treatment. PMID:27291485

  9. Poststroke epilepsy: update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelano, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is among the most common causes of epilepsy after middle age. Patients with poststroke epilepsy (PSE) differ in several respects from patients with other forms of structural-metabolic epilepsy; not least in age, age-related sensitivity to side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and specific drug-drug interaction issues related to secondary-stroke prophylaxis. Encouragingly, there has lately been remarkable activity in the study of PSE. Three developments in PSE research deserve particular focus. First, large prospective trials have established the incidence and risk factors of PSE in the setting of modern stroke care. Stroke severity, cortical location, young age, and haemorrhage remain the most important risk factors. Second, although more studies are needed, epidemiological data indicate that the risk of PSE may be influenced, for instance, by statin treatment. Third, studies are emerging regarding the treatment and prognosis of PSE. Levetiracetam and lamotrigine may be well tolerated treatment options and seizure freedom is achieved in at least a similar proportion of patients as in other epilepsies. Furthermore, new animal models such as photothrombotic stroke gives hope of a more clear understanding of PSE epileptogenesis in the near future. In summary, PSE shows indications of maturing into an independent epilepsy research field. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of PSE and provides an update on management issues such as diagnosis, AED selection, and prognosis. Finally, future research challenges in the field are outlined. PMID:27582897

  10. Safety of nuclear installations: Future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Environmental impact of fossil fuel energy technologies (5 papers), Future needs for nuclear power (7 papers), Safety objectives (10 papers), Safety aspects of the next generation of current-type nuclear power plants (8 papers), Safety aspects of new designs and concepts for nuclear power plants (6 papers), Special safety issues: Safety aspects of new designs and concepts for nuclear power plants (5 papers), Safety aspects of new designs and processes for the nuclear fuel cycle (5 papers), Closing panel (3 papers), 12 poster presentations and a Summary of the Workshop. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Ban, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Multiple methods are needed to address the many different components or dimensions of cultural identity and experience that constitute local worlds, ways of life or systems of knowledge. Quantitative and observational methods of clinical epidemiology and experimental science as well as qualitative ethnographic methods are needed to capture crucial aspects of culture as systems of meaning and practice. Emerging issues in cultural psychiatric research include: cultural variations in illness experience and expression; the situated nature of cognition and emotion; cultural configurations of self and personhood; concepts of mental disorder and mental health literacy; and the prospect of ecosocial models of health and culturally based interventions. The conclusion considers the implications of the emerging perspectives from cultural neuroscience for psychiatric theory and practice.

  12. Tissue engineering: current strategies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-04-01

    Novel therapies resulting from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may offer new hope for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical issues. Currently, patients with diseased and injured organs are often treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and as the number of new cases of organ failure increases. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is a rapidly advancing part of regenerative medicine, and new discoveries in this field create new options for this type of therapy. For example, new types of stem cells, such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells that can circumvent the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cells, have been discovered. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous, adult cells have already entered the clinical setting, indicating that regenerative medicine holds much promise for the future. PMID:22111050

  13. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  14. Neurosciences research in space - Future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    1991-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space missions on the central nervous system, near-term research, to take place from 1990-1995, will be directed at investigating the acute effects of microgravity and the 'space adaptation syndrome'. These include experiments scheduled for the Spacelab Life Sciences 1 which is designed to evaluate changes in the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. An extensive series of experiments, collectively termed Microgravity Vestibular Investigations (MVI), is also planned for the IML-1 mission to be flown in 1992. The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. Mid-term goals, projected to be achieved from 1995-2000, include the use of new technology such as magnetic recording techniques. Long-term goals are also discussed including studies dealing with neuronal plasticity and sensory substitution, augmentation, and robotic telepresence.

  15. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  16. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medsinge A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anagha Medsinge,1,2 Ken K Nischal1,2 1Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, and Adult Motility, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, (UPMC 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. Keywords: children, pediatric cataract, infantile

  17. Animal care guidelines and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A B

    2007-06-01

    Two notions broadly accepted in developed western societies have made animal care guidelines inevitable. These are that domestic animals are sentient and that humans are responsible to ensure the proper care of domestic animals. Despite these common views, people have differing moral understandings of the human-animal relationship, and there are sharp divisions over how these views should be applied to domestic animal care. Animal care guidelines have been developed by different nations at several organizational levels to represent a compromise that is acceptable to most people. These organizational levels include individual poultry companies, national poultry associations, individual customers of the poultry industry, national associations of customer companies, national governments, and international organizations. Animal care guideline development has typically included input from producers and scientists and, depending on the sponsoring organization, animal advocates and government representatives as well. Animal advocacy groups have also sought to influence domestic animal care by campaigning against animal production practices or by offering their preferred guidelines for producers to adopt in the hope that the endorsement of the welfare group would add value to the product. Originally, animal care guidelines were only recommended, with little or no requirement for compliance. In recent years, the need for retail companies to assure certain welfare standards has led to animal welfare auditing of production facilities. Animal care guidelines primarily have sought to establish standards for handling and husbandry in existing production systems. Future guidelines may put increasing emphasis on adoption of alternative management practices or housing systems. International animal care guidelines are being developed on 2 levels (i.e., among national governments to create a common standard for trade in animal products and within international retail companies to

  18. Neurosciences research in space Future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    Future research in the neurosciences can best be understood in the context of NASA's life sciences goals in the near term (1990-1995), mid term (1995-2000), and long term (2000 and beyond). Since NASA is planning short-duration Spacelab and International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) flights for many years to come, the acute effects of exposure to microgravity will continue to be of experimental and operational interest in the near term. To this end, major new areas of research will be devoted to ground-based studies of preflight adaptation trainers and their efficacy in preventing or reducing the incidence of space motion sickness. In addition, an extensive series of studies of the vestibular system will be conducted inflight on the IML-1 mission The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. In the mid-term period, Spacelab missions will employ new technology such as magnetic recording techniques in order to evaluate changes in the processing of sensory and motor inputs at the brainstem and cortical level during exposure to microgravity. Two Space Life Sciences (SLS) missions planned for the mid to late 1990's, SLS-4 and SLS-5, will utilize an onboard centrifuge facility that will enable investigators to study the effects of partial gravity on sensory and motor function. In the long term (2000 and beyond), Space Station Freedom and long-duration missions will provide opportunities to explore new options in the neurosciences, such as sensory substitution and augmentation, through the use of physical sensors to provide three-dimensional tactile-visual, tactile-auditory and tactile-somatosensory inputs. The use of this technology will be extremely important in the area of robotic telepresence. Finally, Space Station Freedom and proposed LifeSat missions will provide neuroscientists the opportunity to study the effects of partial gravity and microgravity on neuronal plasticity.

  19. [Future directions of cardiovascular surgery in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S S

    2016-08-01

    The cardiovascular surgery in China has achieved great progress both on scale and technology though development over the past thirty years. However, the technical predominance of cardiovascular surgery in therapies for some diseases has been weakened, along with developments of new drugs and interventional technology. Besides, the change of doctor-patient relationship result from internet medical information service and less attraction of cardiovascular surgery discipline to talents bring certain challenge to the development of cardiovascular surgery. Currently, cardiovascular surgeons should practice the "patient first" principle, carry out individual customized treatment and precision therapy, absorb the advantages of other subjects like intervention and imaging in order to achieve technological breakthroughs, create new treatment technologies and models with smaller trauma and better outcome, establish heart team to provide patient oriented treatment. Besides, cardiovascular surgeons should improve knowledge system by learning related technology and science, become hybrid doctors of research. Cardiovascular surgeons should pay high attention to critical effect of research on the disciplinary development, carry out question and demand oriented clinical studies, change the medical practice by virtue of research achievements, direct the treatment for cardiovascular diseases, and finally provide better health service and rebuild the predominance of cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27502127

  20. Nuclear Breast Imaging: Clinical Results and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Wendie A

    2016-02-01

    Interest in nuclear breast imaging is increasing because of technical improvements in dedicated devices that allow the use of relatively low doses of radiotracers with high sensitivity for even small breast cancers. For women with newly diagnosed cancer, primary chemotherapy is often recommended, and improved methods of assessing treatment response are of interest. With widespread breast density notification, functional rather than anatomic methods of screening are of increasing interest as well. For a cancer imaging technology to be adopted, several criteria must be met that will be discussed: evidence of clinical benefit with minimal harm, standardized interpretive criteria, direct biopsy guidance, and acceptable cost-effectiveness.

  1. Gastric Cancer: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie On-On Chan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the world. However, in the past 10 decades, the view of gastric cancer has been changing. This includes the unexplained decline in the incidence of the cancer, the proximal shift of the cancer in the stomach, the identification of Helicobacter pylori as an etiological agent, rapid development in molecular tumour biology, new treatment modalities and the adoption of mass screening for prevention. This article reviews the changing views of gastric cancer and the latest developments.

  2. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case–control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex...

  3. Pharmacogenomics and Pancreatic Cancer Treatment. Optimizing Current Therapy and Individualizing Future Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonmo Peter Kang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Each year, more than 30,000 Americans are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We have only made incremental advancements in treatment of pancreatic cancer despite our best efforts. Research has revealed that pancreatic cancer is a genetic disease which is associated with various forms of cancer associated genetic alterations. Identification and understanding of these carcinogenic gene alterations is the base upon which we can overcome drug resistance and develop novel treatment approaches. In this paper, we review current understanding of pharmacogenomics of pancreatic cancer treatment and address future direction of the field.

  4. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case-control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21 cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1Rα (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon α2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis. PMID:25040886

  5. Future Directions for Surgical Trial Designs in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Relton, Clare

    2016-07-01

    Should patients undergo surgical intervention as soon as they receive a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), or should they wait until pharmacologic treatment fails? This article describes some of the challenges encountered in surgical trials for TN, and provides some guidance for future trials in this area. One future direction for TN research is to use the innovative "cohort multiple RCT design," This article describes some of the challenges encountered in surgical trials for TN, and provides some guidance for future trials in this area. One future direction for TN research is to use the innovative "cohort multiple RCT design," which enables multiple trials to be embedded within a single cohort of patients with TN diagnosis, providing an efficient and effective approach to the testing of multiple interventions for TN with each other and with usual care. PMID:27325002

  6. Acupuncture and Depth: Future Direction for Acupuncture Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The research on acupuncture has increased steadily over the years and regular review and revision of the direction of future acupuncture research are necessary. This paper aims to review and explore the significance of acupuncture depth in modern acupuncture research. Searches conducted in Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases reflected a lack of focus on depth of acupuncture. We propose that the research trends of acupuncture should progress to the depth of insertion. It is suggested that future acupuncture research, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs), should take into consideration the depth of insertion. Comparison between databases using different language of medium suggests the need for international collaboration of researchers from the same field. It is also crucial to inherit and innovate traditional medicine (TM) through modern technology. The use of bibliometric method is also suitable for development of TM research trends. Acupuncture and depth should be considered as one of the future directions of acupuncture research. PMID:25114707

  7. Cancer chemotherapy: Challenges for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Kiyoji (ed.) (National Nagoya Hospital (Japan)); Saito, H. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan)); Carter, S.K. (ed.) (Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, New York (United States)); Bast, R.C. Jr (ed.) (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center)

    1992-01-01

    At this symposium the main topics were new strategies for cancer therapy based on biology and pharmacology. Presentations on the biology of tumor progression and regression covered the molecular basis of cancer suppression by human tumor suppressor genes, mutation of the p53 gene and accumulation of the p53 protein, tumor suppressor genes involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer, and lessons learned from studies on tumor suppression by chromosome transfer. Many new reports on oncogenes provided the highlights for these chemotherapists present. For cancer therapy based on pharmacology, papers were presented on drug resistance such as P-glycoprotein (p170) multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter limitations on successful therapy for childhood tumors: possible circumvention of MDR by cyclosporin A, regulation of the MDR gene in response to environmental stimuli, and dose-intensive chemotherapies. On the subject of cancer therapy, lung cancer was the focus of attention, and the efficacy of combined modalities was reported and discussed.

  8. Past, current, and future directions in Canadian drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, P G

    Canada's earliest drug laws were directed at the opiates and cocaine. More recent concerns have been with cannabis, other hallucinogens, and the reemergence of cocaine, especially in the form of crack. Renewed enforcement efforts, combined with the redirection of priorities toward demand reduction via educational intervention, have been the hallmarks of recent Canadian drug policy initiatives. Some implications of these strategies for the future definition of the boundaries of Canada's drug problems, and likely policy directions, are discussed. PMID:2289838

  9. High performance computing: Clusters, constellations, MPPs, and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, Jack; Sterling, Thomas; Simon, Horst; Strohmaier, Erich

    2003-06-10

    Last year's paper by Bell and Gray [1] examined past trends in high performance computing and asserted likely future directions based on market forces. While many of the insights drawn from this perspective have merit and suggest elements governing likely future directions for HPC, there are a number of points put forth that we feel require further discussion and, in certain cases, suggest alternative, more likely views. One area of concern relates to the nature and use of key terms to describe and distinguish among classes of high end computing systems, in particular the authors use of ''cluster'' to relate to essentially all parallel computers derived through the integration of replicated components. The taxonomy implicit in their previous paper, while arguable and supported by some elements of our community, fails to provide the essential semantic discrimination critical to the effectiveness of descriptive terms as tools in managing the conceptual space of consideration. In this paper, we present a perspective that retains the descriptive richness while providing a unifying framework. A second area of discourse that calls for additional commentary is the likely future path of system evolution that will lead to effective and affordable Petaflops-scale computing including the future role of computer centers as facilities for supporting high performance computing environments. This paper addresses the key issues of taxonomy, future directions towards Petaflops computing, and the important role of computer centers in the 21st century.

  10. Current capabilities and future directions in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    A summary of significant findings is given, followed by specific recommendations for future directions of emphasis for computational fluid dynamics development. The discussion is organized into three application areas: external aerodynamics, hypersonics, and propulsion - and followed by a turbulence modeling synopsis.

  11. Is There a Future for Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosland, Maarten C

    2016-08-01

    The outcome of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, demonstrating harm and no preventive activity of selenomethionine and α-tocopherol for prostate cancer, and the lack of approval by the FDA for the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors to prevent prostate cancer have cast doubt about the future of chemoprevention of prostate cancer. This article attempts to critically assess whether the notion that chemoprevention of prostate cancer has no future is warranted. Risk of prostate cancer is modifiable and chemoprevention of prostate cancer, particularly fatal/lethal cancer, is both needed and possible. However, the approach to prostate cancer-chemopreventive agent development has not followed a rational and systematic process. To make progress, the following steps are necessary: (i) identification of intermediate biomarkers predictive of fatal/lethal disease; (ii) development of a rational approach to identification of candidate agents, including high-throughput screening and generation of information on mechanism and biology of candidate agents and potential molecular targets; and (iii) systematic evaluation of the predictive value of preclinical models, phase II trials, and intermediate biomarkers for the outcome of phase III trials. New phase III trials should be based on adequate preclinical and phase II studies. Cancer Prev Res; 9(8); 642-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27099271

  12. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved. PMID:12756087

  13. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved.

  14. The future of the cancer prevention workforce: why health literacy, advocacy, and stakeholder collaborations matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulik, Gayle A; Cameron, Carrie; Chamberlain, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    In considering the role of the cancer prevention workforce in meeting the nation's future health care needs, it is vital to address the considerable gaps in information, communication, training, professional development, roles, and levels of collaboration among diverse disciplines, stakeholders, and constituencies. As part of an October 2009 symposium at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center entitled "Future Directions in Cancer Prevention and Control: Workforce Implications for Training, Practice, and Policy," the Health Policy and Advocacy Working Group was convened to discuss barriers to closing these gaps. Three major themes emerged from the group's deliberations and are discussed here: (1) the role of critical health literacy and evidence-based collaborations in cancer prevention education, research, and practice; (2) the implications of health advocacy for policy development and clinical and public health practice; and (3) culturally and linguistically appropriate cancer prevention programs and information within advocacy/workforce collaborations. Mechanisms for addressing these gaps are presented. PMID:22311694

  15. Social media and international advertising: Theoretical challenges and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Okazaki, Shintaro; Taylor, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The primary aim of this article is to identify theoretical foundations that can be used in research on social media in the context of international advertising research. An additional objective is to identify future research directions for theory building in this research area. Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on the extant literature to identify three key theoretical foundations that can be used in research on advertising in media from an advertising p...

  16. Foresight scanning: future directions of clinical and pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    Foresight Scanning: Future Directions of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Research. Brian C. Foster, Therapeutic Products Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT The Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences Satellite Symposium on Foresight Scanning, May 26 and 27, 2008, Nordegg, Alberta, Canada, focussed on the future directions of clinical and pharmaceutical research. The symposium brought together a group of clinicians, regulatory scientists, researchers and students to examine where clinical, pharmaceutical, and regulatory science might be in 10 to 15 years. Industry, regulatory, analytical, and clinical perspectives were presented and discussed, as well as the impact of exogenous (indirect) and endogenous (direct) change drivers. Unconditional funding was provided by Bayer HealthCare; they had no input on the direction of the meeting or selection of speakers. It was envisioned that the more important endogenous drivers may not be new information or changes in technology, policy, regulation, or health care delivery, but amplification of long-term underlying trends by emergence of new technologies, convergence of existing technologies or new communication and collaboration vehicles such as Web 2.0.

  17. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Thundimadathil

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to convent...

  18. Status and future of the direct sales market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three topics of interest concerning the direct purchase of natural gas, were discussed. The three topics were: (1) the Ontario market, past, present and future, along with an analysis of market segmentation, (2) Ontario local distribution companies (LDC) separation, or separating the merchant role from the distribution role, and (3) the status of direct purchase in Alberta. Changes in the natural gas market since deregulation in 1985, were also reviewed. It was noted that today, only a handful of agents, brokers and marketers of natural gas are vying for the market; customers are looking to purchase gas at a price lower than the LDC buy/sell price; and there is pressure for the LDCs to separate the merchant functions from the distribution functions in most of the provinces in Canada. The direct and long term impact of these developments will be to enhance competition among distributors

  19. Low Anterior Resection Syndrome: Current Management and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Berger, Nicholas; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes for rectal cancer surgery have improved significantly over the past 20 years with increasing rates of survival and recurrence, specifically local recurrence. These gains have been realized during a period of time in which there has been an increasing emphasis on sphincter preservation. As we have become increasingly aggressive in avoiding resection of the anus, we have begun accepting bowel dysfunction as a normal outcome. Low anterior resection syndrome, defined as a constellation of symptoms including incontinence, frequency, urgency, or feelings of incomplete emptying, has a significant impact on quality of life and results in many patients opting for a permanent colostomy to avoid these symptoms. In this article, we will highlight the most recent clinical and basic science research on this topic and discuss areas of future investigation. PMID:27582649

  20. Natural killer cell biology: an update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kerry S; Hasegawa, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a minor subset of normal lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses toward tumor and virus-infected cells. They can mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity toward these abnormal cells and rapidly secrete numerous cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. Significant progress has been made in the past 2 decades to improve our understanding of NK cell biology. Here we review recent discoveries, including a better comprehension of the "education" of NK cells to achieve functional competence during their maturation and the discovery of "memory" responses by NK cells, suggesting that they might also contribute to adaptive immunity. The improved understanding of NK cell biology has forged greater awareness that these cells play integral early roles in immune responses. In addition, several promising clinical therapies have been used to exploit NK cell functions in treating patients with cancer. As our molecular understanding improves, these and future immunotherapies should continue to provide promising strategies to exploit the unique functions of NK cells to treat cancer, infections, and other pathologic conditions.

  1. Gene Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Deanna; Burmester, James K.

    2006-01-01

    The broad field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments that are likely to become important in preventing deaths from cancer. In this review, we discuss the history, highlights and future of three different gene therapy treatment approaches: immunotherapy, oncolytic virotherapy and gene transfer. Immunotherapy uses genetically modified cells and viral particles to stimulate the immune system to destroy cancer cells. Recent clinical trials of second and third generation vacc...

  2. CERN Theory Institute: Future directions in lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the Institute is to bring together researchers in lattice gauge theory and in its applications to phenomenology to discuss interesting future directions of research. The focus will be on new ideas rather than on the latest computation of the usual quantities. The aim is to identify calculations in QCD, flavour physics, other strongly-interacting theories, etc. which are of high physics interest, and to clarify the theoretical and technical difficulties which, at present, prevent us from carrying them out.

  3. Present status and future direction of plutonium process chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale plutonium recovery/processing facilities are currently operated at the US Department of Energy Hanford, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River Sites. This paper presents an overview of plutonium process chemistry used at these sites, with particular emphasis on solution chemistry involved in recovery, purification, and waste treatment operations. By extrapolating from the present system of processes, this paper also attempts to chart the future direction of plutonium process development and operation. Areas where a better understanding of basic plutonium chemistry will contribute to development of improved processing are called out

  4. CT myocardial perfusion imaging: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging of the heart has advanced rapidly, and it is now possible to perform a comprehensive assessment at a low radiation dose. CT myocardial perfusion imaging can provide additive information to CT coronary angiography, and is particularly useful in patients with heavily calcified coronary arteries or coronary artery stents. A number of protocols are now available for CT myocardial perfusion including static, dynamic, and dual-energy techniques. This review will discuss the current status of CT myocardial perfusion imaging, its clinical application, and future directions for this technology.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics - Current capabilities and directions for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutler, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has made great strides in the detailed simulation of complex fluid flows, including some of those not before understood. It is now being routinely applied to some rather complicated problems and starting to affect the design cycle of aerospace flight vehicles and their components. It is being used to complement, and is being complemented by, experimental studies. Several examples are presented in the paper to illustrate the current state of the art. Included is a discussion of the barriers to accomplishing the basic objective of numerical simulation. In addition, the directions for the future in the discipline of computational fluid dynamics are addressed.

  6. Cancer stem cells: an insight and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept derives from the fact that cancers are dysregulated tissue clones whose continued propagation is vested in a biologically distinct subset of cells that are typically rare. Rare CSCs have been isolated from a number of human tumors, including hematopoietic, brain, colon, and breast cancer. With the growing evidence that CSCs exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. Understanding the biology of CSCs will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  7. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: current challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy DG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dominic G Roy,1,2 John C Bell1–31Centre for Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 2Department of Biochemistry, Immunology and Microbiology, 3Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CanadaAbstract: The optimal route for clinical delivery of oncolytic viruses is thought to be systemic intravenous injection; however, the immune system is armed with several highly efficient mechanisms to remove pathogens from the circulatory system. To overcome the challenges faced in trying to delivery oncolytic viruses specifically to tumors via the bloodstream, carrier cells have been investigated to determine their suitability as delivery vehicles for systemic administration of oncolytic viruses. Cell carriers protect viruses from neutralization, one of the most limiting aspects of oncolytic virus interaction with the immune system. Cell carriers can also possess inherent tumor tropism, thus directing the delivery of the virus more specifically to a tumor. With preclinical studies already demonstrating the success and feasibility of this approach with multiple oncolytic viruses, clinical evaluation of cell-mediated delivery of viruses is on the horizon. Meanwhile, ongoing preclinical studies are aimed at identifying new cellular vehicles for oncolytic viruses and improving current promising cell carrier platforms.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cell carrier, systemic delivery, tumor targeting, cancer

  8. HIV Vaccine: Recent Advances, Current Roadblocks, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muni Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. In spite of successful interventions and treatment protocols, an HIV vaccine would be the ultimate prevention and control strategy. Ever since identification of HIV/AIDS, there have been meticulous efforts for vaccine development. The specific aim of this paper is to review recent vaccine efficacy trials and associated advancements and discuss the current challenges and future directions. Recombinant DNA technologies greatly facilitated development of many viral products which were later incorporated into vectors for effective vaccines. Over the years, a number of scientific approaches have gained popularity and include the induction of neutralizing antibodies in late 1980s, induction of CD8 T cell in early 1990s, and combination approaches currently. Scientists have hypothesized that stimulation of right sequences of somatic hypermutations could induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs capable of effective neutralization and viral elimination. Studies have shown that a number of host and viral factors affect these processes. Similarly, eliciting specific CD8 T cells immune responses through DNA vaccines hold future promises. In summary, future studies should focus on the continuous fight between host immune responses and ever-evasive viral factors for effective vaccines.

  9. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  10. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  11. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burke Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, MACC Fund Research Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001 is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, oncology, Seneca, valley

  12. Haemostatic alterations in colorectal cancer: perspectives for future treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The role of the haemostatic system in colorectal cancer (CRC) is reviewed. Correlations between the activation of the haemostatic system and overall survival have been suggested. Experimental studies indicate that the haemostatic system plays a key role in growth, invasion and dissemination of...... tumour cells, and in tumour related angiogenesis. Additional activation by the surgical trauma and postoperative infections are discussed. Finally, anti-cancer modalities directed against regulation of the haemostatic system in CRC are considered....

  13. Future directions for the development of Chlamydomonas-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Besides serving as a valuable model in biological sciences, Chamydomonas reinhardtii has been used during the last decade in the biotechnology arena to establish models for the low cost production of vaccines. Antigens from various pathogens including Plasmodium falciparum, foot and mouth disease virus, Staphylococcus aureus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) as well as some auto-antigens, have been produced in C. reinhardtii. Although some of them have been functionally characterized with promising results, this review identifies future directions for the advancement in the exploitation of this robust and safe vaccine production platform. The present analysis reflects that important immunological implications exist for this system and remain unexplored, including the possible adjuvant effects of algae biomolecules, the effect of bioencapsulation on immunogenicity and the possible development of whole-cell vaccines as an approach to trigger cytotoxic immune responses. Recently described molecular strategies that aim to optimize the expression of nuclear-encoded target antigens are also discussed. PMID:24053395

  14. Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-06

    This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

  15. Compressed sensing for radio interferometric imaging: review and future direction

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, J D

    2011-01-01

    Radio interferometry is a powerful technique for astronomical imaging. The theory of Compressed Sensing (CS) has been applied recently to the ill-posed inverse problem of recovering images from the measurements taken by radio interferometric telescopes. We review novel CS radio interferometric imaging techniques, both at the level of acquisition and reconstruction, and discuss their superior performance relative to traditional approaches. In order to remain as close to the theory of CS as possible, these techniques necessarily consider idealised interferometric configurations. To realise the enhancement in quality provided by these novel techniques on real radio interferometric observations, their extension to realistic interferometric configurations is now of considerable importance. We also chart the future direction of research required to achieve this goal.

  16. Future Directions in Solar EUV/UV Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Studies of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the Sun provide a unique and powerful means to investigate plasma properties, such as density, temperature, abundance and flow speeds throughout the low solar atmosphere, from chromsphere to corona. In particular, with the SOHO mission, recent EUV/UV spectroscopic studies have paved the way for significant advances in numerous areas of solar physics research, such as active region structure and evolution, quiet Sun transient processes, mass ejection onset, and so on... and the wealth of data will guarantee that we will be reaping the rewards for some time to come. However, spectroscopy demands relatively high mass, high telemetry instrumentation, and the products are not readily understood by the non-specialist. Thus, with the new breed of lighter missions and a greater need to enhance public awareness, what is the future for solar EUV/UV spectroscopy? The NASA STEREO mission due for launch in 2004 is not expected to carry a spectrometer. The Japanese Solar-B mission will be carrying an EUV spectrometer. The need for such instruments for the possible ESA Solar Orbiter, the NASA Solar Probe and other future missions must be addressed. SOHO comes from mid-1980's technology so we can readily enhance our current performances with the use of multilayers, improved CCD technology, multi-line-of-sight observations etc... So, as well as advertising the success of solar spectroscopy in recent years, an outline of possible directions willl be given which will underline the strong case for including such experiments in future solar missions.

  17. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  18. Direct gastroscopy for detecting gastric cancer in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子其; 万军; 朱成; 王孟薇; 赵东海; 付永和; 张建萍; 王亚红; 吴本俨

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of direct gastroscopy for detecting gastric cancer. Methods Clinical screening by direct gastroscopy was performed for gastric cancer (GC) from September 1985 to July 1998. 3048 elderly people were screened. Their age ranged from 60 to 93 years, and 2034 of the 3084 were followed up. Results Ninety-two patients with gastric cancer were discovered by gastroscopy, representing 3.02% of the screened population. The rate of early gastric cancer (EGC) was 63.04% (58/92) of all gastric cancers detected. The rate was up to 79.59% (39/49) on follow-up, and was 74.14% (43/51) in asymptomatic patients with gastric cancer. The excision rate was 88.89% for patients with gastric cancer, and 100% for patients with early gastric cancer. The 5-year survival rate was 91.89% for patients with gastric cancer, and 96.30% for patients with early gastric cancer. Conclusion Clinical screening and follow-up by direct gastroscopy in persons over 60 years of age are a safe and effective method for raising the 5-year survival and detection rate of gastric cancer, especially early gastric cancer.

  19. Cervical cancer control, priorities and new directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonego, J; Bosch, F.X.; Coursaget, P.; Cox, JT; Franco, E; Frazer, I; Sankaranarayanan, R; Schiller, J; Singer, A; Wright, TCJr; Kinney, W; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Linder, J

    2004-01-01

    99% of cervical cancer is initiated by HPV infection. The estimated lifetime risk of cervical cancer is nevertheless relatively low (less than 1 in 20 for most community based studies). Although sensitivity and specificity of the available diagnostic techniques are suboptimal, screening for persiste

  20. Current Therapy and Future Directions in Biliary Tract Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Ciombor, Kristen K; Goff, Laura W.

    2013-01-01

    Cancers of the biliary tree represent a rare group of diseases with a devastating impact on patients. Gallbladder cancer is often associated with cholelithiasis. Cholangiocarcioma may arise in the setting of biliary inflammation such as primary sclerosing cholangitis but most commonly occurs in patients without a particular risk factor. Surgical removal of biliary cancer is essential for cure, but it is associated with a very high rate of recurrence and for many patients is not possible at th...

  1. Accredited Standards Committee N15 Developments And Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accredited Standards Committee (ASC) N15, Methods of Nuclear Material Control, is sponsored by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) to develop standards for protection, control and accounting of special nuclear materials in all phases of the nuclear fuel cycle, including analytical procedures where necessary and special to this purpose, except that physical protection of special nuclear material within a nuclear power plant is not included. Voluntary consensus standards complement federal regulations and technical standards and fulfill an important role for the nuclear regulatory agencies. This paper describes the N15 standards development process, with INMM as the Standards Developing Organization (SDO) and the N15 Committee responsible for implementation. Key components of the N15 standards development process include ANSI accreditation; compliance with the ANSI Essential Requirements (ER), coordination with other SDOs, communication with stakeholders, maintenance of balance between interest categories, and ANSI periodic audits. Recent and future ASC N15 activities are discussed, with a particular focus on new directions in anticipation of renewed growth in nuclear power.

  2. Recent Advances in PV Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Satyen K.

    1998-04-01

    The photovoltaic technology is making a major thrust in the commercial arena with 1997 worldwide production of PV modules reaching over 125 MW and growing at the rate of 20-25semiconductor materials and devices are emerging as strong contenders for PV applications even though silicon is still the 'work-horse' of the industry. Ultra-high efficiency solar cells fabricated from gallium arsenide (GaAs) and its ternary alloys like gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) are finding applications in space technology. Enormous progress has also been made on various thin-film solar cell technologies, which offer the promise for substantially reducing the cost of PV systems. Some of the leading contenders are amorphous and polycrystalline silicon, compound semiconductor thin films such as copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2) based alloys, and cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films. Exciting new developments are happening in the use of nano-particle semiconductor materials like titanium dioxide (TiO2) for low-cost PV devices. Intense research on these and other materials and devices is making a strong impact on the technology. In this presentation, a brief overview of recent advances in PV research will b e made and the trends and opportunities for future research directions will be identified.

  3. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Kooyk, Yvette van, E-mail: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-08

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future.

  4. Thermal batteries: A technology review and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    Thermally activated (``thermal``) batteries have been used for ordnance applications (e.g., proximity fuzes) since World War II and, subsequent to that, in nuclear weapons. This technology was developed by the Germans as a power source for their V2 rockets. It was obtained by the Allies by interrogation of captured German scientists after the war. The technology developed rapidly from the initial primitive systems used by the Germans to one based on Ca/CaCrO{sub 4}. This system was used very successfully into the late 1970s, when it was replaced by the Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} electrochemical system. This paper describes the predominant electrochemical couples that have been used in thermal batteries over the years. Major emphasis is placed on the chemistry and electrochemistry of the Ca/CaCrO{sub 4} and Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} systems. The reason for this is to give the reader a better appreciation for the advances in thermal-battery technology for which these two systems are directly responsible. Improvements to date in the current Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} and related systems are discussed and areas for possible future research and development involving anodes, cathodes, electrolytes, and insulations are outlined. New areas where thermal-battery technology has potential applications are also examined.

  5. Acute Kidney Injury: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Briosa Neves

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common problem highly associated with hospitalisation. AKI is the cause of harmful short-term consequences: longer hospital stays, greater disability after discharge, and greater risk of in-hospital mortality, as well as adverse long-term outcomes, such as progression to chronic kidney disease, development of cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of long-term mortality. The concept of AKI has changed since the introduction of the ‘Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease’ (RIFLE classification. More recently, the ‘Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification appears to have provided increased diagnostic sensitivity and outcome-prediction capability. Novel biomarkers and further research on the role of the immune system in AKI may help improve the diagnosis, severity, outcome evaluation, and treatment of the condition. In this review we describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and prognosis of AKI, as well as possible future directions for its clinical management.

  6. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: current perspective and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kishore, Lalit; Kaur, Navpreet

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders with extremely complex pathophysiology and affects both somatic and autonomic components of the nervous system. Neuropathy is the most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. Metabolic disruptions in the peripheral nervous system, including altered protein kinase C activity, and increased polyol pathway activity in neurons and Schwann cells resulting from hyperglycemia plays a key role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. These pathways are related to the metabolic and/or redox state of the cell and are the major source of damage. Activation of these metabolic pathways leads to oxidative stress, which is a mediator of hyperglycemia induced cell injury and a unifying theme for all mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy. The therapeutic intervention of these metabolic pathways is capable of ameliorating diabetic neuropathy but therapeutics which target one particular mechanism may have a limited success. Available therapeutic approaches are based upon the agents that modulate pathogenetic mechanisms (glycemic control) and relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. This review emphasizes the pathogenesis, presently available therapeutic approaches and future directions for the management of diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Evaluating theories of bird song learning: implications for future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margoliash, D

    2002-12-01

    Studies of birdsong learning have stimulated extensive hypotheses at all levels of behavioral and physiological organization. This hypothesis building is valuable for the field and is consistent with the remarkable range of issues that can be rigorously addressed in this system. The traditional instructional (template) theory of song learning has been challenged on multiple fronts, especially at a behavioral level by evidence consistent with selectional hypotheses. In this review I highlight the caveats associated with these theories to better define the limits of our knowledge and identify important experiments for the future. The sites and representational forms of the various conceptual entities posited by the template theory are unknown. The distinction between instruction and selection in vocal learning is not well established at a mechanistic level. There is as yet insufficient neurophysiological data to choose between competing mechanisms of error-driven learning and reinforcement learning. Both may obtain for vocal learning. The possible role of sleep in acoustic or procedural memory consolidation, while supported by some physiological observations, does not yet have support in the behavioral literature. The remarkable expansion of knowledge in the past 20 years and the recent development of new technologies for physiological and behavioral experiments should permit direct tests of these theories in the coming decade.

  8. [Historic significance and future prospect of cancer high incidence scenes in China based on the development of esophageal cancer high incidence scene in Linzhou, Henan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W W

    2016-09-23

    Cancer high incidence scenes are specific and distinguishing characteristics of cancer prevention in China, which not only have made significant contributions to cancer control with Chinese characteristics, but also benefited the masses in cancer high incidence areas and have achieved a great deal of success. These achievements affect not only the prevention and control of cancer, but also of chronic non-communicable diseases both in China and in the world. This paper reviews the history, successes and problems of cancer prevention and control in esophageal cancer high incidence areas in Linzhou City, Henan Province and other provinces in China, and point out the future direction of cancer high incidence scenes on the basis of opportunities and challenges to be faced in modern era.

  9. Future Directions for NCI’s Surveillance Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the early 1970s, NCI’s SEER program has been an invaluable resource for statistics on cancer in the United States. For the past several years, SEER researchers have been working toward a much broader and comprehensive goal for providing cancer stati

  10. Canadian advanced life support capacities and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, M.; Graham, T.; Stasiak, M.; Berinstain, A.; Scott, A.; Vuk, T. Rondeau; Dixon, M.

    2009-07-01

    Canada began research on space-relevant biological life support systems in the early 1990s. Since that time Canadian capabilities have grown tremendously, placing Canada among the emerging leaders in biological life support systems. The rapid growth of Canadian expertise has been the result of several factors including a large and technically sophisticated greenhouse sector which successfully operates under challenging climatic conditions, well planned technology transfer strategies between the academic and industrial sectors, and a strong emphasis on international research collaborations. Recent activities such as Canada's contribution of the Higher Plant Compartment of the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant and the remote operation of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse in the Canadian High Arctic continue to demonstrate Canadian capabilities with direct applicability to advanced life support systems. There is also a significant latent potential within Canadian institutions and organizations with respect to directly applicable advanced life support technologies. These directly applicable research interests include such areas as horticultural management strategies (for candidate crops), growth media, food processing, water management, atmosphere management, energy management, waste management, imaging, environment sensors, thermal control, lighting systems, robotics, command and data handling, communications systems, structures, in-situ resource utilization, space analogues and mission operations. With this background and in collaboration with the Canadian aerospace industry sector, a roadmap for future life support contributions is presented here. This roadmap targets an objective of at least 50% food closure by 2050 (providing greater closure in oxygen, water recycling and carbon dioxide uptake). The Canadian advanced life support community has chosen to focus on lunar surface infrastructure and not low Earth orbit or transit systems (i.e. microgravity

  11. Precision cancer medicine: the future is now, only better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Schilsky, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine for cancer is already being realized with the recent introduction of many targeted therapies, some with companion diagnostic tests that identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment. The utility of molecular profiling of cancer to identify actionable aberrations has been suggested by several small clinical trials conducted in patients with advanced cancer and by many anecdotes but is yet to be proven in well-designed, prospective, randomized trials. Several trials that will definitively test this strategy are now underway or soon to be launched. Melanoma, a disease once largely untreatable when metastatic, may be a paradigm for understanding how the molecular drivers of a disease can lead to highly effective targeted therapies, as well as for realizing the enormous therapeutic potential of unleashing the immune system against cancer to produce long-term disease control. Looking to the future, advanced omics technologies and computational techniques will enable assessment of not only genomic variants, as performed today, but also of pathway and network aberrations that will greatly facilitate selection of drug combinations likely to benefit specific patients. As our deepening understanding of tumor biology converges with rapid advances in measurement science and technology and computational analysis, we have an enormous opportunity to create a future for precision medicine in oncology that provides for highly specific, minimally toxic, and dramatically effective treatment for each patient.

  12. Biology of cancer: current issues and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J

    1992-02-01

    The future of cancer treatment is limited only by the rate of progress made in understanding the biology of cancer. The future will present a considerable challenge to health care professionals to learn new theories, understand new terms, and expect different toxicities. The explosion of information and technology is exciting, yet frightening. The willingness of scientists, health care professionals, and consumers to deal with the ethical, financial, and political issues generated by this progress is gratifying. Because science has created such advances, the effort to deal with the outcomes is worthwhile but still difficult. The challenge to rapidly facilitate the sharing of the scientific and clinical advances has been recognized by the nation. A legislative mandate to create a way to store and analyze the vast data related to molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics resulted in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The development of automated systems to analyze genetic, environmental, biological, and chemistry information can only enhance future progress in the management of cancer.

  13. External and internal radiation therapy: Past and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. Treatment modalities comprise radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy can be performed by using external or internal radiation therapy. However, each method has its unique properties which undertakes special role in cancer treatment, this question is brought up that: For cancer treatment, whether external radiation therapy is more efficient or internal radiation therapy one? To answer this question, we need to consider principles and structure of individual methods. In this review, principles and application of each method are considered and finally these two methods are compared with each other.

  14. Science and cycling: current knowledge and future directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Greg; Davison, Richard; Jeukendrup, Asker; Passfield, Louis

    2003-09-01

    In this holistic review of cycling science, the objectives are: (1) to identify the various human and environmental factors that influence cycling power output and velocity; (2) to discuss, with the aid of a schematic model, the often complex interrelationships between these factors; and (3) to suggest future directions for research to help clarify how cycling performance can be optimized, given different race disciplines, environments and riders. Most successful cyclists, irrespective of the race discipline, have a high maximal aerobic power output measured from an incremental test, and an ability to work at relatively high power outputs for long periods. The relationship between these characteristics and inherent physiological factors such as muscle capilliarization and muscle fibre type is complicated by inter-individual differences in selecting cadence for different race conditions. More research is needed on high-class professional riders, since they probably represent the pinnacle of natural selection for, and physiological adaptation to, endurance exercise. Recent advances in mathematical modelling and bicycle-mounted strain gauges, which can measure power directly in races, are starting to help unravel the interrelationships between the various resistive forces on the bicycle (e.g. air and rolling resistance, gravity). Interventions on rider position to optimize aerodynamics should also consider the impact on power output of the rider. All-terrain bicycle (ATB) racing is a neglected discipline in terms of the characterization of power outputs in race conditions and the modelling of the effects of the different design of bicycle frame and components on the magnitude of resistive forces. A direct application of mathematical models of cycling velocity has been in identifying optimal pacing strategies for different race conditions. Such data should, nevertheless, be considered alongside physiological optimization of power output in a race. An even distribution

  15. Science and cycling: current knowledge and future directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Greg; Davison, Richard; Jeukendrup, Asker; Passfield, Louis

    2003-09-01

    In this holistic review of cycling science, the objectives are: (1) to identify the various human and environmental factors that influence cycling power output and velocity; (2) to discuss, with the aid of a schematic model, the often complex interrelationships between these factors; and (3) to suggest future directions for research to help clarify how cycling performance can be optimized, given different race disciplines, environments and riders. Most successful cyclists, irrespective of the race discipline, have a high maximal aerobic power output measured from an incremental test, and an ability to work at relatively high power outputs for long periods. The relationship between these characteristics and inherent physiological factors such as muscle capilliarization and muscle fibre type is complicated by inter-individual differences in selecting cadence for different race conditions. More research is needed on high-class professional riders, since they probably represent the pinnacle of natural selection for, and physiological adaptation to, endurance exercise. Recent advances in mathematical modelling and bicycle-mounted strain gauges, which can measure power directly in races, are starting to help unravel the interrelationships between the various resistive forces on the bicycle (e.g. air and rolling resistance, gravity). Interventions on rider position to optimize aerodynamics should also consider the impact on power output of the rider. All-terrain bicycle (ATB) racing is a neglected discipline in terms of the characterization of power outputs in race conditions and the modelling of the effects of the different design of bicycle frame and components on the magnitude of resistive forces. A direct application of mathematical models of cycling velocity has been in identifying optimal pacing strategies for different race conditions. Such data should, nevertheless, be considered alongside physiological optimization of power output in a race. An even distribution

  16. Education in Europe: are cancer nurses ready for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, J; Faithfull, S

    2006-01-01

    Much has been written about the need for continuing professional development for nurses to enhance practice and promote quality-nursing care. However, little has been written about the challenges faced by European nurses in keeping up-to-date with health care developments in relation to specialist areas. Educators providing courses are currently facing many challenges; not only the increasing costs of specialist education provision, distance learning, but also the ever increasing changes in health care requiring modification of specialist nursing skills and knowledge within curriculum. This means that educators need to rethink approaches to teaching and learning and links with practice. One of the challenges for the future is how to shift the skills needed for support of cancer patients out into the community , providing quality care for those requiring outpatient and ambulatory cancer care provision. However, continuing professional development is often encouraged as a mechanism for delivering service training rather perceived as developmental for the individual. The European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) as a society has grasped the initiative for educational development with educational needs analysis, a curriculum identifying practice as central to learning, practice-related topics such as TITAN and the development of education for cancer in older people. There are enormous possibilities opening up within health care for us to develop cancer nursing in many settings and contexts, not only as a result of improved survival and treatments but because vocational education is being scrutinised as part of the Bologna agreement. Lastly, educationalists need to grasp these opportunities and take the initiative and strengthen education for nurses who don't know they need it. Improvements in specialist cancer care are shared and lessons learnt can translate into other nursing services so that we can provide better care for cancer patients throughout their cancer

  17. Recent progress and future directions of ChinaFLUX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    ecosystems in China. Finally, the current research emphasis and future directions of ChinaFLUX were presented. By combining flux network and terrestrial transect, ChinaFLUX will develop integrated research with multi-scale, multi-process, multi-subject observations, placing emphasis on the mechanism and coupling relationships between water, carbon and nitrogen cycles in terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. Future Directions of Electromagnetic Methods for Hydrocarbon Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    For hydrocarbon applications, seismic exploration is the workhorse of the industry. Only in the borehole, electromagnetic (EM) methods play a dominant role, as they are mostly used to determine oil reserves and to distinguish water from oil-bearing zones. Throughout the past 60 years, we had several periods with an increased interest in EM. This increased with the success of the marine EM industry and now electromagnetics in general is considered for many new applications. The classic electromagnetic methods are borehole, onshore and offshore, and airborne EM methods. Airborne is covered elsewhere (see Smith, this issue). Marine EM material is readily available from the service company Web sites, and here I will only mention some future technical directions that are visible. The marine EM success is being carried back to the onshore market, fueled by geothermal and unconventional hydrocarbon applications. Oil companies are listening to pro-EM arguments, but still are hesitant to go through the learning exercises as early adopters. In particular, the huge business drivers of shale hydrocarbons and reservoir monitoring will bring markets many times bigger than the entire marine EM market. Additional applications include support for seismic operations, sub-salt, and sub-basalt, all areas where seismic exploration is costly and inefficient. Integration with EM will allow novel seismic methods to be applied. In the borehole, anisotropy measurements, now possible, form the missing link between surface measurements and ground truth. Three-dimensional (3D) induction measurements are readily available from several logging contractors. The trend to logging-while-drilling measurements will continue with many more EM technologies, and the effort of controlling the drill bit while drilling including look-ahead-and-around the drill bit is going on. Overall, the market for electromagnetics is increasing, and a demand for EM capable professionals will continue. The emphasis will

  19. [Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment: Current Knowledge and Future Challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from various distresses, including cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment during and after cancer diagnosis and treatment are collectively called "Cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI)". The number of publications about cognitive impairment due to cancer therapy, especially chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiotherapy, has been growing. Patients often worry not only about their disease condition and therapies, but also experience concerns regarding their memory, attention, and ability to concentrate. Even subtle CRCI can have a significant impact on social relationships, the ability to work, undergo treatment, accomplish meaningful goals, and the quality of life. Longitudinal studies of cancer patients indicated that up to 75% experience CRCI during treatment. Furthermore, CRCI may persist for many years following treatment. However, it is not well understood by most physicians and medical staff. CRCI can be mediated through increased inflammatory cytokines and hormonal changes. In addition, the biology of the cancer, stress, and attentional fatigue can also contribute to CRCI. Genetic factors and co-occurring symptoms may explain some of the inter-individual variability in CRCI. Researchers and patients are actively trying to identify effective interventional methods and useful coping strategies. Many patients are willing to discuss their disease condition and future treatment with medical staff and/or their families. Some patients also hope to discuss their end-of-life care. However, it is difficult to express their will after developing cognitive impairment. Advance care planning (ACP) can help in such situations. This process involves discussion between a patient, their family, and clinicians to clarify and reflect on values, treatment preferences, and goals to develop a shared understanding of how end-of-life care should proceed. The number of cancer patients with cognitive impairment has been increasing owing to the

  20. Bed bug detection: Current technologies and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates current technologies used to detect bed bug infestations, and presents new information regarding the underlying chemical basis of canines scent detection. The manuscript also reports new and future devices that may play a part in bed bug detection in the future....

  1. Current management of diabetes mellitus and future directions in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    outcomes, but macrovascular outcomes and cardiovascular safety remain controversial with several glucose-lowering agents. Future directions in diabetes care include strategies such as the 'bionic pancreas', stem cell therapy and targeting the intestinal microbiome. All of these treatments are still being refined, and it may be several decades before they are clinically useful. Prevention and cure of diabetes is the Holy Grail but remain elusive due to lack of detailed understanding of the metabolic, genetic and immunological causes that underpin diabetes. Much progress has been made since the time of Prof MacLean 90 years ago, but there are still great strides to be taken before the life of the patient with diabetes improves even more significantly. PMID:26453594

  2. Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotopoulos N

    2015-04-01

    of different theories and technical approaches on the way to the actual implementation of the basic concept of MPI have been seen in the last few years. Research groups around the world are working on different scanner geometries, from closed bore systems to single-sided scanners, and use reconstruction methods that are either based on actual calibration measurements or on theoretical models. This review aims at giving an overview of current developments and future directions in MPI about a decade after its first appearance. Keywords: magnetic particle imaging, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, magnetic particle spectrometer, peripheral nerve stimulation, cardiovascular interventions

  3. HIV and Hepatitis Testing: Global Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Cheryl; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and viral hepatitis due to HBV and HCV infection are major causes of chronic disease worldwide, and share some common routes of transmission, epidemiology, initial barriers faced in treatment access, and in strategies for a global public health response. Testing and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection is the gateway for access to both care and treatment and prevention services, and crucial for an effective HIV and hepatitis epidemic response. In this review article, we first summarize the common goals and guiding principles in a public health approach to HIV and hepatitis testing. We summarize the impressive global progress in HIV testing scale-up and evolution of approaches, with expansion of provider-initiated testing and counseling in clinical settings (particularly antenatal and tuberculosis clinics), the introduction of more community based testing services, and use of rapid diagnostic tests enabling provision of same-day test results. However, 46% of all people living with HIV are still unaware of their serostatus, and many continue to be diagnosed and start antiretroviral therapy late. As testing and treatment scale-up accelerates for an "treat all" approach, other challenges to address include how to better focus testing and reach those yet undiagnosed and most at risk, especially key populations, men, adolescents, and children. We summarize future directions in HIV testing to speed scale-up and close gaps that are addressed in the WHO 2015 consolidated HIV testing guidelines. In contrast to HIV, action in hepatitis testing and treatment has been fragmented and limited to a few countries, and there remains a large burden of undiagnosed cases globally. We summarize key challenges in the hepatitis testing response, including lack of simple, reliable, and low-cost diagnostic tests, laboratory capacity, and testing facilities; inadequate data to guide country specific hepatitis testing approaches and who to screen; stigmatization and social

  4. Metastatic colorectal cancer-past, progress and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The clinical management of metastatic (stage Ⅳ)colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common challenge faced by surgeons and physicians. The last decade has seen exciting developments in the management of CRC, with significant improvements in prognosis for patients diagnosed with stage Ⅳ disease. Treatment options have expanded from 5-fluorouracil alone to a range of pharmaceutical and interventional therapies,improving survival, and providing a cure in selected cases. Enhanced understanding of the biologic pathways most important in colorectal carcinogenesis has led to a new generation of drugs showing promise in advanced disease. It is hoped that in the near future the treatment paradigm of metastatic CRC will be analogous to that of a chronic illness, rather than a rapidly terminal condition.This overview discusses the epidemiology of advanced CRC and currently available therapeutic options including medical, surgical, ablative and novel modalities in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. Cancer prevention: state of the art and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, I; Tramalloni, D; Bragazzi, N L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer imposes a heavy societal burden worldwide, in terms of both epidemiology and costs. The introduction of more sophisticated imaging and diagnostic techniques and advanced drugs that specifically target tumor cells is leading to increasingly expensive treatments, which may be affordable only for few patients. Prevention, and particularly primary prevention, is an effective way of addressing the challenging issue of cancer, since between a third and a half of cancers could be prevented on the basis of our current knowledge of risk factors. Moreover, prevention is cost-effective, its effects are not limited to high-risk subjects but extend to the entire population, and it is not dependent on socioeconomic status. Regulatory measures can have a broad impact, even on future generations; by empowering and educating subjects, promoting healthy behaviours and teaching self-care, they can trigger a virtuous cycle. In recent decades, oncology has shifted from being merely reactive to being proactive; this shift has led to the development of so-called "P4 medicine", where the 4 Ps stand for "preventive", "predictive", "personalized" and "participatory". Prevention programs are an important part of the effort to control cancer, as they are able to reduce both the incidence of cancer and mortality. For instance, screening for colorectal, breast and cervical cancer is reducing the burden of these common tumors. Anti-cancer vaccines, both prophylactic and therapeutic, constitute another important preventive tool. Although progress has been made in these areas, much remains to be done. With regard to screening programs, coverage could be increased by introducing new, more acceptable, less invasive tests, stratifying screening through correlation with anamnestic, clinical, radiological and genomic data (so-called "populationbased personalized cancer screening"), and exploiting new information and communication technologies, such as smartphone applications or personalized text

  6. Religion, spirituality, and mental health: current controversies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C H; Koenig, Harold

    2012-10-01

    Although studies examining religion, spirituality, and mental health generally indicate positive associations, there is a need for more sophisticated methodology, greater discrimination between different cultures and traditions, more focus on situated experiences of individuals belonging to particular traditions, and, in particular, greater integration of theological contributions to this area. We suggest priorities for future research based on these considerations.

  7. Childhood obesity: State of art and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García Cortés

    2016-04-01

    It is expected to clarify agreements and dissonances in the proposals to combat and prevent childhood obesity. Furthermore, this study aims to project recommendations for future studies involving childhood obesity throw the causes that have been associated disease in the reviewed literature.

  8. Refugee Issues: Current Status and Directions for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gary; And Others

    A comprehensive review of current refugee policy and program issues is provided in this paper, which is intended to serve both as a status report and a guide to developing an agenda for the future. Chapter I deals with early warning as to potential refugee movements, mass asylum, and interim assistance. Chapter II discusses and analyzes four types…

  9. Sustainable practices in medicinal chemistry: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Marian C; Dillon, Barry; Hamann, Lawrence G; Hughes, Gregory J; Kopach, Michael E; Peterson, Emily A; Pourashraf, Mehrnaz; Raheem, Izzat; Richardson, Paul; Richter, Daniel; Sneddon, Helen F

    2013-08-01

    The medicinal chemistry subgroup of the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute Pharmaceutical Roundtable (ACS GCI PR) offers a perspective on the current state of environmentally sustainable practices in medicinal chemistry with the aim of sharing best practices more widely and highlighting some potential future developments.

  10. The next 25 years? future scenarios and future directions for education and technology

    OpenAIRE

    Facer, K.L; Sandford, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The educational technology research field has been at the heart of debates about the future of education for the last quarter century. This paper explores the socio-technical developments that the next 25 years might bring and the implications of such developments for educators and for educational technology research. The paper begins by outlining the diverse approaches to educational futures that are currently visible in the field, and suggests four principles to under- pin future thinking i...

  11. The Rare Cancer Network: ongoing studies and future strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Ozsahin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Rare Cancer Network (RCN was formed in the early 1990’s to create a global network that could pool knowledge and resources in the studies of rare malignancies whose infrequency prevented both their study with prospective clinical trials. To date, the RCN has initiated 74 studies resulting in 46 peer reviewed publications. The First International Symposium of the Rare Cancer Network took place in Nice in March of 2014. Status updates and proposals for new studies were heard for fifteen topics. Ongoing studies continue for cardiac sarcomas, thyroid cancers, glomus tumors, and adult medulloblastomas. New proposals were presented at the symposium for primary hepatic lymphoma, solitary fibrous tumors, Rosai-Dorfman disease, tumors of the ampulla of Vater, salivary gland tumors, anorectal melanoma, midline nuclear protein in testes carcinoma, pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea, osteosarcomas of the mandible, and extra-cranial hemangiopericytoma. This manuscript presents the abstracts of those proposals and updates on ongoing studies, as well a brief summary of the vision and future of the RCN.

  12. Prostate Cancer Patients’ Refusal of Cancer-Directed Surgery: A Statewide Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in USA. The surgical outcomes of prostate cancer remain inconsistent. Barriers such as socioeconomic factors may play a role in patients’ decision of refusing recommended cancer-directed surgery. Methods. The Nebraska Cancer Registry data was used to calculate the proportion of prostate cancer patients recommended the cancer-directed surgery and the surgery refusal rate. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to analyze the socioeconomic indicators that were related to the refusal of surgery. Results. From 1995 to 2012, 14,876 prostate cancer patients were recommended to undergo the cancer-directed surgery in Nebraska, and 576 of them refused the surgery. The overall refusal rate of surgery was 3.9% over the 18 years. Patients with early-stage prostate cancer were more likely to refuse the surgery. Patients who were Black, single, or covered by Medicaid/Medicare had increased odds of refusing the surgery. Conclusion. Socioeconomic factors were related to the refusal of recommended surgical treatment for prostate cancer. Such barriers should be addressed to improve the utilization of surgical treatment and patients’ well-being.

  13. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study

    OpenAIRE

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O’Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Methods Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct r...

  14. Work organization interventions: state of knowledge and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lawrence R; Sauter, Steven L

    2004-01-01

    Changes taking place in the modern workplace, such as more flexible and lean production technologies, flatter management structures, and nontraditional employment practices fundamentally alter work organization factors and raise concerns about potentially negative influences on worker health and safety. These changes raise concerns about adverse effects on worker safety and health and call attention to the need for interventions to counter these effects. This forum article provides an overview of work organization intervention research, highlights gaps in the research literature, and sets forth an agenda for future intervention research. Research to date has focused primarily on individual-level interventions, with far less attention to interventions at the legislative/policy level, employer/organization level, and job/task level. Future research is recommended to establish the effectiveness of work organization interventions using improved methodological designs and giving increased attention to the circumstances within organizations that promote the adoption of such interventions.

  15. CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF NEW DRUG DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Garg Tarun; Bilandi Ajay; Kapoor Bhawna; Kumar Sunil; Chanana Arsh

    2011-01-01

    New drug delivery systems based products have significantly increased in the past few years, and this growth is expected to continue in the near future. Today a large number of companies are busy developing protein- and peptide-based drugs. Large molecules that degrade rapidly in the blood stream so these biopharmaceuticals (proteins, peptides, carbohydrates, oligo-nucleotides, and nucleic acids in the form of DNA) present drug delivery challenges. Moreover, they have a limited ability to cro...

  16. Social Protection in the Mekong: policy trends and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Cousins, Mel

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyses the current and possible future development of social protection systems in three Mekong countries: Cambodia, Lao PDR and Viet Nam. The three countries are at differing levels of development but face a number of shared challenges including poverty and malnutrition, climate change and food price volatility. Their social protection systems range from an embryonic system in Laos to an ‘emerging’ system in Viet Nam. Following an overview of the three countries and their social ...

  17. The microball and Gammasphere: Research highlights and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D.G.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F. [Washington Univ., Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Microball, a compact, 4{pi} charged-particle detector array, has been used in conjunction with Gammasphere for numerous physics experiments, and more are planned in the near future. A summary of this research program is presented, and the device and its capabilities are described. An example of its use in the study of the population and entry state excitation energy distributions of normal and superdeformed bands in {sup 82}Sr is presented.

  18. Direct Reprogramming—The Future of Cardiac Regeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A. Doppler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, the only available curative therapy for end stage congestive heart failure (CHF is heart transplantation. This therapeutic option is strongly limited by declining numbers of available donor hearts and by restricted long-term performance of the transplanted graft. The disastrous prognosis for CHF with its restricted therapeutic options has led scientists to develop different concepts of alternative regenerative treatment strategies including stem cell transplantation or stimulating cell proliferation of different cardiac cell types in situ. However, first clinical trials with overall inconsistent results were not encouraging, particularly in terms of functional outcome. Among other approaches, very promising ongoing pre-clinical research focuses on direct lineage conversion of scar fibroblasts into functional myocardium, termed “direct reprogramming” or “transdifferentiation.” This review seeks to summarize strategies for direct cardiac reprogramming including the application of different sets of transcription factors, microRNAs, and small molecules for an efficient generation of cardiomyogenic cells for regenerative purposes.

  19. Archiving strategy for USGS EROS center and our future direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation and Science Center has the responsibility to acquire, manage, and preserve our Nation's land observations. These records are obtained primarily from airplanes and satellites dating back to the 1930s. The ability to compare landscapes from the past with current information enables change analysis at local and global scales. With new observations added daily, the records management challenges are daunting, involving petabytes of electronic data and tens of thousands of rolls of analog film. This paper focuses upon the appraisal and preservation functions employed to ensure that these records are available for current and future generations.

  20. Future Directions for Building Services Technologies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2008-01-01

      The hypothesis of this paper is that industrial transformation in the Danish construction sector needs in the future to focus on integrating building services technologies into the buildings. This can be illustrated by analysing historical developments in building services usage, exploring design...... strategies for the effective integration of building services, and by developing new industrialised solutions for building services. The paper is based on the current Danish situation, and is based on linking research on building services, user needs, building design and new industrial processes.  ...

  1. Evaluating Direct Marketing Campaigns: recent findings and future research topics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-J. Jonker (Jedid-Jah); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); N. Piersma (Nanda)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper contains a survey of the recent literature on the evaluation of direct marketing campaigns. We give an outline of the various stages included in such a campaign. Next, we review the statistical methods most frequently used and we review the general findings from using these me

  2. Direct Measurements of Black Hole Charge with Future Astrometrical Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, A F; Ingrosso, G; Nucita, A A

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Zakharov et al. (2005) considered the possibility of evaluating the spin parameter and the inclination angle for Kerr black holes in nearby galactic centers by using future advanced astrometrical instruments. A similar approach which uses the characteristic properties of gravitational retro-lensing images can be followed to measure the charge of Reissner-Nordstrom black hole. Indeed, in spite of the fact that their formation might be problematic, charged black holes are objects of intensive investigations. From the theoretical point of view it is well-known that a black hole is described by only three parameters, namely, its mass M, angular momentum J and charge Q. Therefore, it would be important to have a method for measuring all these parameters, preferably by model independent way. In this paper, we propose a procedure to measure the black hole charge by using the size of the retro-lensing images that can be revealed by future astrometrical missions. A discussion of the Kerr-Newmann black hole c...

  3. The MCMI-III: present and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, T; Davis, R D

    1997-02-01

    Both the original Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-I; Millon, 1977) and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II; Millon, 1987) were refined and strengthened on a regular basis by both theoretic logic and research data. This aspiration has continued. The new Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III; Millon, 1994) has been further coordinated with the most recent official diagnostic schema, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1994) in an even more explicit way than before. Although the publication of the first version of the MCMI preceded the publication of the DSM-IV, its author played a major role in formulating the official manual's personality disorders, contributing thereby to their conceptual correspondence. The DSM-III-R (APA, 1987) was subsequently published in the same year as the MCMI-II; the inventory was modified in its final stages to make it as consonant as possible with the conceptual changes introduced in the then forthcoming official classification. The present version of the MCMI, the MCMI-III, strengthens these correspondences further by drawing on many of the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-IV to serve as the basis for drafting the inventory's items. This article reports on a select set of theoretical and empirical developments that are being carefully weighed for possible inclusion in future MCMIs, or as a guide in the refinement process of future MCMIs. PMID:16370772

  4. 3D Media over Future Internet: Current Status and Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Tasos Dagiuklas

    2012-01-01

    Future Media Internet has been designed to overcome current limitations and address emerging trends including: network architecture, content and service delivery across heterogeneous networks, diffusion of heterogeneous nodes and devices, mass digitisation, new forms of (3D) user centric/user generated content provisioning, emergence of software as a service and interaction with improved security, trustworthiness and privacy. This paper presents current and future research trends for 3D Video...

  5. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle

  6. Web Mining in Soft Computing Relevance and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Kour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the different characteristics of web data, the basic components of web mining and its different types. Web mining combines two of the activated research areas: Data Mining and World Wide Web. The Web mining research relates to several researches communities such as Database, Knowledge Discovery, Information Retrieval and Artificial Intelligence. The limitations of some of the existing web mining and knowledge discovery methods and tools are enunciated, and the significance of soft computing (comprising fuzzy logic (FL, artificial neural networks (ANNs, genetic algorithms (GAs, and rough sets (RSs highlighted. A survey of the existing literature on “soft web mining” is provided along with the commercially available systems. The prospective areas of web mining where the application of soft computing needs immediate attention are outlined with justification. Scope for future research in developing “soft web mining” systems is explained. An extensive bibliography is also provided

  7. Female sex trafficking: conceptual issues, current debates, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkovska, Biljana; Siegel, Melissa; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Bos, Arjan E R

    2015-01-01

    Female sex trafficking is a pressing concern. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of relevant issues regarding the concept of female sex trafficking and research in the field of human trafficking, drawing on a variety of disciplines, including economics, gender and sexuality studies, psychology, sociology, law, and social work. We discuss the debates surrounding the definition of human trafficking, compare and contrast it with human smuggling, and outline connections between female sex trafficking and the issue of sex work and prostitution. We further discuss the history and current estimations of female sex trafficking. We then outline the main actors in female sex trafficking, including trafficked persons, traffickers, clients, and service providers, and we overview the trafficking process from recruitment to identification, recovery, and (re)integration. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future research that tie together the concepts of vulnerability, exploitation, and long-term recovery and (re)integration. PMID:25897567

  8. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  9. Increasing Emotional Intelligence through Training: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola S. Schutte

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence consists of adaptive emotional functioning involving inter-related competencies relating to perception, understanding, utilising and managing emotions in the self and others. Researchers in diverse fields have studied emotional intelligence and found the construct to be associated with a variety of intrapersonal and interpersonal factors such as mental health, relationship satisfaction, and work performance. This article reviews research investigating the impact of training in emotional-intelligence skills. The results indicate that it is possible to increase emotional intelligence and that such training has the potential to lead to other positive outcomes. The paper offers suggestions about how future research, from diverse disciplines,can uncover what types of training most effectively increase emotional intelligence and produce related beneficial outcomes.

  10. Nanotechnology in ocular delivery: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Yasmin; Maurya, D P; Iqbal, Z; Aqil, M

    2011-06-01

    Our knowledge in the field of ocular drug delivery is rapidly expanding. An increase in the understanding of ocular drug absorption and disposition vis-à-vis developments in nanotechnology has led to the emergence of many of the nanotechnology-based ocular drug delivery systems including nanoparticles, microemulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, light-sensitive nanocarrier systems, etc. The need to develop effective treatments for posterior eye segment diseases is more important than surface delivery. Treatment of blinding diseases of the eye, such as proliferative retinopathy or macular degeneration, requires effective and safe delivery of drugs to posterior eye segment tissues, and recent advances in nanotechnology have demonstrated successful outcomes. Nanoscientists should focus their efforts on nano-ophthalmology. This review describes the current status and progress made so far, and the course that needs to be pursued in the future. PMID:21695286

  11. Eye Nutrition in Context: Mechanisms, Implementation, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Adams

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoid-based visual cues and roles of carotenoids in human vision are reviewed, with an emphasis on protection by zeaxanthin and lutein against vision loss, and dietary sources of zeaxanthin and lutein are summarized. In addition, attention is given to synergistic interactions of zeaxanthin and lutein with other dietary factors affecting human vision (such as antioxidant vitamins, phenolics, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids and the emerging mechanisms of these interactions. Emphasis is given to lipid oxidation products serving as messengers with functions in gene regulation. Lastly, the photo-physics of light collection and photoprotection in photosynthesis and vision are compared and their common principles identified as possible targets of future research.

  12. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma. PMID:26305520

  13. CT of pulmonary emphysema - current status, challenges, and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by irreversible destruction of lung parenchyma. Emphysema is a major contributor to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which by itself is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Computed tomography (CT) is an established method for the in-vivo analysis of emphysema. This review first details the pathological basis of emphysema and shows how the subtypes of emphysema can be characterized by CT. The review then shows how CT is used to quantify emphysema, and describes the requirements and foundations for quantification to be accurate. Finally, the review discusses new challenges and their potential solution, notably focused on multi-detector-row CT, and emphasizes the open questions that future research on CT of pulmonary emphysema will have to address. (orig.)

  14. Healthcare Scheduling by Data Mining: Literature Review and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M. Rinder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a systematic literature review of the application of industrial engineering methods in healthcare scheduling, with a focus on the role of patient behavior in scheduling. Nine articles that used mathematical programming, data mining, genetic algorithms, and local searches for optimum schedules were obtained from an extensive search of literature. These methods are new approaches to solve the problems in healthcare scheduling. Some are adapted from areas such as manufacturing and transportation. Key findings from these studies include reduced time for scheduling, capability of solving more complex problems, and incorporation of more variables and constraints simultaneously than traditional scheduling methods. However, none of these methods modeled no-show and walk-ins patient behavior. Future research should include more variables related to patient and/or environment.

  15. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

  16. Minireview: Endocrine Disruptors: Past Lessons and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Johnson, Anne F; Birnbaum, Linda S; Colborn, Theo; Guillette, Louis J; Crews, David P; Collins, Terry; Soto, Ana M; Vom Saal, Frederick S; McLachlan, John A; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2016-08-01

    Within the past few decades, the concept of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has risen from a position of total obscurity to become a focus of dialogue, debate, and concern among scientists, physicians, regulators, and the public. The emergence and development of this field of study has not always followed a smooth path, and researchers continue to wrestle with questions about the low-dose effects and nonmonotonic dose responses seen with EDCs, their biological mechanisms of action, the true pervasiveness of these chemicals in our environment and in our bodies, and the extent of their effects on human and wildlife health. This review chronicles the development of the unique, multidisciplinary field of endocrine disruption, highlighting what we have learned about the threat of EDCs and lessons that could be relevant to other fields. It also offers perspectives on the future of the field and opportunities to better protect human health. PMID:27477640

  17. Qualitative psychotherapy research: the journey so far and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Heidi M

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the evolution of qualitative psychotherapy research over the past 3 decades. Clients' and therapists' accounts of their experiences in psychotherapy provide a window into the psychotherapy relationship and its mechanisms of change. A sizable body of literature has been generated that uses qualitative methods to collect and analyze these accounts and to shed light on the psychotherapy process. It notes changes in the field such as growing numbers of dissertations and publications using qualitative methods as well as a strengthening emphasis on qualitative research within graduate education and research funding bodies. Future recommendations include developing principles for practice from qualitative methods and conducting qualitative meta-analyses. Other recommendations include forming journal review policies that support the publication of qualitative research and that focus on coherence in adapting methods to meet research goals, in light of a study's characteristics and epistemological framework, rather than focusing on sets of procedures.

  18. Experimental tests of general relativity: recent progress and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard theory of gravity, especially where the needs of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory is used for many practical purposes involving spacecraft navigation, geodesy, and time transfer. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss recent progress in tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy tests of new physics beyond general relativity. Space-based experiments in fundamental physics are presently capable of uniquely addressing important questions related to the fundamental laws of nature. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics that are anticipated in the near future and evaluate the discovery potential of a number of recently proposed space-based gravitational experiments. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Status and Future Directions of the ENERGY STAR Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard; Webber, Carrie; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-12-04

    In 1992 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Since then, the EPA, now in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has expanded the program to cover nearly the entire buildings sector, spanning new homes, commercial buildings, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, commercial and residential lighting, and home electronics. This paper is based on our experience since 1993 in providing technical support to the ENERGY STAR program. We provide a snapshot of the ENERGY STAR program in the year 2000, including a general overview of the program, its accomplishments, and the possibilities for future development.

  20. Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Morillo-Pozo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs have emerged and shifted the focus from the typical scalar wireless sensor networks to networks with multimedia devices that are capable to retrieve video, audio, images, as well as scalar sensor data. WMSNs are able to deliver multimedia content due to the availability of inexpensive CMOS cameras and microphones coupled with the significant progress in distributed signal processing and multimedia source coding techniques. In this paper, we outline the design challenges of WMSNs, give a comprehensive discussion of the proposed architectures, algorithms and protocols for the different layers of the communication protocol stack for WMSNs, and evaluate the existing WMSN hardware and testbeds. The paper will give the reader a clear view of the state of the art at all aspects of this research area, and shed the light on its main current challenges and future trends. We also hope it will foster discussions and new research ideas among its researchers.

  1. Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks: current trends and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalkawi, Islam T; Zapata, Manel Guerrero; Al-Karaki, Jamal N; Morillo-Pozo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) have emerged and shifted the focus from the typical scalar wireless sensor networks to networks with multimedia devices that are capable to retrieve video, audio, images, as well as scalar sensor data. WMSNs are able to deliver multimedia content due to the availability of inexpensive CMOS cameras and microphones coupled with the significant progress in distributed signal processing and multimedia source coding techniques. In this paper, we outline the design challenges of WMSNs, give a comprehensive discussion of the proposed architectures, algorithms and protocols for the different layers of the communication protocol stack for WMSNs, and evaluate the existing WMSN hardware and testbeds. The paper will give the reader a clear view of the state of the art at all aspects of this research area, and shed the light on its main current challenges and future trends. We also hope it will foster discussions and new research ideas among its researchers. PMID:22163571

  2. The Present and Future of Prostate Cancer Urine Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Clark

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to successfully cure patients with prostate cancer (PCa, it is important to detect the disease at an early stage. The existing clinical biomarkers for PCa are not ideal, since they cannot specifically differentiate between those patients who should be treated immediately and those who should avoid over-treatment. Current screening techniques lack specificity, and a decisive diagnosis of PCa is based on prostate biopsy. Although PCa screening is widely utilized nowadays, two thirds of the biopsies performed are still unnecessary. Thus the discovery of non-invasive PCa biomarkers remains urgent. In recent years, the utilization of urine has emerged as an attractive option for the non-invasive detection of PCa. Moreover, a great improvement in high-throughput “omic” techniques has presented considerable opportunities for the identification of new biomarkers. Herein, we will review the most significant urine biomarkers described in recent years, as well as some future prospects in that field.

  3. Clinical application and future direction in PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes that F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is crucial to play the major roles in patients with carcinoma in our institute. Positron emission tomography (PET) center consists of one cyclotron (18/9 Cyclone IBA) and PET scanner (Phillips) associated with GSO crystal. FDG-PET is employed to study approximately 3000 patients with carcinoma. We believe that our institute as cancer center in Fukuoka prefecture acts to give the more information prior to therapeutic management of patients in a clinical setting. First, the presentation describes the incidental finding before therapy, staging before surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the therapeutic effect, the elevation of tumor marker, and the clinical application of FDG-PET in the novel therapy. As noted above, the presentation demonstrates, showing the clinical FDG-PET imaging, how to contribute to patients management. Second, the new PET technology has played for rapid advance in molecular imaging. The advantage of new technique in molecular biology and their integration into nuclear medicine provide a critical opportunity to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The presentation briefly addresses the history of molecular imaging and the role as monitoring gene therapy with reporter gene. (author)

  4. Precision therapy for lymphoma--current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intlekofer, Andrew M; Younes, Anas

    2014-10-01

    Modern advances in genomics and cancer biology have produced an unprecedented body of knowledge regarding the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma. The diverse histological subtypes of lymphoma are molecularly heterogeneous, and most likely arise from distinct oncogenic mechanisms. In parallel to these advances in lymphoma biology, several new classes of molecularly targeted agents have been developed with varying degrees of efficacy across the different types of lymphoma. In general, the development of new drugs for treating lymphoma has been mostly empiric, with a limited knowledge of the molecular target, its involvement in the disease, and the effect of the drug on the target. Thus, the variability observed in clinical responses likely results from underlying molecular heterogeneity. In the era of personalized medicine, the challenge for the treatment of patients with lymphoma will involve correctly matching a molecularly targeted therapy to the unique genetic and molecular composition of each individual lymphoma. In this Review, we discuss current and emerging biomarkers that can guide treatment decisions for patients with lymphoma, and explore the potential challenges and strategies for making biomarker-driven personalized medicine a reality in the cure and management of this disease.

  5. Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeram, Navindra P

    2008-02-13

    Overwhelming evidence suggests that edible small and soft-fleshed berry fruits may have beneficial effects against several types of human cancers. The anticancer potential of berries has been related, at least in part, to a multitude of bioactive phytochemicals that these colorful fruits contain, including polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, ellagitannins, gallotannins, phenolic acids), stilbenoids, lignans, and triterpenoids. Studies show that the anticancer effects of berry bioactives are partially mediated through their abilities to counteract, reduce, and also repair damage resulting from oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, berry bioactives also regulate carcinogen and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various transcription and growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, and subcellular signaling pathways of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis. Berry phytochemicals may also potentially sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance, and berry fruit consumption may provide protection from therapy-associated toxicities. Although a wide variety of berry fruits are consumed worldwide, this paper focuses on those commonly consumed in North America, namely, blackberries, black raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, red raspberries, and strawberries. In addition, a large body of studies on singly purified berry bioactives is available, but this paper focuses on studies of "whole berries" per se, that is, as berry extracts and purified fractions, juices, and freeze-dried powders. Potential mechanisms of anticancer action and bioavailability of berry phenolics, as well as gaps in knowledge and recommendations for future berry research, are also briefly discussed. PMID:18211019

  6. Phytocannabinoids for Cancer Therapeutics: Recent Updates and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, K R; Goyal, S N; Sharma, C; Patil, C R; Ojha, S

    2015-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids (pCBs) are lipid-soluble phytochemicals present in the plant, Cannabis sativa L. and non-cannabis plants which have a long history in recreation and traditional medicine. The plant and the constituents isolated were central in the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the most new target for drug discovery. The ECS includes two G-protein-coupled receptors; the cannabinoid receptors-1 and -2 (CB1 and CB2) for marijuana's psychoactive principle Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), their endogenous small lipid ligands; namely anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), also known as endocannabinoids and the enzymes for endocannabinoid biosynthesis and degradation such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The ECS has been suggested as a pro-homeostatic and pleiotropic signaling system activated in a time- and tissue-specific way during pathological conditions including cancer. Targeting the CB1 receptors becomes a concern because of adverse psychotropic reactions. Hence, targeting the CB2 receptors or the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes by pCBs obtained from plants lacking psychotropic adverse reactions has garnered interest in drug discovery. These pCBs derived from plants appear safe and effective with a wider access and availability. In the recent years, several pCBs derived other than non-cannabinoid plants have been reported to bind to and functionally interact with cannabinoid receptors and appear promising candidate for drug development including cancer therapeutics. Several of them also targets the endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes that control endocannabinoid levels. In this article, we summarize and critically discuss the updates and future prospects of the pCBs as novel and promising candidates for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26179998

  7. Targeting Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: Current Advances and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, A C; Owen, J H; Prince, M E

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor-initiating cells, comprise a subset of tumor cells with demonstrated ability for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Targeting of CSCs remains an attractive yet elusive therapeutic option, with the goal of increasing specificity and effectiveness in tumor eradication, as well as decreasing off-target or systemic toxicity. Research into further characterization and targeted therapy toward head and neck CSCs is an active and rapidly evolving field. This review discusses the current state of research into therapy against head and neck CSCs and future directions for targeted therapy.

  8. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to efficiently

  9. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1999-03-01

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to

  10. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  11. 3D Media over Future Internet: Current Status and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasos Dagiuklas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Future Media Internet has been designed to overcome current limitations and address emerging trends including: network architecture, content and service delivery across heterogeneous networks, diffusion of heterogeneous nodes and devices, mass digitisation, new forms of (3D user centric/user generated content provisioning, emergence of software as a service and interaction with improved security, trustworthiness and privacy. This paper presents current and future research trends for 3D Video Delivery across the entire networked-media ecosystem (from the encoding/packetisation, through the transmission and up to end-user experience.

  12. Computer aided surgery. Current status and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes topics in the title in the order of 3D model reconstruction and therapeutic planning based on images before surgery; registration of the actual images in virtual physical space of the patient who is under surgical operation, to the preoperative ones with use of 3D-position sensor, ultrasonics, endoscopy and X-diaphanoscopy; and their accuracy analysis. Images before surgery usually obtained with CT and MR are reconstructed in 3D for the purpose of therapeutic planning by segmentation of the target organ/site, surrounding organs, bones and blood vessels. Navigation system at the surgery functions to make the images obtained before and during operation to be integrated for their registration and displaying. Usually, the optical marker and camera both equipped in the endoscope, and position sensor (tracker) are used for integration in the operation coordinate system. For this, the actual pictures at liver operation are given. For accuracy analysis there is a theory of target registration error, which has been established on FDA demands. In future, development of technology concerned in this field like that of robot, bio-dynamics, biomaterials, sensor and high performance computing together with 4D document of surgery for feed-back to technology are desirable for the systematic growing of this surgical technology. (T.I.)

  13. International medical education and future directions: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Ronald M

    2006-12-01

    Internationalization, one of the most important forces in higher education today, presents a powerful challenge and an opportunity for medical schools. Factors encouraging internationalization include (1) globalization of health care delivery, (2) governmental pressures, (3) improved communication channels, (4) development of a common vocabulary, (5) outcome-based education and standards, (6) staff development initiatives, and (7) competitiveness and commercialization. A three-dimensional model--based on the student (local or international), the teacher (local or international), and the curriculum (local, imported, or international)-offers a range of perspectives for international medical education. In the traditional approach to teaching and learning medicine, local students and local teachers use a local curriculum. In the international medical graduate or overseas student model, students from one country pursue in another country a curriculum taught and developed by teachers in the latter. In the branch-campus model, students, usually local, have an imported curriculum taught jointly by international and local teachers. The future of medical education, facilitated by the new learning technologies and pedagogies, lies in a move from such international interconnected approaches, which emphasize the mobility of students, teachers, and curriculum across the boundaries of two countries, to a transnational approach in which internationalization is integrated and embedded within a curriculum and involves collaboration between a number of schools in different countries. In this approach, the study of medicine is exemplified in the global context rather than the context of a single country. The International Virtual Medical School serves as an example in this regard.

  14. Combinatorial optimization: Current successes and directions for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Karla L.

    2000-12-01

    Our ability to solve large, important combinatorial optimization problems has improved dramatically in the past decade. The availability of reliable software, extremely fast and inexpensive hardware and high-level languages that make the modeling of complex problems much faster have led to a much greater demand for optimization tools. This paper highlights the major breakthroughs and then describes some very exciting future opportunities. Previously, large research projects required major data collection efforts, expensive mainframes and substantial analyst manpower. Now, we can solve much larger problems on personal computers, much of the necessary data is routinely collected and tools exist to speed up both the modeling and the post-optimality analysis. With the information-technology revolution taking place currently, we now have the opportunity to have our tools embedded into supply-chain systems that determine production and distribution schedules, process-design and location-allocation decisions. These tools can be used industry-wide with only minor modifications being done by each user.

  15. Future directions of fuel efficiency in aviation industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria MRAZOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A major goal for the aviation community is reducing fuel consumption. Nowadays we can see so much effort to design a modern aircrafts that offer weight and low fuel burn savings. This study could help to understand the long way during the production of the efficient engine such as PurePower and it shows us many advantages in fuel economy. In the second part of this study the author describes technological enhancements and inevitable measures for the improvement of fuel economy. Current fuel efficient engines and future innovations in aircraft designs are introduced in the third part of the thesis. It also shows a great vision in improving aircraft performance and reducing fuel consumption. Anyway, it is too early to say which of many researching ways will lead to viable solutions, but the air transport industry is committed to support advanced technological innovations. Also, technologies are constantly being deployed and researched by the aviation industry to continuously increase performance. But we cannot forget that our effort to achieve an increased efficiency in terms of fuel consumption is still pushing the industry further.

  16. Filoviruses in Bats: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Olival

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, including Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus, pose significant threats to public health and species conservation by causing hemorrhagic fever outbreaks with high mortality rates. Since the first outbreak in 1967, their origins, natural history, and ecology remained elusive until recent studies linked them through molecular, serological, and virological studies to bats. We review the ecology, epidemiology, and natural history of these systems, drawing on examples from other bat-borne zoonoses, and highlight key areas for future research. We compare and contrast results from ecological and virological studies of bats and filoviruses with those of other systems. We also highlight how advanced methods, such as more recent serological assays, can be interlinked with flexible statistical methods and experimental studies to inform the field studies necessary to understand filovirus persistence in wildlife populations and cross-species transmission leading to outbreaks. We highlight the need for a more unified, global surveillance strategy for filoviruses in wildlife, and advocate for more integrated, multi-disciplinary approaches to understand dynamics in bat populations to ultimately mitigate or prevent potentially devastating disease outbreaks.

  17. Building Future Directions for Teacher Learning in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathy; Lindsay, Simon

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, as part of a process to renew an overall sector vision for science education, Catholic Education Melbourne (CEM) undertook a review of its existing teacher in-service professional development programs in science. This review led to some data analysis being conducted in relation to two of these programs where participant teachers were positioned as active learners undertaking critical reflection in relation to their science teaching practice. The conditions in these programs encouraged teachers to notice critical aspects of their teaching practice. The analysis illustrates that as teachers worked in this way, their understandings about effective science pedagogy began to shift, in particular, teachers recognised how their thinking not only influenced their professional practice but also ultimately shaped the quality of their students' learning. The data from these programs delivers compelling evidence of the learning experience from a teacher perspective. This article explores the impact of this experience on teacher thinking about the relationship between pedagogical choices and quality learning in science. The findings highlight that purposeful, teacher-centred in-service professional learning can significantly contribute to enabling teachers to think differently about science teaching and learning and ultimately become confident pedagogical leaders in science. The future of quality school-based science education therefore relies on a new vision for teacher professional learning, where practice explicitly recognises, values and attends to teachers as professionals and supports them to articulate and share the professional knowledge they have about effective science teaching practice.

  18. Future directions for separation science in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent extraction and ion exchange have been the most widely used separation techniques in nuclear and radiochemistry since their development in the 1940s. Many successful separations processes based on these techniques have been used for decades in research laboratories, analytical laboratories, and industrial plants. Thus, it is easy to conclude that most of the fundamental and applied research that is needed in these areas has been done, and that further work in these ''mature'' fields is unlikely to be fruitful. A more careful review, however, reveals that significant problems remain to be solved, and that there is a demand for the development of new reagents, methods, and systems to solve the increasingly complex separations problems in the nuclear field. Specifically, new separation techniques based on developments in membrane technology and biotechnology that have occurred over the last 20 years should find extensive applications in radiochemical separations. Considerable research is needed in such areas as interfacial chemistry, the design and control of highly selective separation agents, critically evaluated data bases and mathematical models, and the fundamental chemistry of dilute solutions if these problems are to be solved and new techniques developed in a systematic way. Nonaqueous separation methods, such as pyrochemical and fluoride volatility processes, have traditionally played a more limited role in nuclear and radiochemistry, but recent developments in the chemistry and engineering of these processes promises to open up new areas of research and application in the future

  19. Peaking for optimal performance: Research limitations and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; Mujika, Iñigo; Reilly, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    A key element of the physical preparation of athletes is the taper period in the weeks immediately preceding competition. Existing research has defined the taper, identified various forms used in contemporary sport, and examined the prescription of training volume, load, intensity, duration, and type (progressive or step). Current limitations include: the lack of studies on team, combative, racquet, and precision (target) sports; the relatively small number of randomized controlled trials; the narrow focus on a single competition (single peak) compared with multiple peaking for weekly, multi-day or multiple events; and limited understanding of the physiological, neuromuscular, and biomechanical basis of the taper. Future research should address these limitations, together with the influence of prior training on optimal tapering strategies, and the interactions between the taper and long-haul travel, heat, and altitude. Practitioners seek information on how to prescribe tapers from season to season during an athlete's career, or a team's progression through a domestic league season, or multi-year Olympic or World Cup cycle. Practical guidelines for planning effective tapers for the Vancouver 2010 and London 2012 Olympics will evolve from both experimental investigations and modelling of successful tapers currently employed in a wide range of sports. PMID:19153861

  20. Neuroendoscopy in Kuwait: Evolution, Current Status, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Waleed A; Abdelrahman, Ahmed Y; Alsheikh, Tarik M; Najibullah, Mostafa M

    2016-08-01

    An overview of the development of neuroendoscopy at the neurosurgery department, Ibn Sina Hospital in Kuwait, is presented with an outline of difficulties and obstacles faced by the field until it reached its current status. The factors and solutions that helped us overcome these problems are also elaborated on. After a modest beginning few years ago, endoscopic skull base procedures, intraventricular neuroendoscopy, and spinal endoscopy are regularly performed in the department. Although neuroendoscopy is not per se a neurosurgical subspecialty, it is an area that requires special training. Achieving an appropriate level of care necessitates these highly trained neurosurgeons to collaborate together and with other specialties to create teamsgeared towards offering such treatment options topatients. Importantly, a multitude of essential facilities should be available to make such a pattern of practice possible. In our experience, this was made possible through continued efforts that have finally paid off and gradually led to a complete shift of the face of neuroendoscopic practice in our department. Our future endeavors aim at further development of neuroendoscopy in the department to create a center of excellence. PMID:27188640

  1. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy. (topical review)

  2. Alcohol and NMDA Receptor: Current research and future direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman eChandrasekar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by NMDA receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadapation is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism.

  3. Towards a global environmental sociology? Legacies, trends and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidskog, Rolf; Mol, Arthur PJ; Oosterveer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A current debate on environmental sociology involves how the subdiscipline should conceptualise and investigate the environment and whether it should be prescriptive and deliver policy recommendations. Taking this debate as a point of departure this article discusses the current and future role of sociology in a globalised world. It discusses how environmental sociology in the US and Europe differ in their understandings of sociology’s contribution to the study of the environment. Particular stress is placed on how these two regions differ with respect to their use of the tradition of sociological thought, views on what constitutes the environment and ways of institutionalising environmental sociology as a sociological field. In conclusion, the question is raised of whether current versions of environmental sociology are appropriate for analysing a globalised world environment; or whether environmental sociology’s strong roots in European and US cultures make it less relevant when facing an increasingly globalised world. Finally, the article proposes some new rules for a global environmental sociology and describes some of their possible implications for the sociological study of climate change. PMID:25937642

  4. Future directions for in-situ product removal (ISPR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John; Bisschops, Marc; Straathof, Adrie J J;

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited by inhibit......This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited...... by inhibitory or toxic products, as wen as unstable products or reactions that are thermodynamically unfavorable. However, several issues for industrial implementation were revealed in the discussion. Most notably implementation will be dependent on (1) research into the appropriate process structure, (2......) methods to achieve process robustness, (3) systematic selection methods for separation operations and (4) the nature of the product market. Here, these four issues will be discussed as a basis for future work in this area....

  5. Public participation in energy facility siting. Part 2; Future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlatch, E.E. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The first planning era for energy facility siting was typified by technological decision making in a climate of eminent domain. The second planning era, from 1970 to present, involves regulatory/adjudicatory decision making in a climate of adversarial proceedings. However, outcomes are not much different than in the first: Decisions are still largely made on technological grounds, sites are secretly selected and anonymously secured, and public participation has little effect on decisions. The result has been endgame litigation that delays needed projects increases cost, and polarizes participants. Utilities are understandably reluctant to plan large base-load plants, yet almost all projections of electricity use indicate that such plants will be needed after 1996, if not before. The author discusses how it is in the self-interest of all three principal actors---industry, environmental groups, and state and local government---to move beyond confrontation to a third planning era based on negotiation. Unassisted negotiation (open siting or open planning) and assisted negotiation (facilitation and mediation) promise to produce mutual gain for all parties through cooperative and creative problem solving. Most importantly, they lay the groundwork for future productive interaction.

  6. [Oral medicine in Israel: Current status and future directions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aframian, D J; Vered, M

    2016-04-01

    The oral cavity-body relationships are bi-directional: oral diseases affect the welfare and health of the individual, while diseases and conditions of organs and tissues in the human body affect oral health. The global policy of the World Health Organization is to improve oral health in the 21st century as an integral part of promoting our general health. During the recent years the knowledge of the dental profession has grown exponentially and widened its fields of interest and this has led to impressive advances at both clinical and research levels. Oral medicine, which is a recognized, licensed specialty in Israel, is a definite example that reflects this process. In the last decade residency programs in oral medicine are in the process of constant increased demand. The authors discuss this trend and comment on the need to maintain excellence in this specialty.

  7. Metaphor and music emotion: Ancient views and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannese, Alessia; Rappaz, Marc-André; Grandjean, Didier

    2016-08-01

    Music is often described in terms of emotion. This notion is supported by empirical evidence showing that engaging with music is associated with subjective feelings, and with objectively measurable responses at the behavioural, physiological, and neural level. Some accounts, however, reject the idea that music may directly induce emotions. For example, the 'paradox of negative emotion', whereby music described in negative terms is experienced as enjoyable, suggests that music might move the listener through indirect mechanisms in which the emotional experience elicited by music does not always coincide with the emotional label attributed to it. Here we discuss the role of metaphor as a potential mediator in these mechanisms. Drawing on musicological, philosophical, and neuroscientific literature, we suggest that metaphor acts at key stages along and between physical, biological, cognitive, and contextual processes, and propose a model of music experience in which metaphor mediates between language, emotion, and aesthetic response.

  8. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: current challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dominic G; Bell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The optimal route for clinical delivery of oncolytic viruses is thought to be systemic intravenous injection; however, the immune system is armed with several highly efficient mechanisms to remove pathogens from the circulatory system. To overcome the challenges faced in trying to delivery oncolytic viruses specifically to tumors via the bloodstream, carrier cells have been investigated to determine their suitability as delivery vehicles for systemic administration of oncolytic viruses. Cell carriers protect viruses from neutralization, one of the most limiting aspects of oncolytic virus interaction with the immune system. Cell carriers can also possess inherent tumor tropism, thus directing the delivery of the virus more specifically to a tumor. With preclinical studies already demonstrating the success and feasibility of this approach with multiple oncolytic viruses, clinical evaluation of cell-mediated delivery of viruses is on the horizon. Meanwhile, ongoing preclinical studies are aimed at identifying new cellular vehicles for oncolytic viruses and improving current promising cell carrier platforms. PMID:27512657

  9. Metaphor and music emotion: Ancient views and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannese, Alessia; Rappaz, Marc-André; Grandjean, Didier

    2016-08-01

    Music is often described in terms of emotion. This notion is supported by empirical evidence showing that engaging with music is associated with subjective feelings, and with objectively measurable responses at the behavioural, physiological, and neural level. Some accounts, however, reject the idea that music may directly induce emotions. For example, the 'paradox of negative emotion', whereby music described in negative terms is experienced as enjoyable, suggests that music might move the listener through indirect mechanisms in which the emotional experience elicited by music does not always coincide with the emotional label attributed to it. Here we discuss the role of metaphor as a potential mediator in these mechanisms. Drawing on musicological, philosophical, and neuroscientific literature, we suggest that metaphor acts at key stages along and between physical, biological, cognitive, and contextual processes, and propose a model of music experience in which metaphor mediates between language, emotion, and aesthetic response. PMID:27362475

  10. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation - Outcomes and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountfort, Katrina; Camm, John; Lip, Gregory; Goette, Andreas; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves

    2014-11-01

    Stroke prevention is central to the management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are the established and long-standing option for stroke prevention therapy in patients with AF. However, non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have recently been developed and demonstrated non-inferior efficacy vs VKA treatment, with fewer limitations in clinical practice and with reduced risks of major bleeding. In order to discuss the usage, efficacy and safety of NOACs, a satellite symposium was held at the Cardiostim/ EHRA Europace Congress in Nice in June 2014. At present, three NOACs, a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and two direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban) have been approved in Europe for stroke prevention in patients with AF. In addition, the once-daily factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban has recently been evaluated in this setting in the phase III Effective Anticoagulation with Factor Xa Next Generation in Atrial Fibrillation - Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction Study 48 (ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48) that compared edoxaban 30 mg once daily (low-dose regimen) with dose-adjusted warfarin (international normalised ratio 2.0-3.0). ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 was the largest trial with a NOAC to date, and demonstrated that both dosing regimens of once-daily edoxaban were non-inferior to well-managed warfarin treatment for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism and also provided significant reductions in the risk of haemorrhagic stroke, cardiovascular mortality, major bleeding and intracranial bleeding. In summary, the recent availability of NOACs has enabled physicians to avoid the limitations of VKA therapy in clinical practice and tailor anticoagulant treatment to the individual patient. However, worldwide usage of oral anticoagulant therapy remains suboptimal compared with guideline recommendations, and further dissemination of its benefits may prove helpful. PMID:26835091

  11. The Next 25 Years?: Future Scenarios and Future Directions for Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facer, K.; Sandford, R.

    2010-01-01

    The educational technology research field has been at the heart of debates about the future of education for the last quarter century. This paper explores the socio-technical developments that the next 25 years might bring and the implications of such developments for educators and for educational technology research. The paper begins by outlining…

  12. Oleanane triterpenoids in the prevention and therapy of breast cancer: current evidence and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Nisha R.; Mandal, Animesh; Bhatia, Deepak; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Sethi, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and major cause of death in women in the world. Emerging evidence underscores the value of dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals, including triterpenoids, in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Oleanolic acid, an oleanane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid, is present in a large number of dietary and medicinal plants. Oleanolic acid and its derivatives exhibit several promising pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, cardioprotective, antipruritic, spasmolytic, antiallergic, antimicrobial and antiviral effects. Numerous studies indicate that oleanolic acid and other oleanane triterpenoids modulate multiple intracellular signaling pathways and exert chemopreventive and antitumor activities in various in vitro and in vivo model systems. A series of novel synthetic oleanane triterpenoids have been prepared by chemical modifications of oleanolic acid and some of these compounds are considered to be the most potent anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic triterpenoids. Accumulating studies provide extensive evidence that synthetic oleanane derivatives inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of various cancer cells in vitro and demonstrate cancer preventive or antitumor efficacy in animal models of blood, breast, colon, connective tissue, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate and skin cancer. This review critically examines the potential role of oleanolic acid, oleanane triterpenoids and related synthetic compounds in the chemoprevention and treatment of mammary neoplasia. Both in vitro and in vivo studies on these agents and related molecular mechanisms are presented. Several challenges and future directions of research to translate already available impressive preclinical knowledge to clinical practice of breast cancer prevention and therapy are also presented. PMID:25395898

  13. Towards a global environmental sociology? Legacies, trends and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidskog, Rolf; Mol, Arthur Pj; Oosterveer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Le débat actuel sur la sociologie de l’environnement porte sur la façon de conceptualiser et d’examiner l’environnement et sur la nécessité de proposer une approche normative et des recommandations politiques. À partir de ce débat, cet article examine le rôle actuel et futur de la sociologie dans le contexte de la mondialisation. Il analyse dans quelle mesure les recherches sociologiques de l’environnement aux États-Unis et en Europe diffèrent dans leur compréhension de la contribution de la sociologie à l’étude de l’environnement. Un accent particulier est mis sur les différences entre les deux régions pour ce qui concerne leur utilisation de la tradition sociologique, leur vision de la nature de l’environnement et leurs moyens d’institutionnaliser la sociologie de l’environnement en tant que domaine de recherche. En conclusion, ce travail soulève la question de savoir si les approches actuelles de la sociologie de l’environnement sont appropriées à l’analyse de l’environnement mondialisé et si les origines européennes et nord-américaines de la sociologie de l’environnement la rendent moins pertinente dans un contexte de mondialisation croissante. Enfin, cet article propose de nouvelles règles pour une sociologie mondiale de l’environnement et met en évidence les incidences possibles des études sociologiques sur le changement climatique.

  14. Hepatitis C in the Russian Federation: challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukomolov, Sergey; Trifonova, Galina; Levakova, Irina; Bolsun, Daria; Krivanogova, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    seen in the near future that will require urgent preventive and therapeutic measures.

  15. Future World Energy Constraints and the Direction for Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was originally written in response to the concern that rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by burning of fossil fuels will ultimately contribute to global warming. Now we are beginning to see evidence of coming problems in the supply of fuels for transportation. This paper describes the benefits of adequate energy supply and the problems of future energy supply. Partial solutions are suggested for immediate application as well as longer term solutions to address both of these concerns. To evaluate the situation and solutions we must understand: (1) how much primary energy is currently used world-wide and might be needed in 2100, (2) how important energy is to the welfare of people, (3) the forms of energy sources and end uses and (4) where new sources may come from. The major portion of world primary energy demand is provided by fossil fuels. This portion dropped from 93% in 1970 to 85% in 1995, mainly because of the increased use of nuclear energy. How ever, since the mid-1990s fossil fuels have maintained their 85% share of world energy supply. The importance of the relationship between per capita energy consumption and per capita income for the world is discussed. The limits of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energies are examined. The contribution of renewable energies is compared to 41 different views of world energy demand in 2100. Without new technology for large scale storage of intermittent electricity from wind and solar the contribution of renewable energies is not likely to grow significantly beyond the current level of 7-8%. The paper offers conclusions and partial solutions that we can work on immediately. Examination of the forms of energy supplied by the sun, which is powered by nuclear fusion, and the way in which nuclear fission currently supplies energy to the world sets the research framework for longer term solutions. This framework points towards two possible longer term complementary res earch projects which

  16. Shared decision making in endocrinology: present and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Ospina, Naykky Singh; Maraka, Spyridoula; Tamhane, Shrikant; Montori, Victor M; Brito, Juan P

    2016-08-01

    In medicine and endocrinology, there are few clinical circumstances in which clinicians can accurately predict what is best for their patients. As a result, patients and clinicians frequently have to make decisions about which there is uncertainty. Uncertainty results from limitations in the research evidence, unclear patient preferences, or an inability to predict how treatments will fit into patients' daily lives. The work that patients and clinicians do together to address the patient's situation and engage in a deliberative dialogue about reasonable treatment options is often called shared decision making. Decision aids are evidence-based tools that facilitate this process. Shared decision making is a patient-centred approach in which clinicians share information about the benefits, harms, and burden of different reasonable diagnostic and treatment options, and patients explain what matters to them in view of their particular values, preferences, and personal context. Beyond the ethical argument in support of this approach, decision aids have been shown to improve patients' knowledge about the available options, accuracy of risk estimates, and decisional comfort. Decision aids also promote patient participation in the decision-making process. Despite accumulating evidence from clinical trials, policy support, and expert recommendations in endocrinology practice guidelines, shared decision making is still not routinely implemented in endocrine practice. Additional work is needed to enrich the number of available tools and to implement them in practice workflows. Also, although the evidence from randomised controlled trials favours the use of this shared decision making in other settings, populations, and illnesses, the effect of this approach has been studied in a few endocrine disorders. Future pragmatic trials are needed to explore the effect and feasibility of shared decision making implementation into routine endocrinology and primary care practice. With the

  17. Future World Energy Constraints and the Direction for Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lightfoot, H.D.

    2004-09-12

    This paper was originally written in response to the concern that rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by burning of fossil fuels will ultimately contribute to global warming. Now we are beginning to see evidence of coming problems in the supply of fuels for transportation. This paper describes the benefits of adequate energy supply and the problems of future energy supply. Partial solutions are suggested for immediate application as well as longer term solutions to address both of these concerns. To evaluate the situation and solutions we must understand: (1) how much primary energy is currently used world-wide and might be needed in 2100, (2) how important energy is to the welfare of people, (3) the forms of energy sources and end uses and (4) where new sources may come from. The major portion of world primary energy demand is provided by fossil fuels. This portion dropped from 93% in 1970 to 85% in 1995, mainly because of the increased use of nuclear energy. How ever, since the mid-1990s fossil fuels have maintained their 85% share of world energy supply. The importance of the relationship between per capita energy consumption and per capita income for the world is discussed. The limits of conservation, energy efficiency and renewable energies are examined. The contribution of renewable energies is compared to 41 different views of world energy demand in 2100. Without new technology for large scale storage of intermittent electricity from wind and solar the contribution of renewable energies is not likely to grow significantly beyond the current level of 7-8%. The paper offers conclusions and partial solutions that we can work on immediately. Examination of the forms of energy supplied by the sun, which is powered by nuclear fusion, and the way in which nuclear fission currently supplies energy to the world sets the research framework for longer term solutions. This framework points towards two possible longer term complementary res earch projects which

  18. Overview of Higher Education in Turkey and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel KAVAK

    2011-01-01

    .Examining the estimates regarding the future of higher education in our country, report from a project implemented jointly by TUSIAD and the UNFPA reveals significant presumptions. According to that report, a more rapid growth than OECD countries in higher education will continue between 2010 and 2025. According to the same data, as of 2020s the enrollment rate of females in higher education is expected to exceed males. All of these developments indicate a significant competition in the field of higher education in Turkey between public universities as well as between public and foundation universities in the coming years. This competition is expected to lead to significant changes in the management of higher education in Turkey.

  19. Shared decision making in endocrinology: present and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Ospina, Naykky Singh; Maraka, Spyridoula; Tamhane, Shrikant; Montori, Victor M; Brito, Juan P

    2016-08-01

    In medicine and endocrinology, there are few clinical circumstances in which clinicians can accurately predict what is best for their patients. As a result, patients and clinicians frequently have to make decisions about which there is uncertainty. Uncertainty results from limitations in the research evidence, unclear patient preferences, or an inability to predict how treatments will fit into patients' daily lives. The work that patients and clinicians do together to address the patient's situation and engage in a deliberative dialogue about reasonable treatment options is often called shared decision making. Decision aids are evidence-based tools that facilitate this process. Shared decision making is a patient-centred approach in which clinicians share information about the benefits, harms, and burden of different reasonable diagnostic and treatment options, and patients explain what matters to them in view of their particular values, preferences, and personal context. Beyond the ethical argument in support of this approach, decision aids have been shown to improve patients' knowledge about the available options, accuracy of risk estimates, and decisional comfort. Decision aids also promote patient participation in the decision-making process. Despite accumulating evidence from clinical trials, policy support, and expert recommendations in endocrinology practice guidelines, shared decision making is still not routinely implemented in endocrine practice. Additional work is needed to enrich the number of available tools and to implement them in practice workflows. Also, although the evidence from randomised controlled trials favours the use of this shared decision making in other settings, populations, and illnesses, the effect of this approach has been studied in a few endocrine disorders. Future pragmatic trials are needed to explore the effect and feasibility of shared decision making implementation into routine endocrinology and primary care practice. With the

  20. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Update and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Huang, MD, PhD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The development of cutaneous pathological scars, namely, hypertrophic scars (HSs and keloids, involves complex pathways, and the exact mechanisms by which they are initiated, evolved, and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. The generally held concepts that keloids and HSs represent “aberrant wound healing” or that they are “characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles” have done little to promote their accurate clinicopathological classification or to stimulate research into the specific causes of these scars and effective preventative therapies. To overcome this barrier, we review here the most recent findings regarding the pathology and pathogenesis of keloids and HSs. The aberrations of HSs and keloids in terms of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases of the wound healing process are described. In particular, the significant roles that the extracellular matrix and the epidermal and dermal layers of skin play in scar pathogenesis are examined. Finally, the current hypotheses of pathological scar etiology that should be tested by basic and clinical investigators are detailed. Therapies that have been found to be effective are described, including several that evolved directly from the aforementioned etiology hypotheses. A better understanding of pathological scar etiology and manifestations will improve the clinical and histopathological classification and treatment of these important lesions.

  1. Fundamental issues, recent advances, and future directions in myodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatze, H

    2002-12-01

    A state-of-the-art report is presented on recent progress in selected areas of myodynamics, but also on problems that severely hamper the further development of the discipline. Significant advances have been made in elucidating the force-producing interaction between actin and the myosin-S1-subunit, including the localization of the most probable molecular site of power stroke initiation. Concerning the architecture of the myostructures, strong experimental evidence has accumulated for numerous intra-, inter-, and extramuscular pathways for lateral force transmission in addition to the serial sarcomere-to-sarcomere myotendinous path. It is shown that contemporary muscle models are inadequate in most respects and lag far behind the requirements an appropriate myodynamic model should fulfil. A similar comment applies to the current approaches designed to solve the myoskeletal indeterminacy problem. These formulations neglect myodynamic properties and do not allow for the implementation of biologically realistic objective functions. The solutions currently obtained are highly unsatisfactory. New research directions to rectify these situations are suggested, also with regard to the identification of subject-specific myodynamic parameters. PMID:12435541

  2. Direct Laser Cladding , Current Status and Future Scope of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisheit, A.; Gasser, A.; Backes, G.; Jambor, T.; Pirch, N.; Wissenbach, K.

    During the last decades Direct Laser Cladding has become an established technique in many industrial fields for applying wear and corrosion protection layers on metallic surfaces as well as for the repair of high value-added components. The most important application fields are die and tool making, turbine components for aero engines and power generation, machine components such as axes and gears, and oil drilling components. Continuous wave (CW) lasers with a power up to 18 kW are used on automated machines with three or more axes, enabling 3D cladding . The outstanding feature of DLC is the high precision which leads to a minimum heat input into the work piece and a very low distortion. Due to the high cooling rates a fine grained microstructure is achieved during solidification. A new development in laser cladding is micro cladding in a size range below 50 \\upmum especially for electronic and medical applications. Furthermore, additive manufacturing is coming again into focus as a clean and resource-efficient method to manufacture and modify functional prototypes as well as unique and small lot parts.

  3. Contemporary issues and future directions for research into pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, M; Baron, E

    2000-08-01

    The recent healthy increase in research into all aspects of gambling is noted. The dominant theme accounting for most of this research is the mental disorder model of pathological gambling and measures that have been derived from this conceptualization. It is suggested that an alternative approach focusing on the construct of choice or subjective control over gambling may be a research direction that will ensure that progress is maintained. In this paper a context for the discussion is provided by first identifying briefly fundamental conceptual and methodological issues associated with the mental disorder model. In particular it is argued that the heterogeneity of the diagnosis of pathological gambling makes the research task of assessing truly independent variables extremely difficult. Subsequently an illustrative schema is presented that demonstrates both the potential advantages and some of the complexities associated with the dependent variable of self-control over gambling behaviour. The main advantages are argued to be (a) the focus of research is narrowed to one potential cause of harmful impacts rather than the great diversity of impacts themselves, (b) prospective studies of regular gamblers in real gambling venues may be a key source of insight into the development of pathological gambling and (c) it promotes the development of theoretical links with the mainstream of the discipline of psychology. Despite the conceptual difficulties that may be associated with the variable of self-control, it is suggested that these may be overcome because contemporary research into the addictive behaviours has demonstrated considerable success in the definition and measurement of control and related themes such as craving, restraint and temptation. PMID:11092063

  4. Penal law of the future: directions of reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishko A.Ya.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most urgent problems of the penal legislation application are stated: social and economic support of post-penitentiary adaptation; lack of legal status of the RF subject in the penitentiary legal relations; direct dependence of many rights and legitimate interests of convicts upon judicial and administrative discretion; absence of a mechanism of implementing penal norms and subordinate normative legal acts, monitoring their implementation. The provisions of the RF Penal Code, contradicting the view established in the penal law theory regarding the penitentiary legal relations termination after the release of convict from further punishment, are revealed. The main technical and legal defects of the penal legislation in the inter-branch and interdisciplinary spheres are called (goals and objectives of the penal law are defined, goals and objectives of the punishment execution aren’t; principles of guilt and justice are fixed in the Criminal Code, but aren’t fixed in the Penal Code; incomparability of the guarantees of exercising the right to qualified legal assistance by ordinary citizens and convicts, etc.. The problem of the substitution of legislator by penal agency in regulating convicts’ rights and legitimate interests is stated. The provisions to be implemented in new penal legislation are expressed: 1 punishment in form of imprisonment should be in the very fact of isolation from society, otherwise the convict’s legal status shouldn’t differ from other citizens; 2 the list of prohibitions and restrictions for prisoners should be determined at the legislative level; 3 penal legislation should be exempt from evaluation terms and norms-exceptions, regarding convicts rights’ restrictions.

  5. Sustainable winter cities: Future directions for planning, policy and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Norman E. P.

    Attempts to generate a "climate-responsive" northern urban form are part of a relatively recent phenomenon and field of investigation. In conjunction with the international "winter cities" movement, the need has been established for explicit, systematic inquiry directed toward national and local action to improve the comfort and lifestyles of all northern inhabitants. It is important to recognize that winter-induced discomforts exist and that they must be acknowledged in planning theory and practice. For northern cities to function more satisfactorily, the negative impacts of winter must be reduced while its beneficial characteristics are enhanced. While not all summer activities can or should be abandoned during winter, proper micro-climatic control is essential if human life is to be retained outside. The outdoor season should be extended since so much indoor isolation occurs. The main principles to be incorporated in exemplary "winter city" design should be contact with nature, year-round usability, user participation, cultural continuity, and the creation of comfortable micro-climatic conditions throughout much of the city's open spaces. All valuable sources of inspiration must be harnessed in the attempt to mediate between organic regionalism and internationalism, on the one hand, and romanticism and pragmatic realism, on the other. Creating optimum conditions for human well-being, habitation, work and intellectual development in each of the four seasons is vital under harsh environments. Adopting a climate-sensitive approach to planning policy and urban design can render everyday life less stressful, especially during the lengthy winter periods found in many northern latitude and high altitude settings.

  6. Towards Future Broadband Public Safety Systems: Current Issues and Future Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The vision of the Fifth generation (5G) of mobile communication is that it will be an umbrella for communications for various vertical industries that have different requirements for delay, data rates, reliability, availability, and security. 5G will not be a single technology - rather a converge......The vision of the Fifth generation (5G) of mobile communication is that it will be an umbrella for communications for various vertical industries that have different requirements for delay, data rates, reliability, availability, and security. 5G will not be a single technology - rather...... a convergence of not just new revolutionary technologies, but of the already existing, and evolving technologies as well. This paper analyses the impact of convergence and its importance to the evolution of critical communication systems, both with respect to the fundamental features of the public safety...... systems and the future broadband services that are becoming an integral part of the work of the first responders. This paper presents and discusses the recent standardization and research efforts in the area of public safety communication systems and indicates the technologies required to enable future...

  7. Scenarios of future lung cancer incidence by educational level: Modelling study in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Menvielle; I. Soerjomataram; E. de Vries; G. Engholm; J.J. Barendregt; J.W. Coebergh; A.E. Kunst

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To model future trends in lung cancer incidence in Denmark by education under different scenarios for cigarette smoking. Methods: Lung cancer incidence until 2050 was modelled using Prevent software. We estimated lung cancer incidence under a baseline scenario and under four alternative s

  8. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  9. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Shlien

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation.

  10. Stem cells and lung cancer: future therapeutic targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison, Malcolm R; Lebrenne, Arielle C; Islam, Shahriar

    2009-09-01

    In both the UK and USA more people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer's high mortality rate is also reflected on a global scale, with lung cancer accounting for more than 1 million deaths per year. In tissues with ordered structure such a lung epithelia, it is likely that the cancers have their origins in normal adult stem cells, and then the tumours themselves are maintained by a population of malignant stem cells - so-called cancer stem cells. This review examines both these postulates in animal models and in the clinical setting, noting that stem cell niches appear to foster tumour development, and that drug resistance can often be attributed to malignant cells with stem cell properties. PMID:19653862

  11. Current Status and Future Perspectives in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Gu; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is increasing all over the world. The exact cause of this increase is still debated and there are conflicting reports. Sophisticated molecular studies suggest that environmental chemicals may have effects of thyroid carcinogenesis. The development of powerful molecular biology techniques has enabled targeted next-generation sequencing for detection of mutations in thyroid cancer, and this technique can make a specific diagnosis of thyroid cancer in cytologically indeterminate c...

  12. Adjuvant Therapy of Colon Cancer: Current Status and Future Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Options for the adjuvant therapy of resected stage III colon cancer have expanded beyond the previously well-accepted standard of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with leucovorin. The Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT) study confirmed that capecitabine (Xeloda) is at least as effective and is less toxic than a bolus 5-FU and leucovorin regimen for patients with stage III colon cancer. This study, in addition to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) C-06, which...

  13. ALK in Lung Cancer: Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, scientists discovered that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements are present in a small subset of non–small-cell lung cancers. ALK-positive cancers are highly sensitive to small-molecule ALK kinase inhibitors, such as crizotinib. Phase I and II studies of crizotinib in ALK-positive lung cancer demonstrated impressive activity and clinical benefit, leading to rapid US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2011. Although crizotinib induces remissions and extends the l...

  14. Lung cancer epidemiology: contemporary and future challenges worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Didkowska, Joanna; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Mańczuk, Marta; Łobaszewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Over the last century, lung cancer from the rarest of diseases became the biggest cancer killer of men worldwide and in some parts of the world also of women (North America, East Asia, Northern Europe, Australia and New Zealand). In 2012 over 1.6 million of people died due to lung cancer. The cause-effect relationship between tobacco smoking and lung cancer occurrence has been proven in many studies, both ecological and clinical. In global perspective one can see the increasing tobacco consum...

  15. The Current Status and Future Directions of Heavy Charged Particle Therapy in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard P.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chu, William T.; Coutrakon, George B.; Hug, Eugen B.; Kraft, Gerhard; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-03-01

    As aggressive, 3D-conformal treatment has become the clearly accepted goal of radiation oncology, heavy charged-particle treatment with protons and heavier ions has concurrently and relentlessly ascended to the forefront. Protons and helium nuclei, with relatively low linear-energy-transfer (LET) properties, have consistently been demonstrated to be beneficial for aggressive (high-dose) local treatment of many types of tumors. Protons have been applied to the majority of solid tumors, and have reached a high degree of general acceptance in radiation oncology after three decades and 55,000 patients treated. However, some 15% to 20% of tumor types have proven resistant to even the most aggressive low-LET irradiation. For these radio-resistant tumors, treatment with heavier ions (e.g., carbon) offers great potential benefit. These high-LET particles have increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) that reaches its maximum in the Bragg peak. Irradiation with these heavier ions offers the unique combination of excellent 3D-dose distribution and increased RBE. We are presently witnessing several, important parallel developments in particle therapy. Protons will likely continue their exponential growth phase, and more compact design systems will make protons available to a larger patient population—thus becoming the "heavy charged particle of choice" for Cancer Centers with limited financial resources. In parallel, major academic efforts will further advance the field of heavier ion therapy, exploring all opportunities for particle treatment and continuing the search for the ideal particle(s) for specific tumors. The future of ion therapy will be best realized by clinical trials that have ready access to top-quality delivery of both protons and heavier ions that can be accurately shaped for treatment of a specific pathology, and which will permit direct randomized-trial comparison of the effectiveness of the various ions for different diseases. Optimal results

  16. Psychological Issues in Cancer Genetics: Current Research and Future Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Penelope

    1997-01-01

    Data concerning the psychological impact of high risk of cancer are reviewed, including implications of genetic testing, breast screening,and accuracy of women's risk estimates. Work in progress on prophylactic mastectomy and chemoprevention is reviewed. Research on cancer families, and interventions and prevention strategies for high-risk…

  17. Stomach Cancer Mortality in The Future: Where Are We Going?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Amiri (Masoud)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGastric cancer mortality has been fallen throughout Europe during the past decades in terms of both incidence and mortality rates. It is mainly as a result of remarkable improvement of life conditions in European societies. Efforts to reduce global cancer disparities begin with an unders

  18. Pancreatic Cancer: Updates on Translational Research and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos G Sarris

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies with a mortality rate almost equal to its incidence. It is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and despite intensive basic and clinical research over the last few years, the survival benefit for the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is still disappointing. Due to the absence of specific symptoms and the lack of early detection tests, pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced inoperrable stage and palliative chemotherapy with the purine analogue gemcitabine in combination with the targeted agent erlotinib, remains the mainstay method in the management of these patients. Therefore, there is an imperative need for new findings in the translational research field with prognostic, predictive and therapeutic value. In this paper we summarize five most interesting research abstracts as presented at the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. In particular, we focus on Abstract #141 which investigates the interaction between liver and pancreatic organ damage in patients with pancreatic cancer and the potential contribution of the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3 gene variation in pancreatic cancer development and on Abstract #149, in which, the prognostic and predictive role of SWI/SNF complex, a chromatin-remodeling complex, is examined. The key role of pharmacogenomics, in terms of predicting response and resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer patients, is analyzed in Abstract #142 and the contribution of circulating tumor cell detection in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, allowing the avoidance of more invasive procedures like EUS-FNA, is discussed in Abstract #157. Lastly, in Abstract #164, the diagnostic utility of YKL-40 and IL-6 in pancreatic cancer patients is investigated.

  19. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  20. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  1. Lung cancer epidemiology: contemporary and future challenges worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkowska, Joanna; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Mańczuk, Marta; Łobaszewski, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Over the last century, lung cancer from the rarest of diseases became the biggest cancer killer of men worldwide and in some parts of the world also of women (North America, East Asia, Northern Europe, Australia and New Zealand). In 2012 over 1.6 million of people died due to lung cancer. The cause-effect relationship between tobacco smoking and lung cancer occurrence has been proven in many studies, both ecological and clinical. In global perspective one can see the increasing tobacco consumption trend followed by ascending trends of lung cancer mortality, especially in developing countries. In some more developed countries, where the tobacco epidemics was on the rise since the beginning of the 20th century and peaked in its mid, in male population lung cancer incidence trend reversed or leveled off. Despite predicted further decline of incidence rates, the absolute number of deaths will continue to grow in these countries. In the remaining parts of the world the tobacco epidemics is still evolving what brings rapid increase of the number of new lung cancer cases and deaths. Number of lung cancer deaths worldwide is expected to grow up to 3 million until 2035. The figures will double both in men (from 1.1 million in 2012 to 2.1 million in 2035) and women (from 0.5 million in 2012 to 0.9 million in 2035) and the two-fold difference between sexes will persist. The most rapid increase is expected in Africa region (AFRO) and East Mediterranean region (EMRO). The increase of the absolute number of lung cancer deaths in more developed countries is caused mostly by population aging and in less developed countries predominantly by the evolving tobacco epidemic.

  2. Colorectal cancer management in Poland: current improvements and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly identified malignant neoplasm diagnosed in men (12% of total cancers) and women (11%) in Poland, while CRC mortality is second in men (10.1%) and third in women (11.2%). The main reasons for increasing incidence and mortality are an aging population and an increase in environmental and lifestyle factors which may lead to cancer. In Poland there is a lack of historical (regularly published and accessible) data on cancer morbidity and survival rates. The Oncology Centre published cancer data for the first time in February 2009 the 2006, which, also for the first time, embraced the entire country. Oncology data collection in Poland is based on a network of 16 Regional Cancer Registries reporting to the Polish National Cancer Registry in Warsaw. An additional source of oncology data is the National Health Fund and the Central Statistical Office. The National Cancer Programme (2005) provides funding at ca 780 million euro, which includes amongst others the Early CRC Detection Programme to promote a free screening colonoscopy. Oncology services in Poland are funded almost entirely by public resources--the national budget as sustained by tax revenues (Ministry of Health) and the National Health Fund as sustained by the obligatory public health insurance contribution. Oncology expenditure covered by the national budget (Ministry of Health) and the National Cancer Programme in 2006 amounted to 44.8 million euro and 105.2 million euro, respectively. All these preventive, curative and organizational efforts have significantly improved access to efficient therapies (including radiotherapy) and diagnostic procedures in recent years in Poland, although, clearly, a lot remains to be done.

  3. Angiogenesis Inhibition in Prostate Cancer: Current Uses and Future Promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny B. Aragon-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been well recognized as a fundamental part of a multistep process in the evolution of cancer progression, invasion, and metastasis. Strategies for inhibiting angiogenesis have been one of the most robust fields of cancer investigation, focusing on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family and its receptors. There are numerous regulatory drug approvals to date for the use of these agents in treating a variety of solid tumors. While therapeutic efficacy has been established, challenges remain with regards to overcoming resistance and assessing response to antiangiogenic therapies. Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among American men and angiogenesis plays a role in disease progression. The use of antiangiogenesis agents in prostate cancer has been promising and is hereby explored.

  4. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Definition, Needs, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Colin; Serge Mordon; Pierre Nevoux; Mohammed Feras Marqa; Adil Ouzzane; Philippe Puech; Gregory Bozzini; Bertrand Leroux; Arnauld Villers; Nacim Betrouni

    2012-01-01

    Current challenges and innovations in prostate cancer management concern the development of focal therapies that allow the treatment of only the cancer areas sparing the rest of the gland to minimize the potential morbidity. Among these techniques, focal laser ablation (FLA) appears as a potential candidate to reach the goal of focusing energy delivery on the identified targets. The aim of this study is to perform an up-to-date review of this new therapeutic modality. Relevant literature was ...

  5. Cancer Stem Cells – Basics, Progress and Future Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Bapat S.A

    2010-01-01

    The primary characteristics of adult stem cells are maintaining prolonged quiescence, ability to self-renew and plasticity to differentiate into multiple cell types. These properties are evolutionarily conserved from fruit fly to humans. Similar to normal tissue repair in organs, the stem cell concept is inherently impregnated in the etiology of cancer. Tumors contain a minor population of tumor-initiating cells, called "cancer stem cells" that maintain some similarities in self-renewal and d...

  6. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of prostate cancer: Past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Mearini, Luigi; Porena, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Upon a review of recently published articles on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of prostate cancer, we evaluated the current status of HIFU as a primary treatment option for localized prostate cancer and its use as salvage therapy when radiation failed. We also briefly discuss current issues in indications, definition of response, and finally the future of HIFU development.

  7. The past and future impact of next-generation sequencing in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    N. Sethi; MacLennan, K; Wood, HM; Rabbitts, P

    2016-01-01

    Progress in sequencing technology is intrinsically linked to progress in understand cancer genomics. This review aims to discuss the development from Sanger sequencing to next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. We highlight the technical considerations for understanding reports using NGS. We discuss the findings of studies in head and neck cancer using NGS as well as the Cancer Genome Atlas. Finally we discuss future routes for research utilising this methodology and the potential impact...

  8. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been an National Health Service (NHS) improvement clinical leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre and Hillingdon Hospital where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. She is a senior Clinical Lecturer at University College London and Visiting Professor in Cancer and Supportive Care at the Centre for Complexity Management at the University of Hertfordshire. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative Consequences of Treatment work stream. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as a part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health

  9. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been a National Health Service (NHS) Improvement Clinical Leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College Of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the 'National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, consequences of treatment work stream'. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on Cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was as Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health advisory committees. She has previously worked on a number of national projects, including leading the Department of Health's response to the Shipman Enquiry, undertaking a review of specialist public health for

  10. Courting the future: cancer and genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Describing this double issue of MEDICC Review could be an exercise for a first-year philosophy course in logic. It's not about "cancer and genetics" in Cuba. It's about cancer in Cuba and about genetics in Cuba, not about exploring relationships between them. Nevertheless, while the marriage of the two themes was fortuitous, in that the two had long been scheduled for the journal in 2014, there is a certain felicity to their sharing an issue. To date, the outstanding accomplishments of genetics have been most helpful for conditions occurring at the beginning of life and cancer is largely (though not exclusively) a disease related to aging. But the two are intrinsically connected: Although only a few of the more than 100 different diseases grouped under the term cancer are known to be hereditary, every cancer begins with a mutation in one or more genes, whether the mutation is inherited, due to an exposure, or is simply a random error in the millions of cell divisions that are part and parcel of cellular reproduction. Our cover image, a stained-glass window by Cuban artist Rosa María de la Terga at Cuba's National Medical Genetics Center, illustrates the elegance of the DNA molecule, the intricate key to life.

  11. Diet, nutrition, and cancer: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Susan T; Playdon, Mary C; Rock, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    Despite the potentially important roles of diet and nutrition in cancer prevention, the evidence to support these roles is widely perceived by the public and health professionals as being inconsistent. In this Review, we present the issues and challenges in conducting and interpreting diet-cancer research, including those relating to the design of epidemiological studies, dietary data collection methods, and factors that affect the outcome of intervention trials. Approaches to improve effect estimates, such as the use of biomarkers to improve the accuracy of characterizing dietary exposures, are also discussed. Nutritional and dietary patterns are complex; therefore, the use of a reductionist approach to investigations, by focusing on specific nutrients, can produce misleading information. The effects of tumour heterogeneity and the failure to appreciate the nonlinear, U-shaped relationship between micronutrients and cancer in both observational studies and clinical trials are discussed. New technologies and investigational approaches are enabling the exploration of complex interactions between genetic, epigenetic, metabolic, and gut-microbial processes that will inform our knowledge of the diet-cancer relationship. Communicating the status of the evolving science in the context of the overall scientific evidence base, and evidence-based dietary recommendations for cancer prevention, should be emphasized in guidance for the public and for individual patients. PMID:26951041

  12. Green Marketing Mix: A Review of Literature and Direction for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Kumar; Bhimrao Ghodeswar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a systematic review of literature in green marketing domain and to propose directions for future research. Green marketing issues are delineated from literature extending marketing orientation and marketing mix frameworks. As society becomes more concerned with the natural environment, businesses modify their behaviour in an attempt to address society's concerns. Based on the literature review, the conceptual review and direction for futu...

  13. A Comment on "The Far Future of Exoplanet Direct Characterization" - the Case for Interstellar Space Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Following on from ideas presented in a recent paper by Schneider et al. (2010) on "The Far Future of Exoplanet Direct Characterization", I argue that they have exaggerated the technical obstacles to performing such 'direct characterization' by means of fast (order 0.1c) interstellar space probes. A brief summary of rapid interstellar spaceflight concepts that may be found in the literature is presented. I argue that the presence of interstellar dust grains, while certainly something which wil...

  14. Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches to Chronic Pain: Recent Advances and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews and highlights recent research advances and future research directions concerned with behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches to chronic pain. Reviews assessment research on studies of social context of pain, relationship of chronic pain to depression, cognitive variables affecting pain, and comprehensive assessment measures.…

  15. Review of Current Studies in Instructional Design Theory in Korea: Major Trends and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Yeon, Eunkyoung

    2009-01-01

    This article reviewed recent studies of instructional design theory in Korea to explore major trends and suggest future directions. Based on the analysis of 40 articles from the "Journal of Educational Technology" between 1994 and 2006, this study identified six trends: little emphasis on the conceptualization of instructional design theory;…

  16. Social network analysis for technology-enhanced learning: review and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory; Ullmann, Thomas; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Cela, Karina; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sie, R. L. L., Ullmann, T. D., Rajagopal, K., Cela, K., Bitter-Rijpkema, M., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Social network analysis for technology-enhanced learning: review and future directions. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(3/4), 172-190.

  17. Teaching and Learning Vocabulary in a Second Language: Past, Present and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiguashca, Raffaella Uslenghi

    1993-01-01

    In a review of two decades of vocabulary research, it is noted that vocabulary has moved from "poor relation" to "guest of honor" status in language teaching. Research areas include specialized bibliographies, vocabulary acquisition, vocabulary teaching, course materials, and lexicography. Future research directions are suggested, including…

  18. Collection Directions: Some Reflections on the Future of Library Collections and Collecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Lorcan; Malpas, Constance; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models. The authors look at the changing dynamics of print collections, at the greater engagement with research and learning behaviors, and at trends in scholarly communication. The goal is…

  19. 75 FR 9232 - Measuring Progress on Food Safety: Current Status and Future Directions; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Measuring Progress on Food Safety: Current Status and Future Directions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  20. 75 FR 37752 - Measuring Progress on Food Safety: Current Status and Future Directions; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Update is communicated via Listserv, a free electronic mail subscription service for industry, trade... Food Safety and Inspection Service Measuring Progress on Food Safety: Current Status and Future Directions; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public...

  1. Early Childhood Inclusion in the United States: Goals, Current Status, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Bruder, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    The current status and future directions of early childhood inclusion in the United States are discussed from the perspective of 4 key goals: access, accommodations and feasibility, developmental progress, and social integration. Recommendations are put forward to promote inclusion goals emphasizing administrative structures, personnel…

  2. Future Directions in Etiologic, Prevention, and Treatment Research for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; South, Kelsey; Shaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred regarding the understanding of etiologic processes that give rise to eating disorders and the design and evaluation of efficacious prevention programs and treatment interventions. Herein we offer suggestions regarding potentially fruitful directions for future research in these areas. We suggest it would be…

  3. Prognostic factors in ovarian cancer : current evidence and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, APG; Boezen, HM; Schouten, JP; Arts, HJG; Hofstra, RMW; Willemse, PHB; de Vries, EGE; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    In ovarian cancer, translational research on the prognostic impact of molecular biological factors has until now not led to clinical implementation of any of these factors. This is partly due to the often conflicting results of different prognostic factor studies on the same molecular biological fac

  4. Future cancer treatment using antiparticles form the exotic "antiworld"

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "An international research team has taken the first, but nevertheless promisiong step towards a new form of radiotherapy for cancer. This team includes scientists at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Aarhus, as well as the Department of Medical Physics and the Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, the Aarhus University Hospital." (1 page)

  5. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Definition, Needs, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Colin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current challenges and innovations in prostate cancer management concern the development of focal therapies that allow the treatment of only the cancer areas sparing the rest of the gland to minimize the potential morbidity. Among these techniques, focal laser ablation (FLA appears as a potential candidate to reach the goal of focusing energy delivery on the identified targets. The aim of this study is to perform an up-to-date review of this new therapeutic modality. Relevant literature was identified using MEDLINE database with no language restrictions (entries: focal therapy, laser interstitial thermotherapy, prostate cancer, FLA and by cross-referencing from previously identified studies. Precision, real-time monitoring, MRI compatibility, and low cost of integrated system are principal advantages of FLA. Feasibility and safety of this technique have been reported in phase I assays. FLA might eventually prove to be a middle ground between active surveillance and radical treatment. In conclusion, FLA may have found a role in the management of prostate cancer. However, further trials are required to demonstrate the oncologic effectiveness in the long term.

  6. Haemostatic alterations in colorectal cancer: perspectives for future treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The role of the haemostatic system in colorectal cancer (CRC) is reviewed. Correlations between the activation of the haemostatic system and overall survival have been suggested. Experimental studies indicate that the haemostatic system plays a key role in growth, invasion and dissemination of tu...

  7. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharski, Leo R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  8. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms.

  9. Multigene prognostic tests in breast cancer: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Balázs; Hatzis, Christos; Sanft, Tara; Hofstatter, Erin; Aktas, Bilge; Pusztai, Lajos

    2015-01-27

    There is growing consensus that multigene prognostic tests provide useful complementary information to tumor size and grade in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers. The tests primarily rely on quantification of ER and proliferation-related genes and combine these into multivariate prediction models. Since ER-negative cancers tend to have higher proliferation rates, the prognostic value of current multigene tests in these cancers is limited. First-generation prognostic signatures (Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, Genomic Grade Index) are substantially more accurate to predict recurrence within the first 5 years than in later years. This has become a limitation with the availability of effective extended adjuvant endocrine therapies. Newer tests (Prosigna, EndoPredict, Breast Cancer Index) appear to possess better prognostic value for late recurrences while also remaining predictive of early relapse. Some clinical prediction problems are more difficult to solve than others: there are no clinically useful prognostic signatures for ER-negative cancers, and drug-specific treatment response predictors also remain elusive. Emerging areas of research involve the development of immune gene signatures that carry modest but significant prognostic value independent of proliferation and ER status and represent candidate predictive markers for immune-targeted therapies. Overall metrics of tumor heterogeneity and genome integrity (for example, homologue recombination deficiency score) are emerging as potential new predictive markers for platinum agents. The recent expansion of high-throughput technology platforms including low-cost sequencing of circulating and tumor-derived DNA and RNA and rapid reliable quantification of microRNA offers new opportunities to build extended prediction models across multiplatform data.

  10. Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables and future cancer incidence in selected European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Oomen, Dian; Lemmens, Valery; Oenema, Anke; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Barendregt, Jan; de Vries, Esther

    2010-09-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death in western countries. Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of cancers of the oropharynx, oesophagus, lung, stomach and colorectum. We investigated the potential effect of interventions aimed at increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables to the recommended level (500 g/d) on future cancer incidence in Europe. Data on cancer incidence and daily intake of fruit and vegetables were compiled for France, Germany, The Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. We also performed a meta-analysis of European observational studies to arrive at a quantitative estimate on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and cancer risk. Predictions on the future cancer incidence were modelled using PREVENT 3.01. Our study predicted 212,000 fruit- and vegetable-related cancer cases in these countries in 2050, out of which 398 (0.19%) might be prevented if the 500 g/d fruit and vegetable intake were achieved in the aforementioned countries. The largest absolute impact was observed for lung cancer with 257 (out of 136,517) preventable cases if the intervention was successfully implemented. Sweden would benefit the most from intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption with a 2% reduction in expected cases. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption has a small impact on reducing the burden of cancer in Europe. Health impact assessment tools such as PREVENT can provide the basis for decision making in chronic disease prevention.

  11. The new biology of cancer: future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, J W

    1989-06-01

    Our recognition that cancer evolves by clonal selection and that the basis for this selection is the growth advantage provided by the inappropriate expression or suppression of genes present in all normal cells allows us to anticipate that the pathways of this evolutionary process may be discovered. If a finite number of such pathways exist with some commonality between various tumors, there is the possibility to anticipate the mechanisms that cell clones might use for both carcinogenesis and tumor progression and to deal with evolving clones before their survival potential becomes overwhelming. As our biochemical understanding increases we may develop the capability to do the following: to identify individuals who have inherited or acquired defective cancer suppressor genes; to identify precursor lesions more exactly; to characterize the degree of progression of a newly diagnosed tumor (has the metastatic phenotype evolved?); to develop antibodies against cell membrane proteins necessary to tumor progression; to produce immune probes that carry cytotoxins or isotopes to specific cell populations; and to take advantage of cell signals to modify tumor growth. The potential for application of the New Biology to cancer medicine seems endless.

  12. Application of Quantum Dots-Based Biotechnology in Cancer Diagnosis: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Peng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs have excellent photo-physical properties, and the QDs-based probes have achieved encouraging developments in cellular and in vivo molecular imaging. More and more researches showed that QDs-based technology may become a promising approach in cancer research. In this review, we focus on recent application of QDs in cancer diagnosis and treatment, including early detection of primary tumor such as ovarian cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer and pancreatic cancer, as well as regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. With the development of QDs synthesis and modification, the effect of QDs on tumor metastasis investigation will become more and more important in the future.

  13. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  14. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed.

  15. Testing keV sterile neutrino dark matter in future direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Miguel D

    2016-01-01

    We determine constraints on sterile neutrino warm dark matter through direct detection experiments, taking XENON100 and its future stages as example. If keV-scale sterile neutrinos scatter inelastically with bound electrons of the target material, an electron recoil signal is generated. This can be used to set limits on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active sector. While not competitive with astrophysical constraints from X-ray data, the constraints are the first direct laboratory bounds on sterile neutrino warm dark matter, and will be in some parts of parameter space the strongest limits on keV-scale neutrinos.

  16. Projecting prevalence by stage of care for prostate cancer and estimating future health service needs: protocol for a modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xue Q; Smith, David P; Clements, Mark S.; Patel, Manish I.; McHugh, Bill; O'Connell, Dianne L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Current strategies for the management of prostate cancer are inadequate in Australia. We will, in this study, estimate current service needs and project the future needs for prostate cancer patients in Australia. Methods and analysis First, we will project the future prevalence of prostate cancer for 2010–2018 using data for 1972–2008 from the New South Wales (NSW) Central Cancer Registry. These projections, based on modelled incidence and survival estimates, will be estimated us...

  17. Does direct cash flow presentation help in predicting future operating cash flow?

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Flavio Manuel Vilas-Boas

    2012-01-01

    Research literature and regulators are unconditional in pointing the disclosure of operating cash flow through direct method a section of unique information. Besides the intuitive facet, it is also consistent in forecasting future operating cash flows and a cohesive piece to financial statement puzzle. Bearing this in mind, I produce an analysis on the usefulness and predictive ability on the disclosure of gross cash receipts and payments over the disclosure of reconciliation between net inco...

  18. Future directions for a critical social psychology of racism/antiracism

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth, Caroline; Hook, Derek

    2005-01-01

    A variety of possible future directions for a critical psychology of racism/antiracism may assist us in avoiding the trappings of conceptual/methodological homogeneity and disciplinary insularity. Greater reference to the literature of fiction, to the epistemological domain of the aesthetic, may benefit us given that it permits different positionings, imaginings and modes of self-reflection than afforded within the strict truth-conditions of mainstream social science practice. We stand also t...

  19. Informal interactions between audit committees and internal audit functions: exploratory evidence and directions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbub Zaman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:This paper recognises the importance of informal processes within corporate governance and complements existing research in this area by investigating factors associated with the existence of informal interactions between audit committees and internal audit functions and in providing directions for future research.Design/Methodology/Approach:To examine the existence and drivers of informal interactions between audit committees and internal audit functions, this paper relies on a quest...

  20. Future Direction Of Real Estate Education For The Certificate Programs At National Institute Of Valuation (INSPEN)

    OpenAIRE

    M.Haris Yop

    2015-01-01

    Real estate education is a unique program specifically develops to educate and equip students with strong knowledge and principle of Real Estate that lead to and sustain a productive Real Estate based career in future. The direction of real estate education necessitates an important emphasis on the managerial, empirical and decision-making aspects of the respective industry. INSPEN is established with a function to execute educational programs with a particular emphasis on the needs and wants...

  1. Future Directions for Research on the Development and Prevention of Early Conduct Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes our state of knowledge regarding the development and prevention of conduct problems in early childhood, then identifies directions that would benefit future basic and applied research. Our understanding about the course and risk factors associated with early-developing conduct problems has been significantly enhanced during the past three decades; however, many challenges remain in understanding the development of early conduct problems for girls, the contribution of pove...

  2. Future Directions in Studies on Student Perception of Teacher Written Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui

    2015-01-01

    Teacher feedback plays a key role in teaching second language writing. Though teachers have devoted a great deal of time to giving written feedback to L2 students, some students complained that they benefit little from written feedback. This study reviews research on the effectiveness of teacher written feedback in ESL context or EFL context in United States, and tries to sug⁃gest future direction in further research.

  3. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  4. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Turner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  5. Reactivity of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Lung Cancer Antigens with Human Lung, Breast and Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Schumacher

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A panel of monoclonal antibodies (n=72 including controls directed against lung cancer antigens was screened immunohistochemically against a panel of seven human lung cancer cell lines (including small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma, six human breast cancer cell lines and one human colon cancer cell line, The majority of the antibodies (n=42 reacted also with antigens present on breast and colon cancer cell lines, This cross reactivity especially between lung and breast cancer cell lines is not altogether unexpected since antigens common to breast and lung tissue including their neoplasms such as MUC1 antigen have been described, Our results indicate that epitopes shared by lung and breast cancers are probably more common than previously thought. The relevance for prognosis and therapy of these shared antigens, especially as disease markers in breast cancer, has to be investigated.

  6. Quantum Dots for Cancer Research: Current Status, Remaining Issues, and Future Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a major threat to public health in the 21st century because it is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis, cancer invasion, and metastasis remain unclear. Thus, the development of a novel approach for cancer detection is urgent, and real-time monitoring is crucial in revealing its underlying biological mechanisms. With the optical and chemical advantages of quantum dots (QDs), QD-based nanotechnology is helpful in constructing a biomedical imaging platform for cancer behavior study. This review mainly focuses on the application of QD-based nanotechnology in cancer cell imaging and tumor microenvironment studies both in vivo and in vitro, as well as the remaining issues and future perspectives

  7. Status and future of the direct sales market; CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuMaresq, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Three topics of interest concerning the direct purchase of natural gas, were discussed. The three topics were: (1) the Ontario market, past, present and future, along with an analysis of market segmentation, (2) Ontario local distribution companies (LDC) separation, or separating the merchant role from the distribution role, and (3) the status of direct purchase in Alberta. Changes in the natural gas market since deregulation in 1985, were also reviewed. It was noted that today, only a handful of agents, brokers and marketers of natural gas are vying for the market; customers are looking to purchase gas at a price lower than the LDC buy/sell price; and there is pressure for the LDCs to separate the merchant functions from the distribution functions in most of the provinces in Canada. The direct and long term impact of these developments will be to enhance competition among distributors.

  8. Current state and future prospects of direct-to-consumer (DTC pharmacogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Wee eChua

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct-to-consumer (DTC DNA testing has grown from contentious beginnings into a global industry, by providing a wide range of personal genomic information directly to its clients. These companies, typified by the well-established 23andMe, generally carry out a gene-chip analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using DNA extracted from a saliva sample. These genetic data are then assimilated and provided direct to the client, with varying degrees of interpretation. Although much debate has focused on the limitations and ethical aspects of providing genotypes for disease risk alleles, the provision of pharmacogenetic results by DTC companies is less studied. We set out to evaluate current DTC pharmacogenetics offerings, and then to consider how these services might best evolve and adapt in order to play a potentially useful future role in delivery of personalized medicine.

  9. A Review of Barriers to Minorities' Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials: Implications for Future Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ali; Nguyen, Claire; Lee, Yi-Hui; Cooksey-James, Tawna

    2016-04-01

    To enhance nurses' awareness and competencies in practice and research by reporting the common barriers to participation of minorities in cancer clinical trials and discussing facilitators and useful strategies for recruitment. Several databases were searched for articles published in peer reviewed journals. Some of the barriers to minorities' participation in clinical trials were identified within the cultural social-context of cancer patients. The involvement of community networking was suggested as the most effective strategy for the recruitment of minorities in cancer clinical trials. Using culturally sensitive approaches to enhance ethnic minorities' participation is important for advancing cancer care and eliminating health disparities. Awareness of barriers and potential facilitators to the enrollment of ethnic minority cancer patients may contribute to enhancing nurses' competencies of recruiting ethnic minorities in nursing research, playing efficient roles in cancer clinical trials team, and providing culturally competent quality care. PMID:25822567

  10. Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Current and Future Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D. Rapidis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are at considerable risk for death, with 5-year relative survival rates of approximately 60%. The profound multifaceted deficiencies in cell-mediated immunity that persist in most patients after treatment may be related to the high rates of treatment failure and second primary malignancies. Radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy commonly have severe acute and long-term side effects on immune responses. The development of immunotherapies reflects growing awareness that certain immune system deficiencies specific to HNSCC and some other cancers may contribute to the poor long-term outcomes. Systemic cell-mediated immunotherapy is intended to activate the entire immune system and mount a systemic and/or locoregional antitumor response. The delivery of cytokines, either by single cytokines, for example, interleukin-2, interleukin-12, interferon-, interferon-, or by a biologic mix of multiple cytokines, such as IRX-2, may result in tumor rejection and durable immune responses. Targeted immunotherapy makes use of monoclonal antibodies or vaccines. All immunotherapies for HNSCC except cetuximab remain investigational, but a number of agents whose efficacy and tolerability are promising have entered phase 2 or phase 3 development.

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy in cancer: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, Mario A.; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Juvenal, Guilermo J. [National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Div. of Nuclear Biochemistry; University of Buenos Aires (Argentina). School of Medicine. Dept. of Human Biochemistry

    2007-07-15

    Undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UTC) is a very aggressive tumor with no effective treatment, since it lacks iodine uptake and does not respond to radio or chemotherapy. The prognosis of these patients is bad, due to the rapid growth of the tumor and the early development of metastasis. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the selective uptake of certain boron non-radioactive compounds by a tumor, and the subsequent irradiation of the area with an appropriate neutron beam. {sup 10}B is then activated to {sup 11}B, which will immediately decay releasing alpha particles and {sup 7}Li, of high linear energy transfer (LET) and limited reach. Clinical trials are being performed in patients with glioblastoma multiform and melanoma. We have explored its possible application to UTC. Our results demonstrated that a cell line of human UTC has a selective uptake of borophenylalanine (BPA) both in vitro and after transplantation to nude mice. Treatment of mice by BNCT led to a complete control of growth and cure of 100% of the animals. Moreover dogs with spontaneous UTC also have a selective uptake of BPA. At the present we are studying the biodistribution of BPA in patients with UTC before its application in humans. (author)

  12. Future possibilities in the prevention of breast cancer: Fat and fiber and breast cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Prentice, Ross L.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for a reduction in dietary fat or for an increase in dietary fiber to reduce breast cancer risk has been debated for some years. It is argued here that available research data, even though extensive, leave open hypotheses ranging from little or no potential to major public health potential for breast cancer prevention by means of these dietary maneuvers. Some elements of a research strategy for testing these and other dietary breast cancer prevention hypotheses are described.

  13. Direct cancer tissue proteomics: a method to identify candidate cancer biomarkers from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S-I; Thumar, J; Lundgren, D H; Rezaul, K; Mayya, V; Wu, L; Eng, J; Wright, M E; Han, D K

    2007-01-01

    Successful treatment of multiple cancer types requires early detection and identification of reliable biomarkers present in specific cancer tissues. To test the feasibility of identifying proteins from archival cancer tissues, we have developed a methodology, termed direct tissue proteomics (DTP), which can be used to identify proteins directly from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue samples. Using minute prostate biopsy sections, we demonstrate the identification of 428 prostate-expressed proteins using the shotgun method. Because the DTP method is not quantitative, we employed the absolute quantification method and demonstrate picogram level quantification of prostate-specific antigen. In depth bioinformatics analysis of these expressed proteins affords the categorization of metabolic pathways that may be important for distinct stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we validate Wnt-3 as an upregulated protein in cancerous prostate cells by immunohistochemistry. We propose that this general strategy provides a roadmap for successful identification of critical molecular targets of multiple cancer types.

  14. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  15. The past, present, and future of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, M; Shinde, S; Banavali, R

    1999-10-01

    Since the first experiences with direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising in the early 1980s, pharmaceutical marketers, government regulators, researchers, health practitioners, and consumers have been both perplexed and intrigued by this practice. As experience with DTC advertising has expanded, so has knowledge and understanding of its risks and rewards. This article discusses important issues in DTC advertising, such as the effects it may have on the patient-practitioner relationship, the diffusion and adoption of new drugs, prices, and competition. It also discusses the future of DTC advertising. PMID:10566574

  16. Towards a Unified Conceptualization of Reshoring and Insourcing Decisions and Directions for Future Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foerstl, Kai; Kirchoff, Jon; Bals, Lydia

    Recently the reshoring and insourcing decisions are widely discussed within the Purchasing and Supply Management community. With this study we conceptualize the two phenomena in a unified framework and provide grounded theory on their joint and respective drivers. Based on these findings we...... are able to develop an agenda for future research. Implications for further research include the need to clearly differentiate between governance (i.e. insourcing) and location (i.e. reshoring) changes, the need to differentiate between reshoring/insourcing as strategic direction or reaction to failure...

  17. Tom Ten Have's contributions to causal inference and biostatistics: review and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Dylan S; Joffe, Marshall M; Lynch, Kevin G; Roy, Jason A; Russell Localio, A

    2014-09-10

    Tom Ten Have made many contributions to causal inference and biostatistics before his untimely death. This paper reviews Tom's contributions and discusses potential related future research directions. We focus on Tom's contributions to longitudinal/repeated measures categorical data analysis and particularly his contributions to causal inference. Tom's work on causal inference was primarily in the areas of estimating the effect of receiving treatment in randomized trials with nonadherence and mediation analysis. A related area to mediation analysis he was working on at the time of his death was posttreatment effect modification with applications to designing adaptive treatment strategies.

  18. Review of numerical methods for simulation of the aortic root: Present and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Cartier, Raymond; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-05-01

    Heart valvular disease is still one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in develop countries. Numerical modeling has gained considerable attention in studying hemodynamic conditions associated with valve abnormalities. Simulating the large displacement of the valve in the course of the cardiac cycle needs a well-suited numerical method to capture the natural biomechanical phenomena which happens in the valve. The paper aims to review the principal progress of the numerical approaches for studying the hemodynamic of the aortic valve. In addition, the future directions of the current approaches as well as their potential clinical applications are discussed.

  19. Schema therapy for bipolar disorder: a conceptual model and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Lisa D; Provencher, Martin D; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-05-15

    Schema therapy (ST) is an integrative form of psychotherapy developed for complex, chronic psychological disorders with a characterlogical underpinning. Bipolar disorder is just such a disorder--complex and often comorbid, with demonstrated stable cognitive and personality features that complicate the course of illness. This article presents the reasons justifying the application of ST to bipolar disorder and proposes a treatment rationale and future directions for treatment and research. If well adapted to the characteristics of bipolar disorder, ST might prove to be an effective adjunctive psychotherapy option that attenuates emotional reactivity, reduces symptoms and improves quality of life.

  20. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Adam; Alvarez, Manrique; Rodriguez, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Overall, heart disease accounts for about 1 in 4 deaths with coronary heart disease (CHD) being responsible for over 370,000 deaths per year. It has frequently and repeatedly been shown that some minority groups in the USA have higher rates of traditional CHD risk factors, different rates of treatment with revascularization procedures, and excess morbidity and mortality from CHD when compared to the non-Hispanic white population. Numerous investigations have been made into the causes of these disparities. This review aims to highlight the recent literature which examines CHD in ethnic minorities and future directions in research and care.

  1. A study on the establishment of nuclear cooperative relations and future direction between Korea and Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out in order to review the cooperation with Egypt and establish and activate the cooperative relations with Egypt. Recent policy trends in the use and development of nuclear energy in Egypt, were investigated including introduction of nuclear power plant, and cooperative relations between two nations were also established under the implementation of the project. It was agreed through exchanges of visits of nuclear cooperation delegation; 1) exchange of visits of cooperation delegation, 2) invitation of egypt experts to policy seminar 3) cooperation between relevant nuclear related organizations of two countries, 4) future cooperation fields and directions between two countries. It is recommended that cooperation with Egypt be implemented systematically through the long term based on national basic cooperation directions and integrated strategies

  2. A study on the establishment of nuclear cooperative relations and future direction between Korea and Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.; Yun, S. W.; Ko, H. S

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out in order to review the cooperation with Egypt and establish and activate the cooperative relations with Egypt. Recent policy trends in the use and development of nuclear energy in Egypt, were investigated including introduction of nuclear power plant, and cooperative relations between two nations were also established under the implementation of the project. It was agreed through exchanges of visits of nuclear cooperation delegation; 1) exchange of visits of cooperation delegation, 2) invitation of egypt experts to policy seminar 3) cooperation between relevant nuclear related organizations of two countries, 4) future cooperation fields and directions between two countries. It is recommended that cooperation with Egypt be implemented systematically through the long term based on national basic cooperation directions and integrated strategies.

  3. Face-to-face: Changing future teachers through direct service learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Caro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study analyzed the changes in social dispositions of pre-service teachers. These pre-service teachers tutored homeless children in an urban homeless shelter as part of a direct service learning project. Utilizing surveys at the beginning of the study and at the end, and reflective journals of participants, data was analyzed according to changes in the following dispositions: understanding students with social needs, anticipated changes in future teaching dispositions, and anticipated changes in pedagogical approaches. Findings support the need for imbedding direct service learning into teacher preparation programs. KEYWORDSteacher preparation, social dispositions, service-learning, community-based research, civic engagement, community engagement, community partnerships

  4. Association between human papillomavirus vaccine uptake uptake and cervical cancer screening in the Netherlands: Implications for future impact on prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, A.; Wielders, C.C.; Bogaards, J.A.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Greeff, de S.C.; Melker, de H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Several countries recently added human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to cervical cancer screening in the effort to prevent cervical cancer. They include the Netherlands, where both programs are free. To estimate their combined future impact on cancer prevention, information is needed on the assoc

  5. A nano-patterned self assembled monolayer (SAM) rutile titania cancer chip for rapid, low cost, highly sensitive, direct cancer analysis in MALDI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M; Gopal, Judy; Hasan, Nazim; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-12-01

    We developed a cancer chip by nano-patterning a highly sensitive SAM titanium surface capable of capturing and sensing concentrations as low as 10 cancer cells/mL from the environment by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The current approach evades any form of pretreatment and sample preparation processes; it is time saving and does not require the (expensive) conventional MALDI target plate. The home made aluminium (Al) target holder cost, on which we loaded the cancer chips for MALDI-TOF MS analysis, is about 60 USD. While the conventional stainless steel MALDI target plate is more than 700 USD. The SAM surface was an effective platform leading to on-chip direct MALDI-MS detection of cancer cells. We compared the functionality of this chip with the unmodified titanium surfaces and thermally oxidized (TO) titanium surfaces. The lowest detectable concentration of the TO chip was 10(3) cells/mL, while the lowest detectable concentration of the control or unmodified titanium chips was 10(6) cells/mL. Compared to the control surface, the SAM cancer chip showed 100,000 times of enhanced sensitivity and compared with the TO chip, 1000 times of increased sensitivity. The high sensitivity of the SAM surfaces is attributed to the presence of the rutile SAM, surface roughness and surface wettability as confirmed by AFM, XRD, contact angle microscope and FE-SEM. This study opens a new avenue for the potent application of the SAM cancer chip for direct cancer diagnosis by MALDI-TOF MS in the near future.

  6. Constructed wetlands, 1991-2011: a review of research development, current trends, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Wei; Ji, Guodong

    2012-12-15

    This study explores a bibliometric approach to quantitatively evaluate global scientific constructed wetlands research, and statistically assess current trends, and future directions using the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) database from 1991 to 2011. Articles referencing constructed wetlands were analyzed by accessing the following: publication language, output characteristics, publication performance by country and institution, author keywords, title words, and KeyWords Plus. Synthetically analyzing three keyword types, we concluded that the dominant constructed wetlands research hotspots from 1991 to 2011 included water, nutrients, plants, and flow. These four hotspots remained the most dominant research areas throughout our study period, and are predicted to remain the top research emphases in the near future. "Soil" also exhibited a notable increase since 2005, and is likely to become another notable area of research interest in the future. "Phytoremediation" and "horizontal" were not identified in 1991-1995, but exhibited marked increases from 136th (0.5%) and 169th (0.7%) in 1996-2000, to 9th (3.8%) and 11th (4.3%) in 2006-2011, respectively. Therefore, given the heightened attention during the last 15 years, these topics are likely to become a primary research focus in upcoming years.

  7. Status and future directions of InP solar cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current status and future directions of InP space solar cell research is provided. The scope of the paper does not allow us to discuss other recent major developments in InP cell modeling, contacts, and characterization, or developments in other solar cell materials. Solar cells made from InP and related materials are not expected to be used in the near future for terrestrial applications, but significant Air-Mass1.5 (AM1.5) cell efficiencies are given for comparison. This paper deals with the developments in single-junction cells, multijunction tandem cells, and space flight testing, including radiation effects. Concentrator InP solar cells are also discussed, since they offer the possibility of simultaneous thermal and current injection annealing. These cells also promise cost effectiveness and the concentrator elements may provide cells with extra protection from space radiation. The concluding section addresses the steps to be taken in the future and provides guidelines for further research and development.

  8. Present status and future directions of the Mayo/IBM PACS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Richard L.; Forbes, Glenn S.; Gehring, Dale G.; Salutz, James R.; Pavlicek, William

    1991-07-01

    This joint project began in 1988 and was motivated by the need to develop an alternative to the archival process in place at that time (magnetic tape) for magnetic resonance imaging and neurological computed tomography. In addition, this project was felt to be an important step in gaining the necessary clinical experience for the future implementation of various aspects of electronic imaging. The initial phase of the project was conceived and developed to prove the concept, test the fundamental components, and produce performance measurements for future work. The key functions of this phase centered on attachment of imaging equipment (GE Signa) and archival processes using a non-dedicated (institutionally supplied) local area network (LAN). Attachment of imaging equipment to the LAN was performed using commercially available devices (Ethernet, PS/2, Token Ring). Image data were converted to ACR/NEMA format with retention of the vendor specific header information. Performance measurements were encouraging and led to the design of following projects. The second phase has recently been concluded. The major features of this phase have been to greatly expand the network, put the network into clinical use, establish an efficient and useful viewing station, include diagnostic reports in the archive data, provide wide area network (WAN) capability via ISDN, and establish two-way real-time video between remote sites. This phase has heightened both departmental and institutional thought regarding various issues raised by electronic imaging. Much discussion regarding both present as well as future archival processes has occurred. The use of institutional LAN resources has proven to be adequate for the archival function examined thus far. Experiments to date have shown that use of dedicated resources will be necessary for retrieval activities at even a basic level. This report presents an overview of the background present status and future directions of the project.

  9. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  10. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Min Zhu; Li-Hua Yuan; Ke-Feng Pu; Bing Dong; An-Xin Wang; Li-Sha Chen

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell resea...

  11. [Current status and future prospect of internal medicine treatment for advanced esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Fan, Q X

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of common malignant tumors, and the incidence and mortality of EC in China rank the first place in the world. Because of the occult onset, the early atypical symptoms, and the lack of effective early diagnostic methods, most of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease and lost the chance of surgery. Comprehensive treatment including palliative medical treatment, molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy and so on is appropriate for these patients. How to choose the chemotherapy regimen and formulate reasonable treatment plan has become a hot spot in clinical research. Molecular targeted drugs have become a new developmental direction in cancer treatment because of their high specificity and antitumor activity, but the effects on esophageal cancer remain controversial. With the development of immune check point blockade treatment, breakthrough has been made in tumor immunotherapy, which has become an important means in cancer comprehensive treatment and shown a good prospect of treatment.

  12. Pharmacogenomics: Biomarker-Directed Therapy for Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert T; Felsenstein, Kenneth M; Theodorescu, Dan

    2016-02-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has seen little change over the last three decades and there is pressing need to identify more effective treatments for advanced disease. Low clinical use of neoadjuvant therapies stems from historical limitations in the ability to predict patients most likely to respond to combination chemotherapies. This article focuses on recent molecular and genetic studies, highlighting promising clinical trials and retrospective studies, and discusses emerging trials that use predictive biomarkers to match patients with therapies to which they are most likely to respond. The implementation of predictive genomic and molecular biomarkers will revolutionize urologic oncology and the clinical management of bladder cancer.

  13. BRAF-Directed Therapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Kopetz, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Activating BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) mutations occur in approximately 5% to 10% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, mostly V600E mutation, and it is associated with distinct clinical and pathological features. To date, there are no approved treatments to target this mutation. BRAF inhibitor monotherapy has limited efficacy, in contrast to metastatic melanoma. Combination strategies that block not only BRAF mutated kinase but other alternative pathways are ongoing and have demonstrated improved activity. This review aims to provide data about new strategies to target to BRAF gene mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27341594

  14. Therapeutics formulated to target cancer stem cells: Is it in our future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Shaker A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the political, social and financial drives for cancer research, many advances have been made in the treatment of many different cancer types. For example, given the increase in awareness, early detection, and treatment of breast and prostate cancers, we have seen substantial increases in survival rates. Unfortunately there are some realms of cancer that have not seen these substantial advancements, largely due to their rapid progression and the inability to specifically target therapy. The hypothesis that cancers arise from a small population of cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, is gaining more popularity amongst researchers. There are, however, still many skeptics who bring into question the validity of this theory. Many skeptics believe that there is not a specific subset of cells that originate with these characteristics, but that they develop certain features over time making them more resistant to conventional therapy. It is theorized that many of the relapses occurring after remission are due to our inability to destroy the self-renewing CSCs. This central idea, that CSCs are biologically different from all other cancer cells, has directed research towards the development of therapy to target CSCs directly. The major dilemma in targeting therapy in myeloproliferative disorders, malignancies of the central nervous system or malignancies in general, is the inability to target CSCs as opposed to normal stem cells. However, with the recent advances in the identifications of unique molecular signatures for CSCs along with ongoing clinical trials targeting CSCs, it is possible to use targeted nanotechnology-based strategies in the management of different types of cancers.

  15. Risks of online advertisement of direct-to-consumer thermography for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Kimberly M; Liang, Bryan A

    2011-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer online advertising for thermography as a sole agent with which to diagnose breast cancer is misleading and exploits women who are seeking preventive health care for breast cancer. Regulatory action should be taken against companies who continue to mislead the public to ensure patient safety and evidence-based public health information. PMID:22216479

  16. Neural Plasticity following Abacus Training in Humans: A Review and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The human brain has an enormous capacity to adapt to a broad variety of environmental demands. Previous studies in the field of abacus training have shown that this training can induce specific changes in the brain. However, the neural mechanism underlying these changes remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the behavioral and imaging findings of comparisons between abacus experts and average control subjects and focused on changes in activation patterns and changes in brain structure. Finally, we noted the limitations and the future directions of this field. We concluded that although current studies have provided us with information about the mechanisms of abacus training, more research on abacus training is needed to understand its neural impact.

  17. MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH – PART 2: A REVIEW OF MODELS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Oke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In recent years, the research scope of maintenance performance has been greatly expanded due to the pressure on maintenance organizations to deliver fruitful results in the current competitive business environment. In part 1 of this paper, treatment methods and maintenance performance models have been explored. In this concluding paper (part 2, the review further investigates maintenance performance models. The paper offers directions on future research in the area of maintenance performance.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: As gevolg van die ondervinding van verbruikers in die jongste tyd word organisasies wat instandhouding pleeg, genoop om deel te neem aan kontemporêre navorsing, wat belofte op verbeterde vertoning inhou. Die eerste gedeelte van hierdie artikel behandel metodes en modelle wat gebruik word. Die tweede gedeelte gaan dan voort om modelle van instandhoudingsvertoning te ondersoek. Die aangebode stof word ten slotte aangevul met raadgewing oor moontlike toekomstige navorsing.

  18. Neural Plasticity following Abacus Training in Humans: A Review and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxin; Chen, Feiyan; Huang, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    The human brain has an enormous capacity to adapt to a broad variety of environmental demands. Previous studies in the field of abacus training have shown that this training can induce specific changes in the brain. However, the neural mechanism underlying these changes remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the behavioral and imaging findings of comparisons between abacus experts and average control subjects and focused on changes in activation patterns and changes in brain structure. Finally, we noted the limitations and the future directions of this field. We concluded that although current studies have provided us with information about the mechanisms of abacus training, more research on abacus training is needed to understand its neural impact.

  19. Functional connectivity measures as schizophrenia intermediate phenotypes: advances, limitations, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hengyi; Dixson, Luanna; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-02-01

    The search for quantifiable biological mediators of genetic risk or 'intermediate phenotypes' is an essential strategy in psychiatric neuroscience and a useful tool for exploring the complex relationships between genes, neural circuits and behaviors. In recent years, the examination of connectivity-based intermediate phenotypes has gained increasing popularity in the study of schizophrenia, a brain disorder that manifests in early adulthood and disturbs a wide range of neural network functions. To date, several potential connectivity phenotypes have been identified that link neuroimaging measures of neural circuit interaction to genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia. This paper briefly reviews recent advances, current limitations and future directions in the search for functional connectivity intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia across different cognitive domains. PMID:26276700

  20. Ecology of Urban Bees: A Review of Current Knowledge and Directions for Future Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Frankie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban bee ecology is an emerging field that holds promise for advancing knowledge of bee community dynamics and promoting bee conservation. Published studies of bee communities in urban and suburban habitats are fewer than those documenting bees in agricultural and wildland settings. As land lost to urbanization is predicted to increase in coming years the necessity of studying urban bee populations is growing. We reviewed 59 publications on urban bee ecology with the following goals, to assess current knowledge, to highlight areas in need of further research, and to suggest applications of study findings to bee conservation. Identified trends in urban areas included the following, negative correlation between bee species richness and urban development, increase in abundance of cavity-nesters in urban habitats, and scarcity of floral specialists. Future directions for studying urban bee ecology include incorporation of landscape-scale assessments, conducting manipulative experiments and actively designing urban bee habitats.

  1. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert; Knowles, Ben; Marley, Mark; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-10-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet.

  2. Future Directions in the Study of Health Behavior among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Knoll, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The study of health behaviors and fostering health-behavior change is an important endeavor even in old age. The aim of this viewpoint article is threefold. First, we use a broad perspective for the definition of health behaviors to capture all relevant aspects of health-behavior change in older adults. Particularly, we suggest a distinction between proximal (e.g., physical activity) and distal health behaviors (e.g., social participation). Second, we recommend a stronger orientation towards processes in order to study health behaviors and the design of health-behavior change interventions. Third, we review the advantages of a developmental perspective in health psychology. Future directions in the study of health behavior among older adults are discussed. PMID:25660128

  3. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities. PMID:25830576

  4. Competencies conference: future directions in education and credentialing in professional psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J; Borden, Kathi A; Collins, Frank L; Forrest, Linda; Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Nelson, Paul D; Rallo, Joseph S; Vasquez, Melba J T; Willmuth, Mary E

    2004-07-01

    The Competencies Conference: Future Directions in Education and Credentialing in Professional Psychology was organized around eight competency-focused work groups, as well as work groups on specialties and the assessment of competence. A diverse group of psychologists participated in this multisponsored conference. After describing the background and structure of the conference, this article reviews the common themes that surfaced across work groups, with attention paid to the identification, training, and assessment of competencies and competence. Recommendations to advance competency-based education, training, and credentialing in professional psychology are discussed. This is one of a series of articles published together in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology. Several other articles that resulted from the Competencies Conference will appear in Professional Psychology: Research and Practice and The Counseling Psychologist.

  5. A Review of the Construct of Demoralization: History, Definitions, and Future Directions for Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sophie; Kissane, David W; Brooker, Joanne; Burney, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Demoralization has been the subject of discussion in relation to end-of-life care. It is characterized by hopelessness and helplessness due to a loss of purpose and meaning. The purpose of this review was to consolidate the conceptual understanding of demoralization and argue for its existence as a psychiatric syndrome. The history of the construct is explored, including the nature of existential distress and related psychological conditions that precipitate demoralization. Recent definitions of demoralization are described and differentiated from similar constructs. Future directions are highlighted, specifically in relation to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of demoralization in palliative care. Overall, demoralization is a clinically useful construct for those facing existential threat, guiding the clinician toward efforts to restore morale, meaning, and purpose.

  6. Cocaine and mitochondria-related signaling in the brain: A mechanistic view and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is extensively used as a psychostimulant among subjects at different ages worldwide. Cocaine causes neuronal dysfunction and, consequently, negatively affects human behavior and decreases life quality severely. Cocaine acts through diverse mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and activation of cell signaling pathways associated to stress response. There is some controversy regarding the effect of cocaine in inducing cell death through apoptosis in different experimental models. The aim of the present work is to discuss data associated to the mitochondrial consequences of cocaine exposure of mammalian cells in several experimental models from in vitro to in vivo, including postmortem human tissue analyses. Furthermore, future directions are proposed in order to serve as a suggestive guide in relation to the next steps towards the complete elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity elicited by cocaine upon mitochondria of neuronal cells. PMID:26707813

  7. A review of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics: Background, recent developments and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development over the past eight years on local Green's function methods for the high-accuracy, high-efficiency numerical solution of nuclear engineering problems is reviewed. The basic concepts and key ideas are presented by starting with an expository review of the original fully two-dimensional local Green's function methods developed for neutron diffusion and heat conduction, and continuing through the progressively more complicated and more efficient nodal Green's function methods for neutron diffusion, heat conduction and neutron transport to establish the background for the recent development of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics. Some of the impressive numerical results obtained via these classes of methods for nuclear engineering problems are briefly summarized. Finally, speculations are proffered on future directions in which the development of these types of methods in fluid mechanics and other areas might lead. (orig.)

  8. The use of animals in agriculture and science: historical context, international considerations and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayvel, A C D

    2005-08-01

    As the final contribution to this important World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) publication, this paper provides some relevant background and contextual information and identifies a number of strategically significant international activities that will influence the future direction of animal welfare internationally. The assumption of an animal welfare leadership role by the OIE, with the full support of its 167 Member Countries, is an international development of major strategic significance. As an inter-governmental organisation, the OIE is committed to a science-based approach to the development of animal welfare guidelines and standards and to working closely with all stakeholders. This paper covers the use of animals in both agriculture and science, reflecting the OIE's dual remit for both animal health and animal welfare and the importance of animal-based research and testing to the OIE's animal health and reference laboratory roles.

  9. Medical applications of wireless sensor networks - current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Krešimir; Zagar, Drago; Križanović, Višnja

    2012-02-01

    In recent years a significant development of BASN (Body Area Sensor Networks) as a special subclass of WSN (Wireless Sensor Networks) has emerged. These networks have enabled a rapid development of telemedicine systems, which provide remote monitoring of patients and their vital parameters. The article gives a short overview of the BASN networks. Furthermore, a general system architecture of telemedicine systems is proposed. The proposed architecture includes a local sensory area, a communication network area and an institutional network area. It also provides the security and privacy of patient-related data. Furthermore, the article surveys some existing telemedicine systems. Finally, some current problems are explained and the directions for the future development of the telemedicine systems are given. PMID:22634904

  10. Attachment among older adults: current issues and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J M; Cafferty, T P

    2001-09-01

    Although John Bowlby conceptualized attachment theory as applicable across the life span, researchers have been relatively slow to examine attachment phenomena specifically among older adults. The present article reviews the extant research applying attachment theory to older populations; preliminary findings suggest that attachment issues hold particular relevance for older adults, given the increased potential for separation, loss and vulnerability associated with aging. Although many of the studies reviewed are somewhat limited methodologically, the overall pattern of results suggests that attachment patterns are associated with a variety of outcomes in later life (such as adaptation to chronic illness and caregiver burden among family members, reactions to the death of a loved one, and general well-being) in a theoretically consistent manner. The implications of and questions raised by current findings are reviewed, and directions for future research are discussed.

  11. Research on aging in Latin America: Present status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennott-Miller, L

    1994-01-01

    This essay examines the status of aging research in Latin America. It presents a profile of the aging population in the Region in relation to societal institutions, illustrating how the aged are only marginally served by them. Most of the available information is derived from secondary sources and comes from international and national agencies, and private organizations. Data-based research includes small-sample studies of specific issues and country-specific investigations by both U.S. and Latin American researchers. Paradigms used emphasize successful/productive aging, functional ability, and, to a lesser extent, work focused on health conditions or specific situations such as poverty. The best sources of contextual information are often unpublished or not published in the mainstream literature. Future directions recommended include organizing existing data to inform policy, identifying, with Latin American researchers, the most critical research questions, formalizing collaborative relationships, and holding a working conference of those involved in Latin American aging research to develop a future agenda. PMID:24390003

  12. Risk assessment of the impact of future volcanic eruptions on direct normal irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Blanc, Philippe; Vignola, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from Plinian volcanic eruptions affect the solar surface irradiance forcing by scattering the solar radiation as it passes through the Earth atmosphere. Since these aerosols have high single scattering albedos they mostly affect direct normal irradiances (DNI). The effect on global horizontal irradiance (GHI) is less because some of the scattered irradiance reaches the surface as diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) and adds to the GHI. DNI is the essential input to concentrating solar thermal electric power (CSP/STE) and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) plants. Therefore, an assessment of the future potential variability in the DNI resource caused by Plinian volcanic eruptions is desirable. Based on investigations of the El Chichón and Pinatubo eruptions, the microphysical, and thereby optical, properties of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols are well known. Given these, radiative transfer computations of the DNI resource can be made. The DNI resource includes forward scattered irradiance within the acceptance angle of a given CSP/STE or CPV plant. The rarity of Plinian eruptions poses a challenge for assessing the statistical risk of future eruptions and its potential of risk in the electricity production. Here we present and discuss methods to account for these potential volcanic eruptions for technical and economical studies including scenarios with very high probability of exceedance (e.g. P99 scenarios) for risk assessment of DNI-based solar power projects.

  13. Consciousness in humans and non-human animals: Recent advances and future directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eBoly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This joint article reflects the authors’ personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last ten years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical and conceptual insights. These include the evidence for the importance of fronto-parietal connectivity and of feedback processes, both of which enable information to travel across distant cortical areas effectively, as well as numerous dissociations between consciousness and cognitive functions, such as attention, in humans. In addition, we describe the development of mental imagery paradigms, which made it possible to identify covert awareness in non-responsive subjects. Non-human animal consciousness research has also witnessed substantial advances on the specific role of cortical areas and higher order thalamus for consciousness, thanks to important technological advances. In addition, much progress has been made in the understanding of non-vertebrate cognition relevant to possible conscious states. Finally, major advances have been made in theories of consciousness, and also in their comparison with the available evidence. Along with reviewing these findings, each author suggests future avenues for research in their field of investigation.

  14. Direct-Acting Antivirals for the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C: Open Issues and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Bok Chae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, two direct-acting antivirals (DAAs show well-established efficacy against hepatitis C virus (HCV, namely, first-wave protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir. Most clinical trials have examined DAAs in combination with standard of care (SOC regimens. Future therapeutic drugs were divided into three categories. They are second-wave protease inhibitors, second-generation protease inhibitors, and polymerase inhibitors. Second-wave protease inhibitors are more improved form and can be administered once a day. Oral drug combinations can be favored because interferon (IFN not only has to be given as intradermal injection, but also can cause several serious side effects. Combination of drugs with different mechanisms shows a good sustained virological response (SVR. But several mutations are associated with viral resistance to DAAs. Therefore, genotypic resistance data may provide insights into strategies aimed at maximizing SVR rates and minimizing resistance. Combined drug regimens are necessary to prevent the emergence of drug-resistant HCV. Many promising DAA candidates have been identified. Of these, a triple regimen containing sofosbuvir shows promise, and treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir yields a high SVR rate (95%. Oral drug combinations will be standard of care in the near future.

  15. Factors influencing receptivity to future screening options for pancreatic cancer in those with and without pancreatic cancer family history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitkopf Carmen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer (PC is considered the most lethal cancer and approximately 10% of PC is hereditary. The purpose of the study was to assess attitudes of at-risk family members with two or more relatives affected with pancreas cancer (PC toward PC risk and future screening options. Methods At-risk family members and primary care controls were surveyed regarding perceived PC risk, PC worry/concern, attitude toward cancer screening, screening test accuracy, and intentions regarding PC screening via blood testing or more invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS. Results PC family members reported greater perceived risk of PC than controls (54% vs. 6%, respectively, p 89% receptivity to the potential PC screening options presented, though receptivity was greater among PC family members as compared to controls (p  Conclusions Receptivity to screening options for PC appears high. Clinicians should address behavioral and genetic risk factors for PC and foster appropriate concern regarding PC risk among at-risk individuals.

  16. The use of virtual reality in memory rehabilitation: current findings and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B M; Rose, F D

    2003-01-01

    There is considerable potential for using virtual reality (VR) in memory rehabilitation which is only just beginning to be realized. PC-based virtual environments are probably better suited for this purpose than more immersive virtual environments because they are relatively inexpensive and portable, and less frightening to patients. Those exploratory studies that have so far been performed indicate that VR involvement would be usefully directed towards improving assessments of memory impairments and in memory remediation using reorganization techniques. In memory assessment, the use of VR could provide more comprehensive, ecologically-valid, and controlled evaluations of prospective, incidental, and spatial memory in a rehabilitation setting than is possible using standardized assessment tests. The additional knowledge gained from these assessments could more effectively direct rehabilitation towards specific impairments of individual patients. In memory remediation, VR training has been found to promote procedural learning in people with memory impairments, and this learning has been found to transfer to improved real-world performance. Future research should investigate ways in which the procedural knowledge gained during VR interaction can be adapted to offset the many disabilities which result from different forms of memory impairment. PMID:12867677

  17. Gold Nanostructures as a Platform for Combinational Therapy in Future Cancer Therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelveh, Salomeh [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chithrani, Devika B., E-mail: devika.chithrani@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); STTARR Innovation Centre, Toronto Medical Discovery Tower, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-03-04

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshells (GNSs) and gold nanocages (GNCs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options and recent developments in cancer research show that the incorporation of gold nanostructures into these protocols has enhanced tumor cell killing. These nanostructures further provide strategies for better loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. In addition, the heat generation capability of gold nanostructures upon exposure to UV or near infrared light is being used to damage tumor cells locally in photothermal therapy. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. In this review article, the recent progress in the development of gold-based NPs towards improved therapeutics will be discussed. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents, holds an array of promising directions for cancer research.

  18. Gold Nanostructures as a Platform for Combinational Therapy in Future Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomeh Jelveh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs, gold nanorods (GNRs, gold nanoshells (GNSs and gold nanocages (GNCs in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options and recent developments in cancer research show that the incorporation of gold nanostructures into these protocols has enhanced tumor cell killing. These nanostructures further provide strategies for better loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. In addition, the heat generation capability of gold nanostructures upon exposure to UV or near infrared light is being used to damage tumor cells locally in photothermal therapy. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. In this review article, the recent progress in the development of gold-based NPs towards improved therapeutics will be discussed. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents, holds an array of promising directions for cancer research.

  19. Geriatric assessment with management in cancer care: Current evidence and potential mechanisms for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Allore, Heather; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Mohile, Supriya G.; Williams, Grant R.; Chapman, Andrew; Extermann, Martine; Olin, Rebecca L.; Targia, Valerie; Mackenzie, Amy; Holmes, Holly M.; Hurria, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Older adults with cancer represent a complex patient population. Geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended to evaluate the medical and supportive care needs of this group. “GA with management” is a term encompassing the resultant medical decisions and interventions implemented in response to vulnerabilities identified on GA. In older, non-cancer patients, GA with management has been shown to improve a variety of outcomes, such as reducing functional decline and health care utilization. However, the role of GA with management in the older adult with cancer is less well established. Rigorous clinical trials of GA with management are necessary to develop an evidence base and support its use in the routine oncology care of older adults. At the recent U-13 conference, “Design and Implementation of Intervention Studies to Improve or Maintain Quality of Survivorship in Older and/or Frail Adults with Cancer,” a session was dedicated to developing research priorities in GA with management. Here we summarize identified knowledge gaps in GA with management studies for older patients with cancer and propose areas for future research. PMID:27197915

  20. Nanomedicine applied to translational oncology: A future perspective on cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregoli, Lisa; Movia, Dania; Gavigan-Imedio, James D; Lysaght, Joanne; Reynolds, John; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2016-01-01

    The high global incidence of cancer is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity worldwide. By taking advantage of the properties of matter at the nanoscale, nanomedicine promises to develop innovative drugs with greater efficacy and less side effects than standard therapies. Here, we discuss both clinically available anti-cancer nanomedicines and those en route to future clinical application. The properties, therapeutic value, advantages and limitations of these nanomedicine products are highlighted, with a focus on their increased performance versus conventional molecular anticancer therapies. The main regulatory challenges toward the translation of innovative, clinically effective nanotherapeutics are discussed, with a view to improving current approaches to the clinical management of cancer. Ultimately, it becomes clear that the critical steps for clinical translation of nanotherapeutics require further interdisciplinary and international effort, where the whole stakeholder community is involved from bench to bedside. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and finding a cure remains the holy-grail for many researchers and clinicians. The advance in nanotechnology has enabled novel strategies to develop in terms of cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this concise review article, the authors described current capabilities in this field and outlined comparisons with existing drugs. The difficulties in bringing new drugs to the clinics were also discussed. PMID:26370707

  1. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Soon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings.

  2. Geriatric assessment with management in cancer care: Current evidence and potential mechanisms for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Allore, Heather; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Mohile, Supriya G; Williams, Grant R; Chapman, Andrew; Extermann, Martine; Olin, Rebecca L; Targia, Valerie; Mackenzie, Amy; Holmes, Holly M; Hurria, Arti

    2016-07-01

    Older adults with cancer represent a complex patient population. Geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended to evaluate the medical and supportive care needs of this group. "GA with management" is a term encompassing the resultant medical decisions and interventions implemented in response to vulnerabilities identified on GA. In older, non-cancer patients, GA with management has been shown to improve a variety of outcomes, such as reducing functional decline and health care utilization. However, the role of GA with management in the older adult with cancer is less well established. Rigorous clinical trials of GA with management are necessary to develop an evidence base and support its use in the routine oncology care of older adults. At the recent U-13 conference, "Design and Implementation of Intervention Studies to Improve or Maintain Quality of Survivorship in Older and/or Frail Adults with Cancer," a session was dedicated to developing research priorities in GA with management. Here we summarize identified knowledge gaps in GA with management studies for older patients with cancer and propose areas for future research. PMID:27197915

  3. Potential impacts of topography and prevailing wind direction on future precipitation changes in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunematsu, N.; Dairaku, K.; Hirano, J.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate future changes in summertime precipitation amounts over the Japanese islands and their relations to the topographical heights, this study analyzed 20 km horizontal grid-spacing regional climate model downscalings of MIROC3.2-hires 20C3M and SRES-A1B scenario data for the periods of 1981-2000 and 2081-2100. Results indicate the remarkable increases in June-July-August mean daily precipitation in the west and south sides (windward sides) of the mountainous regions, especially in western Japan where heavy rainfall is frequently observed in the recent climate. The remarkable increases in summertime precipitation are likely to occur not only in high altitude areas but also at low altitudes. The occurrence frequencies of precipitation greater than 100 mm/day would also increase in such areas. The intensification of southwesterly moist air flows in the lower troposphere is considered to be one of the main causes of those precipitation changes because the intensified southwesterly moist air flows impinging on the western and southern slopes of the mountains can generate stronger upslope flows and well-developed clouds, leading to increased precipitation. Also, the results show that future precipitation changes in the lee sides of the mountainous regions (e.g., the Tokyo metropolitan area) would be comparatively small. These results indicate large influences of topography and prevailing wind direction on future precipitation changes. Acknowledgments: This study was conducted as part of the research subject "Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in Water Hazard Assessed Using Regional Climate Scenarios in the Tokyo Region' (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; PI: Koji Dairaku) of Research Program on Climate Change Adaptation (RECCA) and was supported by the SOUSEI Program, funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Government of Japan. We thank the regional climate modeling groups (MRI

  4. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from the Eurasian taiga: current knowledge and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Baeck, J. (Dept. of Forest Ecology, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Hakola, H. (Finnish Meteorological Institute, Air Quality Research, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    n this paper, the research conducted on the emissions of the biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from the European boreal zone, or taiga, is reviewed. We highlight the main findings and the key gaps in our knowledge. Ecosystem scale BVOC emissions from the Eurasian taiga are observed to be relatively low as compared with those from some forest ecosystems in warmer climates. One of the distinctive features of the Eurasian taiga is the predominance of monoterpene emitting coniferous trees. Recent research indicates that in addition to evaporation from storage structures, part of the monoterpene emission of conifers originates directly from synthesis. Monoterpene emission from boreal deciduous trees originates mainly directly from synthesis. The boreal trees exhibit distinct intra-species variation in the monoterpene mixtures they emit. Important sources of isoprene in the Eurasian taiga include Norway spruce, open wetland ecosystems and some non-dominant woody species, such as European aspen and willows. Many boreal tree species also emit non-terpenoid compounds and highly reactive sesquiterpenes. The future challenges in the research on BVOC emissions from the Eurasian taiga include (i) quantification and understanding the non-terpenoid VOC emissions from the taiga ecosystems, (ii) bringing ecosystems in the eastern Eurasian taiga into the sphere of BVOC emission studies, (iii) establishing long-term ecosystem flux studies combined with plant physiological measurements, and (iv) integrating knowledge and research skills on BVOC synthesis, storages and emissions, land cover changes and atmospheric processes in different spatial and temporal scales in order to better understand the impact of biosphere on atmospheric chemistry and composition in changing climate. (orig.)

  5. Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-a Defined Future Using Lessons From Other Cancers: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Chari, Suresh T; Maitra, Anirban; Srivastava, Sudhir; Cleeter, Deborah F; Go, Vay Liang W; Rothschild, Laura J; Goldberg, Ann E

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of effective early detection programs has significantly improved treatment, prognosis, and life expectancy in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Early-detection methods need to be developed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), where progress during the past decades has remained slow. Addressing this need, the forum "Early Detection: Lessons Learned from Other Cancers" was held in November 2015 and presented by the Kenner Family Research Fund in partnership with the American Pancreatic Association. Leading experts from breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers described the development of early detection methods in their respective fields. Emerging opportunities for scientific advancement were subsequently identified that hold the greatest promise for the future of early detection in PDAC, including a 4-part strategic map of necessary actionable items. Knowledge from other fields must be applied to achieve large-scale change within the arena of PDAC. A major breakthrough in early detection of PDAC will occur only through a definitive interdisciplinary collaborative effort involving a critical mass of committed academic research institutions, government agencies, industry leaders, and philanthropies. PMID:27518362

  6. Social networks and future direction for obesity research: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Redeker, Nancy; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant efforts to decrease obesity rates, the prevalence of obesity continues to increase in the United States. Obesity risk behaviors including physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, and sleep deprivation are intertwined during daily life and are difficult to improve in the current social environment. Studies show that social networks-the thick webs of social relations and interactions-influence various health outcomes, such as HIV risk behaviors, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, and cardiovascular mortality; however, there is limited information on the influences of social networks on obesity and obesity risk behaviors. Given the complexities of the biobehavioral pathology of obesity and the lack of clear evidence of effectiveness and sustainability of existing interventions that are usually focused on an individual approach, targeting change in an individual's health behaviors or attitude may not take sociocontextual factors into account; there is a pressing need for a new perspective on this problem. In this review, we evaluate the literature on social networks as a potential approach for obesity prevention and treatment (i.e., how social networks affect various health outcomes), present two major social network data analyses (i.e., egocentric and sociometric analysis), and discuss implications and the future direction for obesity research using social networks. PMID:25982770

  7. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested. PMID:26463064

  8. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  9. Present Challenges, Critical Needs, and Future Technological Directions for NASA's GN and C Engineering Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently undergoing a substantial redirection. Notable among the changes occurring within NASA is the stated emphasis on technology development, integration, and demonstration. These new changes within the Agency should have a positive impact on the GN&C discipline given the potential for sizeable investments for technology development and in-space demonstrations of both Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) systems and Autonomous Precision Landing (APL) systems. In this paper the NASA Technical Fellow for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) provides a summary of the present technical challenges, critical needs, and future technological directions for NASA s GN&C engineering discipline. A brief overview of the changes occurring within NASA that are driving a renewed emphasis on technology development will be presented as background. The potential benefits of the planned GN&C technology developments will be highlighted. This paper will provide a GN&C State-of-the-Discipline assessment. The discipline s readiness to support the goals & objectives of each of the four NASA Mission Directorates is evaluated and the technical challenges and barriers currently faced by the discipline are summarized. This paper will also discuss the need for sustained investments to sufficiently mature the several classes of GN&C technologies required to implement NASA crewed exploration and robotic science missions.

  10. Immunoconjugates and long circulating systems: origins, current state of the art and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkaryev, Alexander; Sawant, Rupa; Deshpande, Madhura; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the area of immunoconjugated drugs and drug delivery systems (DDS). The immuno-modification of either the drug or DDS has proven to be a very promising approach that has significantly improved the targeted accumulation in pathological sites while decreasing its undesirable side effects in healthy tissues. The arrangement for both prolonged life in the circulation and specific target recognition represents another potent strategy in the development of immuno-targeted systems. The longevity of immuno-targeted DDS such as immunoliposomes and immunomicelles improves their targetability even in the presence of the additional passive accumulation in areas with a compromised vasculature. The added use of the immuno-targeted systems takes advantage of the specific microenvironment of pathological sites including lowered pH, increased temperature, and variation in the enzymatic activity. "Smart" stimulus-responsive systems combine different valuable functionalities including PEG-protection, targeting antibody, cell-penetration, and stimulus-sensitive functions. In this review we examined the evolution, current status and future directions in the area of therapeutical immunoconjugates and long-circulating immuno-targeted DDS. PMID:22964425

  11. THE ASSESSMENT OF ENTREPRENEURIAL PERSONALITY: THE CURRENT SITUATION AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Suárez-Álvarez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is fundamental in modern society because it represents an important source of innovation, employment, productivity, and growth. While the first theoretical models arose from economic and sociological approaches, psychology provides models that integrate different aspects such as cognitions, attitudes and personality, which allow a more detailed study. The purpose of this paper is to show the main contributions of psychology to the assessment of the enterprising personality. For this purpose, the main models and instruments developed to date were reviewed. The results confirm that the enterprising personality has a multidimensional structure and eight personality traits can be highlighted: achievement motivation, risk-taking, autonomy, self-efficacy, stress tolerance, innovativeness, internal locus of control, and optimism. From a methodological point of view, Item Response Theory and Computerised Adaptive Tests represent the most advanced and modern methods for assessing enterprising personality. There are currently several measurement instruments available. Future areas of research should be directed at the construction of multidimensional models as well as providing alternatives that facilitate a reduction in social desirability and other biases inherent in self-reports.

  12. High magnetic field science and its application in the United States current status and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2013-01-01

    The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area? A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the str...

  13. Engineered Nanomaterials: Knowledge Gaps in Fate, Exposure, Toxicity, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify current knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs, highlight research gaps, and suggest future research directions. Humans and other living organisms are exposed to ENMs during production or use of products containing them. To assess the hazards of ENMs, it is important to assess their physiochemical properties and try to relate them to any observed hazard. However, the full determination of these relationships is currently limited by the lack of empirical data. Moreover, most toxicity studies do not use realistic environmental exposure conditions for determining dose-response parameters, affecting the accurate estimation of health risks associated with the exposure to ENMs. Regulatory aspects of nanotechnology are still developing and are currently the subject of much debate. Synthesis of available studies suggests a number of open questions. These include (i developing a combination of different analytical methods for determining ENM concentration, size, shape, surface properties, and morphology in different environmental media, (ii conducting toxicity studies using environmentally relevant exposure conditions and obtaining data relevant to developing quantitative nanostructure-toxicity relationships (QNTR, and (iii developing guidelines for regulating exposure of ENMs in the environment.

  14. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayorga, L C; Rages, K; West, R A; Knowles, B; Lewis, N; Marley, M S

    2016-01-01

    We present phase curves of Jupiter from 0-140 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of Jupiter as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter's phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter's color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how WFIRST and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  15. Canola/Rapeseed Protein: Future Opportunities and Directions-Workshop Proceedings of IRC 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lisa; Rempel, Curtis B; Wanasundara, Janitha P D

    2016-01-01

    At present, canola meal is primarily streamlined into the animal feed market where it is a competitive animal feed source owing to its high protein value. Beyond animal feed lies a potential game-changer with regards to the value of canola meal, and its opportunity as a high quality food protein source. An economic and sustainable source of protein with high bioavailability and digestibility is essential to human health and well-being. Population pressures, ecological considerations, and production efficiency underscore the importance of highly bioavailable plant proteins, both for the developed and developing world. Despite decades of research, several technologies being developed, and products being brought to large scale production, there are still no commercially available canola protein products. The workshop entitled "Canola/Rapeseed Protein-Future Opportunities and Directions" that was held on 8 July 2015 during the 14th International Rapeseed Congress (IRC 2015) addressed the current situation and issues surrounding canola meal protein from the technological, nutritional, regulatory and genomics/breeding perspective. Discussions with participants and experts in the field helped to identify economic barriers and research gaps that need to be addressed in both the short and long term for the benefit of canola industry. PMID:27135237

  16. Privacy, Trust and Identity in Pervasive Computing: A Review of Technical Challenges and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameera Al-Karkhi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Developments in pervasive computing introduced a new world of computing where networked processors embedded and distributed in everyday objects communicating with each other over wireless links. Computers in such environments work in the background while establishing connections among them dynamically and hence will be less visible and intrusive. Such a vision raises questions about how to manage issues like privacy, trust and identity in those environments. In this paper, we review the technical challenges that face pervasive computing environments in relation to each of these issues. We then present a number of security related considerations and use them as a basis for comparison between pervasive and traditional computing. We will argue that these considerations pose particular concerns and challenges to the design and implementation of pervasive environments which are different to those usually found in traditional computing environments. To address these concerns and challenges, further research is needed. We will present a number of directions and topics for possible future research with respect to each of the three issues.

  17. Reflections on the development of psychology in Ethiopia and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondie, Yemataw

    2014-10-01

    The introduction and development of psychology in Ethiopia has been mainly limited to Addis Ababa University in the capital city, and also to educational and school psychology which was highly influenced by the field of education at this pioneering university. Similarly, mental health services have been principally developed at the Amanuel Mental Hospital in Addis Ababa that has existed since the 1950s. However, the expansion of higher learning institutions on one hand, and the apparent growing prevalence of mental illness on the other, seem to have contributed to the development of both mental health training and services in other regional cities and towns. Although the influence of the education-oriented psychological training of the Addis Ababa University is still present, clinical psychology education and services are now being started in other universities. One of these is the master's programme in clinical psychology opened for the first time in the University of Gondar. This article sheds light on the development of psychology in Ethiopia and addresses some of the issues raised about the factors that have influenced its development such as traditional beliefs, poverty and comparisons between mental health in lower middle-income countries and higher middle-income countries ( Uppal et al., 2014 ). The paper also proposes future directions for the education, research, infrastructure and services of clinical psychology and mental health in Ethiopia.

  18. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. PMID:24748800

  19. A hymenopterists’ guide to the Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology: utility, clarification, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Seltmann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera exhibit an incredible diversity of phenotypes, the result of ~240 million years of evolution and the primary subject of more than 250 years of research. Here we describe the history, development, and utility of the Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO and its associated applications. These resources are designed to facilitate accessible and extensible research on hymenopteran phenotypes. Outreach with the hymenopterist community is of utmost importance to the HAO project, and this paper is a direct response to questions that arised from project workshops. In a concerted attempt to surmount barriers of understanding, especially regarding the format, utility, and development of the HAO, we discuss the roles of homology, “preferred terms”, and “structural equivalency”. We also outline the use of Universal Resource Identifiers (URIs and posit that they are a key element necessary for increasing the objectivity and repeatability of science that references hymenopteran anatomy. Pragmatically, we detail a mechanism (the “URI table” by which authors can use URIs to link their published text to the HAO, and we describe an associated tool (the “Analyzer” to derive these tables. These tools, and others, are available through the HAO Portal website (http://portal.hymao.org. We conclude by discussing the future of the HAO with respect to digital publication, cross-taxon ontology alignment, the advent of semantic phenotypes, and community-based curation.

  20. Enhancement of Psychosocial Treatment With D-Cycloserine: Models, Moderators, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael W; Kredlow, M Alexandra; Smits, Jasper A J; Hofmann, Stefan G; Tolin, David F; de Kleine, Rianne A; van Minnen, Agnes; Evins, A Eden; Pollack, Mark H

    2016-08-15

    Advances in the understanding of the neurobiology of fear extinction have resulted in the development of d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, as an augmentation strategy for exposure treatment. We review a decade of research that has focused on the efficacy of DCS for augmenting the mechanisms (e.g., fear extinction) and outcome of exposure treatment across the anxiety disorders. Following a series of small-scale studies offering strong support for this clinical application, more recent larger-scale studies have yielded mixed results, with some showing weak or no effects. We discuss possible explanations for the mixed findings, pointing to both patient and session (i.e., learning experiences) characteristics as possible moderators of efficacy, and offer directions for future research in this area. We also review recent studies that have aimed to extend the work on DCS augmentation of exposure therapy for the anxiety disorders to DCS enhancement of learning-based interventions for addiction, anorexia nervosa, schizophrenia, and depression. Here, we attend to both DCS effects on facilitating therapeutic outcomes and additional therapeutic mechanisms beyond fear extinction (e.g., appetitive extinction, hippocampal-dependent learning).

  1. Achieving Transmission Fairness in Distributed Medium Access Wireless Mesh Networks: Design Challenges, Guidelines and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salitha Priyanka Undugodage

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless mesh networking gained an international interest over the years as a result to high recognition inthe wireless industry as a cost effective, scalable, wider coverage and capacity capable wireless technology.The contention based distributed medium access in wireless networks has advanced not only in supportingthe quality of multimedia but also achieving high throughput and to minimize packet delay overheads inlegacy systems. Unfortunately, the impact of such enhancement has not been fully justified with meshnetwork environments yet. The medium access framesare required to be contended over multi-hops toovercome the challenges of improving overall systemperformance through concurrent transmissions. Thegoal of this paper is to discuss the issues and challenges of transmission fairness and the effect ofconcurrent transmission on system performance. To mitigate transmission fairness issues, we reviewexisting open literature on mesh networking and provide guidelines for better system design anddeployment. Finally, we conclude the paper with future research directions. This study may help networkdesigner and planner to overcome the remaining challenging issues in the design and deployment of WMNsworldwide.

  2. Enhancement of Psychosocial Treatment With D-Cycloserine: Models, Moderators, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael W; Kredlow, M Alexandra; Smits, Jasper A J; Hofmann, Stefan G; Tolin, David F; de Kleine, Rianne A; van Minnen, Agnes; Evins, A Eden; Pollack, Mark H

    2016-08-15

    Advances in the understanding of the neurobiology of fear extinction have resulted in the development of d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, as an augmentation strategy for exposure treatment. We review a decade of research that has focused on the efficacy of DCS for augmenting the mechanisms (e.g., fear extinction) and outcome of exposure treatment across the anxiety disorders. Following a series of small-scale studies offering strong support for this clinical application, more recent larger-scale studies have yielded mixed results, with some showing weak or no effects. We discuss possible explanations for the mixed findings, pointing to both patient and session (i.e., learning experiences) characteristics as possible moderators of efficacy, and offer directions for future research in this area. We also review recent studies that have aimed to extend the work on DCS augmentation of exposure therapy for the anxiety disorders to DCS enhancement of learning-based interventions for addiction, anorexia nervosa, schizophrenia, and depression. Here, we attend to both DCS effects on facilitating therapeutic outcomes and additional therapeutic mechanisms beyond fear extinction (e.g., appetitive extinction, hippocampal-dependent learning). PMID:26520240

  3. Aggression in Tephritidae Flies: Where, When, Why? Future Directions for Research in Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae include over 4000 species, many of which constitute enormous threats to fruit and vegetable production worldwide. A number of Tephritidae are lekking species, forming aggregations in which males fight to defend a small territory where they court females and mate. Male-male contests also occur in non-lekking species, characterized by resource defense polygyny. Tephritidae females display agonistic behavior to maintain single oviposition sites and reduce larval competition for food. Here, how, where, when and why aggressive interactions occur in Tephritidae flies is reviewed. A number of neglected issues deserving further research are highlighted, with a special focus on diel periodicity of aggression, cues evoking aggressive behavior, the role of previous experience on fighting success and the evolution of behavioral lateralization of aggressive displays. In the final section, future directions to exploit this knowledge in Integrated Pest Management, with particular emphasis on enhancement of Sterile Insect Technique and interspecific competitive displacement in the field are suggested.

  4. 2006: STATUS OF TSUNAMI SCIENCE RESEARCH AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara H. Keating

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, Dr. Robert Wiegel compiled “Tsunami Information Sources”. The compilation has been made available via a website and has been published as an issue in Science of Tsunami Hazards. The compiled references have been assigned keyword descriptions, and compiled in order to review the breath and depth of Tsunami Science publications.The review indicates that tsunami research involves eight major scientific disciplines: Geology, Seismology, Tsunami Science, Engineering, Disaster Management, Meteorology and Communications. These disciplines were subdivided into many topical subjects and the results were tabulated.The topics having the largest number of publications include: tsunamigenic earthquakes, numerical modeling, field surveys, engineering models, harbor, bay, and canal modeling and observations, energy of tsunamis, workshops, tsunami warning centers, instrumentation, tsunami catalogs, tsunami disaster mitigation, evaluation of hazards, the aftermath of tsunamis on humans, and AID provided to Tsunami Damaged Communities.Several areas of research were identified as likely directions for future research, including: paleotsunami studies, risk assessments, instrumentation, numerical modeling of earthquakes and tsunami, particularly the 2004 Indian Ocean event. There is a dearth of recent publications available on tsunami hazards education for the general public.

  5. Esophagogastric junction and gastric adenocarcinoma: neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Steven

    2014-06-01

    In North America, gastric cancer is the third most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third most lethal neoplasm overall. In Asia, gastric cancer represents an even more serious problem: in Japan, it is the most common cancer in men. The standard primary therapy for gastric cancer is surgical resection; in esophagogastric-junction (EGJ) adenocarcinoma, which is often included in studies of gastric cancer, surgery is also typically the initial management strategy. However, the rates of locoregional and distant recurrence following surgery with curative intent have remained high. Investigators have explored a variety of ways of reducing these rates and improving survival in patients with gastric and EGJ cancers. These strategies have included explorations of the optimal extent of regional lymphadenectomy at the time of gastric resection; investigation of different neoadjuvant, perioperative, and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens; use of preoperative and postoperative radiation therapy; and the use of pre- and postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT).To date, benefit has been seen in gastric cancer patients with the use of what is called a"D2 resection"(which includes lymph nodes of stations 7 through 12) and with adjuvant CRT (in the West) or adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 (in Japan); and neoadjuvant CRT has been shown to have a survival benefit in patients with EGJ cancers.

  6. Development of antibody directed nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivkov, R.; DeNardo, S. J.; Meirs, L. A.; Natarajan, A.; DeNardo, G. L.; Gruettner, C.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics, tumor uptake, and biologic effects of inductively heating 111In-chimeric L6 (ChL6) monoclonal antibody (mAb)-linked iron oxide nanoparticle (bioprobes) by externally applied alternating magnetic fields (AMF) were studied in athymic mice bearing human breast cancer HBT 3477 xenografts. In addition, response was correlated with calculated total deposited heat dose. Methods: Using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide HCl, 111In-7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid-ChL6 was conjugated to the carboxylated polyethylene glycol on dextran-coated iron oxide 20-nm particles, one to two mAbs per nanoparticle. After magnetic purification and sterile filtration, pharmacokinetics, histopathology, and AMF/bioprobe therapy were done using 111In-ChL6 bioprobe doses (20 mcg/2.2 mg ChL6/ bioprobe), i.v. with 50 mcg ChL6 in athymic mice bearing HBT 3477; a 153 kHz AMF was given 72 hours postinjection for therapy with amplitudes of 1,300, 1,000, or 700 Oe. Weights, blood counts, and tumor size were monitored and compared with control mice receiving nothing, or AMF, or bioprobes alone. Results: 111In-ChL6 bioprobe binding in vitro to HBT 3477 cells was 50% to 70% of that of 111In-ChL6. At 48 hours, tumor, lung, kidney, and marrow uptakes of the 111In-ChL6 bioprobes were not different from that observed in prior studies of 111In-ChL6. Significant therapeutic responses from AMF/bioprobe therapy were shown compared with no treatment. In addition, greatest therapeutic benefit was observed for the 700 Oe treatment cohort. Toxicity was only seen in the 1,300 Oe AMF cohort, with 4 of 12 immediate deaths associated with skin erythema and petechiae. Conclusion: This study shows that mAb-conjugated nanoparticles (bioprobes), when given i.v., escape into the extravascular space and bind to cancer cell membrane antigen.Thus, bioprobes can be used in concert with externally applied AMF to deliver thermoablative cancer therapy. Therapeutic benefit

  7. Monoclonal antibodies-based treatment in gastric cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Polom, Karol; Petrioli, Roberto; Marano, Luigi; Marrelli, Daniele; Paganini, Giovanni; Savelli, Vinno; Generali, Daniele; De Franco, Lorenzo; Ravelli, Andrea; Roviello, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death, and despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients, only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and the related signaling pathways offers, from the clinical point of view, promising advances for selected groups of patients. In the past, targeted therapies have significantly impacted the treatment strategy of several common solid tumors such as breast, colorectal, and lung cancers. Unfortunately, translational and clinical research shows fewer encouraging targeted treatments with regards to the GC. To date, only two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), named trastuzumab and ramucirumab, are approved for the treatment of advanced GC, suggesting that in GC, maybe more than in other cancers, effective targeted therapy requires patient selection based on precise predictive molecular biomarkers. The aim of this review is to summarize the available data on the clinical advantages offered by the use of mAbs in the treatment of advanced/metastatic GC. Future perspective is also discussed. PMID:26566626

  8. Targeted medical therapy of biliary tract cancer: Recent advances and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The limited efficacy of cytotoxic therapy for advanced biliary tract and gallbladder cancers emphasizes the need for novel and more effective medical treatment options. A better understanding of the specific biological features of these neoplasms led to the development of new targeted therapies, which take the abundant expression of several growth factors and cognate tyrosine kinase receptors into account. This review will briefly summarize the status and future perspectives of antiangiogenic and growth factor receptor-based pharmacological approaches for the treatment of biliary tract and gallbladder cancers. In view of multiple novel targeted approaches, the rationale for innovative therapies, such as combinations of growth factor (receptor)-targeting agents with cytotoxic drugs or with other novel anticancer drugs will be highlighted.

  9. Established, emerging and future roles of PET/CT in the management of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is rapidly being integrated into the imaging pathways of several different tumour types, most frequently using the glucose analogue 2- [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Integrated FDG-PET/CT combines functional and anatomical imaging to improve sensitivity and specificity of tumour detection. The aim of this article is to review the established, emerging, and future roles of FDG-PET/CT in the management of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC)

  10. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  11. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Salama

    Full Text Available General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects.

  12. Patient-tailored modulation of the immune system may revolutionize future lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer research has devoted most of its energy over the past decades on unraveling the control mechanisms within tumor cells that govern its behavior. From this we know that the onset of cancer is the result of cumulative genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells leading to an unregulated cell cycle, unlimited replicative potential and the possibility for tissue invasion and metastasis. Until recently it was often thought that tumors are more or less undetected or tolerated by the patient’s immune system causing the neoplastic cells to divide and spread without resistance. However, it is without any doubt that the tumor environment contains a wide variety of recruited host immune cells. These tumor infiltrating immune cells influence anti-tumor responses in opposing ways and emerges as a critical regulator of tumor growth. Here we provide a summary of the relevant immunological cell types and their complex and dynamic roles within an established tumor microenvironment. For this, we focus on both the systemic compartment as well as the local presence within the tumor microenvironment of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), admitting that this multifaceted cellular composition will be different from earlier stages of the disease, between NSCLC patients. Understanding the paradoxical role that the immune system plays in cancer and increasing options for their modulation may alter the odds in favor of a more effective anti-tumor immune response. We predict that the future standard of care of lung cancer will involve patient-tailor-made combination therapies that associate (traditional) chemotherapeutic drugs and biologicals with immune modulating agents and in this way complement the therapeutic armamentarium for this disease

  13. The Controlled Cortical Impact Model: Applications, Considerations for Researchers, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osier, Nicole D; Dixon, C Edward

    2016-01-01

    Controlled cortical impact (CCI) is a mechanical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that was developed nearly 30 years ago with the goal of creating a testing platform to determine the biomechanical properties of brain tissue exposed to direct mechanical deformation. Initially used to model TBIs produced by automotive crashes, the CCI model rapidly transformed into a standardized technique to study TBI mechanisms and evaluate therapies. CCI is most commonly produced using a device that rapidly accelerates a rod to impact the surgically exposed cortical dural surface. The tip of the rod can be varied in size and geometry to accommodate scalability to difference species. Typically, the rod is actuated by a pneumatic piston or electromagnetic actuator. With some limits, CCI devices can control the velocity, depth, duration, and site of impact. The CCI model produces morphologic and cerebrovascular injury responses that resemble certain aspects of human TBI. Commonly observed are graded histologic and axonal derangements, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, subdural and intra-parenchymal hematoma, edema, inflammation, and alterations in cerebral blood flow. The CCI model also produces neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments similar to those observed clinically. In contrast to other TBI models, the CCI device induces a significantly pronounced cortical contusion, but is limited in the extent to which it models the diffuse effects of TBI; a related limitation is that not all clinical TBI cases are characterized by a contusion. Another perceived limitation is that a non-clinically relevant craniotomy is performed. Biomechanically, this is irrelevant at the tissue level. However, craniotomies are not atraumatic and the effects of surgery should be controlled by including surgical sham control groups. CCI devices have also been successfully used to impact closed skulls to study mild and repetitive TBI. Future directions for CCI research surround continued

  14. Inactivated and subunit vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome: Current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Calvert, Jay G; Roof, Michael; Lager, Kelly M

    2015-06-17

    Within a few years of its emergence in the late 1980s, the PRRS virus had spread globally to become the foremost infectious disease concern for the pork industry. Since 1994, modified live-attenuated vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV-MLV) have been widely used, but have failed to provide complete protection against emerging and heterologous field strains of the virus. Moreover, like many other MLVs, PRRSV-MLVs have safety concerns including vertical and horizontal transmission of the vaccine virus and several documented incidences of reversion to virulence. Thus, the development of efficacious inactivated vaccines is warranted for the control and eradication of PRRS. Since the early 1990s, researchers have been attempting to develop inactivated PRRSV vaccines, but most of the candidates have failed to elicit protective immunity even against homologous virus challenge. Recent research findings relating to both inactivated and subunit candidate PRRSV vaccines have shown promise, but they need to be pursued further to improve their heterologous efficacy and cost-effectiveness before considering commercialization. In this comprehensive review, we provide information on attempts to develop PRRSV inactivated and subunit vaccines. These includes various virus inactivation strategies, adjuvants, nanoparticle-based vaccine delivery systems, DNA vaccines, and recombinant subunit vaccines produced using baculovirus, plant, and replication-deficient viruses as vector vaccines. Finally, future directions for the development of innovative non-infectious PRRSV vaccines are suggested. Undoubtedly there remains a need for novel PRRSV vaccine strategies targeted to deliver cross-protective, non-infectious vaccines for the control and eradication of PRRS.

  15. Desalination and reuse of high-salinity shale gas produced water: drivers, technologies, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Devin L; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    In the rapidly developing shale gas industry, managing produced water is a major challenge for maintaining the profitability of shale gas extraction while protecting public health and the environment. We review the current state of practice for produced water management across the United States and discuss the interrelated regulatory, infrastructure, and economic drivers for produced water reuse. Within this framework, we examine the Marcellus shale play, a region in the eastern United States where produced water is currently reused without desalination. In the Marcellus region, and in other shale plays worldwide with similar constraints, contraction of current reuse opportunities within the shale gas industry and growing restrictions on produced water disposal will provide strong incentives for produced water desalination for reuse outside the industry. The most challenging scenarios for the selection of desalination for reuse over other management strategies will be those involving high-salinity produced water, which must be desalinated with thermal separation processes. We explore desalination technologies for treatment of high-salinity shale gas produced water, and we critically review mechanical vapor compression (MVC), membrane distillation (MD), and forward osmosis (FO) as the technologies best suited for desalination of high-salinity produced water for reuse outside the shale gas industry. The advantages and challenges of applying MVC, MD, and FO technologies to produced water desalination are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. We find that desalination for reuse of produced water is technically feasible and can be economically relevant. However, because produced water management is primarily an economic decision, expanding desalination for reuse is dependent on process and material improvements to reduce capital and operating costs.

  16. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance Program: lessons learned and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Ghannoum, M; Dittmer, D P; Greenspan, J S

    2016-04-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) was established in 2006 to provide the capacity to investigate the oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS within the ACTG infrastructure. Its goals were to explore the effects of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the development of opportunistic infections, and variation and resistance of opportunistic pathogens in the context of immune suppression and long-term ART. The objectives of this talk, presented as part of a plenary session at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS, were to (i) provide an overview of OHARA's most recent research agenda, and how it evolved since OHARA's inception; (ii) describe OHARA's main accomplishments, including examples of research protocols completed and their key findings; and (iii) describe spin-off projects derived from OHARA, lessons learned, and future directions. OHARA has met its central goal and made key contributions to the field in several ways: (i) by developing/updating diagnostic criteria for oral disease endpoints commonly measured in OHARA protocols and in HIV/AIDS research in general and has creating standardized training modules, both for measuring these oral disease endpoints across clinical specialties, and for collecting oral fluid specimens; (ii) by implementing a total of nine protocols, six of which are completed. Three protocols involved domestic research sites, while three involved international research sites (in Africa, India, and South America); (iii) and by developing and validating a number of laboratory assays used in its protocols and in the field of oral HIV/AIDS research. PMID:27109281

  17. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subedi BH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bishnu H Subedi,1,2 Parag H Joshi,1 Steven R Jones,1 Seth S Martin,1 Michael J Blaha,1 Erin D Michos1 1Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, 2Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. Keywords: high-density lipoprotein, lipids, cholesterol, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, therapy

  18. Resource potential of bamboo, challenges and future directions towards sustainable management and utilization in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew Desalegn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Bamboo, the fastest growing and high yielding perennial plant of the world has more than 1500 species and 1500 versatile socio-economic uses and ecological services. Ethiopia has two indigenous bamboo species namely Yushania alpina and Oxytenantheria abyssinica, covering about one million ha with a wide distribution. The objective of this paper is to highlight the potential of bamboo resources, challenges including biodeterioration damage, opportunities and future research directions towards its sustainable management and rational utilization.Area of study: Bamboo resources of EthiopiaMaterial and Methods: Reconnaissance survey was done to some parts of the bamboo growing potential areas in Ethiopia besides the literature review. Main results: The bamboo resource, despite its socio-economic and environmental benefits, currently, in most areas has been under high pressure due to land use changes, bamboo mass- flowering, poor processing with low value addition, and damage by biodeteriorating agents (termites, beetles and fungi. The preservative tests on Ethiopian bamboos revealed low natural durability and highlighted the paramount importance of appropriate protection measures such as Tanalith and vehicles used motor oil to increase durability, service life and rational utilization of bamboo-based products and structures as potential alternative construction and furniture material.Research highlights: Therefore, integrated research and development interventions involving different propagation and managements techniques, harvesting season, processing, value addition including proper seasoning and preservation technologies and marketing are recommended to fill the information and technological gaps on sustainable management and rational utilization of this fast growing and multipurpose bamboo resources in Ethiopia.Key words: Bamboo; challenges; management; socio-economic and environmental significance; utilization.

  19. A 60-year journey of mycorrhizal research in China:Past,present and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The significance of mycorrhizas(fungal roots in 90% of land plants) in plant nutrient acquisition and growth,element biogeo-chemical cycling and maintaining of terrestrial ecosystem structures has been globally established for more than 120 years.Great progress in mycorrhizal research in the past 60 years(1950-2009,1981-2009 in particular) has also been made across China,particularly in the mainland,Hong Kong and Taiwan.For instance,a total of 20 new and ~120 records of arbuscular mycorrhizal(AM) fungal species,30 new and ~800 records of ectomycorrhizal(EM) fungal species,a dozen of new and ~100 records of orchid mycorrhizal(OM) fungal species have been isolated by morphological observation and/or molecular identification in China since the 1950s.Great accomplishment has also been made in the following area,including fungal species richness and genetic structure,relationships between species composition and plant taxa,effects of mycorrhizal fungi on plant nutrient uptake and growth,resistances to pathogens and interactions with other soil microorganisms,potential of mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation and/or land reclamation,alterations of enzymatic activities in mycorrhizal plants,and elevated CO2 and O3 on root colonization and species diversity.Unfortunately,the international community cannot easily appreciate almost all Chinese mycorrhizal studies since the vast majority of them have been published in Chinese and/or in China-based journals.The aim of this review is to make a comprehensive exposure of the past and present China’s major mycorrhizal research to the whole world,and then to suggest potential directions for the enhancement of future mycorrhizal research within and/or between the Chinese and international mycorrhizal community.

  20. Real-time nutrient monitoring in rivers: adaptive sampling strategies, technological challenges and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaen, Phillip; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte; Bradley, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Excessive nutrient concentrations in river waters threaten aquatic ecosystem functioning and can pose substantial risks to human health. Robust monitoring strategies are therefore required to generate reliable estimates of river nutrient loads and to improve understanding of the catchment processes that drive spatiotemporal patterns in nutrient fluxes. Furthermore, these data are vital for prediction of future trends under changing environmental conditions and thus the development of appropriate mitigation measures. In recent years, technological developments have led to an increase in the use of continuous in-situ nutrient analysers, which enable measurements at far higher temporal resolutions than can be achieved with discrete sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis. However, such instruments can be costly to run and difficult to maintain (e.g. due to high power consumption and memory requirements), leading to trade-offs between temporal and spatial monitoring resolutions. Here, we highlight how adaptive monitoring strategies, comprising a mixture of temporal sample frequencies controlled by one or more 'trigger variables' (e.g. river stage, turbidity, or nutrient concentration), can advance our understanding of catchment nutrient dynamics while simultaneously overcoming many of the practical and economic challenges encountered in typical in-situ river nutrient monitoring applications. We present examples of short-term variability in river nutrient dynamics, driven by complex catchment behaviour, which support our case for the development of monitoring systems that can adapt in real-time to rapid environmental changes. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current nutrient monitoring techniques, and suggest new research directions based on emerging technologies and highlight how these might improve: 1) monitoring strategies, and 2) understanding of linkages between catchment processes and river nutrient fluxes.

  1. Non-Canonical Hh Signaling in Cancer—Current Understanding and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Dongsheng Gu; Jingwu Xie

    2015-01-01

    As a major regulatory pathway for embryonic development and tissue patterning, hedgehog signaling is not active in most adult tissues, but is reactivated in a number of human cancer types. A major milestone in hedgehog signaling in cancer is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a smoothened inhibitor Vismodegib for treatment of basal cell carcinomas. Vismodegib can block ligand-mediated hedgehog signaling, but numerous additional clinical trials have failed to show significant i...

  2. Albumin-bound paclitaxel in solid tumors: clinical development and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Kundranda MN; Niu J

    2015-01-01

    Madappa N Kundranda,1 Jiaxin Niu21Medical Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Goodyear, Arizona, USA Abstract: Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) is a solvent-free formulation of paclitaxel that was initially developed more than a decade ago to overcome toxicities associated with the solvents used in the formulation of standard paclitaxel and to potentially improve efficacy. Nab-paclitaxel has demons...

  3. What Is the Role of Nanotechnology in Diagnosis and Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer? Promising Scenarios for the Near Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truffi Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to tumor heterogeneity and to various physiological barriers that hinder drug delivery to the metastatic sites. To overcome these limitations, nanoformulated drugs have been developed and tested in preclinical studies, and few of them have been successfully translated into clinical practice. In particular, liposomal anthracyclines and nanoformulated albumin-bound paclitaxel have revealed an improved therapeutic index when compared to conventional chemotherapy, with significant reduction of drugs toxicity. Several strategies for nanoparticles engineering have more recently been explored to increase selectivity for tumor cells and to reach poorly accessible metastatic districts. Targeted nanoparticles, directed toward tumor markers and tissue-specific metastases, may provide effective devices in case of low-vascularized and small-sized metastases, thus paving the way for a real change in the natural history of metastatic disease. A number of targets have been identified and exploited for surface functionalization of different types of nanoparticles, which are currently undergoing preclinical studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of current nanotechnology applied to metastatic breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Promising results encourage an upcoming translation of this research into clinical practice for an effective management of the disease in the near future.

  4. Between Two Worlds: Liminality and Late-Stage Cancer-Directed Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Disease-directed therapy near death is a growing trend among persons living with late-stage cancer. As a sociocultural phenomenon, cancer-directed therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) when given for very advanced disease is a process that offers questionable benefits and portends further suffering, but also suggests potential for growth and transcendence. Theories and concepts drawn from cultural anthropology, sociology, and existentialism illustrate how contextual factors contribute to the creation of a "liminal space"; the latter part of the cancer trajectory where living and dying can overlap. When applied to clinical practice, this theoretical framework gives the patient, family, and health care provider a way of "unmasking" a period of transition during terminal illness when aggressive disease-directed care continues to be provided. The liminal space may function as an existential plane; a gateway or threshold with inherent potential for psychospiritual development during the final stage of life.

  5. Alpha-emitter radium-223 in the management of solid tumors: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases, which are commonly seen in patients with advanced cancers, are a major cause of skeletal events, disability, and death. Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223; Xofigo, formerly Alpharadin), a first-in-class, alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that selectively targets bone metastases with high-energy short-range alpha-particles, has been approved for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. Approval is based on results of the randomized phase III trial Alpharadin in Symptomatic Prostate Cancer (ALSYMPCA), in which radium-223 prolonged overall survival and time to first symptomatic skeletal event versus placebo among patients with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and was generally well tolerated, with low myelosuppression rates and manageable gastrointestinal adverse events. Long-term follow-up of the ALSYMPCA safety population showed that the incidence of myelosuppression remained low among patients treated with radium-223, with no additional safety issues of acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, or primary bone cancer within approximately 1.5 years after treatment. The radium-223 overall survival benefit and low toxicity make it an effective, well-tolerated, and novel treatment option for CRPC and symptomatic bone metastases and opens the possibility of exploring radium-223 in the treatment of bone metastases from other cancers. A phase I clinical trial of patients with breast and prostate cancer with skeletal metastases demonstrated that radium-223 was safe and well tolerated at all therapeutically relevant dosages. Moreover, a phase IIa trial of patients with advanced breast cancer and progressive bone-dominant disease demonstrated that radium-223 targeted areas of increased bone metabolism and showed biologic activity. PMID:24857093

  6. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on projected future fire regimes in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Wimberly, Michael C

    2016-01-15

    We asked two research questions: (1) What are the relative effects of climate change and climate-driven vegetation shifts on different components of future fire regimes? (2) How does incorporating climate-driven vegetation change into future fire regime projections alter the results compared to projections based only on direct climate effects? We used the western United States (US) as study area to answer these questions. Future (2071-2100) fire regimes were projected using statistical models to predict spatial patterns of occurrence, size and spread for large fires (>400 ha) and a simulation experiment was conducted to compare the direct climatic effects and the indirect effects of climate-driven vegetation change on fire regimes. Results showed that vegetation change amplified climate-driven increases in fire frequency and size and had a larger overall effect on future total burned area in the western US than direct climate effects. Vegetation shifts, which were highly sensitive to precipitation pattern changes, were also a strong determinant of the future spatial pattern of burn rates and had different effects on fire in currently forested and grass/shrub areas. Our results showed that climate-driven vegetation change can exert strong localized effects on fire occurrence and size, which in turn drive regional changes in fire regimes. The effects of vegetation change for projections of the geographic patterns of future fire regimes may be at least as important as the direct effects of climate change, emphasizing that accounting for changing vegetation patterns in models of future climate-fire relationships is necessary to provide accurate projections at continental to global scales.

  7. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  8. Pharmacological Modulation of Proton Channel Hv1 in Cancer Therapy: Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Audry; Pupo, Amaury; Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacological modulation of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment has emerged as a relevant component for cancer therapy. Several approaches aiming to deplete innate and adaptive suppressive populations, to circumvent the impairment in antigen presentation, and to ultimately increase the frequency of activated tumor-specific T cells are currently being explored. In this review, we address the potentiality of targeting the voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, as a novel strategy to modulate the tumor microenvironment. The function of Hv1 in immune cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and T cells has been associated with the maintenance of NADPH oxidase activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species, which are required for the host defense against pathogens. We discuss evidence suggesting that the Hv1 proton channel could also be important for the function of these cells within the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, as summarized here, tumor cells express Hv1 as a primary mechanism to extrude the increased amount of protons generated metabolically, thus maintaining physiologic values for the intracellular pH. Therefore, because this channel might be relevant for both tumor cells and immune cells supporting tumor growth, the pharmacological inhibition of Hv1 could be an innovative approach for cancer therapy. With that focus, we analyzed the available compounds that inhibit Hv1, highlighted the need to develop better drugs suitable for patients, and commented on the future perspectives of targeting Hv1 in the context of cancer therapy. PMID:27260771

  9. Anti–PD-1/PD-L1 therapy of human cancer: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lieping; Han, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Major progress has been made toward our understanding of the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway (referred to as the PD pathway). mAbs are already being used to block the PD pathway to treat human cancers (anti-PD therapy), especially advanced solid tumors. This therapy is based on principles that were discovered through basic research more than a decade ago, but the great potential of this pathway to treat a broad spectrum of advanced human cancers is just now becoming apparent. In this Review, we will briefly review the history and development of anti-PD therapy, from the original benchwork to the most up-to-date clinical results. We will then focus the discussion on three basic principles that define this unique therapeutic approach and highlight how anti-PD therapy is distinct from other immunotherapeutic approaches, namely tumor site immune modulation, targeting tumor-induced immune defects, and repairing ongoing (rather than generating de novo) tumor immunity. We believe that these fundamental principles set the standard for future immunotherapies and will guide our efforts to develop more efficacious and less toxic immune therapeutics to treat human cancers. PMID:26325035

  10. Low temperature plasmas as emerging cancer therapeutics: the state of play and thoughts for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Adam M; Frame, Fiona M; Arya, Manit; Maitland, Norman J; O'Connell, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    The field of plasma medicine has seen substantial advances over the last decade, with applications developed for bacterial sterilisation, wound healing and cancer treatment. Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) are particularly suited for medical purposes since they are operated in the laboratory at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, providing a rich source of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). A great deal of research has been conducted into the role of reactive species in both the growth and treatment of cancer, where long-established radio- and chemo-therapies exploit their ability to induce potent cytopathic effects. In addition to producing a plethora of RONS, LTPs can also create strong electroporative fields. From an application perspective, it has been shown that LTPs can be applied precisely to a small target area. On this basis, LTPs have been proposed as a promising future strategy to accurately and effectively control and eradicate tumours. This review aims to evaluate the current state of the literature in the field of plasma oncology and highlight the potential for the use of LTPs in combination therapy. We also present novel data on the effect of LTPs on cancer stem cells, and speculatively outline how LTPs could circumvent treatment resistance encountered with existing therapeutics. PMID:26888782

  11. Low temperature plasmas as emerging cancer therapeutics: the state of play and thoughts for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Adam M; Frame, Fiona M; Arya, Manit; Maitland, Norman J; O'Connell, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    The field of plasma medicine has seen substantial advances over the last decade, with applications developed for bacterial sterilisation, wound healing and cancer treatment. Low temperature plasmas (LTPs) are particularly suited for medical purposes since they are operated in the laboratory at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, providing a rich source of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). A great deal of research has been conducted into the role of reactive species in both the growth and treatment of cancer, where long-established radio- and chemo-therapies exploit their ability to induce potent cytopathic effects. In addition to producing a plethora of RONS, LTPs can also create strong electroporative fields. From an application perspective, it has been shown that LTPs can be applied precisely to a small target area. On this basis, LTPs have been proposed as a promising future strategy to accurately and effectively control and eradicate tumours. This review aims to evaluate the current state of the literature in the field of plasma oncology and highlight the potential for the use of LTPs in combination therapy. We also present novel data on the effect of LTPs on cancer stem cells, and speculatively outline how LTPs could circumvent treatment resistance encountered with existing therapeutics.

  12. The direct medical costs of breast cancer in Iran: analyzing the patient′s level data from a cancer specific hospital in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The direct economic cost of breast cancer in Iran is very high; nonetheless, as the age of breast cancer in Iran is nearly 10 years lower than Western countries, the burden of the disease in Iran is expected to be significantly high. Medication therapy is the main cost component of the breast cancer.

  13. Situational analysis and future directions of AYUSH: An assessment through 5-year plans of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2015-01-01

    study, the 5-year planning documents have been reviewed, from the 1(st)plan to 12(th)plan, to enable reflection and throw some light into the future directions of AYUSH system.

  14. Situational analysis and future directions of AYUSH: An assessment through 5-year plans of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2015-01-01

    5-year planning documents have been reviewed, from the 1stplan to 12thplan, to enable reflection and throw some light into the future directions of AYUSH system. PMID:26649240

  15. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF AYUSH: AN ASSESSMENT THROUGH FIVE YEAR PLANS OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmejaya Samal

    2015-12-01

    the concerned community. In this paper the five year planning documents have been reviewed, from first plan to 12th plan, to enable reflection and throw some light in to the future directions of AYUSH system. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(4.000: 348-354

  16. Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Amir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motion; and center of mass vertical motion. Methods We evaluated major motions performed during walking and identified the amount of work the body expends and the portion of recoverable energy. During walking, there are phases of the motion at the joints where muscles act as brakes and energy is lost to the surroundings. During those phases of motion, the required braking force or torque can be replaced by an electrical generator, allowing energy to be harvested at the cost of only minimal additional effort. The amount of energy that can be harvested was estimated experimentally and from literature data. Recommendations for future directions are made on the basis of our results in combination with a review of state-of-the-art biomechanical energy harvesting devices and energy conversion methods. Results For a device that uses center of mass motion, the maximum amount of energy that can be harvested is approximately 1 W per kilogram of device weight. For a person weighing 80 kg and walking at approximately 4 km/h, the power generation from the heel strike is approximately 2 W. For a joint-mounted device based on generative braking, the joints generating the most power are the knees (34 W and the ankles (20 W. Conclusions Our theoretical calculations align well with current device performance data. Our results suggest that the most energy can be harvested from the lower limb joints, but to do so efficiently, an innovative and light-weight mechanical design is

  17. Developmental programming: State-of-the-science and future directions-summary from a Pennington biomedical symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    On December 8-9, 2014, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center convened a scientific symposium to review the state-of-the-science and future directions for the study of developmental programming of obesity and chronic disease. The objectives of the symposium were to discuss: (i) past and current s...

  18. 76 FR 47596 - Notice of Scientific Summit; The Science of Compassion-Future Directions in End-of-Life and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of Scientific Summit; The Science of Compassion... Services, will convene a scientific summit titled ``The Science of Compassion--Future Directions in...

  19. Laser Direct-Write Onto Live Tissues: A Novel Model for Studying Cancer Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Hope E; Phamduy, Theresa B; Azimi, Mohammad S; Saksena, Jayant; Burow, Matthew E; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M; Chrisey, Douglas B; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-11-01

    Investigation into the mechanisms driving cancer cell behavior and the subsequent development of novel targeted therapeutics requires comprehensive experimental models that mimic the complexity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, our laboratories have combined a novel tissue culture model and laser direct-write, a form of bioprinting, to spatially position single or clustered cancer cells onto ex vivo microvascular networks containing blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and interstitial cell populations. Herein, we highlight this new model as a tool for quantifying cancer cell motility and effects on angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in an intact network that matches the complexity of a real tissue. Application of our proposed methodology offers an innovative ex vivo tissue perspective for evaluating the effects of gene expression and targeted molecular therapies on cancer cell migration and invasion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2333-2338, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26923437

  20. Social Media and Alcohol: Summary of Research, Intervention Ideas and Future Study Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Moreno

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol content is frequently displayed on social media through both user-generated posts and advertisements. Previous work supports that alcohol content on social media is influential and often associated with offline behaviors for adolescents and young adults. Social media may have a role in future alcohol intervention efforts including identifying those at risk or providing timely prevention messages. Future intervention efforts may benefit from an affordance approach rather than focusing on a single platform.

  1. Social Media and Alcohol: Summary of Research, Intervention Ideas and Future Study Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Megan A.; Jon D’Angelo; Jennifer Whitehill

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol content is frequently displayed on social media through both user-generated posts and advertisements. Previous work supports that alcohol content on social media is influential and often associated with offline behaviors for adolescents and young adults. Social media may have a role in future alcohol intervention efforts including identifying those at risk or providing timely prevention messages. Future intervention efforts may benefit from an affordance approach rather than focusing ...

  2. Social Media and Alcohol: Summary of Research, Intervention Ideas and Future Study Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Megan A.; D'Angelo, Jon; Whitehill, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol content is frequently displayed on social media through both user-generated posts and advertisements. Previous work supports that alcohol content on social media is influential and often associated with offline behaviors for adolescents and young adults. Social media may have a role in future alcohol intervention efforts including identifying those at risk or providing timely prevention messages. Future intervention efforts may benefit from an affordance approach rather than focusi...

  3. Effect of direct moxibustion at Sihua points on cytokine of chemotherapy patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张去飞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of direct moxibustion at Sihua points on immune function and life qualityof chemotherapy patients with non-small cell lung cancer.Methods Eighty cases were randomly divided into a chemotherapy and moxibustion group(group A)and

  4. New directions in cellular therapy of cancer: a summary of the summit on cellular therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A summit on cellular therapy for cancer discussed and presented advances related to the use of adoptive cellular therapy for melanoma and other cancers. The summit revealed that this field is advancing rapidly. Conventional cellular therapies, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, are becoming more effective and more available. Gene therapy is becoming an important tool in adoptive cell therapy. Lymphocytes are being engineered to express high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs, chimeric antibody-T cell receptors (CARs and cytokines. T cell subsets with more naïve and stem cell-like characteristics have been shown in pre-clinical models to be more effective than unselected populations and it is now possible to reprogram T cells and to produce T cells with stem cell characteristics. In the future, combinations of adoptive transfer of T cells and specific vaccination against the cognate antigen can be envisaged to further enhance the effectiveness of these therapies.

  5. Therapeutic Strategies for Human IgM Antibodies Directed at Tumor-Associated Ganglioside Antigens: Discoveries Made During the Morton Era and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter C; Irie, Reiko F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated gangliosides have been investigated for their potential as antigenic targets for more than 35 years, culminating in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of dinutuximab (Unituxin), an IgG antibody targeted against GD2, for the treatment of neuroblastoma in children. This review is focused on discoveries and development of therapeutic approaches involving human IgM antibodies directed against gangliosides, which occurred over the past 40 years at University of California-Los Angeles and the John Wayne Cancer Institute, where Dr. Donald Morton led the surgical oncology department until his death. PMID:27481004

  6. The future of e-learning in healthcare professional education: some possible directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Walsh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available E-learning in healthcare professional education still seems like it is a new innovation but the reality is that e-learning has been around for as long as the internet has been around. This is approximately twenty years and so it is probably appropriate to now take stock and consider what the future of e-learning in healthcare professional education might be. One likely occurrence is that there will be more formats, more interactive technology, and sometimes game-based learning. Another future of healthcare professional education will likely be in simulation. Like other forms of technology outside of medicine, the cost of e-learning in healthcare professional education will fall rapidly. E-learning will also become more adaptive in the future and so will deliver educational content based on learners' exact needs. The future of e-learning will also be mobile. Increasingly in the future e-learning will be blended with face to face education.

  7. Functional Time Series Models to Estimate Future Age-Specific Breast Cancer Incidence Rates for Women in Karachi, Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farah Yasmeen[1; Sidra Zaheer[2

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in Pakistan. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is about 2.5 times higher than that in the neighboring countries India and Iran. In Karachi, the most populated city of Pakistan, the age-standardized rate of breast cancer was 69.1 per 100,000 women during 1998-2002, which is the highest recorded rate in Asia. The carcinoma of breast in Pakistan is an enormous public health concern. In this study, we examined the recent trends of breast cancer incidence rates among the women in Karachi. Methods: We obtained the secondary data of breast cancer incidence from various hospitals. They included Jinnah Hospital, KIRAN (Karachi Institute of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine), and Civil hospital, where the data were available for the years 2004-2011. A total of 5331 new cases of female breast cancer were registered during this period. We analyzed the data in 5-year age groups 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75+. Nonparametric smoothing were used to obtained age-specific incidence curves, and then the curves are decomposed using principal components analysis to fit FTS (functional time series) model. We then used exponential smoothing statspace models to estimate the forecasts of incidence curve and construct prediction intervals. Results: The breast cancer incidence rates in Karachi increased with age for all available years. The rates increased monotonically and are relatively sharp with the age from 15 years to 50 years and then they show variability after the age of 50 years. 10-year forecasts for the female breast cancer incidence rates in Karachi show that the future rates are expected to remain stable for the age-groups 15-50 years, but they will increase for the females of 50-years and over. Hence in future, the newly diagnosed breast cancer cases in the older women in Karachi are expected to increase. Conclusion: Prediction of age

  8. Nuclear security: Lessons learned from the past and future global directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nuclear material. Modern society, whether in developed or in developing countries, depends on the availability of nuclear energy and on the day to day use of radioactive material in medicine, agriculture, industry and research. Before 11 September these activities were mainly covered by safety rules regarding health and the environment. Since 11 September it is clear that these activities also require adequate security. For the continued, and expanded, use of nuclear energy or radioactive material, nuclear security is indispensable and an important prerequisite for successful and sustainable development. We are now at a time for reflection and for developing our plan for the next stage of our collective efforts of improving nuclear security. More than three years have passed since September 2001, and we have gained much experience. Through many of our nuclear security services, expert assistance and training events, we have assisted Member States in their efforts to improve their preparedness and response capabilities and have acquired a much better understanding of Member States' problems and concerns and of the need for further support. This conference aims at reviewing where we stand and the achievements we have made as well as identifying the issues and directions for our future efforts

  9. Improvements in the use of aquatic herbicides and establishment of future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getsinger, K.D.; Netherland, M.D.; Grue, C.E.; Koschnick, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    priorities for future research directions in chemical management of submersed plants. The priorities we identified include: (A) improving methods for evaluating non-target impacts of herbicides with an emphasis on threatened and endangered species, or species of special concern; (B) improving herbicide performance in flowing-water environments, including irrigation canals; (C) screening and developing new herbicides to supplement fluridone for large-scale or whole-lake management approaches; (D) screening and developing new organic algaecides to supplement the use of copper-based compounds; (E) developing risk assessment tools to educate the public on the risks of invasive species and chemical management options; (F) increasing cooperative research with ecologists and fisheries scientists to evaluate the long-term impacts of invasive species introductions and herbicide programs on native plant assemblages, water quality, and fish populations; and (G) improving the integration of chemical control technology with other aquatic plant management disciplines. While circumstances may dictate setting new priorities or dropping current ones, the list we have generated represents our vision of the needs that will require the greatest focus over the next several years.

  10. Cancer chemoprevention and nutriepigenetics: state of the art and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhauser, Clarissa

    2013-01-01

    (I3C), diindolylmethane (DIM), sulforaphane, phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI), diallyldisulfide (DADS) and its metabolite allyl mercaptan (AM), cambinol, and relatively unexplored modulators of histone lysine methylation (chaetocin, polyamine analogs). So far, data are still mainly derived from in vitro investigations, and results of animal models or human intervention studies are limited that demonstrate the functional relevance of epigenetic mechanisms for health promoting or cancer preventive efficacy of natural products. Also, most studies have focused on single candidate genes or mechanisms. With the emergence of novel technologies such as next-generation sequencing, future research has the potential to explore nutriepigenomics at a genome-wide level to understand better the importance of epigenetic mechanisms for gene regulation in cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22955508

  11. Norwegian gas sale in an international perspective - future-directed organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with future organization of the Norwegian gas sale. The author gives at first a brief review of the Norwegian gas sale, and then a discussion on which type of criteria being based on by evaluation of models for the Norwegian gas sale. A comparison on which type of criteria used in other gas supplying countries is discussed. The author discusses tendencies of development in the international market including Europe, and is questioning if the existing system of gas sale is prepared to meet future challenges. Several types of proposals are presented to solve these challenges. 5 figs

  12. Development of E-learning in higher education and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Uhomoibhi, J.O; Palma, J; Alves, Paulo; Elpebion, Y.; Restivo, T.M.; Piteira, M.R.; Soares, F.O.; Fernandez, C

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is based on the work of the ‘Future of E-Learning Group’, a constituent of the EUNIS E-Learning task Force. The group has set up a number of tasks to fulfill its role, one of which, is seeking and disseminating information on the development of e-learning with a view to ensuring the right guide is provided for progress into the future. In our work to date, in this era of globalization, we question the ability of present university systems to respond adequately and appropriat...

  13. PRESENT AND FUTURE OF NATIONAL ACCOUNTING REGULATIONS COMPLIANT WITH EUROPEAN DIRECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina, LUȚĂ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Financial statements are the basic form to submit accounting information and they envisage the provision of information on an enterprise's financial status, performance and cash flow. The quality of financial reporting arises from accounting norms that impose a joint terminology ensuring accounting information's comparability, communication and understanding. In the European Union, the standards adopted by the Council of European Communities aim at harmonizing accounting systems, preparing and submitting annual financial statements. To apply them, member states must first incorporate them into their own legislations resorting over time to various implementation solutions, which involves certain difficulties due to economic, social and political peculiarities. In this respect, the European Parliament has adopted Directive 2013/34/EU regarding annual financial statements, consolidated financial statements and associated reports of various types of enterprises. The present paper envisages a comparative study of old directives (Fourth Directive and Seventh Directive and the new Directive.

  14. The EU Nickel Directive revisited--future steps towards better protection against nickel allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Uter, Wolfgang; McFadden, John;

    2011-01-01

    and the Danish nickel regulation, consumer items intended to be in direct and prolonged contact with the skin were not allowed to release more than 0.5 µg nickel/cm2/week. It was considered unlikely that nickel allergy would disappear altogether as a proportion of individuals reacted below the level defined......In July 2001, the EU Nickel Directive came into full force to protect European citizens against nickel allergy and dermatitis. Prior to this intervention, Northern European governments had already begun to regulate consumer nickel exposure. According to part 2 of the EU Nickel Directive...... by the EU Nickel Directive. Despite this, the EU Nickel Directive part 2 was expected to work as an operational limit that would sufficiently protect European consumers against nickel allergy and dermatitis. This review presents the accumulation of epidemiological studies that evaluated the possible effect...

  15. Designing anti-cancer drugs and directing anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Elinor; Soto-Andrade, Jorge; Bongalon, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A prototype for a web application was designed and implemented as a guide to be used by clinicians when designing the best drug therapy for a specific cancer patient, given biological data derived from the patients tumor tissue biopsy. A representation of the patients metabolic pathways is displayed as a graph in the application, with nodes as substrates and products and edges as enzymes. The top metabolically active sub- paths in the pathway, ranked using an algorithm based on both the patie...

  16. Intent to participate in future cervical cancer screenings is lower when satisfaction with the decision to be vaccinated is neutral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Marya Alexander

    Full Text Available HPV vaccination programs have adversely affected participation in future cervical cancer screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of decision satisfaction with accepting/rejecting the HPV vaccine, as well as traditional clinical factors, on the intent to participate in future screening.From January 2011 through August 2012 women 18-26 years old presenting for health care in an urban college student health and wellness clinic in the US Midwest were asked to complete a descriptive and medical history survey including a six element decisional satisfaction survey scored on 5-point Likert scales, where the intent to participate in future cervical cancer screening was measured. Of the 568 women who completed the decisional satisfaction survey, 17% of those <21 years and 7% ≥ 21 years indicated no intent to participate in future cervical cancer screenings. Among women of current screening age, the univariate risk factors of race/ethnicity, contraceptive use, number of lifetime sexual partners, and receipt of HPV vaccine were not predictors of intent for future cervical cancer screening. Instead, only a history of a prior Pap test was a significant positive predictor and only a decisional satisfaction of 'neutral' (Likert score = 3 for any of the four decisional satisfaction elements was a significant negative predictor. For the decisional satisfaction element "best for me personally", there was a 78% decreased likelihood of intending to participate in future screening if the satisfaction was neutral rather than firm (aOR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.05-0.91 and a 26 fold increased likelihood if she had had a prior Pap test (aOR = 26, 95% CI: 5-133.HPV vaccination implementation programs must help women be the owner of their decision around HPV vaccination and understand the importance of future participation in cervical cancer screening.

  17. Laser Ion Acceleration Toward Future Ion Beam Cancer Therapy - Numerical Simulation Sudy-

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Ming

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions ...

  18. Case-control design as investigative approach to assessing cancer etiology: development and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, B; Filipovic, S; Petrovic, B; Nikolic, M

    2012-01-01

    The case-control method evolved out of analyses of series of cases. The analytic form of the case-control study can be found in the 19th century medical literature, but did not appear to be viewed as a special or distinct methodology. The first modern case-control study was the Janet Lane-Claypon's study of breast cancer in 1926, but the design was used only sporadically in medicine until 1950, when 4 published casecontrol studies linked smoking and lung cancer. These 1950s studies synthesized the essential elements of the case-control comparison, produced a conceptual shift within epidemiology, and laid the foundation for the rapid development of the case-control design in the subsequent half century. The powerful consistency of these case-control studies, and the replication of their findings in later prospective studies, promoted the general acceptance of the case-control study as a scientific tool in clinical research. Newer case-control studies have benefited from the advances in design, execution and analysis since 1950s. These advances include more rigorous selection and matching of case and control population, improved interviewing techniques, location of the design within a general framework of epidemiologic strategies for relating exposure to disease, understanding of the measures of effect, and application of increasingly sophisticated statistical procedures to findings. This review traces the development and future perspectives of the case-control design to assessing cancer etiology. With illustrations drawn primarily from the literature on its use and the value of its results to unravelling the etiology of malignant diseases, we tried to explore if the case-control approach firmly ensconced in epidemiology as investigational tool and rivals in importance the more straightforward cohort approach. PMID:23033277

  19. Lessons of ALS imaging: Pitfalls and future directions — A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bede

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: A systematic, critical review of ALS imaging has identified stereotypical shortcomings, the lessons of which should be considered in the design of future prospective MRI studies. At a time when large multicentre studies are underway a candid discussion of these factors is particularly timely.

  20. Research in Online and Blended Learning in the Business Disciplines: Key Findings and Possible Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.; Godfrey, Michael R.; Johnson, Marianne; Pollack, Birgit Leisen; Niendorf, Bruce; Wresch, William

    2009-01-01

    In this literature review, we examine and assess the state of research of online and blended learning in the business disciplines with the intent of assessing the state of the field and identifying opportunities for meaningful future research. We review research from business disciplines such as Accounting, Economics, Finance, Information Systems…

  1. The ABPN Maintenance of Certification Program for Psychiatrists: Past History, Current Status, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Larry R.; Tivnan, Patricia W.; Winstead, Daniel K.; Reus, Victor I.; Andrade, Naleen N.; Brooks, Beth Ann; Colenda, Christopher C.; Mrazek, David A.; Reifler, Burton V.; Schneidman, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) Maintenance of Certification Program, its underlying rationale, how it will be implemented now, and what it might look like in the future. Methods: The authors describe the philosophical foundation, specific components, and the implementation timeline of the ABPN…

  2. A Review of Research on Metacognition in Science Education: Current and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Anat; Barzilai, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to map the current state of research in the field of metacognition in science education, to identify key trends, and to discern areas and questions for future research. We conducted a systematic analysis of 178 studies published in peer-reviewed journals in the years 2000-2012 and indexed in the ERIC database. The…

  3. Future Directions of Management Science and Operations Management in Business School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jack A.; Denton, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The fields of Management Science (MS) and Operations Management (OM) have co-existed in business school curricula for over a half century. This paper examines five trends that point toward a bright future for Operations Management in the business curriculum. These trends include an increasing emphasis on global competition, the growth of the…

  4. ICGI: Past, Present and Future Direction%ICGI:过去、现在及未来

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roy G. CANTRELL; Lloyd MAY

    2002-01-01

    @@ Cotton is viewed as the most important cash crop in the world, and sustains the agricultural economies of many nations by providing a sustainable fiber product for the textilindustries.Unfortunately, many challenges face cotton production at present and in the future.

  5. Treading lightly on shifting ground: The direction and motivation of future geological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The future of the geosciences and geological research will involve complex scientific challenges, primarily concerning global and regional environmental issues, in the next 20-30 years. It is quite reasonable to suspect, based on current political and socioeconomic events, that young geoscientists will be faced with and involved in helping to resolve some well defined problems: water and energy security, the effects of anthropogenic climate change, coastal sea level rise and development, and the mitigation of geohazards. It is how we choose to approach these challenges that will define our future. Interdisciplinary applied research, improved modeling and prediction augmented with faster and more sophisticated computing, and a greater role in creating and guiding public policy, will help us achieve our goals of a cleaner and safer Earth environment in the next 30 years. In the far future, even grander possibilities for eliminating the risk of certain geohazards and finding sustainable solutions to our energy needs can be envisioned. Looking deeper into the future, the possibilities for geoscience research push the limits of the imagination.

  6. Direct ChromOSOme Analysis and FISH Detection of Primary Gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate chromosome aberrations and their role in the genesis and development of primary gastric cancer. Methods: An improved, direct chromosome preparation from solid tumors was adopted for G-banding analysis followed by FISH on decolored G-banding chromosomes so that chromosome aberrations could be confirmed at DNA level. Results: A total of 28 primary gastric cancer specimens were studies. Case 1 and case 2 had simple chromosome numerical changes: 49, XY, +2, +8, +9 and 48, +8, +20, respectively. All but case 1 and 2 had complicated chromosome abnormalities. Chromosome structural of frequent occurrence involved del(7q)(21/26), del(3p)(14/26), del(lp)(l1/26) and del(17p)(10/26). The chromosome abnormalities could be simple and complicated. In former, numerical changes involving 1 to 3 chromosome could be observed. Trisomies 8 and 9 might represent a cytogenetic subgroup of primary gastric cancer. In the later, the del(7q) was the most consistent aberration. 7q32-qter was the commonly lost segment. Conclusion: Numerical and structural alterations of chromosomes are present in primary gastric cancer. Del(7q) is one of the structural change characteristic of primary gastric cancer. In the 7q32-qter fragment, a tumor suppressor gene probably exists and it may have close relation to the genesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  7. Direct Raman imaging spectroscopy of lung cancer cells and apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Furihata, Chie; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic technique enables to observe intracellular molecules without fixation or labeling procedures in situ. We demonstrated a classification of human lung cancer cells with Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis. Normal lung cell-lines and 4 pathological types of cancer cell-lines were seeded on culture dishes and examined. It was as a preliminary study for direct Raman imaging spectroscopy, which could be available for clinical use, to diagnose cancer. The result suggests that Raman spectroscopy could be a complementary method for immunohistology study. We also constructed a new direct Raman imaging system consisting of a high sensitive CCD image sensor, narrow band pass-filters, and a background-free electrically tunable Ti:Sapphire laser. The observation wavelengths can be switched immediately for the purpose of malignancy rapid diagnosis or real time measurement for apoptotic cells. The potential ability of the direct Raman imaging system is supposed to evaluate apoptosis by UV irradiation and anticancer drug-treatment for living lung cancer cells.

  8. Cancer risk from low dose radiation depends directly on the organ mass in a general model of radiation-induced cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z W

    2014-04-01

    Current methods of evaluating radiation-induced cancer risk depend on the organ dose but not explicitly on extensive quantities such as the organ mass. However, at the same organ dose, one may expect the larger number of cells in a larger organ to lead to a higher cancer risk. Here the author introduces organ- and radiation type-specific cell cancer risk coefficients and obtains analytical relations between cancer risk and the radiation environment, which contains the dependence of cancer risk on organ masses. The excess cancer risk induced by low dose radiation for an organ is shown to be directly proportional to the organ mass. Therefore the total excess risk for all solid cancers depends directly on organ masses and consequently on body weight or size. This method is also being compared with three existing methods of evaluating the radiation-induced cancer risk, and special cases where this formulation matches each method are demonstrated. The results suggest that the direct dependence of cancer risk on organ masses needs to be checked against existing epidemiological data and, if verified, should be included in the methodology for the evaluation of radiation-induced cancer risk, in particular the individual risk. This dependence is also expected to affect the cancer risk transport from one population group to another that is different in organ mass, body weight or height. PMID:24562066

  9. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  10. Pembrolizumab for the treatment of thoracic malignancies: current landscape and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Safiya; Leighl, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    New insights into the interaction between the immune system and the tumor microenvironment have led to the development of checkpoint inhibitors that target the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. Pembrolizumab (MK-3475, lambrolizumab, Keytruda(®)) is a PD-1 inhibitor that has shown clinical activity in a variety of solid tumors and is currently approved for the second-line treatment of PD-L1-positive non-small-cell lung cancer and for unresectable/metastatic melanoma. This article will discuss the results of early-phase trials of pembrolizumab in thoracic malignancies as well as ongoing studies aimed to confirm clinical benefit.

  11. Future Directions in Computer Graphics and Visualization: From CG&A's Editorial Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Encarnacao, L. M.; Chuang, Yung-Yu; Stork, Andre; Kasik, David; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Avila, Lisa; Kohlhammer, Jorn; LaViola, Joseph; Tory, Melanie; Dill, John; Domik, Gitta; Owen, G. Scott; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-01

    With many new members joining the CG&A editorial board over the past year, and with a renewed commitment to not only document the state of the art in computer graphics research and applications but to anticipate and where possible foster future areas of scientific discourse and industrial practice, we asked editorial and advisory council members about where they see their fields of expertise going. The answers compiled here aren’t meant to be all encompassing or deterministic when it comes to the opportunities computer graphics and interactive visualization hold for the future. Instead, we aim to accomplish two things: give a more in-depth introduction of members of the editorial board to the CG&A readership and encourage cross-disciplinary discourse toward approaching, complementing, or disputing the visions laid out in this compilation.

  12. Future directions: advances and implications of virtual environments designed for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Brenda K; Soomro, Ahmad; Riva, Giuseppe; Wiederhold, Mark D

    2014-06-01

    Pain symptoms have been addressed with a variety of therapeutic measures in the past, but as we look to the future, we begin encountering new options for patient care and individual health and well-being. Recent studies indicate that computer-generated graphic environments--virtual reality (VR)--can offer effective cognitive distractions for individuals suffering from pain arising from a variety of physical and psychological illnesses. Studies also indicate the effectiveness of VR for both chronic and acute pain conditions. Future possibilities for VR to address pain-related concerns include such diverse groups as military personnel, space exploration teams, the general labor force, and our ever increasing elderly population. VR also shows promise to help in such areas as drug abuse, at-home treatments, and athletic injuries.

  13. Current endovascular treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkosis, Angela A; Abramowitz, Steven; Malik, Rajesh K; Ellozy, Sharif H; Faries, Peter L; Marin, Michael L

    2012-12-01

    The paradigm in elective surgical management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has quickly shifted from major open surgical repairs to less invasive, endovascular procedures. In the last few years, there have been numerous advancements to commercially available devices making the endovascular approach more attractive and efficacious. This review serves to detail the similarities, differences, advantages, and disadvantages of currently available endovascular stent-grafts as well as preview future and emerging technologies in endovascular aortic therapies.

  14. Islamic Banking and Finance: Recent Empirical Literature and Directions for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Abedifar, Pejman; Ebrahim, Shahid; Molyneux, Philip; Tarazi, Amine

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the recent empirical literature in Islamic banking and finance, highlights the main findings and provides a guide for future research. Early studies focus on the efficiency, production technology and general performance features of Islamic versus conventional banks, whereas more recent work looks at profit and loss-sharing (PLS) behaviour, competition, risks as well as other dimensions such as small business lending and financial inclusion. Apart from key exceptions, the e...

  15. Whole-body MR imaging. Practical issues, clinical applications, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustace, S J; Walker, R; Blake, M; Yucel, E K

    1999-05-01

    Whole-body MR imaging is in evolution, and although accepting and recognizing limitations, it is likely that both technique and incurred acquisition times will shorten over the next decade. Although the development of dedicated whole-body MR scanners appears to offer the greatest promise for the future, the development of moving table tops, optimized pulse sequences, and advances in gradient technology now facilitate practical whole-body MR imaging using existing clinical systems.

  16. Adolescent Cellphone Use While Driving: An Overview of the Literature and Promising Future Directions for Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kit Delgado; Kathryn J. Wanner; Catherine McDonald

    2016-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death in adolescents, and drivers aged 16–19 are the most likely to die in distracted driving crashes. This paper provides an overview of the literature on adolescent cellphone use while driving, focusing on the crash risk, incidence, risk factors for engagement, and the effectiveness of current mitigation strategies. We conclude by discussing promising future approaches to prevent crashes related to cellphone use in adolescents. Handheld manipul...

  17. Future Directions: Advances and Implications of Virtual Environments Designed for Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Wiederhold, Brenda K.; Soomro, Ahmad; Riva, Giuseppe; Wiederhold, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Pain symptoms have been addressed with a variety of therapeutic measures in the past, but as we look to the future, we begin encountering new options for patient care and individual health and well-being. Recent studies indicate that computer-generated graphic environments—virtual reality (VR)—can offer effective cognitive distractions for individuals suffering from pain arising from a variety of physical and psychological illnesses. Studies also indicate the effectiveness of VR for both chro...

  18. Towards Sustainable Agricultural Stewardship: Evolution and Future Directions of the Permaculture Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Jungho Suh

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the origins of the concept of permaculture and discusses the sustainability of permaculture itself as a form of alternative agriculture. The principles of permaculture are shown to have many views and perspectives in common with Taoism and with Buddhist ecology and economics. The amalgamation of these Oriental traditions can be translated into the Kaya equation and beyond. It is argued that future permaculture movements should focus on revitalising the communitarian spirit o...

  19. Human factors implications of vehicle automation: Current understanding and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Merat, N.; de Waard, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Advances in vehicle-based technology are currently progressing at an ever- increasing rate and innovations in this area are no longer restricted to Original Equipment Manufacturers or the automotive industry, with service providers such as Google and a number of research institutes in Europe and North America also offering possibilities for new approaches to mobility (see http://www.driverless-future.com/?page_id=155). The race to test the first fleet of such vehicles on public roads is curre...

  20. Design Rework Prediction in Concurrent Design Environment: Current Trends and Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Arundachawat, Panumas; Roy, Rajkumar; Al-Ashaab, Ahmed; Shehab, Essam

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to present state-of-the-art and formulate future research areas on design rework in concurrent design environment. Related literatures are analysed to extract the key factors which impact design rework. Design rework occurs due to changes from upstream design activities and/or by feedbacks from downstream design activities. Design rework is considered as negative iteration; therefore, value in design activities will be increased if design rework is reduced. Set-bas...

  1. ETSI reconfigurable radio systems : Status and future directions on software defined radio and cognitive radio standards

    OpenAIRE

    Mueck M.; Piipponen A.; Kalliojarvi K.; Dimitrakopoulos G.; Tsagkaris K.; Demestichas P.; Casadevall F.; Perez-Romero J.; Sallent O.; Baldini G.

    2010-01-01

    Feature Topic on Advances in IEEE Standards and Testbeds for Cognitive Radio Networks International audience This article details the current work status of the ETSI Reconfigurable Radio Systems Techni- cal Committee, positions the ETSI work with respect to other standards efforts (IEEE 802, IEEE SCC41) as well as the European Regula- tory Framework, and gives an outlook on the future evolution. In particular, software defined radio related study results are presented with a focus on SD...

  2. Organizational Communication: An Analysis of the Main Perspectives, Main Concepts and Future Directions of the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Yüksel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a scholarly debate since the 1980s regarding the content, theory, methodology and applications that define the scope of organizational communication and separate it from other related disciplines. This debate is critical in the sense that it enables to identity organizational communication in a rich manner and helps us define the scope of the field and its unique characteristics. Based on this main assumption, this study addressed the major theoretical/methodological dimensions of the field (functional, interpretive, and critical, conceptualization of the most critical concepts (organization, communication, culture, voice/control in these dimensions, and current gaps and future directions of the field. This study revealed that the field of organizational communication has made great improvements since the field emerged in the last three decade with its own content, methodology, and applications and generated an adequate body of research within these different perspectives. It is shown that representation of the field by different perspectives provides richness to the field compared with the time when organizational communication was solely dominated by functional, positivist research. Key words: Functional/interpretive/critical perspectives, communication, organization, culture, control, effectiveness. Örgütsel İletişim: Alanın Ana Yaklaşımları, Ana Kavramları ve Gelecek Yönelimlerinin AnaliziÖzÖrgütsel iletişim alanının kapsamı ve bu alanı ilgili displinlerden ayıracak içerik, teori, yöntem, ve uygulamalar üzerine akademik tartışmalar 1980’li yıllardan beri devam etmektedir. Bu tartışmalar, örgütsel iletişim alanının derinlemesine anlaşılması, sınırlarının belirlenmesi ve diğer disiplinlerden ayrılan özelliklerinin anlaşılması noktasında hayati öneme sahiptir. Bu temel varsayımdan hareketle, bu çalışma alandaki temel teorik/yöntemsel yaklaşımları (işlevsel, yorumlayıcı, ele

  3. Management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: Current treatment options, challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre R Pachman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Deirdre R Pachman1, Jason M Jones1, Charles L Loprinzi21Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Hot flashes are one of the most common and distressing symptoms associated with menopause, occurring in more than 75% of postmenopausal women. They are especially problematic in breast cancer patients since some breast cancer therapies can induce hot flashes. For mild hot flashes, it is proposed that behavioral modifications are the first step in management. Hormonal therapies, including estrogens and progestogens, are the most well known effective agents in relieving hot flashes; however, the safety of these agents is controversial. There is an increasing amount of literature on nonhormonal agents for the treatment of hot flashes. The most promising data regard newer antidepressant agents such as venlafaxine, which reduces hot flashes by about 60%. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal agent that is effective in reducing hot flashes. While many complimentary therapies, including phytoestrogens, black cohosh, and dehydroepiandrosterone, have been explored for the treatment of hot flashes; none can be recommended at this time. Furthermore, there is a lack of strong evidence to support exercise, yoga, or relaxation for the treatment of hot flashes. Paced respirations and hypnosis appear to be promising enough to warrant further investigation. Another promising nonpharmacological therapy, currently under investigation, involves a stellate ganglion block.Keywords: vasomotor symptoms, hot flashes, menopause, therapy

  4. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiesschaert, Bart; McFadden, Grant; Hermans, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2011-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS) by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1) are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century. PMID:21658227

  5. Parenting styles and practices in children's obesogenic behaviors: scientific gaps and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Heather; Hennessy, Erin; McSpadden, Kate; Oh, April

    2013-08-01

    Given the emerging global childhood obesity epidemic and the specter of a generation of children who will have a shorter life expectancy than that of their parents, recent research has focused on factors that influence children's weight status and obesogenic behaviors (i.e., eating, physical activity, and screen media use). Parents act as primary socializing agents for children, and thus growing evidence supports the role of parenting styles and practices in children's obesity-related behaviors and weight. Studying these processes in children and adolescents is important for several reasons. First, diet and physical activity behaviors and weight status track from childhood and adolescence into adulthood. Furthermore, diet and physical activity behaviors and weight status confer significant risk for cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic diseases. The purpose of this article is to describe the scientific gaps that need to be addressed to develop a more informed literature on parenting styles and practices in the domains of weight status and obesogenic behaviors, as identified by an expert panel assembled by the National Cancer Institute.

  6. Real-time motion analysis reveals cell directionality as an indicator of breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Weiger

    Full Text Available Cancer cells alter their migratory properties during tumor progression to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites. However, it remains unclear how migratory behaviors differ between tumor cells of different malignancy and whether these migratory behaviors can be utilized to assess the malignant potential of tumor cells. Here, we analyzed the migratory behaviors of cell lines representing different stages of breast cancer progression using conventional migration assays or time-lapse imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV to capture migration dynamics. We find that the number of migrating cells in transwell assays, and the distance and speed of migration in unconstrained 2D assays, show no correlation with malignant potential. However, the directionality of cell motion during 2D migration nicely distinguishes benign and tumorigenic cell lines, with tumorigenic cell lines harboring less directed, more random motion. Furthermore, the migratory behaviors of epithelial sheets observed under basal conditions and in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF or lysophosphatitic acid (LPA are distinct for each cell line with regard to cell speed, directionality, and spatiotemporal motion patterns. Surprisingly, treatment with LPA promotes a more cohesive, directional sheet movement in lung colony forming MCF10CA1a cells compared to basal conditions or EGF stimulation, implying that the LPA signaling pathway may alter the invasive potential of MCF10CA1a cells. Together, our findings identify cell directionality as a promising indicator for assessing the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cell lines and show that LPA induces more cohesive motility in a subset of metastatic breast cancer cells.

  7. Direct activation of the apoptosis machinery as a mechanism to target cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jack T; Wells, James A

    2003-06-24

    Apoptosis plays a pivotal role in the cytotoxic activity of most chemotherapeutic drugs, and defects in this pathway provide a basis for drug resistance in many cancers. Thus the ability to restore apoptosis by using small molecules could have important therapeutic implications. Using a cell-free assay to simultaneously target multiple components of the apoptosis pathway, we identified a class of compounds that activate caspases in a cytochrome c-dependent manner and induce apoptosis in whole cells. By reconstituting the apoptosis pathway with purified proteins, we determined that these compounds promote the protein-protein association of Apaf-1 into the functional apoptosome. These compounds exert cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a variety of cancer cell lines while having little or no activity against the normal cell lines tested. These findings suggest that direct activation of the basic apoptosis machinery may be a viable mechanism to selectively target cancer.

  8. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  9. Radiolabelled peptides for tumour therapy: current status and future directions. Plenary lecture at the EANM 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On their plasma membranes, cells express receptor proteins with high affinity for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin. Changes in the density of these receptors during disease, e.g. overexpression in many tumours, provide the basis for new imaging methods. The first peptide analogues successfully applied for visualisation of receptor-positive tumours were radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The next step was to label these analogues with therapeutic radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Results from preclinical and clinical multicentre studies have already shown an effective therapeutic response when using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues to treat receptor-positive tumours. Infusion of positively charged amino acids reduces kidney uptake, enlarging the therapeutic window. For PRRT of CCK-B receptor-positive tumours, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, radiolabelled minigastrin analogues are currently being successfully applied. The combination of different therapy modalities holds interest as a means of improving the clinical therapeutic effects of radiolabelled peptides. The combination of different radionuclides, such as 177Lu- and 90Y-labelled somatostatin analogues, to reach a wider tumour region of high curability, has been described. A variety of other peptide-based radioligands, such as bombesin and NPY(Y1) analogues, receptors for which are expressed on common cancers such as prostate and breast cancer, are currently under development and in different phases of (pre)clinical investigation. Multi-receptor tumour targeting using the combination of bombesin and NPY(Y1) analogues is promising for scintigraphy and PRRT of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  10. Radiolabelled peptides for tumour therapy: current status and future directions. Plenary lecture at the EANM 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, L2, Erasmus MC, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    On their plasma membranes, cells express receptor proteins with high affinity for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin. Changes in the density of these receptors during disease, e.g. overexpression in many tumours, provide the basis for new imaging methods. The first peptide analogues successfully applied for visualisation of receptor-positive tumours were radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The next step was to label these analogues with therapeutic radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Results from preclinical and clinical multicentre studies have already shown an effective therapeutic response when using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues to treat receptor-positive tumours. Infusion of positively charged amino acids reduces kidney uptake, enlarging the therapeutic window. For PRRT of CCK-B receptor-positive tumours, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, radiolabelled minigastrin analogues are currently being successfully applied. The combination of different therapy modalities holds interest as a means of improving the clinical therapeutic effects of radiolabelled peptides. The combination of different radionuclides, such as {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-labelled somatostatin analogues, to reach a wider tumour region of high curability, has been described. A variety of other peptide-based radioligands, such as bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues, receptors for which are expressed on common cancers such as prostate and breast cancer, are currently under development and in different phases of (pre)clinical investigation. Multi-receptor tumour targeting using the combination of bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues is promising for scintigraphy and PRRT of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  11. Clinical reasoning assessment through medical expertise theories: past, present and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushehri, Elham; Soltani Arabshahi, Kamran; Monajemi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Exploration into the concept of "medical expert" dates back to more than 50 years ago, yet yielding three leading theories in the area of clinical reasoning, namely, knowledge structure, hypotheticdeductive, and dual process. Each theory defines "medical expert" in a dissimilar way. Therefore, the methods of assessment through which the experts are identified have been changed during the time. In this paper, we tried to categorize and introduce some widely used tests for identification of experts within the framework of existing main theories. Implementation of the proposed categorization for providing future assessment tools is discussed.

  12. History, Current Knowledge, and Future Directions on Bacteriocin Research in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nes, Ingolf F.

    All organisms, both eukaryotic organisms and bacteria, are able to produce ribosomally antimicrobial peptides. In bacteria, such compounds are referred to as bacteriocins. The history of bacteriocins goes back to the early 1920s. One has experienced many disappointments in the efforts how to put these compounds into practical use despite being one of the most promising groups of antimicrobial agents to fight bacterial pathogens. However, today, we see new possibilities how to take advantage of such peptides for the benefit of man and animals. Bacteriocin production has become an important property of probiotic bacteria, and targeted use of bacteriocins to fight certain pathogens may have a future.

  13. Direction or inertia: the future for regulation of surgical implant devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habal, M B; Karlan, M S; Leake, D

    1978-01-01

    The time has arrived when certain standards are to be introduced to control the introduction of and appropriate use of surgical implant devices. Now is the time for the professional groups involved in standards and medical device legislation to become active and develop surgical implant device standards to be applicable for the future. A commission could be established to work with FDA in respect to the requirements for surgical implant devices. It is time for the clinical organizations involved in writing consensus standards to cooperate in the introduction of surgical implant device standards. PMID:10316638

  14. Current and Future Directions for the U.S. Industry Accounts

    OpenAIRE

    Ann M. Lawson

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Industry Accounts for the United States, which are prepared by the Bureau of Economic Analysis in the U.S. Department of Commerce. It includes a brief history of the programs with emphasis on the past 10 years, as well as a discussion of plans for future work. The Industry Accounts include the benchmark input-output (I-O) accounts, which are based on detailed data from the economic censuses that are conducted every 5 years by the Bureau of the Census; th...

  15. Coronary CT: clinical indications and future directions; Tomografia de coronarias: indicacoes clinicas e perspectivas futuras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Cesar H.; Serpa, Bruna S.; Kay, Fernando U.; Szarf, Gilberto; Passos, Rodrigo B.; Neto, Roberto S.; Chate, Rodigo C.; Funar, Marcelo B., E-mail: cesarnomura@gmail.com [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cury, Roberto C. [Hospital Samaritano, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has started its implementation in cardiology with calcium quantification of coronary plaques in the study without contrast, using the calcium score, demonstrating an important independent predictor of future cardiac events. The examination with intravenous contrast, coronary angiography, appeared later as a noninvasive method for evaluation of anatomy and obstructive coronary disease, characterizing the degree of stenosis and the presence of non calcified atherosclerotic plaques, assessing not only the lumen, but also the vessel wall. With the advent of new machines with more detectors and higher temporal resolution has been a reduction in radiation dose and the possibility of new applications. (author)

  16. Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Galama (Titus); J.L.W. Kippersluis, van (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and

  17. Health inequalities through the lens of health-capital theory: Issues, solutions, and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Galama (Titus); J.L.W. Kippersluis, van (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and

  18. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on future directions in nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was intended to gather active researchers in nuclear physics to discuss the directions for research during the next 10 to 15 years. Topics discussed included: fundamental interactions; nuclear spectroscopy; electromagnetic nuclear physics; intermediate energy physics; heavy ion physics; and interrelationships among subfields of nuclear physics

  19. Objectification Theory and Psychology of Women: A Decade of Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Fredrickson and Roberts (1997) proposed objectification theory as an integrative framework for understanding how women's socialization and experiences of sexual objectification are translated into mental health problems. This article reviews the past decade of research grounded in objectification theory and highlights needed directions for future…

  20. Host-directed therapies for infectious diseases: current status, recent progress, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Rao, Martin; Wallis, Robert S; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Rustomjee, Roxana; Mwaba, Peter; Vilaplana, Cris; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Azhar, Esam; Hoelscher, Michael; Maeurer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Despite extensive global efforts in the fight against killer infectious diseases, they still cause one in four deaths worldwide and are important causes of long-term functional disability arising from tissue damage. The continuing epidemics of tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, and influenza, and the emergence of novel zoonotic pathogens represent major clinical management challenges worldwide. Newer approaches to improving treatment outcomes are needed to reduce the high morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases. Recent insights into pathogen-host interactions, pathogenesis, inflammatory pathways, and the host's innate and acquired immune responses are leading to identification and development of a wide range of host-directed therapies with different mechanisms of action. Host-directed therapeutic strategies are now becoming viable adjuncts to standard antimicrobial treatment. Host-directed therapies include commonly used drugs for non-communicable diseases with good safety profiles, immunomodulatory agents, biologics (eg monoclonal antibodies), nutritional products, and cellular therapy using the patient's own immune or bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. We discuss clinically relevant examples of progress in identifying host-directed therapies as adjunct treatment options for bacterial, viral, and parasitic infectious diseases. PMID:27036359

  1. A Study of the Frequency and Social Determinants of Exposure to Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising Among Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is controversial because cancer treatment is complex and entails more risks and costs than typical treatments that are advertised for other conditions. Drawing from the Structural Influence Model of Communication, this study explores communication inequalities in DTCA exposure across social determinants among a population-based sample of 2013 patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancers. Three survey items assessed patients' frequency of encountering ads concerning treatment alternatives for cancer, dealing with side effects of treatment, and doctors or hospitals offering services for cancer following their diagnosis. The analysis showed that overall exposure to DTCA in this study population was modest (median was once per week). Breast cancer patients reported significantly higher exposure to all three ad categories and overall DTCA exposure than prostate and colorectal cancer patients. Older patients consistently reported lower overall exposure to DTCA across the three cancer types. Other significant correlates included ethnicity (higher exposures among African American prostate cancer patients vs. White; lower exposures in Hispanic colorectal cancer patients vs. White) and cancer stage (higher exposures in Stage IV prostate cancer patients vs. Stages 0-II). Education level did not predict patients' DTCA exposure. The implications of these observed inequalities in DTCA exposure on cancer outcomes are discussed.

  2. A Study of the Frequency and Social Determinants of Exposure to Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising Among Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is controversial because cancer treatment is complex and entails more risks and costs than typical treatments that are advertised for other conditions. Drawing from the Structural Influence Model of Communication, this study explores communication inequalities in DTCA exposure across social determinants among a population-based sample of 2013 patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancers. Three survey items assessed patients' frequency of encountering ads concerning treatment alternatives for cancer, dealing with side effects of treatment, and doctors or hospitals offering services for cancer following their diagnosis. The analysis showed that overall exposure to DTCA in this study population was modest (median was once per week). Breast cancer patients reported significantly higher exposure to all three ad categories and overall DTCA exposure than prostate and colorectal cancer patients. Older patients consistently reported lower overall exposure to DTCA across the three cancer types. Other significant correlates included ethnicity (higher exposures among African American prostate cancer patients vs. White; lower exposures in Hispanic colorectal cancer patients vs. White) and cancer stage (higher exposures in Stage IV prostate cancer patients vs. Stages 0-II). Education level did not predict patients' DTCA exposure. The implications of these observed inequalities in DTCA exposure on cancer outcomes are discussed. PMID:25357119

  3. The Attitudes of Chinese Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers toward Advance Directives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advance directives (ADs have been legislated in many countries to protect patient autonomy regarding medical decisions at the end of life. China is facing a serious cancer burden and cancer patients’ quality at the end of life should be a concern. However, limited studies have been conducted locally to gather information about attitudes toward ADs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers toward ADs and to explore the predictors that are associated with attitudes. The study indicated that although there was low awareness of ADs, most cancer patients and family caregivers had positive attitudes toward ADs after related information was explained to them. Participants preferred to discuss ADs with medical staff when they were diagnosed with a life-threatening disease. Preferences for refusing life-sustaining treatment and choosing Hospice-Palliative Care (HPC at the end of life would increase the likelihood of agreeing with ADs. This suggests that some effective interventions to help participants better understand end-of-life treatments are helpful in promoting ADs. Moreover, the development of HPC would contribute to Chinese cancer patients and family caregivers agreeing with ADs.

  4. Maximizing the ExoEarth candidate yield from a future direct imaging mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, Christopher C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Robinson, Tyler D., E-mail: christopher.c.stark@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric for future exoplanet imaging missions. Here we estimate exoEarth candidate yield using single visit completeness for a variety of mission design and astrophysical parameters. We review the methods used in previous yield calculations and show that the method choice can significantly impact yield estimates as well as how the yield responds to mission parameters. We introduce a method, called Altruistic Yield Optimization, that optimizes the target list and exposure times to maximize mission yield, adapts maximally to changes in mission parameters, and increases exoEarth candidate yield by up to 100% compared to previous methods. We use Altruistic Yield Optimization to estimate exoEarth candidate yield for a large suite of mission and astrophysical parameters using single visit completeness. We find that exoEarth candidate yield is most sensitive to telescope diameter, followed by coronagraph inner working angle, followed by coronagraph contrast, and finally coronagraph contrast noise floor. We find a surprisingly weak dependence of exoEarth candidate yield on exozodi level. Additionally, we provide a quantitative approach to defining a yield goal for future exoEarth-imaging missions.

  5. Newton's cradle: a metaphor to consider the flexibility, resistance and direction of nursing's future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Madsen, Wendy; Holmes, Colin

    2014-06-01

    Nursing faces an uncertain future as technological developments, structural changes within health systems and rapidly evolving health needs create new and challenging possibilities. This article draws on the results of a qualitative study undertaken with a range of Queensland nurse leaders to explore their perceptions of these changes. The study re-surfaced, and allows for a re-examination of, four issues that have long created tension within nursing and which continue to have a negative impact on the profession as a whole. These are as follows: professionalisation; preparation of graduates; myths and narratives of nursing; and leadership. We provide a metaphor that imagines all of these tensions operating in dynamic interplay. The image is that of a Newton's Cradle - a model for energy and momentum. The metaphor allows one to see the wide context of changes affecting nursing and the significance of the interconnections. If tensions within nursing maintain their own integrity through containment, understanding and development, they remain in alignment, and energy is conserved rather than wasted or misdirected. It suggests that with increased awareness and attention paid to internal challenges, and by taking a broad-based approach to systemic improvements, nursing could become more effective, progressive and proactive in shaping its own future.

  6. Combining Pharmacological and Psychological Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder: Current Status, Limitations, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Reas, Deborah L; Mitchell, James E

    2016-06-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress about binge eating without the extreme compensatory behaviors for weight control that characterize other eating disorders. BED is prevalent, associated strongly with obesity, and is associated with heightened levels of psychological, psychiatric, and medical concerns. This article provides an overview of randomized controlled treatments for combined psychological and pharmacological treatment of BED to inform current clinical practice and future treatment research. In contrast to the prevalence and significance of BED, to date, limited research has been performed on combining psychological and pharmacological treatments for BED to enhance outcomes. Our review here found that combining certain medications with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or behavioral weight loss (BWL) interventions produces superior outcomes to pharmacotherapy only but does not substantially improve outcomes achieved with CBT/BWL only. One medication (orlistat) has improved weight losses with CBT/BWL albeit minimally, and only one medication (topiramate) has enhanced reductions achieved with CBT in both binge eating and weight. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27086316

  7. Narrative synthesis of equine-assisted psychotherapy literature: Current knowledge and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Tzu; Dakin, Emily; McLure, Merinda

    2016-05-01

    Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) is an innovative emerging approach to mental health treatment. This narrative synthesis explores the current state of knowledge and areas for future research in EAP. Specifically reviewed are qualitative and quantitative empirical studies, including both articles published in peer-reviewed journals and research presented in theses and dissertations. We selected 24 studies for final inclusion in this study, dating between 2005 and 2013, and including the first EAP empirical research completed in 2005. Four of these studies are peer-reviewed journal articles, while 20 are master's theses or doctoral dissertations. The reviewed qualitative research provides initial evidence for the value of EAP for enhancing adolescents' communication and relationship skills. The reviewed experimental and quasi-experimental research provides initial evidence for the value of EAP for enhancing children's and adolescents' emotional, social and behavioural functioning. Yet, conclusions about the effectiveness of EAP must still be considered preliminary due to various methodological limitations in the reviewed research. The narrative review describes these methodological limitations and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25727575

  8. The future direction of ITU-T SG4 and application of correlative technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiang

    2004-04-01

    The future of TMN in ITU-T will be heavily influenced by new telecom technologies, such as IP, and associated management needs. To meet this challenge, SG 4 has adopted two approaches. Current focus of ITU-T SG4 is common working methods for specifying protocol-neutral TMN requirements and information/models and identification of key management technologies to meet future needs. ITU-T SG4 has successfully set up the CORBA framework. The core is re-using the CORBA Common Object Services. ITU-T defines a set of CORBA interfaces for the CORBA generic information model. These interfaces are translated manually from a set of M.3100 GDMO managed object classes following the TMN CORBA framework and guidelines. Although TMN CORBA framework has finished, it still raises new issues, such as implementation conformance and complexity of additional services. It is remarkable that China has made great progress on CORBA-based network management standardization. ITU-T adopts some correlative technologies. SG4 agreed to define the Integrated Management of Hybrid Circuit Switched and Packet/IP Networks. SG4 also make progress in tML, Qos, ETS.

  9. Direct RF Subsampling Receivers for Breast Cancer Detection with Impulse-Based UWB Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Strackx, Maarten; D'Agostino, Emiliano; Leroux, Paul; Reynaert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of a Direct RF subsampling receiver in CMOS is presented for the application of breast cancer detection using impulse-based ultrawideband (UWB) signals. Such a receiver inherently benefits from CMOS scaling since its speed-accuracy tradeoff depends only on technological process parameters. With a proper choice of antenna matching media, the current signal processing requested resolution could be translated into feasible hardware specifications. The track-and-hold (T/H) circ...

  10. Design and cancer-targeting potential of antibody-based molecules directed against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Huhalov, A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines the use of protein engineering to create antibody-based molecules for cancer treatment. The targeting unit used for these molecules was the single chain Fv antibody fragment MFE-23, which is directed against the tumour-associated marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). It was hypothesised that implementation of molecular design features such as humanisation, high affinity, multivalency and mannose glycosylation to accelerate systemic clearance would result in the favourabl...

  11. Application of Quantum Dots-Based Biotechnology in Cancer Diagnosis: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Wei Peng; Yan Li

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have excellent photo-physical properties, and the QDs-based probes have achieved encouraging developments in cellular and in vivo molecular imaging. More and more researches showed that QDs-based technology may become a promising approach in cancer research. In this review, we focus on recent application of QDs in cancer diagnosis and treatment, including early detection of primary tumor such as ovarian cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer an...

  12. The current status and future directions of myxoma virus, a master in immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiesschaert Bart

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV gained importance throughout the twentieth century because of the use of the highly virulent Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS by the Australian government in the attempt to control the feral Australian population of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit and the subsequent illegal release of MYXV in Europe. In the European rabbit, MYXV causes a disease with an exceedingly high mortality rate, named myxomatosis, which is passively transmitted by biting arthropod vectors. MYXV still has a great impact on European rabbit populations around the world. In contrast, only a single cutaneous lesion, restricted to the point of inoculation, is seen in its natural long-term host, the South-American Sylvilagus brasiliensis and the North-American S. Bachmani. Apart from being detrimental for European rabbits, however, MYXV has also become of interest in human medicine in the last two decades for two reasons. Firstly, due to the strong immune suppressing effects of certain MYXV proteins, several secreted virus-encoded immunomodulators (e.g. Serp-1 are being developed to treat systemic inflammatory syndromes such as cardiovascular disease in humans. Secondly, due to the inherent ability of MYXV to infect a broad spectrum of human cancer cells, the live virus is also being developed as an oncolytic virotherapeutic to treat human cancer. In this review, an update will be given on the current status of MYXV in rabbits as well as its potential in human medicine in the twenty-first century. Table of contents Abstract 1. The virus 2. History 3. Pathogenesis and disease symptoms 4. Immunomodulatory proteins of MYXV 4.1. MYXV proteins with anti-apoptotic functions 4.1.1. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic molecules 4.1.2. Inhibition by protein-protein interactions by ankyrin repeat viral proteins 4.1.3. Inhibition of apoptosis by enhancing the degradation of cellular proteins 4.1.4. Inhibition of apoptosis by blocking host Protein Kinase R (PKR 4

  13. Future mission studies: Forecasting solar flux directly from its chaotic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical structure of the programs written to construct a nonlinear predictive model to forecast solar flux directly from its time series without reference to any underlying solar physics is presented. This method and the programs are written so that one could apply the same technique to forecast other chaotic time series, such as geomagnetic data, attitude and orbit data, and even financial indexes and stock market data. Perhaps the most important application of this technique to flight dynamics is to model Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) output of residues between observed position of spacecraft and calculated position with no drag (drag flag = off). This would result in a new model of drag working directly from observed data.

  14. Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galama, Titus J; van Kippersluis, Hans

    2013-06-01

    We explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and our own work, leads us to conclude that non-degenerate versions of the Grossman model (1972a;b) and its extensions can explain many salient stylized facts on health inequalities. Yet, further development is required in at least two directions. First, a childhood phase needs to be incorporated, in recognition of the importance of childhood endowments and investments in the determination of later-life socioeconomic and health outcomes. Second, a unified theory of joint investment in skill (or human) capital and in health capital could provide a basis for a theory of the relationship between education and health. PMID:24570580

  15. Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Galama, Titus; Kippersluis, van, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This discussion paper resulted in a chapter in: (Pedro Rosa Dias and Owen O’Donnell (eds)) 'Research on Economic Inequality' , Volume 21: Health and Inequality, Emerald Group Publishing, 2013. We explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and our own work, l...

  16. Whither CRM? Future directions in Crew Resource Management training in the cockpit and elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The past decade has shown worldwide adoption of human factors training in civil aviation, now known as Crew Resource Management (CRM). The shift in name from cockpit to crew reflects a growing trend to extend the training to other components of the aviation system including flight attendants, dispatchers, maintenance personnel, and Air Traffic Controllers. The paper reports findings and new directions in research into human factors.

  17. Broadening the scope of open innovation : past research, current state and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Vrande, Vareska; Vanhaverbeke,Wim; Gassmann, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    In this first paper of the special issue, we identify some trends in open innovation research by analysing how the literature on this topics has evolved since the introduction of the concept in 2003. Research on open innovation has been mushrooming ever since and the scope has been broadened in different directions. Researchers also started to analyse open innovation at different level of analysis from the individual actors in organisations to ecosystems and national innovation systems. Despi...

  18. Designing serious video games for health behavior change: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe

    2012-07-01

    Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Guidelines discussed include how to develop video games that provide a solid foundation for behavior change by enhancing a player's knowledge and skill, ways in which personal mastery experiences can be incorporated into a video game environment, using game characters and avatars to promote observational learning, creating personalized experiences through tailoring, and the importance of achieving a balance between "fun-ness" and "seriousness." The article concludes with suggestions for future research needed to inform this rapidly growing field.

  19. Exploring the implications of social change for human development: perspectives, issues and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyin

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have investigated the implications of social change for human development from different perspectives. The studies published in this special section were conducted within Greenfield's theoretical framework (2009). The findings concerning links between specific sociodemographic features (e.g., commercial activities, schooling) and individual cognition and social behaviour are particularly interesting because they tap the underlying forces that drive human development. To further understand the issues in these studies and in the field, a pluralist-constructive perspective is discussed, which emphasises the integration of diverse values and practices in both Western and non-Western societies and its effects on the development of sophisticated competencies in individual adaptation to the changing global community. In addition, several issues are highlighted and some suggestions are provided for future explorations in this field.

  20. Standardization and future directions in pattern identification research: International brainstorming session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeeyoun; Park, Bongki; Lee, Ju Ah; You, Sooseong; Alraek, Terje; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Birch, Stephen; Kim, Tae-Hun; Xu, Hao; Zaslawski, Chris; Kang, Byoung-Kab; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-09-01

    An international brainstorming session on standardizing pattern identification (PI) was held at the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine on October 1, 2013 in Daejeon, South Korea. This brainstorming session was convened to gather insights from international traditional East Asian medicine specialists regarding PI standardization. With eight presentations and discussion sessions, the meeting allowed participants to discuss research methods and diagnostic systems used in traditional medicine for PI. One speaker presented a talk titled "The diagnostic criteria for blood stasis syndrome: implications for standardization of PI". Four speakers presented on future strategies and objective measurement tools that could be used in PI research. Later, participants shared information and methodology for accurate diagnosis and PI. They also discussed the necessity for standardizing PI and methods for international collaborations in pattern research.

  1. Maximizing the ExoEarth Candidate Yield from a Future Direct Imaging Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Christopher C; Mandell, Avi; Robinson, Tyler D

    2014-01-01

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric for future exoplanet imaging missions. Here we estimate exoEarth candidate yield using single visit completeness for a variety of mission design and astrophysical parameters. We review the methods used in previous yield calculations and show that the method choice can significantly impact yield estimates as well as how the yield responds to mission parameters. We introduce a method, called Altruistic Yield Optimization, that optimizes the target list and exposure times to maximize mission yield, adapts maximally to changes in mission parameters, and increases exoEarth candidate yield by up to 100% compared to previous methods. We use Altruistic Yield Optimization to estimate exoEarth candidate yield for a large suite of mission and astrophysical parameters using single visit completeness. We find that exoEarth candidate yield is most sensitive to telescope diameter, followed by coronagraph inner working angle, followed by coronagraph contrast, and finally coronagrap...

  2. Over 20 Years of Business Systems Research -Contributions, Gaps, and Future Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtiar Rana, Mohammad

    international business/management researches. This led me to synthesize the contributions of this stream. The review of BS literature from 1992 to 2013 makes an account of its contributions and gaps, brings them to light for international management (IM) studies to show how IM can benefit from this stream......Business system (BS) theory at the intersection between institutionalism and management is gaining incremental attention in the field of management and organization, particularly in cross-border and comparative studies of multinationals management. Yet, this stream does not meet the mainstream......, while gaps found in BS studies present a thirst that future studies of BS can contribute to advance this field of research....

  3. Future directions for the development of virtual reality within an automotive manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Glyn; Salanitri, Davide; Waterfield, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can reduce time and costs, and lead to increases in quality, in the development of a product. Given the pressure on car companies to reduce time-to-market and to continually improve quality, the automotive industry has championed the use of VR across a number of applications, including design, manufacturing, and training. This paper describes interviews with 11 engineers and employees of allied disciplines from an automotive manufacturer about their current physical and virtual properties and processes. The results guided a review of research findings and scientific advances from the academic literature, which formed the basis of recommendations for future developments of VR technologies and applications. These include: develop a greater range of virtual contexts; use multi-sensory simulation; address perceived differences between virtual and real cars; improve motion capture capabilities; implement networked 3D technology; and use VR for market research. PMID:26164106

  4. Pharmacotherapy for the management of achalasia: Current status, challenges and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar; Nassri; Zeeshan; Ramzan

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews currently available pharmacological options available for the treatment of achalasia, with a special focus on the role of botulinum toxin(BT) injection due to its superior therapeutic effect and side effect profile. The discussion on BT includes the role of different BT serotypes, better pharmacological formulations, improved BT injection techniques, the use of sprouting inhibitors, designer recombinant BT formulations and alternative substances used in endoscopic injections. The large body of ongoing research into achalasia and BT may provide a stronger role for BT injection as a form of minimally invasive, cost effective and efficacious form of therapy for patients with achalasia. The article also explores current issues and future research avenues that may prove beneficial in improving the efficacy of pharmacological treatment approaches in patients with achalasia.

  5. Towards an Integrated Approach to Perception and Action: Conference Report and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goren eGordon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article was motivated by the conference entitled ‘Perception & Action – An Interdisciplinary Approach to Cognitive Systems Theory’, which took place September 14-16, 2010 at the Santa Fe Institute, NM, U.S.A. The goal of the conference was to bring together an interdisciplinary group of neuroscientists, roboticists and theorists to discuss the extent and implications of action-perception integration in the brain. The motivation for the conference was the realization that it is a widespread approach in biological, theoretical and computational neuroscience to investigate sensory and motor function of the brain in isolation from one another, while at the same time, it is generally appreciated that sensory and motor processing cannot be fully separated. Our article summarizes the key findings of the conference, provides a hypothetical model that integrates the major themes and concepts presented at the conference, and concludes with a perspective on future challenges in the field.

  6. Part-task training in the context of automation: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Robert S; Clegg, Benjamin A; Blitch, John G

    2013-01-01

    Automation often elicits a divide-and-conquer outlook. By definition, automation has been suggested to assume control over a part or whole task that was previously performed by a human (Parasuraman & Riley, 1997). When such notions of automation are taken as grounds for training, they readily invoke a part-task training (PTT) approach. This article outlines broad functions of automation as a source of PTT and reviews the PTT literature, focusing on the potential benefits and costs related to using automation as a mechanism for PTT. The article reviews some past work in this area and suggests a path to move beyond the type of work captured by the "automation as PTT" framework. An illustrative experiment shows how automation in training and PTT are actually separable issues. PTT with automation has some utility but ultimately remains an unsatisfactory framework for the future broad potential of automation during training, and we suggest that a new conceptualization is needed.

  7. Future agriculture with minimized phosphorus losses to waters: Research needs and direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Andrew N; Bergström, Lars; Aronsson, Helena; Bechmann, Marianne; Bolster, Carl H; Börling, Katarina; Djodjic, Faruk; Jarvie, Helen P; Schoumans, Oscar F; Stamm, Christian; Tonderski, Karin S; Ulén, Barbro; Uusitalo, Risto; Withers, Paul J A

    2015-03-01

    The series of papers in this issue of AMBIO represent technical presentations made at the 7th International Phosphorus Workshop (IPW7), held in September, 2013 in Uppsala, Sweden. At that meeting, the 150 delegates were involved in round table discussions on major, predetermined themes facing the management of agricultural phosphorus (P) for optimum production goals with minimal water quality impairment. The six themes were (1) P management in a changing world; (2) transport pathways of P from soil to water; (3) monitoring, modeling, and communication; (4) importance of manure and agricultural production systems for P management; (5) identification of appropriate mitigation measures for reduction of P loss; and (6) implementation of mitigation strategies to reduce P loss. This paper details the major challenges and research needs that were identified for each theme and identifies a future roadmap for catchment management that cost-effectively minimizes P loss from agricultural activities.

  8. Investigating the Aftermath of Terror: Fundamental Outcomes, Methodological Choices, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradus, Jaimie L; Marx, Brian P; Sloan, Denise M

    2016-06-01

    Acts of terrorism are becoming increasingly common throughout the world. These events represent a significant public health concern given the associated health consequences. Although it is clear that terrorist attacks have mental and physical health sequelae, the exact nature and prevalence of these consequences are unclear. Epidemiological research can play an important role in better understanding the mental and physical impact of terrorist attacks. In this editorial, we highlight recent epidemiological research on these terrorism-related health outcomes. We also provide suggestions for how future studies can build on the existing literature and describe ways in which epidemiological methods can be harnessed to extend the current literature. Lastly, we offer recommendations on how to best prepare communities for the aftermath of terrorist attacks, highlighting secondary intervention and prevention strategies. Overall, multilevel strategies are needed to adequately cope with the growing rise of terrorist acts, and these strategies will have to be reassessed as the nature of terrorist attacks changes. PMID:27136497

  9. Continuing professional development in nursing in Australia: current awareness, practice and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikitis, Mary; McAllister, Margaret; Sharman, Rachael; Raith, Lisa; Faithfull-Byrne, Annette; Priaulx, Rae

    2013-08-01

    Australian nurses and midwives are expected to compile a professional development portfolio during their annual registration process. This study aimed to ascertain the current understanding, practice and future continuing professional development (CPD) needs of nurses and midwives employed in a regional area of Queensland, Australia. Perceived barriers and incentives for CPD were also measured. 289 public and private hospital nurses and midwives responded to the survey. Results showed that participants understood the new requirements, valued ongoing learning, preferred education to occur within work hours, and considered their workplaces as accepting of change. Approximately two-thirds of participants believed CPD should be shared between them and their employers. Barriers to undertaking CPD included understaffing, and the concern that CPD would interfere with time outside work. Organisational support positively influenced attitudes to CPD. This study highlights the importance of supportive management in encouraging their workforce to embrace ongoing learning and change. PMID:24099224

  10. Future directions for the development of virtual reality within an automotive manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Glyn; Salanitri, Davide; Waterfield, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can reduce time and costs, and lead to increases in quality, in the development of a product. Given the pressure on car companies to reduce time-to-market and to continually improve quality, the automotive industry has championed the use of VR across a number of applications, including design, manufacturing, and training. This paper describes interviews with 11 engineers and employees of allied disciplines from an automotive manufacturer about their current physical and virtual properties and processes. The results guided a review of research findings and scientific advances from the academic literature, which formed the basis of recommendations for future developments of VR technologies and applications. These include: develop a greater range of virtual contexts; use multi-sensory simulation; address perceived differences between virtual and real cars; improve motion capture capabilities; implement networked 3D technology; and use VR for market research.

  11. The scientific challenges of NEPA: Future directions based on 20 years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    January 1, 1990, marked the 20th anniversary of the signing of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since this law was enacted, numerous institutions have assisted federal agencies in the implementation of NEPA, including the preparation of environmental impact statements and environmental assessments. The Ninth Oak Ridge National Laboratory Life Sciences Symposium was dedicated to the celebration of this anniversary. The symposium was held October 24--27, 1989, in Knoxville, Tennessee. The intent of the symposium was (1) to review what has been learned while performing NEPA assessments, (2) to summarize the state-of-the-art in methods and approaches, and (3) to define future opportunities and new approaches required to link high quality science to the decision-making process

  12. Nitrogen deposition and greenhouse gas emissions from grasslands: uncertainties and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; Hudiburg, Tara W; Bernacchi, Carl J; Parton, William J; DeLucia, Evan H

    2016-04-01

    Increases in atmospheric nitrogen deposition (Ndep) can strongly affect the greenhouse gas (GHG; CO2, CH4, and N2O) sink capacity of grasslands as well as other terrestrial ecosystems. Robust predictions of the net GHG sink strength of grasslands depend on how experimental N loads compare to projected Ndep rates, and how accurately the relationship between GHG fluxes and Ndep is characterized. A literature review revealed that the vast majority of experimental N loads were higher than levels these ecosystems are predicted to experience in the future. Using a process-based biogeochemical model, we predicted that low levels of Ndep either enhanced or reduced the net GHG sink strength of most grasslands, but as experimental N loads continued to increase, grasslands transitioned to a N saturation-decline stage, where the sensitivity of GHG exchange to further increases in Ndep declined. Most published studies represented treatments well into the N saturation-decline stage. Our model results predict that the responses of GHG fluxes to N are highly nonlinear and that the N saturation thresholds for GHGs varied greatly among grasslands and with fire management. We predict that during the 21st century some grasslands will be in the N limitation stage where others will transition into the N saturation-decline stage. The linear relationship between GHG sink strength and N load assumed by most studies can overestimate or underestimate predictions of the net GHG sink strength of grasslands depending on their N baseline status. The next generation of global change experiments should be designed at multiple N loads consistent with future Ndep rates to improve our empirical understanding and predictive ability. PMID:26661794

  13. Radiation treatment compliance in the indigenous population: the pilot of Northern Territory experience and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a perception that Indigenous patients are less likely to attend radiotherapy treatment. This study sought to determine if a difference in radiotherapy treatment compliance rates exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. Secondly, we aimed to ascertain which patient, disease and treatment factors affect compliance in Indigenous patients. All patients treated with radiotherapy at the Alan Walker Cancer Care Centre between March and October 2010 were analysed. Data regarding compliance rates (defined as those who chose and completed the recommended course of treatment), patient, disease and treatment factors were collected, and chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were applied. A total of 41 courses were delivered to Indigenous patients and 224 courses delivered to non-Indigenous patients in this period. There was no difference in compliance between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients (83% vs. 81%, P=0.75). Of the factors assessed, it was found that there was an association between toxicity grade and compliance (P=0.048). From this cohort, we cannot support the perception that Indigenous patients have overall poorer compliance with recommended radiation treatment courses. In this study, the only factor which correlated significantly with compliance was toxicity grade. It is felt that a number of factors, which negatively impact on compliance, can potentially be counteracted by a culturally sensitive model of care.

  14. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-10-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation are introduced into the LMDz-INCA (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, version 4 - INteraction with Chemistry and Aerosols, version 3) global model. An important aspect of this new model is that both fine nitrate particle formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing corresponds to 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing, representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050, and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentration of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia, which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and North America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in ammonium nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates, for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative

  15. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Hauglustaine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation have been introduced in the LMDz-INCA global model. Both fine nitrate particles formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is −0.056 W m−2. This forcing has the same magnitude than the forcing associated with organic carbon particles and represents 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios and for the 2030, 2050 and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentrations of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and Northern America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of −0.234 W m−2 to a range of −0.070 to −0.130 W m−2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of −0.060 to −0.115 W m−2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative forcing calculations increases the

  16. Phylogeographic studies of plants in China: Advances in the past and directions in the future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Quan LIU; Yong-Shuai SUN; Xue-Jun GE; Lian-Ming GAO; Ying-Xiong QIU

    2012-01-01

    Phylogeography has been one major focus of evolutionary biology in recent years,with many important advances in Chinese species.In this issue,we collected 11 phylogeographic studies of plants by Chinese laboratories.We further synthesized the main findings and patterns emerging from these and previous phylogeographic studies in China and asked where phylogeographic research should be directed in the coming years.Numerous examples have shown that phylogeographic patterns in China did not show an expected expansion-contraction pattern at large scale,mirroring the geological records showing that no unified ice sheet had developed in China during the Quaternary Period.Instead,regional expansions and intraspecific divergences are very common in most studied species during the Quaternary oscillations.Different intraspecific lineages or alleles (haplotypes) were detected in multiple localized refugia,from where regional or local expansions are likely to have started.Hybridizations and introgressions are frequent between intraspecific lineages or between different species.We also reviewed computational methods for phylogeographic analyses.Despite the great progress made in recent years,there remains much to discover about the spatial-temporal dimensions and underlying speciation mechanisms of Chinese plants.Phylogeographic studies represent a key knot that connects the genus phylogeny (macroevolution) and speciation and adaptation (microevolution).Therefore,we advocate that:(i) phylogeographic studies of plants in China should be directed to the closely related species or a monophyletic group (for example,a genus or a section) in the coming years; and (ii) population genetic data based on direct sequencing multiple loci,especially those from nuclear genome and statistical tests should be widely adopted and enforced.The recovered intraspecific divergences and phylogeographic patterns of multiple-species may allow us to better understand the high plant diversity in China and

  17. Magnesium and Osteoporosis: Current State of Knowledge and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette A. M. Maier

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A tight control of magnesium homeostasis seems to be crucial for bone health. On the basis of experimental and epidemiological studies, both low and high magnesium have harmful effects on the bones. Magnesium deficiency contributes to osteoporosis directly by acting on crystal formation and on bone cells and indirectly by impacting on the secretion and the activity of parathyroid hormone and by promoting low grade inflammation. Less is known about the mechanisms responsible for the mineralization defects observed when magnesium is elevated. Overall, controlling and maintaining magnesium homeostasis represents a helpful intervention to maintain bone integrity.

  18. The Future of Foreign Direct Liability? Exploring the International Relevance of the Dutch Shell Nigeria Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Enneking

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2013, The Hague District Court in the Netherlands rendered a groundbreaking verdict in a civil liability suit against Royal Dutch Shell and its Nigerian subsidiary (SPDC. The lawsuit had been brought before it by four Nigerian farmers and the Dutch NGO Milieudefensie, in response to a number of oil-spill incidents from SPDC-operated pipelines in the Nigerian Niger Delta. Although the majority of the claims were dismissed, the district court in its ruling did grant one claim that related to spills from an abandoned wellhead, ordering SPDC to pay compensation for the resulting loss. This judgment has international relevance, as this Dutch Shell Nigeria case forms part of a worldwide trend towards foreign direct liability cases. Growing numbers of similar lawsuits have been brought before the courts in other Western societies, but judgments on the merits have so far remained scarce. The relevance of the case has further increased with the US Supreme Court’s April 2013 ruling in the case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., which has significantly limited the scope of the Alien Tort Statute. This article explores The Hague District Court’s decision in the Dutch Shell Nigeria case, and places the case within the socio-legal context of the contemporary trend towards foreign direct liability cases, the international debates on corporate accountability and business & human rights, and the Supreme Court's judgment in the Kiobel case.

  19. Management of recurrent head and neck cancer: recent progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockstein, Bruce E

    2011-08-20

    The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is on the rise in the US despite a drop in cigarette smoking rates. Much of this rise is due to the increasing incidence of SCCHN attributable to human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV-related SCCHN has a high cure rate, which contributes to the stable death rates despite the increased incidence. Up to half of patients with SCCHN will develop recurrence. For these patients, the first clinical decision is whether the recurrence is potentially treatable for cure, or is incurable. For those deemed potentially curable, surgical or radiation-based therapies, or both, are undertaken. For those who have incurable recurrences, the goals are palliation and possibly prolongation of life - average survivals are in the range of 6-12 months depending on the type of recurrence and other factors. Several chemotherapy drugs are active in SCCHN, most notably the platinum compounds, taxanes, fluorouracil (5-FU), methotrexate and cetuximab. Approximately 10-25% of patients will respond to treatment with one of these drugs. The response rate is higher for combinations such as a platinum plus a taxane, a platinum plus 5-FU, a combination of the three, or one of more of these drugs plus cetuximab. Combination chemotherapy has not been shown to prolong survival over single-agent therapy, with the exception of the addition of cetuximab to a platinum and 5-FU combination. A number of orally bioavailable tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been tested or are undergoing trials in SCCHN. None of these has as yet been shown to be more effective than the currently available drugs. For patients with recurrences who are undergoing active therapy, and especially for those for whom further therapy is no longer appropriate or is declined, strict attention is necessary to palliation of pain, oral and airway issues, and to nutrition, speech, and social and psychological issues. PMID:21861540

  20. The South America VLF Network - SAVNET: Achievements, Latest Results and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present recent results obtained by the South America VLF Network (SAVNET). The use of the VLF technique by tracking subionospheric propagation anomalies appears as a very promising tool to study various aspects of Space Weather disturbances. On long timescales it is possible to indirectly monitor the solar Lyman-alpha radiation along the solar cycles. Short time phenomena like solar explosive events can be observed with 100% probability, even for the small intensity events. The effect of high-energy precipitating solar particles can be tracked in the low ionosphere. The same technique is also relevant to study the ionospheric perturbations caused by geomagnetic storms on typical timescales of a day to few days. Extra solar and terrestrial high-energy phenomena are naturally detected in the very sensitive low ionospheric plasma, as Gamma-ray bursts and Soft Gamma-ray repeaters. Finally, the remote sensing of the low ionosphere is also used to search for seismic-electromagnetic effects prior to Earthquakes. At the present time, SAVNET is composed of nine (9) tracking receiver stations in Brazil, Peru, Argentina and Mexico. In this presentation we will describe our future plans for expanding the array. Eastern Europe, Ecuador and Asia are good host candidates to participate in these forthcoming activities. The array expansion is necessary to improve the probability detection of very high-energy remote phenomena, and to demonstrate that these processes of great astrophysical importance can be easily detected using a cheap and simple technique.