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Sample records for cancer epidemiologic study

  1. Epidemiological studies of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindborg, J J

    1977-06-01

    The FDI has shown considerable interest in the oral cancer and has in recent years arranged three symposia on the subject. The incidence of oral cancer shows marked geographic differences mostly depending upon environmental factors. In the present paper the epidemiology of oral cancer is illustrated by the relative frequency to total number of cancers and incidence rates from a number of countries. Canada has the highest rate of cancer of the vermilion border, which is extremely rare among dark-skinned people. Even within one country differences may be found, a fact which is illustrated by findings from Czechoslovakia and India. In most of the studies dealing with the etiology of oral cancer tobacco usage in its various forms is shown to be the outstanding factor.

  2. Vitamin D and cancer: an overview on epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez Mena, José Manuel; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a rapidly increasing number of studies have investigated the relationship of vitamin D with total cancer and site-specific cancer obtaining diverse findings. In this chapter we provide an overview of epidemiological studies of vitamin D intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D serum levels and vitamin D associated polymorphisms in relation to total and site-specific cancer risk. Overall, epidemiological evidence for total cancer is inconclusive. However, a large number of studies support a relationship of vitamin D with colorectal cancer and to a lesser extent with breast cancer. Findings are inconsistent for other cancers including all other gastrointestinal cancers and prostate cancer. Different vitamin D associated polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated to colorectal, breast and prostate cancer risk.

  3. Epidemiologic study on penile cancer in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A. Favorito

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess epidemiologic characteristics of penile cancer in Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2006 to June 2007, a questionnaire was distributed to all Brazilian urologists. Their patients' clinical and epidemiological data was analyzed (age, race, place of residence, history of sexually transmitted diseases, tobacco smoking, performance of circumcision, type of hospital service, as well as the time between the appearance of the symptoms and the diagnosis, the pathological characteristics of the tumor (histological type, degree, localization and size of lesion, stage of disease, the type of treatment performed and the present state of the patient. RESULTS: 283 new cases of penile cancer in Brazil were recorded. The majority of these cases occurred in the north and northeast (53.02% and southeast (45.54% regions. The majority of patients (224, or 78.96% were more than 46 years of age while only 21 patients (7.41% were less than 35 years of age. Of the 283 patients presenting penile cancer, 171 (60.42% had phimosis with the consequent impossibility to expose the glans. A prior medical history positive for HPV infection was reported in 18 of the 283 cases (6.36%. In 101 patients (35.68% tobacco smoking was reported. The vast majority of the cases (n = 207; 73.14% presented with tumors localized in the glans and prepuce. In 48 cases (16.96% the tumor affected the glans, the prepuce and the corpus penis; in 28 cases (9.89% the tumor affected the entire penis. The majority of the patients (n = 123; 75.26% presented with T1 or T2; only 9 patients (3.18% presented with T4 disease. CONCLUSION: Penile cancer is a very frequent pathology in Brazil, predominantly affecting low income, white, uncircumcised patients, living in the north and northeast regions of the country.

  4. Endometriosis and breast cancer: A survey of the epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    PONTIKAKI, A.; SIFAKIS, S.; Spandidos, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. Recent reviews have demonstrated the connection between endometriosis and breast cancer, which represents the most frequently diagnosed female cancer and the most common cause of cancer-related mortality among women worldwide. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of available published epidemiological studies indicating the asso...

  5. Biologically based epidemiological studies of electric power and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Use of electricity is a hallmark of the industrialization process, but there has been no suspicion that electricity could increase the risk of cancer. Recently, however, a number of epidemiologic studies have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) may do just that. Although few cancer experiments have been done yet, there are a number of biological effects of EMF reported in the literature that might provide bases for designing cancer experiments and epidemiologic studies. These include effects of EMF on: (a) DNA transcription and translation, (b) calcium balance in cells, and (c) pineal production of melatonin. Alterations in DNA transcription and translation could have pleiotropic effects. Disruption of calcium homeostasis has many implications including oncogene activation, promotional activity via protein kinases and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and increasing oxidative stress. Reduction of melatonin suggests a possible increased risk of cancers of hormone-dependent tissues such as breast and prostate. The idea that a cancer-causing agent must either be an initiator or a promoter should be discarded; indeed, the phenomenologic meaning of these two terms has become confused with imputed mechanistic necessity in recent years. Agents that affect division of normal cells or of fully transformed cells can play an important role in clinical cancer development quite apart from initiation or promotion. Epidemiologic studies of EMF and cancer should attempt to take account of other products of electric power (e.g., light at night) or factors associated with occupational EMF exposure (e.g., toxic chemicals) that may increase cancer risk and therefore act as cofactors or confounders. Epidemiology and laboratory studies should act synergistically in determining if there is a problem and identifying mitigation strategies if needed. 84 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Radiation dosimetry for epidemiology lung cancer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung doses have been calculated for 999 workers whose primary exposure was to airborne uranium during the period 1943 to 1947. Internal dose calculations were needed because the major exposure potential was to airborne uranium and because no external monitoring data exists. The lung dose estimates process was divided into two phases: estimation of the uranium intake and calculation of the internal dose. The intake information required included the number of hours worked and the concentration, chemical and physical forms of uranium. These factors were determined through researching historical documents including plant process descriptions, personnel records, operations records, monitoring records, etc. Additional information was also gained through interviews of former plant workers. Job titles and department codes were used to relate uranium exposure conditions to a given individual. Lung doses were estimated using internal dose models developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This system takes into account both particle size and solubility class. Results show that some workers may have received doses as high as 74 rads or 740 rems if a quality factor of 10 is used. The results of this study have been used in a lung cancer case control study to be reported at this conference

  7. Cancer Epidemiology Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohort studies are fundamental for epidemiological research by helping researchers better understand the etiology of cancer and provide insights into the key determinants of this disease and its outcomes.

  8. Radon and lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives and strategy of an epidemiological study on the effects of exposure to radon in Norwegian dwellings is presented. The study is a cooperation between the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Norwegian Cancer Registry in Norway and the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom, with funding by the Norwegian Cancer Society. Measurements of radon are being made in 10,000 dwellings representing all Norwegian municipalities. The potential for detecting an effect of radon exposure by such a study in Norway is unique because: (1) Radon concentrations are high and there are large regional variations. (2) Data from the Norwegian Cancer Registry is of high quality: all cancers have been subject to compulsory reporting since 1955. These data can be broken down according to municipality, sex and age. (3) In 1964/1965 a large scale survey of smoking habits was carried out in Norway. These data can also be broken down according to municipality, sex and age, and by types of smoking and smoking rate. It is intended to examine the correlation between lung cancer incidence and geographical variation in radon levels after making allowance for smoking habits. Radon measurements were started in early 1987 and the results of the study are expected to be published in 1989. (author)

  9. Epidemiological studies on Brassica vegetables and cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, D.T.H.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Poppel, G. van; Verhagen, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the epidemiological data concerning the cancer-preventive effect of brassica vegetables, including cabbage, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower. The protective effect of brassicas against cancer may be due to their relatively high content of glucosinolat

  10. Epidemiologic study of breast cancer in a-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case-control study was made on female breast cancer cases and their matched controls in the Life Span Study sample. The index cases were detected during 1958-69 among the 251 breast cancer cases ascertained originally by McGregor et al. The purpose of this study was to define the epidemiologic risk factors of breast cancer among Japanese women, to test for radiation effects in the presence of other risk factors, and to search for interactions. The survey was conducted by interview at home visits for those residing in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki areas, and by mail survey for others. The interview was carried out by several trained interviewers. Information concerning suspected risk factors of breast cancer, such as familial history, education, age at menarche and menopause, marital history, reproductive history, history of breast feeding, etc., was collected for both index cases and controls. Out of 183 original pairs, analysis was made on 164 pairs with available information for both the index and control, using the method of matched samples described by Mantel and Haenszel. There was enhancement of risk for those exposed to high radiation dose (100 rad or more). Although most major results were similar to those of previous studies, a significant increase of risk was observed among those under one of the following conditions: actual duration of marriage was less than 10 years; number of pregnancies was two or less; and age at delivery of first live born child was 27 or over. These factors had a mutual interrelationship and cases with two or more of these risk factors showed higher risk than those with one. Additive interrelationship was demonstrated between radiation dose and these marital or reproductive risk factors in elevating the relative risk of breast cancer. (author)

  11. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  12. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies.

  13. Sequencing Strategies for Population and Cancer Epidemiology Studies (SeqSPACE) Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sequencing Strategies for Population and Cancer Epidemiology Studies (SeqSPACE) Webinar Series provides an opportunity for our grantees and other interested individuals to share lessons learned and practical information regarding the application of next generation sequencing to cancer epidemiology studies.

  14. Epidemiological Study of Oral and Perioral Cancers in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Razavit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the fact that oral and perioral cancers are not included in common cancers, they are of special importance for their impact on human morbidity and life quality. Awareness of the epidemiological characteristics of oral cancers allows for enhanced planning of timely and effective treatment in order to improve patients’ life quality. The objective of the present study was to investigate the distributional patterns of oral and perioral malignancies in terms of age, gender, type, and location.Methods and Materials: 4553 oral biopsy specimens taken over 17 years (1988-2004 at the Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, were studied. Among these, 283 cases included oral malignant lesions. The age, gender, location, and type of malignancy data for these cases were recorded.Results: The results of this survey showed that commoner malignant oral lesions were epithelial lesions with 175 cases (62%, salivary lesions with 48 cases (17%, and hematogenic malignancies with 23 cases (9%. Squamous cell carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, lymphoma, and osteosarcoma were the commoner malignant lesions in this area of the body. The mean age of patients was 52.2 years of old and the male to female ratio was found to be 1.3.Discussion: The present study showed that compared to the less common malignant lesions, the more common ones, i.e. epithelial and salivary lesions, show far more differences from those reported in previous studies. For example, compared to previous studies, the mean age for epithelial lesions was found to be less by one decade while the mean age for salivary gland lesions was found to be higher by one decade. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC was found to be the most common malignancy but its relative frequency was lower than that reported in previous studies. Moreover, differences were also observed in its anatomical distribution. Lip, salivary gland, and

  15. Epidemiological studies of esophageal cancer in the era of genome-wide association studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Hui; Wang; Yuan; Liu; Bo; Wang; Yi-Xuan; He; Ye-Xian; Fang; Yong-Ping; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer(EC) caused about 395000 deaths in 2010. China has the most cases of EC and EC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in China. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC) is the predominant histologic type(90%-95%), while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma(EAC) remains extremely low in China. Traditional epidemiological studies have revealed that environmental carcinogens are risk factors for EC. Molecular epidemiological studies revealed that susceptibility to EC is influenced by both environmental and genetic risk factors. Of all the risk factors for EC, some are associated with the risk of ESCC and others with the risk of EAC. However, the details and mechanisms of risk factors involved in the process for EC are unclear. The advanced methods and techniques used in human genome studies bring a great opportunity for researchers to explore and identify the details of those risk factors or susceptibility genes involved inthe process of EC. Human genome epidemiology is a new branch of epidemiology, which leads the epidemiology study from the molecular epidemiology era to the era of genome wide association studies(GWAS). Here we review the epidemiological studies of EC(especially ESCC) in the era of GWAS, and provide an overview of the general risk factors and those genomic variants(genes, SNPs, miRNAs, proteins) involved in the process of ESCC.

  16. An epidemiologic risk prediction model for ovarian cancer in Europe : The EPIC study

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K; Huesing, A.; Fortner, R. T.; Tjonneland, A.; Hansen, L.; Dossus, L; Chang-Claude, J; Bergmann, M.; A. Steffen; Bamia, C.; Trichopoulos, D; Trichopoulou, A; Palli, D; Mattiello, A; Agnoli, C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer has a high case-fatality ratio, largely due to late diagnosis. Epidemiologic risk prediction models could help identify women at increased risk who may benefit from targeted prevention measures, such as screening or chemopreventive agents. Methods: We built an ovarian cancer risk prediction model with epidemiologic risk factors from 202 206 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Results: Older age at menopause, longer durati...

  17. Occupation, occupational exposure to solvents and breast cancer analyse of two epidemiological breast cancer studies in male and women

    OpenAIRE

    Villeneuve, Sara

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the occupation and of occupational exposures to petroleum and chlorinated solvents using the data of two epidemiological studies on occupational risk factors of breast cancers in men and in women. Unlike female breast cancer (50,000 new cases per year inFrance), cancer of male breast cancer is a rare disease (

  18. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome...

  19. Epidemiologic studies of particulate matter and lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Ge Li; Xiang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) plays an important role in air pollution, especially in China. European and American researchers conducted several cohort-based studies to examine the potential relationship between PM and lung cancer and found a positive association between PM and lung cancer mortality. In contrast, the results regarding PM and lung cancer risk remain inconsistent. Most of the previous studies had limitations such as misclassification of PM exposure and residual confounders, diminishing the impact of their findings. In addition, prospective studies on this topic are very limited in Chinese populations. This is an important problem because China has one of the highest concentrations of PM in the world and has had an increased mortality risk due to lung cancer. In this context, more prospective studies in Chinese populations are warranted to investigate the relationship between PM and lung cancer.

  20. Epidemiological studies of oats consumption and risk of cancer and overall mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Paolo; Thies, Frank; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2014-10-01

    A review of epidemiological studies on the intake of oats and oat-based products and its effect on the risk of chronic disease and deaths was performed. Seven studies were identified of cancer risk (two each on prostate and colorectal cancer, and one each on pancreatic, breast and endometrial cancer), and one study on overall mortality. With the exception of a case-control study of pancreatic cancer, all studies were of cohort design: five studies were based on a single cohort from Denmark. The results of most cohort studies suggest a weak protective effect of a high intake of oats on cancer risk (relative risks in the order of 0·9). Potential limitations of the studies are dietary exposure misclassification, low statistical power because of limited exposure contrast and residual confounding. Despite the evidence from experimental and mechanistic studies of a protective effect of oats intake on CVD and diabetes, no epidemiological studies have been conducted on these conditions.

  1. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  2. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  3. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lingling Cui; Xinxin Liu; Yalan Tian; Chen Xie; Qianwen Li; Han Cui; Changqing Sun

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990...

  4. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  5. Epidemiologic studies of cervical cancer in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    A case-control study of cervical cancer was conducted in Costa Rica, Co- lombia, Mexico and Panama from 1986 to 1987, to determine risk factors operating in these traditionally high-incidence areas. The study included 759 cases and 1,430 hospital and community controls, and accomplished more than 95% participation rates for both types of participants. The ma- jor risk factors identified were: detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 or 18, increasing number of livebi...

  6. The selection and use of control groups in epidemiologic studies of radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer are based on epidemiologic studies of humans exposed to high doses of radiation. A critical feature of such studies is the selection of an appropriate control group. This report presents a detailed examination of the principles underlying the selection and use of control groups in such epidemiologic studies. It is concluded that the cohort study is the preferred design, because of the rarity of exposure to high levels of radiation in the general population and because the cohort design is less susceptible to bias. This report also assesses potential bias in current risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer due to inappropriate choice and use of control groups. Detailed summaries are presented for those epidemiologic studies on which the BEIR IV risk estimates are based. It is concluded that confounding is by far the major potential concern. Bias is probably negligible in risk estimates for breast cancer. For lung cancer, risk estimates may be underestimated by about 30 percent for males and 10 percent for females due to confounding of smoking and radiation exposure. For leukemia and cancers of the thyroid and bone, the absence of established non-radiation risk factors with a high prevalence in the population under study suggests that there is unlikely to be any substantial confounding radiation risk estimates. Finally, lifetime excess mortality risks have been estimated for several of the cancers of interest following exposure to radiation based on Canadian age-, sex- and cause-specific mortality rates. It is concluded that errors in measurement exposure, uncertainty in extrapolating the results of high dose studies to low doses and low dose rates, and sampling variation in the epidemiologic studies contribute far more to uncertainty in current risk estimates than do any biases in the epidemiologic studies introduced by inappropriate selection and use of control groups. (161 refs., 19 tabs.)

  7. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk : individual participant meta-analysis of 52 epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gapstur, S. M.; Patel, A. V.; Banks, E.; Dal Maso, L.; Talamini, R.; Chetrit, A.; Hirsh-Yechezkel, G.; Lubin, F.; Sadetzki, S.; Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Cairns, B.; Crossley, B.; Gaitskell, K.; Goodill, A.; Green, J.; Hermon, C.; Key, T.; Moser, K.; Reeves, G.; Sitas, F.; Collins, R.; Peto, R.; Gonzalez, C. A.; Lee, N.; Marchbanks, P.; Ory, H. W.; Peterson, H. B.; Wingo, P. A.; Martin, N.; Silpisornkosol, S.; Theetranont, C.; Boosiri, B.; Chutivongse, S.; Jimakorn, P.; Virutamasen, P.; Wongsrichanalai, C.; Goodman, M. T.; Lidegaard, O.; Kjaer, S. K.; Morch, L. S.; Kjaer, S. K.; Tjonneland, A.; Byers, T.; Rohan, T.; Mosgaard, B.; Vessey, M.; Yeates, D.; Freudenheim, J. L.; Titus, L. J.; Chang-Claude, J.; Kaaks, R.; Anderson, K. E.; Lazovich, D.; Robien, K.; Hampton, J.; Newcomb, P. A.; Rossing, M. A.; Thomas, D. B.; Weiss, N. S.; Lokkegaard, E.; Riboli, E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Cramer, D.; Hankinson, S. E.; Tamimi, R. M.; Tworoger, S. S.; Franceschi, S.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Adami, H. O.; Magnusson, C.; Riman, T.; Weiderpass, E.; Wolk, A.; Schouten, L. J.; van den Brandt, P. A.; Chantarakul, N.; Koetsawang, S.; Rachawat, D.; Palli, D.; Black, A.; Brinton, L. A.; Freedman, D. M.; Hartge, P.; Hsing, A. W.; Jnr, J. V. Lacey; Lissowska, J.; Hoover, R. N.; Schairer, C.; Babb, C.; Urban, M.; Graff-Iversen, S.; Selmer, R.; Bain, C. J.; Green, A. C.; Purdie, D. M.; Siskind, V.; Webb, P. M.; Moysich, K.; McCann, S. E.; Hannaford, P.; Kay, C.; Binns, C. W.; Lee, A. H.; Zhang, M.; Ness, R. B.; Nasca, P.; Coogan, P. F.; Palmer, J. R.; Rosenberg, L.; Whittemore, A.; Katsouyanni, K.; Trichopoulou, A.; Trichopoulos, D.; Tzonou, A.; Dabancens, A.; Martinez, L.; Molina, R.; Salas, O.; Lurie, G.; Carney, M. E.; Wilkens, L. R.; Hartman, L.; Manjer, J.; Olsson, H.; Kumle, M.; Grisso, J. A.; Morgan, M.; Wheeler, J. E.; Edwards, R. P.; Kelley, J. L.; Modugno, F.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Casagrande, J.; Pike, M. C.; Wu, A. H.; Canfell, K.; Miller, A. B.; Gram, I. T.; Lund, E.; McGowan, L.; Shu, X. O.; Zheng, W.; Farley, T. M. M.; Holck, S.; Meirik, O.; Risch, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy on

  8. Epidemiology of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, E K

    1985-12-01

    Some information on cancer in Malaysia are available, and its epidemiology is described. There is a need for systematic and coordinated collection of cancer statistics which are essential to patient management, cancer control programme formulation, implementation and evaluation. The decision of the Ministry of Health to introduce National Cancer Registry and to encourage epidemiological studies, which will ultimately lead to the utilization of data and introduction of control and preventive activities for cancers are positive steps in the right direction. Meanwhile, curative and palliative treatment is available from the existing hospital facilities, and preventive activities such as actions on smoking and health will be continued until such time when a comprehensive prevention and control programme for cancers in the country is evolved.

  9. Nutrition and cancer: Review of epidemiological studies and clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Demosthenes Panagiotakos; Georgia Georgiou; Niki Kontou

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors of cancer include unhealthy dietary habits, physical inactivity, smoking, various genetic and environmental factors. Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases with increased incidence; moreover, 80% of gastrointestinal, breast and prostate cancers are attributed to unhealthy eating habits. Many surveys have investigated the role of diet in cancer prevention. Here we summarized current knowledge about dietary factors associated with cancer incidence. There ...

  10. Nutrition and cancer: Review of epidemiological studies and clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes Panagiotakos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors of cancer include unhealthy dietary habits, physical inactivity, smoking, various genetic and environmental factors. Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases with increased incidence; moreover, 80% of gastrointestinal, breast and prostate cancers are attributed to unhealthy eating habits. Many surveys have investigated the role of diet in cancer prevention. Here we summarized current knowledge about dietary factors associated with cancer incidence. There is a strong correlation of the protective effect of fruits and vegetables with colon cancer and the negative effect of red meat and the protective effect of milk on colorectal cancer. High alcohol consumption is related to higher incidence of mouth and esophageal cancers, with hot drinks playing a role in mouth or even gastrointestinal cancers. High fat consumption seems to play a negative role in colorectal cancer, where sugar and salt might be negatively related to stomach cancer. Beyond nutrition, physical inactivity and body fat seems to play an important role in cancer, where there are strong evidence that the first protects against colorectal cancer and the second increases the incidence of breast cancer after menopause. Data for the role of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals lead to the suggestion that dietary supplements should be avoided and all nutritional needs should be covered through a well balanced diet.

  11. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Tovar-Guzmán

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  12. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovar-Guzmán Víctor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  13. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case–control study in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case–control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. EPICAP is a population-based case–control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population. The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014). The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic factors through a detailed questionnaire

  14. Epidemiology of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katherine D Crew; Alfred I Neugut

    2006-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have fallen dramatically in US and elsewhere over the past several decades. Nonetheless, gastric cancer remains a major public health issue as the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Demographic trends differ by tumor location and histology. While there has been a marked decline in distal, intestinal type gastric cancers, the incidence of proximal, diffuse type adenocarcinomas of the gastric cardia has been increasing, particularly in the Western countries. Incidence by tumor sub-site also varies widely based on geographic location, race, and socioeconomic status. Distal gastric cancer predominates in developing countries, among blacks, and in lower socioeconomic groups, whereas proximal tumors are more common in developed countries, among whites, and in higher socio-economic classes. Diverging trends in the incidence of gastric cancer by tumor location suggest that they may represent two diseases with different etiologies. The main risk factors for distal gastric cancer include Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and dietary factors, whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity play important roles in the development of proximal stomach cancer. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of gastric cancer, and to discuss strategies for primary prevention.

  15. Methods for pooling results of epidemiologic studies: The pooling project of prospective studies of diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Ritz, J.; Albanes, D.; Beeson, W.L.; Bernstein, L.; Berrino, F.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Cho, E.; Colditz, G.A.; Folsom, A.R.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Harnack, L.; Horn-Ross, P.L.; Krogh, V.; Leitzmann, M.F.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Rodriguez, C.; Rohan, T.E.; Schatzkin, A.; Shore, R.; Virtanen, M.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Hunter, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    With the growing number of epidemiologic publications on the relation between dietary factors and cancer risk, pooled analyses that summarize results from multiple studies are becoming more common. Here, the authors describe the methods being used to summarize data on diet-cancer associations within

  16. Changing Epidemiology of Common Cancers in Southern Iran, 2007-2010: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoom Masoompour

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the ever changing epidemiology of cancers in Fars province, Iran since the re-establishment of Fars cancer registry. Based on the collected data from all related sources in Fars province from 2007-2010 we calculated the cancer age-standardized rates per 100,000 person-years (ASRs. The results are presented as incidence rates of cases by site according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O, sex, age, crude rate, and ASRs. In women the total ASR was 41.70 per 100,000 from 1985-1989 which had increased to 55.50 and 95.46 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about two and four times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. The incidence of colorectal cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about three and five times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. In men the total ASR was 62.9 per 100,000 in 1985-1989 that increased to 64.50 and 101.48 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. Although stomach cancer was the most common cancer among men during 1985-1989 and 1998-2002, but in recent study bladder cancer was the most common cancer among men in Fars province. The incidence of colorectal cancer in men during 2007-2010 was about three times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. This study shows growing incidence of cancer in southern Iran. The colorectal cancer in both genders had increased and its pattern is similar to western countries. In men, bladder and prostate cancers had a growing rate and the incidences of these cancers in the present study were greater than stomach cancer.

  17. Epidemiology of epithelial ovarian cancer, a single institution-based study in India

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    Surendra Kumar Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality among all cancers of female genital tract in countries where effective cervical cancer screening program exists. As the world's population ages, remarkable increase in the total number of ovarian cancer cases are expected. This is preliminary epidemiological study to decide priorities in ovarian cancer research. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with primary epithelial ovarian cancer cases registered in J. K. Cancer Institute, Kanpur (Uttar Pradesh, from 2007 to 2009. Patients' age at diagnosis, clinical feature, parity of patients, tumor histological type, Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, chemotherapy regimens, and overall survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-three cases of primary ovarian epithelial cancer were analyzed. Patients' mean age at diagnosis was 55.98 ± 9.24 (median = 55. Serous adenocarcinoma (49.69% was the most prevalent type of histopathology followed by endometroid (19.1%, mucinous (10.42% and clear cell (4.29%. Combination of taxane and platin was most commonly used first line regimen in newly diagnosed as well as in relapsed patients post 1 year. Survival was not significantly different in various histopathology (log-rank P = 0.7406, but advancing stage demonstrated gradually poor survival (log-rank P < 0.05 when compared with early stage disease. Conclusion: Research efforts should be in the direction to find early diagnostic and effective screening tools as well as better therapeutic approaches for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  18. Endometriosis and ovarian cancer risk: A systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menelaos eZafrakas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A possible etiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer has been repeatedly reported in the literature. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate published epidemiological data on this issue. Review Methods: We conducted an extensive search of the literature in MEDLINE, of articles ever published until February 2014, using the key-words endometriosis and ovarian and one of the following terms in the title: cancer or malignancy or malignant or tumor or tumour or neoplasia or neoplasm or transformation. Retrieved papers were checked for further relevant publications. Results: Overall, our search yielded one prospective cohort study, ten retrospective cohort and five case-control studies. A meta-analysis of these studies was not considered to be appropriate, due to differences in data reporting, study design and adjustment for confounding factors. Limitations: The main limitation of studies found, with one exception, was the lack of operative confirmation of endometriosis. Conclusions: An association of endometriosis with clear-cell and endometrioid ovarian cancer was a consistent finding in most studies. On the other hand, existing epidemiological evidence linking endometriosis with ovarian cancer is insufficient to change current clinical practice. Prospective cohort studies, with prior laparoscopic confirmation, localization and staging of endometriosis are needed, in order to further clarify this issue.

  19. Dietary magnesium intake and risk of cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hae Jin; Youn, Chang Ho; Kim, Hyo Min; Cho, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Geon Ho; Lee, Won Kee

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary magnesium and the risk of overall cancer using a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Review through November 2012. All the articles searched were independently reviewed by 3 authors based on predetermined selection criterion. A total of 13 epidemiologic studies, 6 case-control studies, and 7 prospective cohort studies involving 1,236,004 participants were included in the final analysis. When all studies were pooled, the relative risk (RR) of overall cancer for the highest level of dietary magnesium intake was 0.801 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.664-0.966) compared with the lowest level of dietary magnesium intake. In subgroup meta-analyses by study design, there was a significant inverse association between dietary magnesium and the risk of cancer in case-control studies (RR = 0.663, 95% CI: 0.475-0.925), whereas there was no significant association in prospective cohort studies (RR = 0.888, 95% CI: 0.745-1.060). Furthermore, there was a significant preventive effect of dietary magnesium for colorectal cancer (RR = 0.775, 95% CI: 0.655-0.919), but not for other cancer. Our meta-analysis showed that higher dietary magnesium intake seems to have a protective effect for cancer, especially colorectal cancer and in females.

  20. Choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanwen; Li, Xiao; Ren, Anjing; Du, Mulong; Du, Haina; Shu, Yongqian; Zhu, Lingjun; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A number of human and animal in vitro or in vivo studies have investigated the relationship between dietary choline and betaine and cancer risk, suggesting that choline and betaine consumption may be protective for cancer. There are also a few epidemiologic studies exploring this relationship, however, with inconsistent conclusions. The PubMed and Embase were searched, from their inception to March 2016, to identify relevant studies and we brought 11 articles into this meta-analysis eventually. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of cancer for the highest versus the lowest range were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97) for choline consumption only, 0.86 (95%CI, 0.76 to 0.97) for betaine consumption only and 0.60 (95%CI, 0.40 to 0.90) for choline plus betaine consumption, respectively. Significant protective effect of dietary choline and betaine for cancer was observed when stratified by study design, location, cancer type, publication year, sex and quality score of study. An increment of 100 mg/day of choline plus betaine intake helped reduce cancer incidence by 11% (0.89, 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.92) through a dose-response analysis. To conclude, choline and betaine consumption lowers cancer incidence in this meta-analysis, but further studies are warranted to verify the results. PMID:27759060

  1. Cancer epidemiology of woodworking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtashamipur, E; Norpoth, K; Lühmann, F

    1989-01-01

    The literature published between 1965 and 1989 on the cancer epidemiology of woodworking in furniture industries and carpentry shops in 17 countries is reviewed. Included are some unpublished data obtained through personal communication with epidemiologists or collected from doctoral dissertations. Of 5,785 cases with sino-nasal cancers, about 23% were found to be woodworkers. Dusty jobs, especially wood processing using high-speed machines, are mainly associated with the enhanced incidence of nasal adenocarcinomas. The latency periods of the latter tumors ranged from 7 to 69 years in five European countries. A variety of neoplasias of the respiratory, digestive, and urinary tracts as well as the hemopoietic and lymphatic systems, including Hodgkin's disease are reported to be significantly associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. These data suggest that the exposure to some types of wood dust might cause a systemic rather than local neoplastic disorder.

  2. Coffee and cancer: a review of epidemiological studies, 1990-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, A; La Vecchia, C

    2000-08-01

    Epidemiological studies on the relation between coffee consumption and cancer risk have been mainly focused on cancers of the urinary bladder, pancreas and colorectum. The relation between coffee and bladder cancer is controversial, despite a large number of studies published over the last three decades. In most studies, the risk tends to be higher in coffee drinkers than in those who do not drink coffee, but the excess risk is generally moderate and is neither dose- nor duration-related. Thus, a strong association between coffee drinking and bladder cancer can be excluded, although it is still unclear whether the weak association is causal or nonspecific and due to some bias or confounding. For pancreatic cancer, a possible association with coffee consumption has been postulated in a large case-control study published in 1981; since then, however, most studies have shown no substantial association, and overall evidence suggests that coffee is not materially related to pancreatic cancer risk. Overall evidence on the coffee-colorectal cancer relation suggests an inverse association, since most case-control studies found odds ratios below unity, particularly for colon cancer. The pattern of risk is less clear for cohort studies. A plausible biological explanation has been given in terms of coffee-related reduction of bile acids and neutral sterol secretion in the colon. For other cancer sites, including oral cavity, oesophagus, stomach, liver, breast, ovary, kidney and lymphoid neoplasms, the relation of coffee drinking with cancer risk has been less extensively investigated, but the evidence is largely reassuring. PMID:10958327

  3. Epidemiologic studies of cancer in minority groups in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D B

    1979-11-01

    Of 13 cancers that tend to occur at lower rates in aboriginal Americans or in the native lands of Japanese, Chinese, and Spanish-speaking persons than in United States whites, rates for all but one (laryngeal) have increased in migrants to the United States. In addition to leukemia, these 13 cancers include neoplasms that have been related, at least in part, to a diet high in animal fats or proteins (colon and rectum cancer); reproductive and endocrinologic factors and a diet high in animal fats or protein (prostate, ovary, corpus uteri, breast, and testis cancer); chemical carcinogens (lung, larynx, bladder, and pancreas cancer); and a common infectious agent that, like polio viruses, causes clinically overt disease with a frequency directly related to age of patient at initial infection (Hodgkin's disease). Of 9 cancers that occur at higher rates in aboriginal Americans or in one or more of the native lands of migrants than in United States whites, the rates of 5 tend to decrease in migrants. These include cancers that may be related to food preservation (stomach cancer); products of microorganisms that may contaminate foods (esophagus and liver cancer); and infectious agents (nasopharynx, cervix uteri, and liver cancer). In addition, rates of cancer of the thyroid are high in aboriginal Americans; those of the gallbladder are high in individuals of native American ancestry and in Japanese; incidence of salivary gland tumors is high in Alaskan natives and Colombians; and rates of kidney cancer are high in Alaskan natives. Five types of epidemiologic studies are described that should be conducted in the migrants and in their countries of origin and adoption to elucidate further the etiology of various neoplasms.

  4. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  5. Soy intake and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrom, Suhaila; Idris, Nik Ruzni Nik

    2016-06-01

    The impact of soy intake on breast cancer risk has been investigated extensively. However, these studies reported conflicting results. The objective of this study is to perform comprehensive review and updated meta-analysis on the association between soy intake and breast cancer risk and to identify significant factors which may contribute to the inconsistencies of results of the individual studies. Based on reviews of existing meta-analysis, we identified four main factors which contributed to the inconsistencies of results of individual studies on the association of soy intake and breast cancer risk namely; region, menopausal status of the patients, soy type and study design. Accordingly, we performed an updated meta-analysis of 57 studies grouped by the identified factors. Pooled ORs of studies carried out in Asian countries suggested that soy isoflavones consumption was inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer among both pre and postmenopausal women (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.54-0.74 for premenopausal women; OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.75 for postmenopausal women). However, pooled OR of studies carried out in Western countries shows that there is no statistically significant association between soy intake and breast cancer risk (OR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.03). Our study suggests that soy food intake is associated with significantly reduced risk of breast cancer for women in Asian but not in Western countries. Further epidemiological studies need to be conducted with more comprehensive information about the dietary intake and relative exposure among the women in these two different regions.

  6. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCER: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

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    Kapil H Agrawal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is heading towards various types of non-communicable diseases, which are also known as modern epidemics. Among these modern epidemics cancer is among the ten commonest cause of mortality in developing countries including India. Oral cancer is a major problem in India and accounts for 50-70% of all the cancers diagnosed. Ninety percent (90% of oral cancers in South East Asia including India are linked to tobacco chewing and tobacco smoking. Research question: What is the profile of Oral cancer (Oral cavity cases reported in the hospital? Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile associated with Oral cancer cases. Methods: Study Design: Hospital based, Cross -sectional study. Settings: Shri Siddhivinayak Ganapati Cancer Hospital, Miraj, Maharashtra. Participants and Sample size: As it is a time bound study sample size comprised of all the confirmed cases of oral cancer reported in the hospital during the study period. The study was carried out from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Study variables included demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, enquiries regarding modifiable risk factors such as tobacco usage, alcohol consumption, site involved (within oral cavity, staging, histopathological examination, treatment modality used. Data entry and statistical analysis was done using Microsoft excel. Data presented in form of percentages and proportions. Results: Out of the total 160 cases, majority of the subjects were above 40 years age. 36 (22% of subjects were young adults (below 40 years age. 125 (78% subjects were male. Most of the subjects belonged to upper lower and lower middle socio-economic scale according to modified Kuppuswamy classification. It was observed that 139 (87% cases consumed tobacco in all forms. Out of these, ninety cases consumed tobacco in chewable form. Tobacco was chewed mainly in the form of gutka. Only ten (10 female subjects chewed tobacco. No female subjects smoked. The most

  7. Sample Cancer Epidemiology Grant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute frequently receives questions from investigators for examples of successfully funded grant applications. Several investigators agreed to let the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program post excerpts of their grant applications online.

  8. Genomic Resources for Cancer Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to research resources, complied by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, that may be of interest to genetic epidemiologists conducting cancer research, but is not exhaustive.

  9. Genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wiklund, Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden throughout the world, yet the etiology of prostate cancer is poorly understood. Evidence has accumulated supporting the existence of a hereditary form of this disease. Improved understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the development and progression of prostate cancer would be a major advance for improved prevention, detection and treatment strategies. This thesis evaluates different aspects of the genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer. In ...

  10. Flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested the chemopreventive effects of flavonoids on carcinogenesis. Yet numbers of epidemiologic studies assessing dietary flavonoids and breast cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. The association between flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, etc. and the risk of breast cancer lacks systematic analysis. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass (except isoflavones and the risk of breast cancer by conducting a meta-analysis. DESIGN: We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published before July 1(st, 2012, using Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED. Summary relative risks (RR were calculated using fixed- or random-effects models. All analyses were performed using STATA version 10.0. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included, involving 9 513 cases and 181 906 controls, six of which were prospective cohort studies, and six were case-control studies. We calculated the summary RRs of breast cancer risk for the highest vs lowest categories of each flavonoid subclass respectively. The risk of breast cancer significantly decreased in women with high intake of flavonols (RR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98 and flavones (RR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.76-0.91 compared with that in those with low intake of flavonols and flavones. However, no significant association of flavan-3-ols (RR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.84-1.02, flavanones (summary RR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.88-1.03, anthocyanins (summary RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.08 or total flavonoids (summary RR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.86-1.12 intake with breast cancer risk was observed. Furthermore, summary RRs of 3 case-control studies stratified by menopausal status suggested flavonols, flavones or flavan-3-ols intake is associated with a significant reduced risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal while not in pre-menopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests the intake of flavonols

  11. Green tea consumption and risk of esophageal cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

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    Zheng Ping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green tea has shown the role of chemoprevention for cancer. Recently, several studies suggested that green tea intake may have effect on esophageal cancer risk, whereas the results were inconsistent. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of all English and Chinese language studies of green tea consumption and esophageal cancer risk indexed in Medline, Embase, the Science Citation Index, the Chinese Biomedical Database and Wanfang Data from 1980 to June 2012. After reviewing each study, extracting data, and evaluating heterogeneity (Chi-square-based Q test and Ι2 and publication bias (Begg and Egger test, a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking esophageal cancer risk. Pooled relative risk (RR or odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the fixed- or random-effect models. Results Ten eligible epidemiologic studies including 33731 participants and 3557 cases for esophageal cancer were included. Eight of which were case–control studies, and two were cohort studies. Overall, there were no association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking risk of esophageal cancer (High: highest vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.49 to 1.02. Medium: drinker vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.03. Low: lowest vs non-drinker: RR/OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.08. When stratified analyses according to study design (case–control and cohort studies, country (China and Japan, participates source (population-based and hospital-based case–control, and gender (female and male, there were significant association between high/medium/low green tea consumption and non-drinking risk of esophageal cancer among female (High: RR/OR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.54. Medium: RR/OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.66. Low: RR/OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.79, but not the others. Conclusions We did not found significant

  12. Cancer risks in workers exposed to radiofrequency and microwave radiation: an epidemiologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiations can penetrate human tissue as and exert various bioeffects at relatively low field power densities. In workers exposed occupationally to RF/MW, radiation development of various functional abnormalities of neural, immune, or cardiovascular systems is also possible. Experimental investigations revealed the possibility of epigenetic activity of certain MW exposures, but there exist single epidemiological studies which indicate increased mortality of neoplasms in workers exposed to microwave radiation. As an example, the multi year study of cancer morbidity in Polish military personnel are presented. Despite of the reported increased morbidity of haematopoietic and lymphatic neoplasms, it was not possible to confirm the causal link of the morbidity with exposure to MW radiation

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CANCERS IN ISFAHAN PROVINCE: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY (1981-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH BABA ZADEH

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignancies occur word wide with variety of patterns depending on an individual's environmental situation and life style. Having data about the distribution and incidence of different malignancies is necessary for the formulation of an effective prevention plan for any specific area. Methods. In the central part of Iran (Isfahan Province a retrospective study was designed to describe cancers' epidemiologic factors by collecting patients' data from the Isfahan Oncology center for the period of 1981-1996. Results. The frequency of malignancies was as follows: Skin cancers 5111 cases with a frequency of 20.9 percent (62.9 percent males and 37.3 percent females. Leukemia 3108 cases with a frequency of 12.7 percent (59.9 percent males and 40.1 percent females. Breast cancer 2796 cases with a frequency of 11.4 percent (6.5 percent males and 93.7 percent females. cancers of the digestive system 2017 cases (60.5 percent males and 39.5 percent females. Non Hodgekin lymphoma 1953 cases with relative frequency of 8 percent (66.9 percent male and 33.1 percent females. cancers of the urinary system 1567 cases with a frequency 7.6 percent (82.5 males and 17.5 females. Head and neck cancers 1545 cases (6.3 percent. Cancer of the reproductive system 1313 cases with a frequency of 5.37 percent. Tumors of the central nervous system 1276 cases with a frequency of 5.22 percent. Lung cancers 933 cases with a frequency of 3.7 percent (80.7 percent males and 19.3 percent females. Hodgekins 913 cases with a frequency of 3.7 percent. Sarcoma of the soft tissue 801 cases (3.28 percent and bone tissue 657 cases (2.7 percent. Endocrine malignancies 422 cases and 1.73 percent of all was at the bottom of categories during the period of study. Discussion. In the present study, the prevalence of acute leukemia and also lymphatic and hodgekine malignancies were more frequent than the world wide data presented in the literature. The frequency of lung tumors

  14. Endometriosis and ovarian cancer risk: A systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Menelaos eZafrakas; Grigorios eGrimbizis; Anna eTimologou; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2014-01-01

    Background: A possible etiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer has been repeatedly reported in the literature. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate published epidemiological data on this issue. Review Methods: We conducted an extensive search of the literature in MEDLINE, of articles ever published until February 2014, using the key-words endometriosis and ovarian and one of the following terms in the title: cancer or malignancy or malignant or tumor or tumour or neopla...

  15. Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Wu, Lang; Zheng, Li-Qiang; Xu, Xin; Ji, Chao; Gong, Ting-Ting

    2016-05-01

    Observational studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We carried out a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to summarize available evidence. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant studies published until the end of January 2015. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A total of 15 case-control studies, eight prospective studies, and one pooled analysis fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.73 (95% CI=0.53-1.00) for fruit and vegetables, 0.73 (95% CI=0.63-0.84) for fruit, and 0.76 (95% CI=0.69-0.83) for vegetables, with significant heterogeneities (I=70.5, 55.7, and 43.0%, respectively). Inverse associations were observed in the stratified analysis by study design, although the results of prospective studies showed borderline significance, with corresponding RR=0.90 (95% CI=0.77-1.05) for fruit and vegetable intake, 0.93 (95% CI=0.83-1.03) for fruit intake, and 0.89 (95% CI=0.80-1.00) for vegetable intake. Besides, significant inverse associations were observed in the majority of other subgroup analyses by study quality, geographic location, exposure assessment method, and adjustment for potential confounders. Findings from the present meta-analysis support that fruit and vegetable intake is associated inversely with the risk of pancreatic cancer. However, study design may play a key role in the observed magnitude of the aforementioned association. Future well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  16. The epidemiology of neuroendocrine tumors in Taiwan: a nation-wide cancer registry-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jen Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs is not well illustrated, particularly for Asian countries. METHODS: The age-standardized incidence rates and observed survival rates of NETs diagnosed in Taiwan from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2008 were calculated using data of the Taiwan Cancer Registry (TCR and compared to those of the Norwegian Registry of Cancer (NRC and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER program. RESULTS: During the study period, a total of 2,187 NET cases were diagnosed in Taiwan, with 62% males and a mean age of 57.9 years-old. The age-standardized incidence rate of NETs increased from 0.30 per 100,000 in 1996 to 1.51 per 100,000 in 2008. The most common primary sites were rectum (25.4%, lung and bronchus (20% and stomach (7.4%. The 5-year observed survival was 50.4% for all NETs (43.4% for men and 61.8% for women, P<0.0001. The best 5-year observed survivals for NETs by sites were rectum (80.9%, appendix (75.7%, and breast (64.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the data of Norway and the US, the age-standardized incidence rate of NETs in Taiwan is lower and the major primary sites are different, whereas the long-term outcome is similar. More studies on the pathogenesis of NETs are warranted to devise preventive strategies and improve treatment outcomes for NETs.

  17. An epidemiologic risk prediction model for ovarian cancer in Europe : The EPIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, K.; Huesing, A.; Fortner, R. T.; Tjonneland, A.; Hansen, L.; Dossus, L.; Chang-Claude, J.; Bergmann, M.; Steffen, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopoulos, D.; Trichopoulou, A.; Palli, D.; Mattiello, A.; Agnoli, C.; Tumino, R.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; Peeters, P. H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as); Gram, I. T.; Weiderpass, E.; Sanchez-Cantalejo, E.; Chirlaque, M-D; Duell, E. J.; Ardanaz, E.; Idahl, A.; Lundin, E.; Khaw, K-T; Travis, R. C.; Merritt, M. A.; Gunter, M. J.; Riboli, E.; Ferrari, P.; Terry, K.; Cramer, D.; Kaaks, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer has a high case-fatality ratio, largely due to late diagnosis. Epidemiologic risk prediction models could help identify women at increased risk who may benefit from targeted prevention measures, such as screening or chemopreventive agents. Methods: We built an ovarian canc

  18. Overview of epidemiologic studies of radiation and cancer risk based on medical series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation for medical reasons have made important contributions to understanding of the relationship between such radiation and subsequent cancer risk. In this paper the strengths and limitations of medical studies are considered and their future potential usefulness is discussed. Studies may be broadly classified into two types, namely, those of individuals exposed for therapeutic purposes such as the study of ankylosing spondylytics and those of individuals exposed for diagnostic or examination purposes such as those of tuberculosis patients routinely examined by chest fluoroscopy. In general, studies of therapeutic exposures tend to involve high doses of radiation given at high dose rates and in a relatively small number of fractions, whereas studies of diagnostic exposures tend to involve relatively low doses, low dose rates and many fractions. However, these generalizations are not always true: for example, in the fluoroscopy studies some patients received doses to organs such as breast and lung which were substantially higher than those experienced in the atomic bomb survivors study and in a study of Israeli children treated with radiation for tinea capitis the average thyroid dose was reported to be low, and only about 0.09 gray. These studies illustrate one of the most important advantages of medical series, namely the variety of such studies in terms of the characteristics of the radiation involved (linear energy transfer characteristics, dose range, dose rate, and fractionation), the organs exposed and hence potentially at risk, and the characteristics of those exposed to such radiation

  19. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  20. Epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipetić Sandra B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastric cancer was the third most common cancer worldwide in 2000, accounting for approximately 876 000 new cases or 9% of the global cancer burden. Epidemiological characteristics As a result of changes in diet, the incidence of gastric cancer has decreased in most countries. Now days, consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits is increasing in regard to canned food. In addition to unhealthy diet, the main risk factors for gastric cancer are H. pylori infection, alcohol consumption, smoking, gastritis, stomach ulcer, gastrectomy, stomach polyposis, positive family history for gastric cancer, pernicious anemia and blood type A. Diet rich in vegetables and fruits, and reduced salt intake can prevent 65-75% of gastric cancer cases among nonsmokers. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infection can also reduce the incidence of this malignant disease. .

  1. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2012 Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  2. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2014 Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  3. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2013 Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  4. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2015 Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  5. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  6. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB)

  7. Citrus Fruit Intake Substantially Reduces the Risk of Esophageal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anqiang; Zhu, Chengpei; Fu, Lilan; Wan, Xueshuai; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haohai; Miao, Ruoyu; He, Lian; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    Many epidemiologic studies indicate a potential association between fruit and vegetable intake and various cancers. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to investigate the association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The authors conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from inception until July 2014. Studies presenting information about citrus intake and esophageal cancer were analyzed. The authors extracted the categories of citrus intake, study-specific odds ratio or relative risk, and the P value and associated 95% confidence intervals for the highest versus lowest dietary intake of citrus fruit level. The association was quantified using meta-analysis of standard errors with a random-effects model. Thirteen case-control studies and 6 cohort studies were eligible for inclusion. Citrus intake may significantly reduce risk of esophageal cancer (summary odds ratio = 0.63; 95% confidence interval = 0.52-0.75; P = 0), without notable publication bias (intercept = -0.79, P = 0.288) and with significant heterogeneity across studies (I = 52%). The results from epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The significant effect is consistent between case-control and cohort studies. Larger prospective studies with rigorous methodology should be considered to validate the association between citrus fruits and esophageal cancer.

  8. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  9. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selikoff, I J

    1974-12-01

    Some 99,000 new cases of cancer of the colon are expected next year, an incidence rate higher than that for both cancer of the lung and cancer of the breast. Evidence from geographic pathology suggests that some environmental factors play a strong role in its etiology. Data obtained in the 1959 survey of one million people by the American Cancer Society and followed since, has failed to show correlation with any of the large number of factors listed. It is suggested that the etiology is one of multiple factors. The synergistic effect of exposure to asbestos and cigarette smoking in the production of bronchogenic carcinoma is demonstrated by data on cohorts of insulation workers. There was also a modest increase in the number of deaths from gastrointestinal cancer in asbestos workers, but smoking did not seem to act in synergistic fashion at that site, except perhaps in the esophagus. Deaths from cancer occurred almost entirely after a period of 20 years or more from initial exposure. The death rate from cancer tended to increase with duration of exposure, but a distinct rise over the expected was seen in those who had been exposed less than one year to amosite dust. PMID:4470947

  10. Gallbladder cancer: epidemiology and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundal R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rajveer Hundal, Eldon A Shaffer Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Gallbladder cancer, though generally considered rare, is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80%-95% of biliary tract cancers. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis, often proving fatal. Its carcinogenesis follows a progression through a metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. This comprehensive review focuses on and explores the risks, management, and outcomes for primary gallbladder carcinoma. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities – inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Age, female sex, congenital biliary tract anomalies, and a genetic predisposition represent important risk factors that are immutable. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Mortality rates closely follow incidence; those countries with the highest prevalence of gallstones experience the greatest mortality from gallbladder cancer. Vague symptoms often delay the diagnosis of gallbladder cancer, contributing to its overall progression and poor outcome. Surgery represents the only potential for cure. Some individuals are fortunate to be incidentally found to have gallbladder cancer at the time of cholecystectomy being performed for cholelithiasis. Such an early diagnosis is imperative as a late presentation connotes advanced staging, nodal involvement, and possible recurrence following attempted resection. Overall mean survival is a mere 6 months, while 5-year survival rate is only 5%. The dismal prognosis, in part, relates to the

  11. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Rajesh P; Mathur, Garima; Mhatre, Sharayu; Yeole, B B

    2011-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer. PubMed was used as a search platform using key words such as "stomach cancer, treatment, clinical characteristics, stomach cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND". Most of the reported studies on gastric cancer from India are case report or case series and few are case-control studies. Indian studies on this topic are limited and have observed H. pylori infection, salted tea, pickled food, rice intake, spicy food, soda (additive of food), tobacco and alcohol as risk factors for gastric cancer. More research is required to understand the etiology, develop suitable screening test, to demarcate high-risk population and to develop and evaluate the effect of primary prevention programs. PMID:21731209

  12. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P Dikshit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer. PubMed was used as a search platform using key words such as "stomach cancer, treatment, clinical characteristics, stomach cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND". Most of the reported studies on gastric cancer from India are case report or case series and few are case-control studies. Indian studies on this topic are limited and have observed H. pylori infection, salted tea, pickled food, rice intake, spicy food, soda (additive of food, tobacco and alcohol as risk factors for gastric cancer. More research is required to understand the etiology, develop suitable screening test, to demarcate high-risk population and to develop and evaluate the effect of primary prevention programs.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology Study in Xuanwei: the Relationship among
Coal Type, Genotype and Lung Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua LI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that the lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei County, China was among the highest in the country and has been associated with exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This risk may be modified by variation in genetic polymorphisms and coal subtypes. Our objective was to use molecular epidemiological techniques to investigate the relationship among genetic polymorphisms, coal subtype and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei County. Methods On the basis of two population-based case-control studies in residents of Xuanwei County, China, questionnaires covering demographic information, smoking history, family and personal medical history, and information on other variables were administered and buccal cells and sputum samples were collected separately from each subject enrolled to extract DNA. GST superfamily, AKR1C3 superfamily, OGG1 superfamily and other genotype were scanned by useing PCR method. ORs and 95%CIs were used to estimate the association between genotypes, coal subtypes and lung cancer risk factors by conditional Logistic regression using Statistical Analysis Software. Results Compared with subjects who using smokeless coal or wood, smoky coal use was statistically significantly associated with lung cancer risk (OR=7.7, 95%CI: 4.5-13.3. There was marked heterogeneity in risk estimates for specific subtypes of smoky coal. Estimates were highest for coal from the Laibin (OR=24.8, Longtan (OR=11.6 and Baoshan (OR=6.0 coal types, and lower for coal from other types; the risk within the same subtype of coal in male and female were similar. The GSTM1-null genotype, the AKR1C3 (Ex1-70C>G, OGG1 (Ex6-315C>G genotypes were closely associated with increased risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei County, and their odds ratios (95%CI were 2.3 (1.3-4.2, 1.8 (1.0-3.5 and 1.9 (1.1-3.3, respectively. Compared to subjects who with GSTM1-positive and used less than

  14. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  15. Endometriosis and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zafrakas, Menelaos; Grimbizis, Grigorios; Timologou, Anna; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2014-01-01

    Background: A possible etiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer has been repeatedly reported in the literature. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate published epidemiological data on this issue. Review Methods: We conducted an extensive search of the literature in MEDLINE, of articles ever published until February 2014, using the key-words “endometriosis” and “ovarian” and one of the following terms in the title: “cancer” or “malignancy” or “malignant” or “tumor” o...

  16. Epidemiological studies and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some generalities on epidemiological studies, this report presents the current status of knowledge and researches in three peculiar domains: leukaemia for young people living around nuclear power stations, pathologies in workers of the nuclear sector, and health condition (incidence of cancers) of populations living around nuclear power stations

  17. Epidemiological factors in gall bladder cancer in eastern India-a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Panda, Nilanjan; Banerjee, Manju; Das, Ruchira

    2013-03-01

    India has high incidence of Gallbladder carcinoma with regional variation in incidence possibly due to environmental factors. Prospective study of all the gall bladder cancer in our hospital over 18 months analysing how the epidemiological factors are influencing the disease. Incidence-Four cases per 100,000 populations per year. The peak incidence was in 41 to 50 years group (49.20 %). Male to female ratio was 1:3.8. Majority (69.84 %) were in lower socio-economic group. 61 out of 63 patients (96.62 %) were non-vegetarians. 60.34 % and 19.04 % patients weighed between 50 and 55 kg and 55and 60 kg respectively (p = 0.003). Male smokers had significantly higher risk (p = 0.000 1). Gall stones were present in 45 out of 63 cases(71.42 %).45 out of 63 patients were typhoid carriers (p < 0.05). Pain abdomen was the commonest complaint (87.30 %), followed by pallor, lump in right upper quadrant, nausea & vomiting and jaundice in 71.42 %, 69.84 %, 66.66 %, 31.74 % patients respectively. This data highlights high prevalence of gall bladder carcinoma in Eastern India. Better hygiene and water supply to prevent typhoid carriers, prevention of malnutrition, early intervention for cholelithiasis, importance of balanced diet, increase in awareness about risk of tobacco and alcohol consumption-all are highlighted as significant modifiable factors. PMID:24426702

  18. Evaluation of endometrial cancer epidemiology in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohîlțea, R E; Furtunescu, F; Dosius, M; Cîrstoiu, M; Radoi, V; Baroș, A; Bohîlțea, L C

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer represents the most frequent gynecological malignant affection in the developed countries, in which the incidence of cervical cancer has significantly decreased due to the rigorous application of screening methods and prophylaxis. According to its frequency, endometrial cancer is situated on the fourth place in the category of women's genital-mammary malignant diseases, after breast, cervical and ovarian cancer in Romania. The incidence and mortality rates due to endometrial cancer have registered an increasing trend worldwide and also in Romania, a significant decrease of the age of appearance for the entire endometrial pathology sphere being noticed. At the national level, the maximum incidence is situated between 60 and 64 years old, the mortality rate of the women under 65 years old being high in Romania. The study evaluates endometrial cancer, from an epidemiologic point of view, at the national level compared to the international statistic data. PMID:25866582

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Prostate Cancer: A Review of Exposure Measures and Results of Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Michael T; Terry, Paul D; Whelan, Jay; Patzer, Rachel E

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies have shown that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3) may play a role in the development of prostate cancer, but the results of epidemiologic studies have been equivocal. Associations in humans may vary depending on study design, measurement methodology of fatty acid intake, intake ranges, and stage of cancer development. To address this, we identified 36 published studies through PubMed (Medline) from 1993 through 2013 on long-chain n-3s and prostate cancer. Exposure measurements included dietary assessment and biomarker levels. Associations for total, early, and late stage prostate cancer were examined by subgroup of study design and exposure measure type and by using forest plots to illustrate the relative strength of associations within each subgroup. We also tested for potential threshold effects by considering studies that included measurement cut-points that met intake levels recommended by the American Heart Association. We found no consistent evidence supporting a role of n-3s in either the causation or prevention of prostate cancer at any stage or grade. Results did not vary appreciably by study design, exposure measurement, intake level, or stage of cancer development. PMID:26595854

  20. Ovarian cancer and oral contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of data from 45 epidemiological studies including 23,257 women with ovarian cancer and 87,303 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancer, Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian; Beral, V.; Doll, R.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral contraceptives were introduced almost 50 years ago, and over 100 million women currently use them. Oral contraceptives can reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the eventual public-health effects of this reduction will depend on how long the protection lasts after use ceases. We...... aimed to assess these effects. METHODS: Individual data for 23,257 women with ovarian cancer (cases) and 87,303 without ovarian cancer (controls) from 45 epidemiological studies in 21 countries were checked and analysed centrally. The relative risk of ovarian cancer in relation to oral contraceptive use...... was estimated, stratifying by study, age, parity, and hysterectomy. FINDINGS: Overall 7308 (31%) cases and 32,717 (37%) controls had ever used oral contraceptives, for average durations among users of 4.4 and 5.0 years, respectively. The median year of cancer diagnosis was 1993, when cases were aged an average...

  1. Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer in Northwest Iran: 2003-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Firouz Amani; Mohammad Sadrkabir; Saeid Sadeghieh Ahari; Saeid Barzghari; Abbas Yazdanbod; Ahmad Sabzevari; Moghgan Hadavi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the world and the third leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. This study aims to assess the epidemiology of gastric cancer in Ardabil Province, Iran. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed on 1056 patients with gastric cancer registered in the Ardabil Cancer Registry. Data were collected by a checklist and analyzed by statistical methods in SPSS version 19. Results: Out of 1056 cas...

  2. Gene-Environment Research and Cancer Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program supports extramural research that investigates both genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancer and/or impact cancer outcomes.

  3. [Preliminaries to a study of epidemiology of occupational cancer among workers of shoe factories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, A I; Shan'gina, O V; Bul'bulian, M A

    1994-01-01

    Data presented in literature proves frequent malignancies of various localizations in workers engaged into footwear production, which could result from exposure to leather, rubber dust and some chemicals (polyvinylchloride, chloroprene and others). Hygienic studies of air at footwear production demonstrate that the workers at their workplaces are exposed to such occupational hazards as dust, chemicals. Epidemiologic research to reveal possible correlation between work conditions and the workers' health are expedient. PMID:7881862

  4. Tumor-based case-control studies of infection and cancer: muddling the when and where of molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Eric A; Wacholder, Sholom; Katki, Hormuzd A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    We describe the "tumor-based case-control" study as a type of epidemiologic study used to evaluate associations between infectious agents and cancer. These studies assess exposure using diseased tissues from affected individuals (i.e., evaluating tumor tissue for cancer cases), but they must utilize nondiseased tissues to assess control subjects, who do not have the disease of interest. This approach can lead to exposure misclassification in two ways. First, concerning the "when" of exposure assessment, retrospective assessment of tissues may not accurately measure exposure at the key earlier time point (i.e., during the etiologic window). Second, concerning the "where" of exposure assessment, use of different tissues in cases and controls can have different accuracy for detecting the exposure (i.e., differential exposure misclassification). We present an example concerning the association of human papillomavirus with various cancers, where tumor-based case-control studies likely overestimate risk associated with infection. In another example, we illustrate how tumor-based case-control studies of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer underestimate risk. Tumor-based case-control studies can demonstrate infection within tumor cells, providing qualitative information about disease etiology. However, measures of association calculated in tumor-based case-control studies are prone to over- or underestimating the relationship between infections and subsequent cancer risk. PMID:25063520

  5. Physical activity and lung cancer among non-smokers : a pilot molecular epidemiological study within EPIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rundle, Andrew; Richie, John; Steindorf, Karen; Peluso, Marco; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Linseisen, Jacob P.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-De-Mesquita, Hendrik B.; Peeters, Petra H.; Lund, Eiliv; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Martinez, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jose Tormo, M.; Quiros, Jose R.; Agudo, Antonio; Berglund, Goran; Jarvholm, Bengt; Bingham, Sheila; Key, Timothy J.; Gormally, Emmanuelle; Saracci, Rodolfo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The association between physical activity, potential intermediate biomarkers and lung cancer risk was investigated in a study of 230 cases and 648 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition. Data on white blood cell aromatic-DNA adducts by

  6. [Exposure to CT scans in childhood and long-term cancer risk: A review of epidemiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysson, Hélène; Journy, Neige; Roué, Tristan; Ducou-Lepointe, Hubert; Etard, Cécile; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2016-02-01

    Amongst medical exams requiring ionizing radiation, computed tomography (CT) scans are used more frequently, including in children. These CT examinations are associated with absorbed doses that are much higher than those associated with conventional radiology. In comparison to adults, children have a greater sensitivity to radiation and a longer life span with more years at cancer risks. Five epidemiological studies on cancer risks after CT scan exposure during childhood were published between 2012 and 2015. The results of these studies are consistent and show an increase of cancer risks in children who have been exposed to several CT scans. However, methodological limits due to indication bias, retrospective assessment of radiation exposure from CT scans and lack of statistical power are to be taken into consideration. International projects such as EPI-CT (Epidemiological study to quantify risks for pediatric computerized tomography and to optimize dose), with a focus on dosimetric reconstruction and minimization of bias will provide more precise results. In the meantime, available results reinforce the necessity of justification and optimization of doses.

  7. Epidemiological Study of High Cancer among Rural Agricultural Community of Punjab in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Thakur

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a citizen’s report, a house-to-house survey was conducted in Talwandi Sabo and Chamkaur Sahib Community Development Blocks in Bathinda and Roop Nagar District respectively in Punjab state located in a northern part of India to identify the number of existing cancer cases, and the number of cancer deaths that occurred in the last 10 years. Age adjusted prevalence of confirmed cancer cases per 100,000 population was 125 (107/85315 in Talwandi Sabo and 72 (71/97928 in Chamkaur Sahib. Cancer of female reproductive system, i.e., breast, uterus/cervix and ovary were more common in Talwandi sabo whereas cancer of blood and lymphatic system, esophagus, and bones were more common in Chamkaur Sahib. Cancer deaths per 100,000 populations per year were 52 in Talwandi Sabo compared to 30 at Chamkaur Sahib. A comparison of the characteristics of randomly selected individuals, from the villages where a cancer case existed or death due to cancer had occurred in last 2 years, revealed that involvement in cultivation, pesticide use, alcohol consumption and smoking were more common in Talwandi Sabo as compared to Chamkaur Sahib. Limited studies show that in drinking water the levels of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Cr, Se, Hg were generally higher, and pesticides such as heptachlor, ethion, and chloropyrifos were also higher in samples of drinking water, vegetables, and blood in Talwandi Sabo as compared to Chamkaur Sahib. As multiple factors were responsible for significantly higher prevalence of cancer cases in Talwandi Sabo, therefore, a multi-pronged strategy to discourage the indiscriminate use of pesticides, tobacco and alcohol needs to be adopted for cancer prevention, and a cancer registry should be set up for elucidation of the role of pesticides and heavy metals in the etiology of cancer in this area.

  8. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and bladder cancer risk and the results were varied. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of studies exclusively dedicated to the relationship between the 3 most commonly used analgesics and bladder cancer risk. METHODS: A systematic literature search up to November 2012 was performed in PubMed database for 3 categories of analgesics: acetaminophen, aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Seventeen studies (8 cohort and 9 case-control studies, involving a total of 10,618 bladder cancer cases, were contributed to the analysis. We found that acetaminophen (relative risk [RR] 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-1.17 and aspirin (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.91-1.14 were not associated with bladder cancer risk. Although non-aspirin NSAIDs was statistically significantly associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer among case-control studies (but not cohort studies, the overall risk was not statistically significant (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.73-1.05. Furthermore, we also found that non-aspirin NSAIDs use was significantly associated with a 43% reduction in bladder cancer risk among nonsmokers (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.76, but not among current smokers. CONCLUSION: The results of our meta-analysis suggest that there is no association between use of acetaminophen, aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs and bladder cancer risk. However, non-aspirin NSAIDs use might be associated with a reduction in risk of bladder cancer for nonsmokers.

  9. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer susceptibility: A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Chen; Fei Liu; Bo Li; Yong-Gang Wei; Lv-Nan Yan; Tian-Fu Wen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer risk by means of meta-analysis.METHODS: Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase and Chinese Biomedicine databas-es. Summary odds ratios and 95% CI for p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer were calculated in .xed-effects model (Mantel-Haenszel method) and random-effects model (DerSimonian and Laird method) when appropriate.RESULTS: This meta-analysis included 1115 liver can-cer cases and 1778 controls. The combined results based on all studies showed that there was a statisti-cally signi.cant link between Pro/Pro genotype and liver cancer, but not between Arg/Arg or Pro/Arg genotype and liver cancer. When stratifying for race, similar re-sults were obtained, i.e. patients with liver cancer had a signi.cantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro genotype than non-cancer patients among Asians. After stratifying the various studies by control source, gender, family history of liver cancer and chronic hepatitis virus infection, we found that (1) patients among hospital-based studies had a significantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a signi.cantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer; (2) female patients with liver cancer had a significantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg and a higher frequency of Pro/Arg+Pro/Pro genotypes than female individuals without cancer; (3) subgroup analyses for family history of liver cancer did not re-veal any signi.cant association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and liver cancer development; and (4) patients with negative hepatitis virus infection had a sig-ni.cantly higher frequency of Pro/Pro and a signi.cantly lower frequency of Arg/Arg genotype than individuals without cancer.CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that the p53 codon 72 polymorphism may be associated with liver cancer among Asians.

  10. Alcohol intake and cigarette smoking and risk of a contralateral breast cancer: The Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, J.A.; Bernstein, L.; Largent, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Study (1985-2001), the roles of alcohol and smoking were examined in 708 women with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (cases) compared with 1,399 women with unilateral breast cancer (controls). Cases and controls aged less than 55 years at first breast cancer diagnosis were identified from 5...... population-based cancer registries in the United States and Denmark. Controls were matched to cases on birth year, diagnosis year, registry region, and race and countermatched on radiation treatment. Risk factor information was collected by telephone interview. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were...... to asynchronous contralateral breast cancer. In this, the largest study of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer to date, alcohol is a risk factor for the disease, as it is for a first primary breast cancer Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/15...

  11. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  12. Epidemiological study to childrens cancer in the environment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the KiKK-study were presented in December 2007, followed by scientific publications in January 2008. The results caused a long-lasting debate, and the study was evaluated by different groups. Amongst these, the evaluation given by the SSK is of special importance. Now, BfS presents its final evaluation: The findings of the KiKK-study cannot be explained on the basis of current knowledge, but they give cause for further research activities. Scientific disciplines outside radiation biology and radiation epidemiology have to be involved. (orig.)

  13. Micronutrients and cancer aetiology: the epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, T

    1994-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies occur most commonly in poor countries and, therefore, are most likely to be associated with cancers common in these countries. Epidemiological studies are hampered by inaccurate measurement of micronutrient intake and by the correlations between intakes of many nutrients. The strongest evidence for a protective effect of micronutrients is for oesophageal cancer. The identity of the micronutrients is not certain, but may include retinol, riboflavin, ascorbic acid and Zn; alcohol, smoking and dietary nitrosamines increase the risk for oesophageal cancer. For stomach cancer there is good evidence that fruit and vegetables are protective. The protective effect of these foods might be largely due to ascorbic acid, but other nutrients and non-nutrients may also be important; the risk for stomach cancer is increased by salt, some types of preserved foods, and by infection of the stomach with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. The risk for lung cancer appears to be reduced by a high intake of fruit and vegetables, but it is not clear which agents are responsible and the major cause of lung cancer is cigarette smoking. Diet is probably the major determinant of the risk for colo-rectal cancer; there is evidence that fruit and vegetables and fibre reduce risk and that meat and animal fat increase risk, but there is no convincing evidence that these relationships are mediated by micronutrients. The risk for cervical cancer is inversely related to fruit and vegetable consumption and, therefore, to consumption of carotenoids and ascorbic acid, but the major cause of this cancer is human papillomavirus and it is not yet clear whether the dietary associations indicate a true protective effect or whether they are due to confounding by other variables. The evidence that micronutrients are important in the aetiology of either breast cancer or prostate cancer is weak, but the possible roles of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol in prostate

  14. Epidemiology of Oral Cavity Cancers in a Country Located in the Esophageal Cancer Belt: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Saedi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As one of the most common cancers among head and neck malignancies, cancer of the oral cavity probably has some variations in countries with a high prevalence of esophageal cancer.  Materials and Methods: Patients with oral cavity cancer who were treated at two tertiary referral centers from January 1999 to January 2009 were included in this study. In addition to demographic data, information regarding personal and family history of head and neck cancer, use of dentures, presence of immune deficiency, consumption of alcohol, and incidence of cigarette smoking was collected. Additionally, a history of opium usage was obtained from the participants in this study. Moreover, an appropriately matched control group was selected for comparisons between the risk factors.   Results: A total of 557 patients were entered into this study over a 10-year period, of whom 219 (39.3% were female and the remaining 338 (60.7% were male. The tongue was the most common site of cancer and 9% of the patients had a history of opium abuse, but more than half of the patients did not have any recognized risk factors. The incidence and stage of cancer had a significant relationship with cigarette smoking (P= 0.013.   Conclusion: Tongue cancer in non-smokers is the predominant pattern of oral cavity cancer in Iran.

  15. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh P Dikshit; Garima Mathur; Sharayu Mhatre; Yeole, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer...

  16. Red and processed meat intake is associated with higher gastric cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcheng Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red and processed meat was concluded as a limited-suggestive risk factor of gastric cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund. However, recent epidemiological studies have yielded inconclusive results. METHODS: We searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2013 for both cohort and case-control studies which assessed the association between red and/or processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. Study-specific relative risk estimates were polled by random-effect or fixed-effect models. RESULTS: Twelve cohort and thirty case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Significant associations were found between both red (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.22-1.73 and processed (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.65 meat intake and gastric cancer risk generally. Positive findings were also existed in the items of beef (RR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.57, bacon (RR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.17-1.61, ham (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.06, and sausage (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.16-1.52. When conducted by study design, the association was significant in case-control studies (RR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.33-1.99 but not in cohort studies (RR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.90-1.17 for red meat. Increased relative risks were seen in high-quality, adenocarcinoma, cardia and European-population studies for red meat. And most subgroup analysis confirmed the significant association between processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that consumption of red and/or processed meat contributes to increased gastric cancer risk. However, further investigation is needed to confirm the association, especially for red meat.

  17. Epidemiological study on the cancer mortality in an area with elevated radon daughter exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many countries water containing considerable amounts of Radon-222 is used in so-called ''Radon Spas'' for therapeutical purposes. In the Austrian radon spas Badgastein and Bad Hofgastein many detailed studies of the environmental natural radioactivity have been carried out for about 20 years. The accumulated annual doses to the basal cells of the segmental and subsegmental bronchiols (receiving the highest dose at inhalation of radon and daughters, and target for lung cancer) were calculated for several population groups in this area. The researcher calculated the exposure to radon and daughter accumulated over a lifetime for each single person who lived in Badgastein for at least 10 years and died between 1947 and 1980. The lifetime bronchial doses of 1366 residents who died between 1947 and 1980 from several causes of death were calculated. Altogether 56 lung cancer cases occurred. From that the annual lung cancer incidence rate for Badgastein (30 and 108 per 105 living people of all ages and for persons over 40 years respectively) is not statistically different from the mean observed lung cancer cases in the whole Federal Province of Salzburg (32 and 98 respectively). A case-control study has also been carried out to compare the mean annual lifetime exposure of lung cancer deaths with those of other. It can be seen that for the higher exposed population groups and even more so for the miners, the persons who died of lung cancer received a higher dose than those who died of other cancer and other causes. Therefore radon daughter inhalation may be responsible for lung cancer induction even in a non-mining environment

  18. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    Findings in epidemiological studies of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer have been inconsistent: many studies have yielded a positive relationship, whereas several studies have shown no relationship. The inconsistency arises because of the occurrence of seroreversion during the period between the time that H. pylori exerts a carcinogenic effect and the time of blood sampling. When this seroreversion is taken into account, there is an epidemiologically positive association between H. pylori status and the risk for gastric cancer. In addition to the epidemiological evidence, experimental studies using Mongolian gerbils have shown that H. pylori infection elevates the risk for gastric cancer. It is concluded that H. pylori is a causal factor for gastric cancer. In the creation of preventive strategies against gastric cancer by the eradication of H. pylori, determination of the time at which H. pylori plays a role as a carcinogen is important. Three hypotheses have been proposed in regard to this timing: that H. pylori infection in childhood or the teenage years acts as a factor that produces precancerous lesions with irreversible damage in the gastric mucosa, that in adulthood it acts as an initiator, and also in adulthood, that it acts as a promoter. As these hypotheses are not mutually exclusive, the extent to which each hypothesis plays a part in explaining gastric carcinogenesis should be evaluated. Only a small proportion of subjects infected with H. pylori have gastric cancer during their lifetime. Interleukin-1 polymorphism, a host factor, and CagA, a virulence factor of H. pylori, are suspected to be risk factors for gastric cancer in subjects with H. pylori infection. Dietary factors, especially vitamin C, and patterns of precancerous lesions also seem to influence the relationship between H. pylori and gastric cancer. H. pylori seems to reduce the risk for esophageal and for some gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. This finding, as

  19. Radon and risk of cancer: epidemiological studies after occupational and domestic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of cancer risk after exposure to radon is mainly based on the results of uranium miners follow-up. A cohort study on the French uranium miners has demonstrated an excess of lung cancer and of larynx cancer mortality. A linear dose-response relationship has been described between the excess relative risk of lung cancer and the cumulative exposure to radon (Poisson regression). This study has contributed to a joint analysis of 11 cohorts of miners, the aim being a more precise evaluation of the different factors able to influence the dose-response relationship between radon and lung cancer mortality. These factors are: age at first exposure, attained age, time since exposure, the pattern of exposure over time and tobacco consumption. The extrapolation of the risk for the general public from the risk estimated after occupational exposure, has to be considered by taking in account several remarks: uranium miners are exposed, beside radon, to two other radiological components, gamma rays and long lived uranium dust, and to other substances specific of the mines, which are absent in the domestic environment but may with radon have an effect on the lung cancer risk. It was impossible to estimate directly, from these uranium miners data, the risk linked to radon for non-smokers and for female population. A case control-study is currently be carrying out in the French hospitals, in order to estimate the risk of lung cancer linked to the last 30 years of radon exposure in the dwellings. (author). 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. BRCA1 polymorphisms and breast cancer epidemiology in the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) study

    OpenAIRE

    Ricks-Santi, Luisel J.; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Shields, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Results of studies for the association of BRCA1 genotypes and haplotypes with sporadic breast cancer have been inconsistent. Therefore, a candidate SNP approach was used in a breast cancer case-control study to explore genotypes and haplotypes that have the potential to affect protein functions or levels. In a breast cancer case-control study, genotyping of BRCA1 polymorphisms Q356R, D693N, and E1038G was performed on 1005 cases and 1765 controls. Unconditional, polytomous logistic regression...

  1. Introduction: Epidemiologic research and prevention of occupational cancer in Europe.

    OpenAIRE

    Boffetta, P.; Kogevinas, M.

    1999-01-01

    Research on occupational cancer epidemiology has been an important area of occupational health in Europe since the early studies were conducted in the United Kingdom in the 1950s and 1960s. During the last decade, occupational cancer research in Europe has gained an international dimension and become increasingly interdisciplinary in nature. At present, occupational exposures might be responsible for 13 to 18% of lung cancers, 2 to 10% of bladder cancers, and 2 to 8% of laryngeal cancers in E...

  2. Indoor radon and risk of lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the present study was to establish whether high radon concentrations in dwellings in Finland had increased the risk of lung cancer. Previous studies had shown an association between the α-active radon daughters and elevated lung cancer risk among miners. Convincing evidence of the risk among the general population exposed to radon indoors was, however, lacking. A descriptive analysis was first conducted in an area in southern Finland with high indoor radon exposure. In 18 rural municipalities this analysis yielded no significant correlation between the average radon exposure and incidence of male lung cancer. A case-control study within a cohort of the same rural population was then designed. The data included 238 male cases of lung cancer diagnosed in 1980-85 and 434 controls (390 smokers and 44 nonsmokers) from the male population. Radon exposure was measured, when possible, in all the dwellings occupied by a case or control in 1950-1975. Measurements were available for the total 25-year period, or for a proportion of it, for 164 cases and 334 controls; for the rest only estimates were available. In spite of the fact that the controls were mainly selected among smokers, the amount smoked still appeared to be the most important lung cancer risk factor in the data, the risk increasing linearly with the quantity of cigarettes smoked in a lifetime. The risk of lung cancer was not associated with the radon exposure level when the whole data were studied. In heavy smokers, however, a positive though not significant, effect on the risk from radon exposure was found. In the range of uncertainty the findings do not conflict with most of those observed among miners or the general population so far. (orig.)

  3. Epidemiology of prostate cancer in India

    OpenAIRE

    Shalu Jain; Sunita Saxena; Anup Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Data from national cancer registries shows that incidence of certain cancers are on rise in India. The cancers which are showing significant increase in incidence rates include prostate, mouth and kidney among male population, corpus uteri, breast and thyroid among female population and lung cancer in both male and female populations. In the present review article we have focused on epidemiology of prostate cancer in Indian subcontinent in terms of incidence, survival, and mortality etc. The ...

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and breast cancer: Epidemiological and Molecular study on Egyptian and Iraqi women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in breast carcinogenesis is still controversial. Unraveling this relationship is potentially important for better understanding of breast cancer etiology, early detection and possibly prevention of breast cancer. The aim of the current study is to unravel the association between EBV and primary invasive breast cancer (PIBC) in two different Arab populations (Egyptian and Iraqi women). Patients and Methods: The study was done on paraffin-embedded tissues of 40 Egyptian and 50 Iraqi patients with PIBC in addition to 20 normal breast tissues as controls for each group. Both controls and neoplastic tissues were assessed for the expression of EBV genes and proteins (EBNA-1, LMP-1, and EBER) as well as CD21 marker by immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH) and PCR techniques. Results: Our gold standard for EBV reactivity in breast cancer cases was positivity of both EBNA1 by PCR and EBER by in situ hybridization. EBV was detected in 18/40 (45%) and 14/50 (28%) of Egyptian and Iraqi women; respectively where p = 0.073, compared to 0/20 (0%) of their control groups (p < 0.05). Regarding the association between EBV positivity and tumor grade, there was not any statistical significant difference between EBV presence and tumor grade in both populations

  5. Application of epidemiologic studies of radiation-induced breast cancer to mammographic screening guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of benefit/risk ratio for the mammographic screening of asymptomatic women has been under intense scrutiny for several years. The studies of radiogenic breast cancer show good agreement in the quantitative estimation of the magnitude of radiation risks, in spite of the variations among the several studies in radiation quality factors, exposure fractionation, and the background population rate of breast cancer. There is a report indicating no evidence for the synergism between radiation and benign breast disease, late menopause, or the family history of breast cancer. According to the report, the radiogenic breast cancer risk is 3-fold higher in nulliparous women as compared with parous women. The analyses of lifetime risks and benefits suggest that the choice of an additive vs. multiplicative risk model is not crucial. The benefit/risk ratio shows strong age dependence which agrees well with the current U.S. guidelines, namely that the routine mammographic screening of the general population of asymptomatic women is recommended only after age of 50. (Yamashita, S.)

  6. Potential cancer risk associated to CT scan. State of the art of epidemiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, Marie-Odile; Baysson, Neige Joumy Helene; Jacob, Sophie; Laurier, Dominique [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Lab. of Epidemiology

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) scans in paediatric population raises the question of a possible health impact of ionizing radiation exposure associated with CT scans. Material and methods: Two large cohort studies have been recently published that assessed the risk of cancer related to CT examinations of children and young adults. Methodology and results of these studies are presented. Results: The UK cohort included over 176,000 young people, who underwent one or more CT scans between 1985 and 2002. The Australian study compared the risk of cancer and leukaemia in a population of 680,000 young people exposed to CT scans between 1985 and 2005 to non-exposed similar age people. Both studies showed a significant dose-response relation between exposure to CT and leukaemia or brain tumour risks. These results are consistent with predictions from A-bomb survivors' data. However, uncertainties in dosimetric estimation and potential bias linked to underlying medical conditions should be considered. Conclusion and perspectives: Further studies with more accurate dosimetry and assessment of potential bias and uncertainties are needed. Ongoing national studies and the European collaborative EPI-CT study will help to better understand the relation between low level radiation exposure and cancer and to support recommendations for patients'' radiation protection. (orig.)

  7. Potential cancer risk associated to CT scan. State of the art of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) scans in paediatric population raises the question of a possible health impact of ionizing radiation exposure associated with CT scans. Material and methods: Two large cohort studies have been recently published that assessed the risk of cancer related to CT examinations of children and young adults. Methodology and results of these studies are presented. Results: The UK cohort included over 176,000 young people, who underwent one or more CT scans between 1985 and 2002. The Australian study compared the risk of cancer and leukaemia in a population of 680,000 young people exposed to CT scans between 1985 and 2005 to non-exposed similar age people. Both studies showed a significant dose-response relation between exposure to CT and leukaemia or brain tumour risks. These results are consistent with predictions from A-bomb survivors' data. However, uncertainties in dosimetric estimation and potential bias linked to underlying medical conditions should be considered. Conclusion and perspectives: Further studies with more accurate dosimetry and assessment of potential bias and uncertainties are needed. Ongoing national studies and the European collaborative EPI-CT study will help to better understand the relation between low level radiation exposure and cancer and to support recommendations for patients'' radiation protection. (orig.)

  8. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  9. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in Europe and Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ganiy Opeyemi Abdulrahman; Ganiyu Adebisi Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to remain the most lethal malignancy in women across the world. This study reviews some of the epidemiological similarities and differences in breast cancer between white European women and black African women with the aim of optimising care for women with breast malignancy across the world. The incidence of breast cancer is lower among African women than their European counterparts. Majority of women in Europe are postmenopausal when they present with breast cancer; h...

  10. The Complexities of Epidemiology and Prevention of Gastrointestinal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Haq

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer epidemiology and prevention is one of the most well studied fields today. The more we can understand about the incidence and pathogenesis of this disease, the better we will be able to prevent it. Effective prevention strategies can decrease the mortality rate of cancer significantly; this is why it is important to delineate the underlying causes. It has been well recognized that genetic mutations, sporadic or hereditary, may lead to increased chance of tumorigenesis. Detecting genetic mutations can lead to the identification of high-risk individuals with hereditary cancer syndromes, which may assist in devising prevention strategies. Further, environmental factors are known to play important roles in epidemiology and suggest prevention tools that could be implemented to reduce cancer incidence and subsequent cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. Chemoprevention has been tried in colon cancer and is finding new advancements in other carcinomas as well. Out of many environmental cancer preventive agents, the most notable developments are the identification of the role of vitamins E, vitamin D and folic acid. Increased consumption of these vitamins has shown to be inversely correlated with cancer risk. This review will highlight important aspects of cancer epidemiology in the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal system focusing on colorectal adenocarcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Additionally, some of the well-known and evolving aspects of epidemiology of colorectal and pancreatic cancer along with current and new prevention strategies will also be reviewed.

  11. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Siegel Scott; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.

    2011-01-01

    Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers), focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21). These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0) we...

  12. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: Epidemiological studies on Peutz-Jeghers syndrome & Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy among women after breast cancer, and the third most common malignancy among men after lung and prostate cancer in the European Union. In the Netherlands, approximately 10000 cases are diagnosed each year. CRC is moreover associ

  13. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  14. An epidemiologic review of marijuana and cancer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hui Jenny; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Tashkin, Donald P; Feng, Bingjian; Straif, Kurt; Hashibe, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use is legal in two states and additional states are considering legalization. Approximately 18 million Americans are current marijuana users. There is currently no consensus on whether marijuana use is associated with cancer risk. Our objective is to review the epidemiologic studies on this possible association. We identified 34 epidemiologic studies on upper aerodigestive tract cancers (n = 11), lung cancer (n = 6), testicular cancer (n = 3), childhood cancers (n = 6), all cancers (n = 1), anal cancer (n = 1), penile cancer (n = 1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), malignant primary gliomas (n = 1), bladder cancer (n = 1), and Kaposi sarcoma (n = 1). Studies on head and neck cancer reported increased and decreased risks, possibly because there is no association, or because risks differ by human papillomavirus status or geographic differences. The lung cancer studies largely appear not to support an association with marijuana use, possibly because of the smaller amounts of marijuana regularly smoked compared with tobacco. Three testicular cancer case-control studies reported increased risks with marijuana use [summary ORs, 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-2.23 for higher frequency and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.08-2.09) for ≥10 years]. For other cancer sites, there is still insufficient data to make any conclusions. Considering that marijuana use may change due to legalization, well-designed studies on marijuana use and cancer are warranted. PMID:25587109

  15. Epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Zamir Ali; Akram, Muhammad; Asif, H M; Sultana, Sabira; Khan, Asmatullah

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is more common in men over the age of 65 years. There are 15% cases with positive family history of prostate cancer Worldwide. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death among the U.S. men. Prostate cancer incidence is strongly related to age with the highest rates in older man. Globally millions of people are suffering from this disease. This study aims to provide awareness about prostate cancer as well as an updated knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Comparative study on cancer incidence in neighboring regions of Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia in 1969-1980. Pannonian Tumor Epidemiology Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The present collaborative study was performed in four confined, neighboring regions of Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia with different demographic and occupational characteristics of their respective populations, various structures of medical facilities, and cancer registration systems. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates and trends of six major cancer sites (stomach, colorectum and lung in both sexes as well as breast, uterine cervix and uterine body in women) in three 4-year periods (1969-1972, 1973-1976, 1977-1980) were computed and mutually compared in the mentioned regions. Relatively high, different but more or less decreasing incidence rates of stomach, and varying but mainly increasing rates and trends of colorectal cancer were observed, while lung cancer incidence rates and tendencies showed great variations in both sexes. For women, besides continuous increase, the tendencies towards culmination and stabilization were found in regions with the highest incidence rates of breast and uterine body cancer in comparison with the more or less declining rates of uterine cervix cancer over the period studied. The observed different incidence rates and trends of these and obviously of other cancer sites require further investigations using more sophisticated epidemiological methods and approaches.

  17. Female Breast Cancer: Epidemiological And Clinical Study Of Some Risk Factors Among Egyptian Females- Multi Clinics Study

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. El-Moselhy; M. A. S. Ahmed*; A. M. Abdel-Fattah

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted on 390 female breast cancer patients and an equal number of females as controls. The patients were attending some University and Teaching Hospitals in Cairo and Assuit. Ninety of them were newly operated. A retrospective, case-control, clinic based study was chosen to carry out this research. The aim of the study was to describe the sociodemographic, characteristics and clinical features of female breast cancer and to determine its risk factors among Egyptian women. A...

  18. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Epidemiological studies on syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology and prognosis of ''fainting'' or syncope has puzzled physicians over the years. Is fainting dangerous? This is a question often asked by the patient--and the answer is ''it depends on a lot of things''. The diverse pathophysiology of syncope and the underlying comorbidites of the...... from smaller studies from different clinical settings with wide differences in patient morbidity. Through the extensive Danish registries we examined the characteristics and prognosis of the patients hospitalized due to syncope in a nationwide study. The aims of the present thesis were to investigate...... thesis demonstrated that the ICD-10 discharge diagnosis could reliably identify a cohort of patients admitted for syncope and that the discharge code carried a high number of unexplained cases despite use of numerous tests. The last studies showed that syncope is a common cause for hospital contact in...

  20. Epidemiological studies on syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology and prognosis of ''fainting'' or syncope has puzzled physicians over the years. Is fainting dangerous? This is a question often asked by the patient--and the answer is ''it depends on a lot of things''. The diverse pathophysiology of syncope and the underlying comorbidites...... from smaller studies from different clinical settings with wide differences in patient morbidity. Through the extensive Danish registries we examined the characteristics and prognosis of the patients hospitalized due to syncope in a nationwide study. The aims of the present thesis were to investigate...... thesis demonstrated that the ICD-10 discharge diagnosis could reliably identify a cohort of patients admitted for syncope and that the discharge code carried a high number of unexplained cases despite use of numerous tests. The last studies showed that syncope is a common cause for hospital contact...

  1. Analysis of Liquid Bead Microarray Antibody Assay Data for Epidemiologic Studies of Pathogen-Cancer Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Danny V.; Hughes, James P.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Galloway, Denise A.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Potter, John D.; Manhart, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Liquid bead microarray antibody (LBMA) assays are used to assess pathogen-cancer associations. However, studies analyze LBMA data differently, limiting comparability. Methods We generated 10,000 Monte Carlo-type simulations of log-normal antibody distributions (exposure) with 200 cases and 200 controls (outcome). We estimated type I error rates, statistical power, and bias associated with t-tests, logistic regression with a linear exposure and with the exposure dichotomized at 200 units, 400 units, the mean among controls plus two standard deviations, and the value corresponding to the optimal sensitivity and specificity. We also applied these models, and data visualizations (kernel density plots, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, predicted probability plots, and Q-Q plots), to two empirical datasets to assess the consistency of the exposure-outcome relationship. Results All strategies had acceptable type I error rates (0.03≤P≤0.048), except for the dichotomization according to optimal sensitivity and specificity, which had a type I error rate of 0.27. Among the remaining methods, logistic regression with a linear predictor (Power=1.00) and t-tests (Power=1.00) had the highest power to detect a mean difference of 1.0 MFI (median fluorescence intensity) on the log scale and were unbiased. Dichotomization methods upwardly biased the risk estimates. Conclusion These results indicate that logistic regression with linear predictors and unpaired t-tests are superior to logistic regression with dichotomized predictors for assessing disease associations with LBMA data. Logistic regression with continuous linear predictors and t-tests are preferable to commonly used LBMA dichotomization methods. PMID:26071614

  2. Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer in Northwest Iran: 2003-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouz Amani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the world and the third leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. This study aims to assess the epidemiology of gastric cancer in Ardabil Province, Iran. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed on 1056 patients with gastric cancer registered in the Ardabil Cancer Registry. Data were collected by a checklist and analyzed by statistical methods in SPSS version 19. Results: Out of 1056 cases, 37% were smokers and 80.9% were illiterate. There were 73.1% male cases. Adenocarcinoma was the most common (89.5% type of cancer and prevalent in males. The tumors were mostly located in the gastric cardia. Most cases were from rural areas. Conclusion: Results showed that the incidence of gastric cancer in Ardabil Province was higher in males compared to females. Compared to the country standards the incidence of gastric cancer was higher.

  3. Collinearity diagnosis for a relative risk regression analysis: an application to assessment of diet-cancer relationship in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Y

    1992-07-01

    In epidemiologic studies, two forms of collinear relationships between the intake of major nutrients, high correlations, and the relative homogeneity of the diet, can yield unstable and not easily interpreted regression estimates for the effect of diet on disease risk. This paper presents tools for assessing the magnitude and source of the corresponding collinear relationships among the estimated coefficients for relative risk regression models. I show how to extend three tools (condition indices, variance decomposition proportions, and standard inflation factors) for diagnosing collinearity in standard regression models to likelihood and partial likelihood estimation for logistic and proportional hazards models. This extension is based on the analogue role of the information matrix in such analyses and the cross-product matrix in the standard linear model. I apply the methodology to relative risk models that relate crude intakes (on the log scale) and nutrient densities to breast cancer cases in the NHANES-I follow-up study. The three diagnostic tools provide complementary evidence of the existence of a strong collinearity in all models that is due largely to homogeneity of the population with respect to our risk scale for the crude intakes. The analysis suggests that the non-significant relative risks for the crude intakes in these models may be due to their involvement in collinear relationships, while the nonsignificant relative risks for the nutrient densities are far less affected by multicollinearity.

  4. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months. PMID:27531538

  5. Main clinical epidemiological features of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study of 95 patients with lung cancer, discharged from Neumology Service at 'Dr Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso' General Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, was carried out from January, 2008 to December, 2008 in order to identify the main clinical epidemiological features of the aforementioned disease. A malignancy predominance among men aged between 56 and 65 years old, belonging to urban areas and being heavy smoker (out of 30 cigarettes per day over 30 years ), was found. Those affected without a confirmed histological type and IV clinical stage epidermoid carcinoma were predominant. Most of them had the opportunity to be treated. Increasing and intensifying health promotion and disease prevention campaigns were recommended so as to achieve the population to avoid or quit the smoking habit. (author)

  6. Cancer epidemiology in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is estimated that there were over 10 million new cancer cases in 2000, 5.4 million of them occurring in the developing countries (Parkin et al, 2001). The marked geographical variation in cancer occurrence results in differing therapeutic priorities: North America has more new cancer cases than South-Central Asia, but there are more deaths from cancer in South-Central Asia, reflecting a different pattern of cancer rather than differences in prognosis. Prediction of future trends is difficult, but the impact of population increase and ageing will be significant, with an expected 63% increase in the population of the less developed countries in 50 years. Four sites of cancer namely breast, cervix, colorectal and nasopharyngeal carcinoma are reviewed, looking at their present and possible future importance in the context of developing countries and their aetiology

  7. Q&A: Muin Khoury on cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Rose, Suzanne

    2014-02-01

    Muin J. Khoury, MD, PhD, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Public Health Genomics and head of the National Cancer Institute's Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, talks about challenges and opportunities in cancer epidemiology research and efforts in the epidemiology community to transform the field.

  8. Gastric Cancer Epidemiology in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Aesun; Kim, Jeongseon; Park, Sohee

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer has been the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Korea although the age-standardized mortality and incidence has decreased gradually during last two decades. Helicobacter pylori infection and cigarette smoking are well-established risk factors, and the role of dietary factors, such as salted foods, fresh vegetables and fruits, soy foods, and processed or grilled meats on gastric carcinogenesis has been suggested. In this review, we review national and international gastric cancer...

  9. Genetics and epidemiology, congenital anomalies and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, J.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    Many of the basic statistical methods used in epidemiology - regression, analysis of variance, and estimation of relative risk, for example - originally were developed for the genetic analysis of biometric data. The familiarity that many geneticists have with this methodology has helped geneticists to understand and accept genetic epidemiology as a scientific discipline. It worth noting, however, that most of the work in genetic epidemiology during the past decade has been devoted to linkage and other family studies, rather than to population-based investigations of the type that characterize much of mainstream epidemiology. 30 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. International pooled study on diet and bladder cancer: the bladder cancer, epidemiology and nutritional determinants (BLEND) study: design and baseline characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Goossens, Maria E; Isa, Fatima; Brinkman, Maree; Mak, David; Reulen, Raoul; Wesselius, Anke; Benhamou, Simone; Bosetti, Cristina; Bueno-De-Mesquita, Bas; Carta, Angela; Allam, Md Farouk; Golka, Klaus; Grant, Eric J; Jiang, Xuejuan; Johnson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012, more than 400,000 urinary bladder cancer cases occurred worldwide, making it the 7th most common type of cancer. Although many previous studies focused on the relationship between diet and bladder cancer, the evidence related to specific food items or nutrients that could be involved in the development of bladder cancer remains inconclusive. Dietary components can either be, or be activated into, potential carcinogens through metabolism, or act to prevent carcinogen damage...

  11. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  12. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Mudit Verma; Mukesh Verma; Payal Patel

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high ris...

  13. Epidemiological review of laryngeal cancer: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Bobdey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laryngeal cancer is one of the 10 leading causes of cancer in Indian men. The association of laryngeal cancer and tobacco smoking is well-established, but the peculiarities such as wide variation of disease distribution and survival, role of tobacco chewing, indoor air pollution, and dietary factors in laryngeal cancer causation needs to be understood. In this study, we review the descriptive and observational epidemiology of laryngeal cancer in India. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Web of science electronic database was searched from January 1995 to December 2013, using the using keywords "laryngeal cancer, laryngeal cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination like OR, AND." Two authors independently selected studies published in English and conducted in India. A total of 15 studies were found to be relevant and eligible for this review. Results: In India, laryngeal cancer contributes to approximately 3-6% of all cancers in men. The age-adjusted incidence rate of cancer larynx in males varies widely among registries, highest is 8.18 per 100,000 in Kamprup Urban District and the lowest is 1.26 per 100,000 in Nagaland. The 5-year survival for laryngeal cancer in India is approximately 28%. Indian studies show tobacco, alcohol, long-term exposure to indoor air pollution, spicy food, and nonvegetarian diet as risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Conclusion: There is wide regional variation in the incidence of laryngeal cancer in India. Survival rates of laryngeal carcinoma are much lower as compared to other Asian countries. Studies conducted in India to identify important risk factors of laryngeal cancer are very limited, especially on diet and indoor air pollution. Hence, more research is required for identifying the etiological factors and development of scientifically sound laryngeal cancer prevention programs.

  14. Renal cell cancer among African Americans: an epidemiologic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipworth Loren

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Incidence rates for renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising more rapidly among blacks than whites, almost entirely accounted for by an excess of localized disease. This excess dates back to the 1970s, despite less access among blacks to imaging procedures in the past. In contrast, mortality rates for this cancer have been virtually identical among blacks and whites since the early 1990s, despite the fact that nephrectomy rates, regardless of stage, are lower among blacks than among whites. These observations suggest that renal cell cancer may be a less aggressive tumor in blacks. We have reviewed the epidemiology of renal cell cancer, with emphasis on factors which may potentially play a role in the observed differences in incidence and mortality patterns of renal cell cancer among blacks and whites. To date, the factors most consistently, albeit modestly, associated with increased renal cell cancer risk in epidemiologic studies among whites - obesity, hypertension, cigarette smoking - likely account for less than half of these cancers, and there is virtually no epidemiologic evidence in the literature pertaining to their association with renal cell cancer among blacks. There is a long overdue need for detailed etiologic cohort and case-control studies of renal cell cancer among blacks, as they now represent the population at highest risk in the United States. In particular, investigation of the influence on renal cell cancer development of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, both of which occur substantially more frequently among blacks, is warranted, as well as investigations into the biology and natural history of this cancer among blacks.

  15. Female Breast Cancer: Epidemiological And Clinical Study Of Some Risk Factors Among Egyptian Females- Multi Clinics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. El-Moselhy; M. A. S. Ahmed*; A. M. Abdel-Fattah

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on 390 female breast cancer patients and an equal number of females as controls. The patients were attending some University and Teaching Hospitals in Cairo and Assuit. Ninety of them were newly operated. A retrospective, case-control, clinic based study was chosen to carry out this research. The aim of the study was to describe the sociodemographic, characteristics and clinical features of female breast cancer and to determine its risk factors among Egyptian women. All the patients and the controls had undergone physical examinations. Laboratory investigations were done for the newly operated patients and their controls. The most important characteristics of breast cancer patients were breast mass as the main presenting symptom (92.1% and treated by modified radical mastectomy (77.2%. Low means level of serum vitamin D and high levels of serum cholesterol and triglyceride were found more among the patients. Age at first full term pregnancy 30 years, age at menopause 45 years, pregnancy termination and/or abortion and never married were important gynaecological and reproductive risk factors (OR=4.44, 3.14, 2.84 and 2.67, respectively. Also, exposure to radiation and/or environmental factors, history of benign breast disease and alcohol use were important associated risk factors (OR=5.05, 4.63 and 4.10, respectively. Moreover, the sister as the nearest female relative with breast cancer, total number of female relatives with breast cancer 2 and relative(s age at diagnosis <50 years were important family history risk factors (OR=9.19, 8.84 and 7.91, respectively. Lastly, high consumption of canned foods, fat rich foods and low consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables were important dietary risk factors (OR=3.39, 1.76 and 1.51, respectively.

  16. The changing epidemiology of smoking and lung cancer histology.

    OpenAIRE

    Wynder, E. L.; Muscat, J E

    1995-01-01

    In 1950, the first large-scale epidemiological studies demonstrated that lung cancer is causatively associated with cigarette smoking, a finding subsequently confirmed by the Royal College of Physicians in London, the U.S. Surgeon General, and the World Health Organization. Although cigarette consumption has gradually decreased in the United States from a high of about 3800 cigarettes per adult per year in 1965 to about 2800 cigarettes in 1993, death from lung cancer has reached a high among ...

  17. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N;

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address t...

  18. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  19. An overview of molecular epidemiologic studies in biliary tract cancer%肝外胆道癌分子流行病学研究的新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟令勤; 刘金钢

    2012-01-01

    胆道癌是一种生存率极低的高致死性疾病,在世界范围内,胆道癌的发病率呈上升趋势.胆道癌不良的预后源于缺乏早期诊断和有效治疗的手段,因此,明确胆道癌的发病机制显得至关重要.基因多态性的关联分析将有助于阐明胆道癌的发生机制,有望发现有价值的肿瘤标记物以确定胆道癌高危人群并进行早期诊断和预后评估,进而成为基因治疗的新靶点.本文从分子流行病学角度对胆道癌基因多态性方面的最新研究进展进行综述.%Biliary tract cancer is a rare but highly fatal malignancy,with world -wide increasing incidence in recent years. The prognosis of biliary tract cancer is grim due to lack of early diagnostic modalities and effective treatments. It is important to explore the pathogenesis of biliary tract cancer. Molecular epidemiologic studies examining the associations between polymorphisms in several gene pathways and biliary tract cancer risk may provide insight into the etiology of this kind of cancer, and be helpful to discover validated biomarkers for early detection in asymptomatic individuals and present new targets of gene therepy in biliary tract cancer in the future. We present a broad overview of molecular epidemiologic studies that have addressed the relationship between biliary tract cancer risk and genetic polymorphisms in several candidate genes and suggest avenues for future research.

  20. Descriptive Epidemiology of Female Breast Cancer in Tianjin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KexinChen; MinHe; ShufenDong; JifangWang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe trends in the changes of incidence and mortality of female breast cancer patients in Tianjin, and evaluate the effect of these trends on prevention. METHODS A method of descriptive epidemiology was used to comprehensively study the status of female breast cancer in Tianjin. RESULTS From 1981 to 2000, the incidence rate of breast cancer in Tianjin had been increasing at the speed of 1.8 % annually, whereas the peak of the age-adjusted incidence and mortality rate expressed a mild declining trend. Follow-up study indicated that 3 and 5-year survival rates improved in various degrees. CONCLUSION Early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer are very important to both increasing survival and lowering mortality from breast cancer. Preventive efforts should be promoted for women who are at high risk for breast cancer.

  1. Pleiotropic and sex-specific effects of cancer GWAS SNPs on melanoma risk in the population architecture using genomics and epidemiology (PAGE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Kocarnik

    Full Text Available Several regions of the genome show pleiotropic associations with multiple cancers. We sought to evaluate whether 181 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with various cancers in genome-wide association studies were also associated with melanoma risk.We evaluated 2,131 melanoma cases and 20,353 controls from three studies in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE study (EAGLE-BioVU, MEC, WHI and two collaborating studies (HPFS, NHS. Overall and sex-stratified analyses were performed across studies.We observed statistically significant associations with melanoma for two lung cancer SNPs in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus (Bonferroni-corrected p2.8e-4.We provide confirmatory evidence of pleiotropic associations with melanoma for two SNPs previously associated with lung cancer, and provide suggestive evidence for a male-specific association with melanoma for prostate cancer variant rs12418451. This SNP is located near TPCN2, an ion transport gene containing SNPs which have been previously associated with hair pigmentation but not melanoma risk. Previous evidence provides biological plausibility for this association, and suggests a complex interplay between ion transport, pigmentation, and melanoma risk that may vary by sex. If confirmed, these pleiotropic relationships may help elucidate shared molecular pathways between cancers and related phenotypes.

  2. Ionizing radiation and cancer risk: evidence from epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, E

    1998-11-01

    Epidemiological studies provide the primary data on the carcinogenic effects of radiation in humans. Much of what is known has come from studies of the atomic bomb survivors, and to a lesser extent from patients receiving radiotherapy. These studies demonstrate that exposure to moderate to high doses of radiation increases the risk of cancer in most organs. For all solid cancers combined, cancers of the thyroid, breast and lung, and leukemia, risk estimates are fairly precise, and associations have been found at relatively low doses (bomb survivors, a linear-quadratic dose response seems to fit the data better than a pure linear model. Radiation does not act entirely in isolation. It can interact with other carcinogens, e.g. tobacco or chemotherapeutic agents, and with host factors such as age at exposure, gender or reproductive history. Interactions with medical interventions or with certain heritable mutations have also been suggested. While the studies of high-dose exposures are essential for understanding the overall biological consequences of radiation exposure, the public is more concerned about the long-term health effects from protracted exposures at low doses. Unfortunately, the inherent limitations of epidemiology make it extremely difficult to directly quantify health risks from these exposures. While most epidemiological data are compatible with linear extrapolations from exposures at high doses or high dose rates, they cannot entirely exclude other possibilities. As the field of epidemiology advances, understanding more about the health effects of prolonged and low-dose exposures will be the next challenge. PMID:9806607

  3. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C R; Bertesteanu, S V G; Mirea, D; Grigore, Raluca; lonescu, Diana; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century the hypopharynx and the cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in the human population with regard to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngoesophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to the latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, and nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  4. Risk Factors and Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Saeed; Ahmad, Mukhtiar; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad; Ur Rehman, Saif; Sultana, Sabira

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 2nd most common cause of death among all cancers and is the 4th most common cancer in the world. The number of deaths due to gastric cancer is about 800,000 annually. Gastric cancer is more common in men as compared to women and is 3rd most common cancer after colorectal and breast cancers in women. A progressive rise in the incidence rate has been observed in females over the last 5 years. The highest incidence of stomach cancer is in China, South America and Eastern Europe. The incidence of gastric cancer has 20 fold variation worldwide. Global variation is linked by two factors which play important role in developing gastric cancer. One is infection with Helicobacter pylori and the 2nd is diet. South Asia is a region with low risk, despite a high prevalence of H.pylori. Gastric carcinoma is common in southern region of India. Gastric cancer is more readily treated if diagnosed early. This study aims to provide awareness about gastric cancer as well as an updated knowledge about risk factors and epidemiology of gastric cancer in Pakistan.

  5. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Siegel Scott

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dichloromethane (methylene chloride is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers, focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21. These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 were seen for the rarer forms of cancers such as brain cancer and specific hematopoietic cancers. Three large population-based case-control studies of incident non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Europe and the United States observed odds ratios between 1.5 and 2.2 with dichloromethane exposure (ever exposed or highest category of exposure, with higher risk seen in specific subsets of disease. More limited indications of associations with brain cancer, breast cancer, and liver and biliary cancer were also seen in this collection of studies. Existing cohort studies, given their size and uneven exposure information, are unlikely to resolve questions of cancer risks and dichloromethane exposure. More promising approaches are population-based case-control studies of incident disease, and the combination of data from such studies, with robust exposure assessments that include detailed occupational information and exposure assignment based on industry-wide surveys or direct exposure measurements.

  6. 2. Molecular Biology as a Tool in Cancer Epidemiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@There can be little doubt that we are entering a new era in our understanding of the origins of human cancer. Unfortunately from the point of view of the cancer epidemiology community, some of the more recent advances in the molecular biology of cancer (once fully assimilated) will tend to make the talk of the up-to-date cancer epidemiologist a great deal less straightforward than many of us had previously envisaged it to be, There may still be a few cancers that will prove to result from only a few distinctive types of mutation in a relatively small number of genes, but I strongly suspect that the great majority of human cancers that we wish to study will prove to have their origins in a complex set of DNA changes whose precise

  7. Cancer precursors epidemiology, detection, and prevention

    CERN Document Server

    Rohan, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic advances in our understanding of cancer causation have come from epidemiologic and laboratory research, particularly over the past two decades. These developments have included a broadening interest in the critical events that take place during the early stages of the dynamic multistep process leading to - vasive cancer. Increasingly, cancer epidemiologists are pursuing research into the origins and natural history of premalignant lesions, including intermediate or surrogate endpoints, a trend - celerated by the development of molecular technologies that are revolutionizing our understanding of the transformation of normal to malignant cells. There seems little doubt that this emerging knowledge will provide further insights not only into carcinogenic processes, but also into more sensitive methods of early detection and more effective means of prevention. In this book, Drs. Franco and Rohan have succeeded in prep- ing a comprehensive, timely, and critical review of the substantial progress that has ...

  8. Epidemiology of esophageal cancer in Japan and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingsong; Totsuka, Yukari; He, Yutong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Qiao, Youlin; Ueda, Junko; Wei, Wenqiang; Inoue, Manami; Tanaka, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for a collaborative multidisciplinary study of the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, the authors reviewed the published literature to identify similarities and differences between Japan and China in esophageal cancer epidemiology. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histologic type, while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma remains extremely low in both countries. Numerous epidemiologic studies in both countries show that alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are contributing risk factors for ESCC. There are differences, however, in many aspects of esophageal cancer between Japan and China, including cancer burden, patterns of incidence and mortality, sex ratio of mortality, risk factor profiles, and genetic variants. Overall incidence and mortality rates are higher in China than in Japan, and variation in mortality and incidence patterns is greater in China than in Japan. During the study period (1987-2000), the decline in age-adjusted mortality rates was more apparent in China than in Japan. Risk factor profiles differed between high- and low-incidence areas within China, but not in Japan. The association of smoking and drinking with ESCC risk appears to be weaker in China than in Japan. Genome-wide association studies in China showed that variants in several chromosome regions conferred increased risk, but only genetic variants in alcohol-metabolizing genes were significantly associated with ESCC risk in Japan. A well-designed multidisciplinary epidemiologic study is needed to examine the role of diet and eating habits in ESCC risk.

  9. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Lipworth

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Loren Lipworth1,2, Robert E Tarone1,2, Lars Lund2,3, Joseph K McLaughlin1,21International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Medicine (JKM, RET and Preventive Medicine (LL, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 3Department of Urology, Viborg Hospital, Viborg, DenmarkAbstract: Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches

  10. Sanitary surveillance in France in relation with the Chernobylsk accident. Updated situation on thyroid cancers and epidemiological studies during 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children has been reported since 1990 in areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine which have been highly contaminated during the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A similar increase is now observed in young adults in the same areas. In France, thyroid cancer is characterized by low occurrence and good prognosis. However, the incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing for more than 20 years, and in 1986, the Chernobyl cloud of radioactive dust crossed the French territory. Thus, the National institute for public health surveillance (I.n.V.S.) carried out several studies to evaluate whether the incidence increase in thyroid cancer is related to radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident. Since 2000, the I.n.V.S. is in charge of a national multidisciplinary approach involving a wide range of public health actors, including the French network of cancer registries (Francim). Since 2003, the I.n.V.S. has been working on improving the surveillance system according to the actions described in the national cancer plan 2003-2007. The I.n.V.S. has increased its financial contribution to cancer registries including the national registry of solid tumors in children, which was created in 2000. The Institute is also working on the implementation of a multi source system for the national cancer surveillance in link with cancer registries. For the twentieth anniversary of the Chernobyl accident, the I.n.V.S. is publishing updated results from the latest research conducted in close collaboration with the partners. These results do not support the initial hypothesis of a potential 'Chernobyl effect' in France. The increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer is also reported in most of developed countries. Practices in cancer diagnosis and the increased rate of total thyroidectomy for benign lesion may lead pathologists to unexpectedly discover small thyroid tumors. This fact is likely to explain most of the incidence increase. The wide

  11. Male Pattern Baldness in Relation to Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: A Prospective Analysis in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Levine, Paul H; Cleary, Sean D; Hoffman, Heather J; Graubard, Barry I; Cook, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    We used male pattern baldness as a proxy for long-term androgen exposure and investigated the association of dermatologist-assessed hair loss with prostate cancer-specific mortality in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. From the baseline survey (1971-1974), we included 4,316 men who were 25-74 years of age and had no prior cancer diagnosis. We estimated hazard ratios and used Cox proportional hazards regressions with age as the time metric and baseline hazard stratified by baseline age. A hybrid framework was used to account for stratification and clustering of the sample design, with adjustment for the variables used to calculate sample weights. During follow-up (median, 21 years), 3,284 deaths occurred; prostate cancer was the underlying cause of 107. In multivariable models, compared with no balding, any baldness was associated with a 56% higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.37), and moderate balding specifically was associated with an 83% higher risk (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.92). Conversely, patterned hair loss was not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Our analysis suggests that patterned hair loss is associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer and supports the hypothesis of overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:26764224

  12. Epidemiology of Thyroid Cancer in Jordan from 1996 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Fayez Nimri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of thyroid cancer has varied from 2 per 100,000 in Europe to 21 per 100,000 in the Hawaiian Chinese population and is 2-3 fold more common in females. Middle East Cancer Consortium figures from 1996-2001 have recorded different age standardized incidence rates that ranged from 2 per 100,000 inEgypt to 7.5 per 100,000 among Israeli Jews. In Jordan the age standardized incidence rate of thyroid cancer was 3 per 100,000 during that period. This study aimed to define the incidence of thyroid cancer in Jordan and to explore the epidemiological char-acteristics of patients and tumors. Methods: This was a descriptive epidemiological study that utilized data reported to the Jordan Cancer Registry during 1996-2008. Results: The incidence rate in Jordan varied during the period from 1996 to 2008; however the recorded rate (2.6 per 100,000 in 1996 and 2008 was similar. The incidence rate was higher among Jordanian females. Age specific incidence rate and age standardized incidence rate were parallel during the study period with no peaks. The most common morphological type of thyroid cancer in Jordan was papillarycarcinoma (76%. The average annual incidence during the study period was highest (3.3 per 100,000 in Amman and (2.2 per 100,000 in Jarash governorates. Conclusion: The results of our study are consistent with international studies. The incidence of thyroid cancer in Jordan is not high when compared with other countries. The high incidence of thyroid cancer in Amman and Jarash governorates in comparisonto the incidence in other governorates needs further assessment.

  13. Descriptive Study on the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Coal-producing Area in Eastern Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua LI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Xuanwei county is located at Late Permian coal-accumulating area in eastern Yunnan and western Guizhou, China. The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei county is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Recent years, the pollution and the higher mortality rate of lung cancer has been watched in the area around Xuanwei, and there is no report about whether the epidemic levels and the pathogen of lung cancer in other area of eastern Yunnan is similar to that in xuanwei. The aim of this study is to epidemic levels and cause of lung cancer in coal-producing area in the east of Yunnan province. Methods 382 study units (nature villages were selected by stratified cluster random sampling from coalproducing area in eastern Yunnan province, China. The villagers who were aged 30-79 years with no history of lung cancer were enrolled. All the participants received an initial single-view posterior-anterior chest radiograph and administered a questionnaire survey (which involves the information of demography, household and fuel use, lifestyle, tobacco and occupational exposure history, family and personal medical history, etc. The subjects with a positive screen by chest x-ray underwent to have a computed tomography scan of the chest and biopsy examination. The confidence interval of the standardized rate ratio were adopted to evaluate the statistical significance of differences in different regions. Results 52,833 villagers were surveyed and screened with X-ray. 604 of them were suspicious lung cancer with an initial chest radiograph, 541 underwent CT scan (362 were diagnosed by CT and 109 were diagnosed by histology. The adjusted positive rates for lung cancer screening with CT is 763.08 per 100,000, the age-standardized rate (ASR with the world standard population is 426.28 per 100,000 (95% confidence

  14. Pathological and Epidemiologic Study of Gastric Cancer in Atomic Bomb Survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1959-77

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuura, Hiroo; Yamamoto, Tsutomu; Sekine, Ichiro; Ochi, Yoshimiti; Ohtake, Masanori

    1984-01-01

    A study to elucidate the effects of atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation exposure on the incidence of stomach cancer was conducted on 79,856 A-bomb survivors included in the Life Span Study sample for whom dose estimates are available. From cases diagnosed duri

  15. A Nation-Wide multicenter 10-year (1999-2008) retrospective clinical epidemiological study of female breast cancer in china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the very limited cancer registry, incidence and mortality rates for female breast cancer in China are regarded to be increasing especially in the metropolitan areas. Representative data on the breast cancer profile of Chinese women and its time trend over years are relatively rare. The aims of the current study are to illustrate the breast cancer profile of Chinese women in time span and to explore the current treatment approaches to female breast cancer. This was a hospital-based nation-wide and multi-center retrospective study of female primary breast cancer cases. China was divided into 7 regions according to the geographic distribution; from each region, one tertiary hospital was selected. With the exception of January and February, one month was randomly selected to represent each year from year 1999 to 2008 at every hospital. All inpatient cases within the selected month were reviewed and related information was collected based on the designed case report form (CRF). The Cancer Hospital/Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) was the leading hospital in this study. Four-thousand two-hundred and eleven cases were randomly selected from the total pool of 45,200 patients and were included in the analysis. The mean age at diagnosis was 48.7 years (s.d. = 10.5 yrs) and breast cancer peaked in age group 40-49 yrs (38.6%). The most common subtype was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (86.5%). Clinical stage I & II accounted for 60.6% of 4,211 patients. Three-thousand five-hundred and thirty-four cases had estrogen receptor (ER) and progestin receptor (PR) tests, among them, 47.9% were positive for both. Two-thousand eight-hundred and forty-nine cases had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER-2) tests, 25.8% of them were HER-2 positive. Among all treatment options, surgery (96.9% (4,078/4,211)) was predominant, followed by chemotherapy (81.4% (3,428/4,211). Much less patients underwent radiotherapy (22.6% (952/4,211)) and endocrine

  16. Valid comparisons and decisions based on clinical registers and population based cohort studies: assessing the accuracy, completeness and epidemiological relevance of a breast cancer query database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacke Christian Olaf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data accuracy and completeness are crucial for ensuring both the correctness and epidemiological relevance of a given data set. In this study we evaluated a clinical register in the administrative district of Marburg-Biedenkopf, Germany, for these criteria. Methods The register contained data gathered from a comprehensive integrated breast-cancer network from three hospitals that treated all included incident cases of malignant breast cancer in two distinct time periods from 1996–97 (N=389 and 2003–04 (N=488. To assess the accuracy of this data, we compared distributions of risk, prognostic, and predictive factors with distributions from established secondary databases to detect any deviations from these “true” population parameters. To evaluate data completeness, we calculated epidemiological standard measures as well as incidence-mortality-ratios (IMRs. Results In total, 12% (13 of 109 of the variables exhibited inaccuracies: 9% (5 out of 56 in 1996–97 and 15% (8 out of 53 in 2003–04. In contrast to raw, unstandardized incidence rates, (in- directly age-standardized incidence rates showed no systematic deviations. Our final completeness estimates were IMR=36% (1996–97 and IMR=43% (2003–04. Conclusion Overall, the register contained accurate, complete, and correct data. Regional differences accounted for detected inaccuracies. Demographic shifts occurred. Age-standardized measures indicate an acceptable degree of completeness. The IMR method of measuring completeness was inappropriate for incidence-based data registers. For the rising number of population-based health-care networks, further methodological advancements are necessary. Correct and epidemiologically relevant data are crucial for clinical and health-policy decision-making.

  17. Secondhand smoke exposure and risk of lung cancer in Japan: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Megumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Wakai, Kenji; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Katanoda, Kota

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systematic evaluation of the association between secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer in Japan has yet to be conducted. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between secondhand smoke and lung cancer in Japanese non-smokers. Methods Relevant studies were collected from the MEDLINE and Ichushi Web databases using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings. Eligible studies were identified, and relative risks or odds ratios were extracted to calculate pooled risk estimates. This procedure was performed independently by at least two authors. Stratified analyses were carried out according to study design, publication year, and whether or not potential confounding variables were accounted for. The presence of publication bias was assessed via funnel plots. Results We identified four cohort studies and five case-control studies. Quantitative synthesis was conducted only for secondhand smoke exposure in the home during adulthood. Of the 12 populations included in meta-analysis, positive secondhand smoke exposure-lung cancer associations were observed in 11, whereas an inverse association was found in the remaining 1. The pooled relative risk of lung cancer associated with secondhand smoke exposure was 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.48). We found no evidence of publication bias, and a significant association remained even when potentially missing studies were included (pooled relative risk: 1.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.46). The results were stable across different subgroup analyses, including by study design, publication year, and when adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusions Secondhand smoke exposure in the home during adulthood results in a statistically significant increase in the risk of lung cancer. PMID:27511987

  18. A molecular epidemiology project on diet and cancer: the EPIC-Italy Prospective Study. Design and baseline characteristics of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Domenico; Berrino, Franco; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Salvini, Simonetta; Ceroti, Marco; Pala, Valeria; Sieri, Sabina; Frasca, Graziella; Giurdanella, Maria Concetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Fiorini, Laura; Celentano, Egidio; Galasso, Rocco; Decarli, Adriano; Krogh, Vittorio

    2003-01-01

    EPIC-Italy is the Italian section of a larger project known as EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition), a prospective study on diet and cancer carried out in 10 European countries. In the period 1993-1998, EPIC-Italy completed the recruitment of 47,749 volunteers (15,171 men, 32,578 women, aged 35-65 years) in 4 different areas covered by cancer registries: Varese (12,083 volunteers) and Turin (10,604) in the Northern part of the country; Florence (13,597) and Ragusa (6,403) in Central and Southern Italy, respectively. An associate center in Naples enrolled 5,062 women. Detailed information for each individual volunteer about diet and life-style habits, anthropometric measurements and a blood sample was collected, after signing an informed consent form. A food frequency questionnaire specifically developed for the Italian dietary pattern was tested in a pilot phase. A computerized data base with the dietary and life-style information of each participant was completed. Blood samples were processed in the same day of collection, aliquoted (RBC, WBC, serum and plasma) and stored in liquid nitrogen containers. Follow-up procedures were validated and implemented for the identification of newly diagnosed cancer cases. Cancer incidence was related to dietary habits and biochemical markers of food consumption and individual susceptibility in order to test the role of diet-related exposure in the etiology of cancer and its interaction with other environmental or genetic determinants. The comparability of information in a prospective study design is much higher than in other studies. The availability of such a large biological bank linked to individual data on dietary and life-style exposures also provides the unique opportunity of evaluating the role of selected genotypes involved in the metabolism of chemical compounds and DNA repair, potentially related to the risk of cancer, in residents of geographic areas of Italy characterized by specific

  19. Comparative epidemiology of gastric cancer between Japan and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingsong Lin; Junko Ueda; Shogo Kikuchi; Yukari Totsuka; Wen-Qiang Wei; You-Lin Qiao; Manami Inoue

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the similarities and differences in gastric cancer epidemiology between Japan and China. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of the PubMed database was performed. The relevant literature published in China was also been cited. Data on incidence and mortality rates in 2008 were obtained from the Cancer Mondial database, published by International Agency for Research on Cancer at http://www-dep.iarc.fr/.RESULTS: Gastric cancer remains a significant public health burden in both Japan and China. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization is high in the adult populations of both countries. Accumulating evidence from intervention studies in both countries has shown the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication in reducing gastric cancer incidence. There are differences, however, in many aspects of gastric cancer, including patterns of incidence and mortality, trends in the prevalence of H. pylori infection, H. pylori strains, the magnitude of risk of gastric cancer related to H. pylori infection, and associations with dietary habits. Compared with China, Japan has seen a more rapid decline in H. pylori infection among adolescents. While Japanese cohort studies have dominated the literature concerning the associations between gastric cancer and dietary habits, numerous case-control studies in China suggest a positive association between a high intake of preserved fish and vegetables and gastric cancer risk. There is a need for a multidisciplinary research approach to understand the interactions between various strains of H. pylori, host factors, and other lifestyle and environmental factors in gastric carcinogenesis in both countries.CONCLUSION: The shared high incidence of gastric cancer and high prevalence of H. pylori, as well as differences in many aspects of gastric cancer, provide an excellent opportunity to establish Sino-Japanese collaborations.

  20. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz, Nubia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000 and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs.Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infec¬tions in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in sponta¬neous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35 account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i Primary prevention by the use of

  1. [Lichen striatus. Epidemiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittart, J A; Pegas, J R; Sant'Ana, L A; Pires, M C

    1989-01-01

    The authors are showing a retrospective study of 53 cases of lichen striatus concerning sex, colour, age, place of lesions, associated diseases and period of the year of occurrence of the dermatosis. There was a larger number of cases in females of white race and age-between 2 and 5 years old. A greater occurrence was observed in the months of September and March which correspond to spring and summer. Adding the fact that there have been more cases in children, at times in brothers and the trend to spontaneous involution, the authors suggest the possibility of a virus as etiology to this entity. PMID:2666785

  2. Thyroid cancer in Belarus: the epidemiological situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting in 1990, an increasing number of children were diagnosed as suffering from thyroid cancer in regions close to the Chernobyl nuclear accident site, and this increase is continuing. But still today, doubts about the significance of this increase are being voiced. Using data from the Belarus epidemiological cancer registration system up to 1994, the geographic distribution, time and cohort trends, age distribution and other characteristics of this epidemic are reviewed. Results show that the geographic distribution is similar to that of iodine-131 following the accident; that when looking at cohorts of children born in the same years incidence has steadily increased since 1990; and that deviations from this pattern might be explained by active case finding.The most likely interpretation of these results is that of a causal association with radiation exposure related to the Chernobyl accident, but possible modifying factors should be examined closely. The most likely future course of the epidemic is an increasing number of cases among those exposed in childhood, and public health measures should take this into account

  3. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Millikan, Robert C.; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G.; Conway, Kathleen; Smith, Lisa. V.; Labbok, Miriam H; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H. Shelton; Perou, Charles M

    2007-01-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified “intrinsic” breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case–control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common s...

  4. Epidemiologic studies based on the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, G. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    There are great opportunities in the post-Chernobyl experience for significant epidemiologic research, perhaps even more in the area of disaster research than in the area of the human health effects of ionizing radiation. But the potential opportunity for learning the effects of radioiodine on the thyroid is very great and has aroused widespread national and international investigative interest. The opportunities for significant epidemiologic research are, however, severely limited currently by the worsening economic situation in Belarus and Ukraine, where the greatest exposure occurred, and by the lack of personnel trained in appropriate methods of study, the lack of modern equipment, the lack of supplies, the poor communication facilities, and the difficulties of accurate dose estimation. the disadvantages may or may not outweigh the obvious advantages of large numbers, the extensive direct thyroidal measurements made shortly after the accident in 1986, the magnitude of the releases of radioiodine, and the retention of the former Soviet system of universal medical care. Both the European Commission (EC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have been working actively to strengthen the infrastructure of Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine. New scientific knowledge has yet to emerge from the extensive epidemiologic work but information of considerable public health significance has begun to accumulate. The bulk of the thyroid cancer has been shown to be valid by international pathology review; both EC and WHO representatives have declared the increase in thyroid cancer among children to have been caused in large part by Chernobyl. No increase in leukemia has been seen in the general population. The WHO pilot studies have shown no evidence of an increase in psychologic or neurologic complications among those exposed in utero. Ongoing epidemiologic work can be described by review of the inventory that the WHO has begun to maintain and publish. 20 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Epidemiologic perspective on immune-surveillance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Daniel William; Olivera J. Finn

    2011-01-01

    Common “themes” in epidemiology related to cancer risk beg a comprehensive mechanistic explanation. As people age, risk for cancer increases. Obesity and smoking increase the risk for many types of cancer. History of febrile childhood diseases lowers the risk for melanomas, leukemias, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and ovarian cancer. Increasing number of ovulatory cycles uninterrupted by pregnancies correlate positively with breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer risk while pregnancies and bre...

  6. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in Europe and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganiy Opeyemi Abdulrahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer continues to remain the most lethal malignancy in women across the world. This study reviews some of the epidemiological similarities and differences in breast cancer between white European women and black African women with the aim of optimising care for women with breast malignancy across the world. The incidence of breast cancer is lower among African women than their European counterparts. Majority of women in Europe are postmenopausal when they present with breast cancer; however, the peak incidence among African women is in the premenopausal period. Ductal carcinoma is the commonest type of breast cancer among women in Africa and Europe. However, medullary and mucinous carcinomas are more common in Africa than in Europe. While European women usually present at an early stage especially with the advent of screening, African women generally present late for treatment resulting in lower survival rates. There should be more research at the molecular level among African women to identify genetic factors that may contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer. There should also be improvement in the health care system in Africa in order to optimise care for women with breast cancer.

  7. Usefulness and reliability of available epidemiological study results in assessments of radiation-related risks of cancer. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinomas occurring in the thyroid gland as a result of radiation generally affect the papillary and, to a slightly lesser extent, follicular parts of this organ, while the available body of evidence hardly gives any indications of anaplastic and medullary neoplasms. Radiation has, however, mostly been associated with multicentric tumours. Among the survivors of the nuclear assaults on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there are no known cases of anaplastic carcinomas of the thyroid. The papillary carcinoma, which is the prevailing type of neoplasm after radiation exposure, has less malignant potential than the follicular one and is encountered in all age groups. Malignant carcinomas of the thyroid are predominantly found in the middle and high age groups. It was calculated that high Gy doses and dose efficiencies are associated in children with a risk coefficient of 2.5 in 104 person-years. This rate is only half as high for adults. Studies performed on relevant cohorts point to latency periods of at least five years. Individuals exposed to radiation are believed to be at a forty-year or even life-long risk of developing cancer. The cancer risk can best be described on the basis of a linear dose-effect relationship. The mortality rate calculated for cancer of the thyroid amounts to approx. 10% of the morbidity rate. The carcinogenic potential of iodine-131 in the thyroid is only one-third as great as that associated with external radiation of high dose efficiency. (orig./MG)

  8. Socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer detection in Hong Kong--a high income city: retrospective epidemiological study using the Breast Cancer Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josette Sin Yee Chor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is not known whether socioeconomic disparities affect the detection of breast cancer in Asian countries where the incidence of breast cancer is a rising trend. In this study, we explore the socioeconomic profiles of women and the stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis in breast cancer patients aged 40 or over in Hong Kong. METHOD: During the period 2008 to 2011, 5393 breast cancer patients registered with the Hong Kong Breast Cancer Registry. Participants and their clinicians were asked to complete standardised questionnaires including patient socio-demographics, health history and risk factors, the course of the disease, post-treatment physical discomfort and psychosocial impact, follow-up recurrence and survival status. RESULTS: Monthly household incomes, educational levels and the practice of regular screening are independently associated with the stage of the disease at diagnosis. Higher socioeconomic status and a higher educational level were associated with an earlier stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Yearly clinical examinations, ultrasound and mammographic screening every 2 to 3 years were significantly associated with the earlier detection of breast cancer. CONCLUSION: There were socioeconomic disparities among Hong Kong women who were found to have breast cancer. Population-based screening policies, including raising awareness among women at risk, should be implemented.

  9. Dietary Flavonols Intake and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Esophageal cancer (EC and gastric cancer (GC are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Many studies have investigated the association between dietary flavonols intake and the risk of EC and GC, but the results are inconsistent. Hence, we conducted a systematic analysis of relevant population-based studies to assess the association and derive a more precise estimation. Methods: The Cochrane, PubMed and Embase databases were searched to identify articles published through January 2016 that met the predetermined inclusion criterion. Twelve studies involving 4593 patients and 519,378 controls were included. Results: The summary odds ratios (ORs of EC, GC and the two combined were respectively 0.88 (95% CI: 0.73–1.08, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.70–0.91 and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74–0.92 for the highest category of dietary flavonols intake compared with the lowest. No significant heterogeneities were observed in these studies. Further analysis showed that the pooled ORs of EC and GC for cohort, population-based case-control and hospital-based case-control studies were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.61–1.34, 0.92 (95% CI: 0.72–1.18, 0.68 (95% CI: 0.38–1.24 and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.65–1.06, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.45–1.59, 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56–0.88. The subgroup analyses revealed a significant association of flavonol intake with a reduced risk of noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma but not gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Moreover, significant inverse associations of flavonol intake with GC risk were observed in women but not in men, in smokers but not in nonsmokers, in European populations but not in American populations. Similarly, a significant inverse association of flavonols intake with EC risk was also observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Conclusion: High intake of dietary flavonols is significantly related to a reduced risk of GC, especially in women and smokers.

  10. Epidemiological studies in psychosomatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, M R

    1975-01-01

    The epidemiological triad of host, agent and environment used conceptually in infectious disease may serve as a model for psychosomatic disorders, despite the involvement of many more variables. There are major problems with diagnosis and measurement, however, and the term "psychosomatic" has several meanings. The two main senses are "specific" psychosomatic disorders and an ecological view of illness. The association between psychiatric and physical disorder has been examined in a variety of settings and the findings have suggested that there is a positive relationship. Despite considerable methodological and sampling difficulties in epidemiological research into psychosomatic illness, recent efforts have been made to overcome these. The results of ecological studies appear to be more consistent that those dealing with "specific" psychosomatic disorders and suggest that man has a general psychophysical propensity to disease. Although physical and mental illness do seem to be intimately linked, the reasons for "vulnerability" to illness and "clustering" of illness are obscure. The clarification of these areas appears to be the main task ahead for epidemiology in the field of psychosomatic medicine. PMID:773850

  11. Can traditional epidemiology detect cancer risks caused by occupational exposure to pesticides?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgellis, A. [Environmental Illness Research Center, Huddinge (Sweden); Kolmodin-Hedman, B. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Public Health Sciences; Kouretas, D. [Thessaly Univ. , Pedion Areos, Volos (Greece). School of Agriculture

    1999-06-01

    In order to investigate the possible relationship between cancer and occupational exposure to pesticides, the authors reviewed the latest literature of the epidemiological studies in this area coming to the conclusion that, while several studies indicate a link between certain pesticides and certain tumors, this information is still insufficient, and further research on the health consequence of exposure to pesticides is needed. Moreover, provided there is a risk, it is often too limited to be detected by available epidemiological techniques. Therefore, in addition to the epidemiological studies, the development of new biology, gene technology and medical biotechnology methods may significantly enhance the specificity of the epidemiological studies. Thus, the fusion of molecular biology and epidemiology into molecular epidemiology may provide more specific methods for monitoring the occupational dependent carcinogenic risk of individuals and groups.

  12. Epidemiology, aetiology, diagnosis and screening of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death globally. Smoking causes about 90 % of all lung cancer cases. Passive, i.e. involuntary smoking has been confirmed to enhance the risk of lung cancer in exposed people. Individual susceptibility is one of important factors in lung cancer formation. New knowledge in epidemiology and aetiology of lung cancer gives new possibilities in diagnostic and screening of this disease. Results of large randomised trials aimed at new technologies in lung cancer screening will be available in a few years. (author)

  13. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival: epidemiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanders, M M J; Vissers, P A J; Haak, H R; van de Poll-Franse, L V

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes and cancer. One of the key issues identified for further investigation was the need for a better understanding of whether diabetes influences cancer prognosis above and beyond the prognosis conferred by each disease state independently. Whether the worsened survival of CRC patients with diabetes could be explained by less favourable patient-, tumour- and treatment-related characteristics has also been evaluated in numerous recent studies. However, as most studies did not account for all the various potential confounders, such as cancer stage, comorbidities and body mass index (BMI) in their analyses, the current evidence for the association between diabetes and survival in CRC patients remains inconclusive. Nevertheless, based on multiple examples in the literature, the present review demonstrates that diabetes affects the presentation of CRC as well as its treatment and outcome, which may then result in lower overall rates of survival in patients with, compared to those without, diabetes. PMID:24507584

  14. Polyphenols and disease risk in epidemiologic studies 1-4

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, I.C.W.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Plant polyphenols, a large group of natural antioxidants, are serious candidates in explanations of the protective effects of vegetables and fruits against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiologic studies are useful for evaluation of the human health effects of long-term exposure to physiologic concentrations of polyphenols, but reliable data on polyphenol contents of foods are still scarce. The aim of this review is to summarize available epidemiologic data on the health effects of ...

  15. Epidemiological adaptation of quartz exposure modeling in Swedish aluminum foundries: nested case-control study on lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Håkan B; Bellander, Tom

    2003-12-01

    In a recent cohort study in aluminum foundries and remelting plants an unexpectedly high risk of lung cancer was found in workers in sand foundries. On the basis of present and historical measurement data, we developed a statistical model for exposure to total dust and crystalline quartz for different jobs and time periods. Cumulative dose estimates of total dust and crystalline quartz were calculated and used in a nested case-control study in the cohort. From the cohort of foundry workers (n = 5016), 46 cases of lung cancer were identified. The final analysis was performed on 31 cases and 233 controls with one year or more of employment. Historical measurement data from the 1960s and onward were collected, totaling 203 total dust and 103 crystalline quartz exposure observations. Regression models, using the determinants of job title, time period, type of foundry, and size of production, were developed for assessing historical total dust and crystalline quartz air concentrations. These estimates were used to calculate individual cumulative exposure in the case-control study. In the multiple linear regression analysis, the determinants explained much of the variations in dust level (r(2) = 0.58). The explained variation in crystalline quartz was much lower (r(2) = 0.13). The regression coefficients for the type of foundry, time period, and size of production were statistically significant for total dust. On the basis of the regression analysis, the final models were used to calculate individual cumulative exposures. The calculated cumulative dust and quartz exposures averaged 33 mg/m(3) * year and 0.42 mg/m(3) * year, respectively. The odds ratios (ORs) were not significant, but showed dose-response trends for both dust and crystalline quartz. PMID:14612297

  16. Epidemiological studies in mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    hypothesis' it was reduced to being an innocent disorder in the 1980s but is now again recognized as a potential risk factor for an accelerated loss of lung function. Whereas early studies in mainly occupational cohorts showed no effect of chronic mucus hypersecretion on decline in lung function, such an...... presence of mucus. In asthma recent findings suggest that in epidemiology chronic mucus hypersecretion may indicate lack of control which leads to an accelerated loss of lung function and increased mortality in subjects with self-reported asthma....

  17. Electromagnetic fields and health effects-epidemiologic studies of cancer, diseases of the central nervous system and arrhythmia-related heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, C.

    2004-07-01

    This epidemiologic investigation comprised separate studies of the risk of cancer, cause-specific mortality rates, risks for neurodegenerative diseases, and the risk of arrhythmia-related heart disease among employees exposed to extremely low- frequency (50-Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the Danish utility industry. All the employees in this industry were followed-up in several registers. The risk of disease was analyzed in relation to occupational exposure to EMF, latency, and duration of employment. A specific job-exposure matrix was developed and validated by comparison with direct measurements of EMF during a workday. Linkage with the Danish Cancer Register did not identify increased risks for the cancers suggested a priori to be associated with exposure to EMF, including leukemia, brain tumors, and breast cancer. Significantly increased risks for lung cancer and mesothelioma were identified for workers highly exposed to asbestos. Linkage with the National Mortality Register revealed a significantly increased overall mortality rate from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with an increasing trend with duration of employment and EMF exposure. In addition, a significantly increased mortality rate from electric accidents was observed. It was hypothesized that the observation of increased mortality from ALS was associated with exposure to EMF or electric shocks. No increased mortality rate from cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease was observed. Linkage with the National Hospital Register also revealed an increased risk of ALS and, thereby confirmed the finding of an increased mortality rate for this disease in the previous study. Linkage of the cohort with the Multiple Sclerosis Register revealed an increased risk of multiple sclerosis, which was not, however, significant Linkage with the Pacemaker Register showed no increased risk of severe arrhythmia-related heart disease. The second part of the study included the establishment of a large, nationwide

  18. Epidemiology of cancer in Mazandaran province 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Norouzi Nejad1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 11 April, 2009 ; Accepted 8 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Cancer is the second most common cause of death in developed countries and third in less developed countries. The incidence of the different histological types of cancer varies greatly between various populations and is attributed to occupational, social, cultural, racial, and geographic influences. The objective of this study was to determine and register all cases of cancer among population of Mazandaran province, during the year of .Materials and methods: Characteristics of all registered malignancies were obtained from records in histopathology and radiology clinical, hospitals and deaths certificated in Mazandaran using the International Classification of Disease (ICD, with data being analyzed using ASR, Excel and spss soft ware.Results: A total of . patients with cancers were found during this study. These, .. were males and . (.% females. Age standardized rate (ASR for all cancers in males and females were 1. and . Respectively. The most common malignancies among females were breast (. skin (., colon and rectum cancers (..In men, stomach (42.41, skin (. and esophagus (. were the most common cancers respectively. Infiltrating duct carcinoma, was the most common histopathological types of tumors (69. in breast cancer. The most common morphology in stomach cancer was adenocarcinoma, (..Conclusion: Distribution of malignant disorders in our population is different from other regions. Therefore, it appears necessary to have a valid health policy for prevention. Consequently, it is necessary to have a valid health policy for prevention and control of this problem.Key words: J Mazand Univ Med

  19. SU-D-16A-01: A Novel Method to Estimate Normal Tissue Dose for Radiotherapy Patients to Support Epidemiologic Studies of Second Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patient cohort of second cancer study often involves radiotherapy patients with no radiological images available: We developed methods to construct a realistic surrogate anatomy by using computational human phantoms. We tested this phantom images both in a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) and a custom Monte Carlo (MC) transport code. Methods: We used a reference adult male phantom defined by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The hybrid phantom which was originally developed in Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) and polygon mesh format was converted into more common medical imaging format. Electron density was calculated from the material composition of the organs and tissues and then converted into DICOM format. The DICOM images were imported into the Eclipse system for treatment planning, and then the resulting DICOM-RT files were imported into the MC code for MC-based dose calculation. Normal tissue doses were calculation in Eclipse and MC code for an illustrative prostate treatment case and compared to each other. Results: DICOM images were generated from the adult male reference phantom. Densities and volumes of selected organs between the original phantom and ones represented within Eclipse showed good agreements, less than 0.6%. Mean dose from Eclipse and MC code match less than 7%, whereas maximum and minimum doses were different up to 45%. Conclusion: The methods established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support epidemiological studies of second cancer in cancer survivors treated by radiotherapy. We also work on implementing body size-dependent computational phantoms to better represent patient's anatomy when the height and weight of patients are available

  20. SU-D-16A-01: A Novel Method to Estimate Normal Tissue Dose for Radiotherapy Patients to Support Epidemiologic Studies of Second Cancer Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jung, J; Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient cohort of second cancer study often involves radiotherapy patients with no radiological images available: We developed methods to construct a realistic surrogate anatomy by using computational human phantoms. We tested this phantom images both in a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) and a custom Monte Carlo (MC) transport code. Methods: We used a reference adult male phantom defined by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The hybrid phantom which was originally developed in Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) and polygon mesh format was converted into more common medical imaging format. Electron density was calculated from the material composition of the organs and tissues and then converted into DICOM format. The DICOM images were imported into the Eclipse system for treatment planning, and then the resulting DICOM-RT files were imported into the MC code for MC-based dose calculation. Normal tissue doses were calculation in Eclipse and MC code for an illustrative prostate treatment case and compared to each other. Results: DICOM images were generated from the adult male reference phantom. Densities and volumes of selected organs between the original phantom and ones represented within Eclipse showed good agreements, less than 0.6%. Mean dose from Eclipse and MC code match less than 7%, whereas maximum and minimum doses were different up to 45%. Conclusion: The methods established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support epidemiological studies of second cancer in cancer survivors treated by radiotherapy. We also work on implementing body size-dependent computational phantoms to better represent patient's anatomy when the height and weight of patients are available.

  1. Descriptive-epidemiological characteristics of lung cancer in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Nataša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lung cancer represents the most common malignant tumour among men, and appears more and more frequently among women in many countries worldwide. The aims of this descriptive epidemiological study were to evaluate the mortality trends of all malignant tumours and lung cancer in Central Serbia from 1990 to 1999, and to estimate the incidence, mortality and the basic demographic characteristics of lung cancer in Central Serbia in 1999. Material and methods. The source of data concerning cancer cases in 1999 was the Cancer Registry of Central Serbia, while data of the Republic Statistics Institute were used for the analysis of mortality trends for the period 1990-1999. All rates were standardized by the direct method, to the world standard population. Confidence intervals for mortality rates were assessed with 95% level of probability. Linear regression coefficient was determined by Fisher's test. Results. The mortality rates showed rising tendencies for both lung cancer (y=-1876.26+0.96x, p=0.028 for men; y=654.78U.33x, p-0.001 for women and all malignant tumours (y=-4139.88+2.15x, p=0.163 for men; y=3649.68 + 1.88x, p=0.016 for women, with statistically significant increase being observed for all trends, except all malignant tumours among men. In the year 1999, lung cancer ranked first among men and third among women, with 29.2% and 10.3% of cancer mortality respectively. The age-specific mortality rates were much higher in men in all age groups. Mortality increased with age and the highest rates were found in the age group 70-74 for both sexes. The highest incidence and mortality rates were reported in Belgrade, Moravicki and Sumadijski district. .

  2. Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal

  3. Epidemiology of cancers among adolescents and young adults from a tertiary cancer center in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Although cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs is increasingly an area of focus, there is a paucity of clinical and epidemiological data from developing countries. Our objective was to analyze the geographical distribution, sex ratio, histology, and disease patterns of cancers in AYA. Materials and Methods: All patients aged 15-29 years with the diagnosis of cancer who were registered with two hospitals in New Delhi during a 12-month period from January 2014 to December 2014 were included. Basic demographic information on age, sex, location of stay, and nationality was available. Using cancer site and morphology codes, the cancers were grouped by the Birch classification of AYA cancers. Clinical information on disease and treatment status, was retrospectively studied. Results: There were 287 patients (57.5% male, 85.4% Indian origin registered with 54 (18.8%, 97 (33.8%, and 136 (47.4% patients in the 15-19, 20-24, and 25-29 years age groups, respectively. The three most common cancer groups were carcinomas (40.8%, lymphomas (12.9%, and leukemias (10.4%. The three most common sites in carcinomas were gastrointestinal tract (GIT, genitourinary tract, and breast. The most prevalent cancers in younger AYA (15-19 years were leukemias, lymphomas, central nervous system neoplasms, and in contrast, older AYA (25-29 years suffered mainly from GIT Carcinomas, lymphomas. The leading cancers were breast and GIT carcinomas in females and lymphomas and GIT carcinomas in males. Conclusion: The occurrence of cancer in AYA in India has been described. The distribution differs from the only previous report from India as well as the US Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, which can be attributed to a referral bias along with the factual difference in cancer etiology and genetics.

  4. Epidemiology of lung cancer; Epidemiologie des Bronchialkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Krebsepidemiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Lung cancer is by far the most common form of cancer worldwide and in Germany is now ''only'' still the commonest cause of death from cancer. The most important single risk factor is smoking but in selected population groups, for example in the professional area, other factors can also play a role which cannot be ignored and open up a corresponding potential for prevention. Effective early detection procedures are at present unknown. The most promising, however, is multislice computed tomography (MSCT) which for this reason is presently being tested for effectiveness in several large research projects. The results are not expected for some years. Until then the early detection of lung cancer with MSCT cannot be considered suitable for routine use but can only be justified within the framework of research studies. (orig.) [German] Lungenkrebs ist weltweit die bei weitem haeufigste Krebsart, in Deutschland aber mittlerweile ''nur'' noch die haeufigste Krebstodesursache. Der bedeutendste Einzelrisikofaktor ist das Rauchen, doch koennen in ausgewaehlten Bevoelkerungsgruppen, z. B. im beruflichen Bereich, auch andere Faktoren eine nicht zu vernachlaessigende Rolle spielen und ein entsprechendes Praeventionspotenzial eroeffnen. Wirksame Frueherkennungsverfahren sind derzeit nicht bekannt. Als aussichtsreich gilt aber die Mehrschichtcomputertomographie (MSCT), die daher gegenwaertig in mehreren grossen Forschungsvorhaben auf ihre Effektivitaet ueberprueft wird. Ergebnisse werden in einigen Jahren erwartet. Bis dahin ist Lungenkrebsfrueherkennung mit MSCT nicht fuer die Routineanwendung geeignet, sondern ausschliesslich im Rahmen von Studien zu rechtfertigen. (orig.)

  5. Descriptive Study on the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Coal-producing Area in Eastern Yunnan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jihua; Yunsheng ZHANG; Li, Yun; Guoqing YIN; Li, Yuebing; Bofu NING; Jiamin GUO

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Xuanwei county is located at Late Permian coal-accumulating area in eastern Yunnan and western Guizhou, China. The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei county is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Recent years, the pollution and the higher mortality rate of lung cancer has been watched in the area around Xuanwei, and there is no report ...

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Hee Yim; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differenc...

  7. Second solid cancers after radiotherapy: a systematic review of the epidemiological studies of the radiation dose-response relationship

    OpenAIRE

    de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid innovation in radiotherapy techniques has resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, since direct observation of the late-effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1–5 gray (Gy)). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of ...

  8. The role of diet in cancer: the epidemiologic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Magdalena; Chajes, Veronique; Romieu, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Diet is an important modifiable risk factor for cancer. Adequate diet modification may play a key role in reducing the incidence of some cancers. A growing body of epidemiological evidence suggested links of some nutritional exposures with individual cancers. This review updates and summarises the existing data on diet related factors for cancer prevention, evaluated in 2007 by World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research and identifies the areas where more research is needed. Mechanisms of action of nutrients are discussed. For cancer prevention, more apparent association pertains to the role of foods from plant origin, processed meat products and alcohol. There is a lack of evidence to clarify the relationship of dairy and cereal products, different types of carbohydrates, micronutrients naturally found in foods vs supplements, industrial trans-fats, food preparation and handling techniques and dietary patterns and cancer, in order to implement safe cancer prevention strategies. PMID:27557384

  9. The epidemiology of Her-2/ neu and P53 in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernstein Jonine L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is an etiologically heterogeneous disease with marked geographical variations. Joint consideration of the relationship between specific molecular alterations and known or suspected epidemiologic risk factors for this disease should help distinguish subgroups of women that are at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. In this article, we present a comprehensive literature review of the etiologic and prognostic roles of Her-2/neu and P53 among women. In addition, we discuss the advantages and limitations of using biomarkers in epidemiological studies. We conclude that more research is needed to understand the complex relationships between genetic alterations and etiologic risk factors for breast cancer.

  10. Molecular epidemiology, and possible real-world applications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction, a key idea in molecular epidemiology, has enabled the development of personalized medicine. This concept includes personalized prevention. While genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic susceptibility loci in breast cancer risk, however, the application of this knowledge to practical prevention is still underway. Here, we briefly review the history of molecular epidemiology and its progress in breast cancer epidemiology. We then introduce our experience with the trial combination of GWAS-identified loci and well-established lifestyle and reproductive risk factors in the risk prediction of breast cancer. Finally, we report our exploration of the cumulative risk of breast cancer based on this risk prediction model as a potential tool for individual risk communication, including genetic risk factors and gene-environment interaction with obesity.

  11. Epidemiological studies and ionizing radiations; Etudes epidemiologiques et rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    After some generalities on epidemiological studies, this report presents the current status of knowledge and researches in three peculiar domains: leukaemia for young people living around nuclear power stations, pathologies in workers of the nuclear sector, and health condition (incidence of cancers) of populations living around nuclear power stations

  12. Polyphenols and disease risk in epidemiologic studies 1-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.C.W.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Plant polyphenols, a large group of natural antioxidants, are serious candidates in explanations of the protective effects of vegetables and fruits against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiologic studies are useful for evaluation of the human health effects of long-term exposure to physiol

  13. Epidemiology of cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresanta, J L

    1992-09-01

    Malignant neoplasms are responsible for more than half a million deaths annually and 22.5% of all deaths in the United States. Cancer is the second leading cause of death overall and the leading cause of death among Americans aged 35-64. Within the next decade it may become the leading cause of death. Cancers of digestive and respiratory organs are responsible for 53% of all cancer deaths. Certain subgroups are at elevated risk for various cancers. For example, sun-sensitive or excessively sun-exposed young white adults, young black women, and elderly patients are at increased risk for cutaneous melanoma, breast cancer, and colon cancer, respectively. Black men have the greatest risk for both lung cancer and cancer of the prostate. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and solid tumors of the brain and nervous system are the most frequent forms of malignancy occurring among children less than or equal to 14 years. Office screening is the traditional method for identifying cancer victims as early as possible. A suitable screening test should be rapid, simple, inexpensive, and impose minimal discomfort. There must be a window of opportunity available to identify the cancer during a detectable preclinical phase, and therapeutic modalities must be available to alter progression. An office screening test for cancer may have any one of four outcomes, and three of them are bad. False negatives are the worst adverse outcome because cancer remains undetected despite screening. An epidemic of lung cancer, caused by cigarette smoking, is occurring in all race and sex groups. If Americans stopped smoking, 87% of lung cancer deaths could be prevented. Tobacco abuse also is a major risk factor for cancer of the esophagus, larynx, and oral cavity. Cigarette smoking is a contributing factor for cancer of the bladder, kidney, and pancreas, and it has been associated with both cervical cancer and cancer of the stomach. Smoking and smokeless tobacco cessation endorsements, messages, and

  14. Evaluation of endometrial cancer epidemiology in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Bohîlțea, RE; Furtunescu, F; Dosius, M; Cîrstoiu, M; Radoi, V; Baroș, A; Bohîlțea, LC

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer represents the most frequent gynecological malignant affection in the developed countries, in which the incidence of cervical cancer has significantly decreased due to the rigorous application of screening methods and prophylaxis. According to its frequency, endometrial cancer is situated on the fourth place in the category of women’s genital-mammary malignant diseases, after breast, cervical and ovarian cancer in Romania. The incidence and mortality rates due to endometria...

  15. Epidemiological evidence on environmental tobacco smoke and cancers other than lung or breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter N; Thornton, Alison J; Hamling, Janette S

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed 87 epidemiological studies relating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure to risk of cancer other than lung or breast in never smoking adults. This updates a 2002 review which also considered breast cancer. Meta-analysis showed no significant relationship with ETS for nasopharynx cancer, head and neck cancer, various digestive cancers (stomach, rectum, colorectal, liver, pancreas), or cancers of endometrium, ovary, bladder and brain. For some cancers (including oesophagus, colon, gall bladder and lymphoma) more limited data did not suggest a relationship. An increased cervix cancer risk (RR 1.58, 95%CI 1.29-1.93, n = 17 independent estimates), reducing to 1.29 (95%CI 1.01-1.65) after restriction to five estimates adjusting for HPV infection or sexual activity suggests a causal relationship, as do associations with nasosinus cancer observed in 2002 (no new studies since), and less so kidney cancer (RR 1.33, 95%CI 1.04-1.70, n = 6). A weaker association with total cancer (RR 1.13, 95%CI 1.03-1.35, n = 19) based on heterogeneous data is inconclusive. Inadequate confounder control, recall bias, publication bias, and occasional reports of implausibly large RRs in individual studies contribute to our conclusion that the epidemiological evidence does not convincingly demonstrate that ETS exposure causes any of the cancers studied. PMID:27321059

  16. 口腔癌相关危险因素的流行病学调查分析%Epidemiologic study of risk factors of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅锦业; 高静; 郑家伟; 张志愿; 钟来平; 项永兵

    2011-01-01

    目的:进行口腔癌相关危险因素的流行病学调查,为口腔癌的预防提供依据.方法:采用流行病学问卷调查方法,在国内8个城市进行多中心大样本病例-对照研究.调查内容主要包括个人基本情况、全身疾病和口腔疾病史、口腔卫生习惯、吸烟与被动吸烟、饮用水及常用的饮料情况、运动及劳动情况、家族史等7个方面.采用SAS 8.2软件包对数据进行t检验或x2检验,采用Logistic回归分析各因素与罹患口腔癌的关系.结果:经常参加运动、饮用牛奶、饮用水处理、高血压、口腔白斑、不良修复体、吸烟史、戒烟史、吸有过滤嘴烟等在病例组和对照组之间有显著差异(P<0.05).吸烟时间越长、吸烟量越大,危险度越高(OR分别为3.57、4.78).运动、饮用牛奶及饮用水处理可降低口腔癌的危险(OR分别为0.48,0.48和0.53).结论:吸烟是口腔癌发生的重要因素,吸过滤嘴烟不能降低口腔癌的发生;运动、饮用牛奶及饮用水处理可降低口腔癌的发生.%PURPOSE: To explore the risk factors of oral cancer in order to provide evidence for oral cancer prevention. METHODS: Epidemiologic questionnaire was used for case-control study in 8 major cities of China. The questionnaire consisted of 7 parts which included essential individual status, systemic and oral diseases, oral hygiene habits, smoking and passive smoking, water and drinks in common usage, sports and labor, family history. SAS8.2 software package was used for data analysis. Student's t test or Chi-square test was used for evaluation of homogeneity between the groups. Logistic regression was used for analyzing the relationship between the factors and oral cancer. RESULTS: Sports, drinking milk and processed water, hypertension, leukoplakia, ill-fitted prosthesis, smoking, smoking cessation and smoking with filter were significanT1y different between the groups (P<0.05). Starting to smoke before 20 years old

  17. Epidemiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenfels, Albert B; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon tumor, but because the mortality rate approaches 100%, this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. In the United States it is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer mortality; in Japan it ranks as the fifth commonest cause of death from cancer. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, accounting for approximately 25-30% of all cases. Some of the time-dependent changes in the frequency of pancreatic cancer can be explained by smoking trends. Aggressive public health measures to control smoking would substantially reduce the burden of pancreatic cancer. Dietary factors are less important for pancreatic cancer than for other digestive tract tumors, but consumption of a diet with adequate quantities of fruits and vegetables, plus control of calories either by dietary measures or by exercise will help to prevent this lethal tumor. There are more than a dozen inherited germline mutations that increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. In addition to germline defects, there are several common polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens that may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer. More research will be needed in this area, to explain and to clarify the interaction between genes and environmental factors.

  18. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, M. J. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M. [Nijmegen, Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women.

  19. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women

  20. Epidemiology, risk and outcomes of venous thromboembolism in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanga, A; Russo, L

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is associated with a fourfold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The risk of VTE varies according to the type of malignancy (i. e. pancreatic cancer, brain cancer, lymphoma) and its disease stage and individual factors (i. e. sex, race, age, previous VTE history, immobilization, obesity). Preventing cancer-associated VTE is important because it represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In order to identify cancer patient at particularly high risk, who need thromboprophylaxis, risk prediction models have become available and are under validation. These models include clinical risk factors, but also begin to incorporate biological markers. The major American and European scientific societies have issued their recommendations to guide the management of VTE in patients with cancer. In this review the principal aspects of epidemiology, risk factors and outcome of cancer-associated VTE are summarized.

  1. Anaplastic thyroid cancer Irish epidemiology and novel chemotherapeutic strategies

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, James Paul

    2009-01-01

    This body of work was conducted over a four year period. Within this timeframe we have conducted a National Epidemiology project, established a National Head and Neck Cancer database and completed Oncology laboratory investigations. Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is the most aggressive endocrine disease in nature. Within the thyroid gland a heterogeneous group of neoplasms may develop. These can range from well differentiated tumours with an excellent prognosis, to ATC tumours which prese...

  2. Epidemiology of cancer from exposure to arylamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Vineis, P

    1994-01-01

    Occupational exposure to arylamines such as benzidine, 2-naphthylamine, and 4-aminobiphenyl is associated with exceptionally elevated risks of bladder cancer (up to 100-fold or more). In one plant, all 15 workers involved in distilling naphthylamine developed bladder cancer, suggesting that for high levels of exposure to potent carcinogens individual susceptibility is irrelevant. More recently, exposure to other arylamines also has been suggested to increase the risk of bladder cancer in huma...

  3. Cancers in Togo from 1984 to 2008: Epidemiological and Pathological Aspects of 5251 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi Amégbor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the epidemiological and histological aspects of cancers in Togo. Materials and Methods. We made a retrospective review of the epidemiological and pathological features of cancers observed from 1984 to 2008 at the laboratory of pathology of CHU-TOKOIN in Lomé, Togo. Results. During our study period, we found 5251 cases of cancers with an annual average frequency of 210 cases. The sex ratio, male/female, was 0.9 and the average age of occurring was 45.3 years. This average age was 46.9 years for men and 43.8 years for women. The most frequent cancers for men were prostate cancer (12.9%, nonmelanoma skin cancer (10.4%, and gastric cancer (10.3%. For women it was breast cancer (27.1%, cervix cancer (11.2% and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6.3%. Histologically, it was carcinomas in 68.1% of the cases, sarcomas in 11% of the cases and non-Hodgkin lymphomas in 12.6% of the cases. Children cancers were primarily Burkitt lymphoma (27.9% of cases and retinoblastoma (8.5% of cases. Conclusion. This study shows that cancers are frequent in Togo and emphasizes on the necessity of having a cancer register for the prevention and the control of this disease in Togo.

  4. Diagnostics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Main risk factors include advanced age, family history, male sex, and lifestyle factors. Screening can reduce incidence and death from colorectal cancer. Therefore, prevention and early detection are crucial in order to detect and remove pre-neoplastic adenomas and to detect cancers at early stages. Colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are established tools for screening. Newer fecal immunochemical tests reveal higher sensitivities for advanced adenoma and cancer than guaiac-based hemoccult tests. Molecular stool and blood tests as well as virtual colonoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy are promising new developments so far not established as routine instruments for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and for adenoma removal. Prognosis is essentially dependent on the tumor stage at the time of the initial diagnosis. Proper staging based on imaging prior to therapy is a prerequisite. In rectal cancer, local staging is an essential requirement for the identification of appropriate candidates for neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27493942

  5. The epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Taiwan, 1998–2008: a nation-wide cancer registry-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in Taiwan and the impact of imatinib on the overall survival (OS) of GIST patients. GISTs were identified from the Taiwan Cancer Registry (TCR) from 1998 to 2008. The age-adjusted incidence rates and the observed OS rates were calculated. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to examine the mortality risk in three time periods (1998–2001, 2002–2004, 2005–2008) according to the application and availability of imatinib. From 1998 to 2008, 2,986 GISTs were diagnosed in Taiwan. The incidence increased from 1.13 per 100,000 in 1998 to 1.97 per 100,000 in 2008. The most common sites were stomach (47-59%), small intestine (31-38%), and colon/rectum (6-9%). The 5-year observed OS was 66.5% (60.3% for men, 74.2% for women, P < .0001). GISTs in the stomach had a better 5-year observed OS (69.4%) than those in the small intestine (65.1%) (P < .0001). The outcome of GIST improved significantly after the more widespread use of imatinib; the 5-year observed OS increased from 58.9% during 1998–2001 to 70.2% during 2005–2008 (P < .0001). Younger age, female sex, stomach location, and later diagnostic years were independent predictors of a better survival. The incidence of GIST has been increasing in Taiwan, partially due to the advancement of diagnostic technology/method and the increased awareness by physicians. The outcome of GIST has improved significantly with the availability and the wider use of imatinib

  6. The epidemiology of diabetes and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Bendix; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Friis, Søren

    2014-10-01

    The literature on cancer occurrence in persons with diabetes has almost invariably been concerned with relative measures. In this paper, we briefly review this, but the aim is to quantify the absolute occurrence of diabetes and cancer in the population in order to give a fuller picture, which also includes the competing mortality risk. Overall, we find that some 35 % of the population will have a diagnosis of diabetes in their lifetime, 44 % a diagnosis of cancer, and about 15 % will have both diagnoses. The impact of differing mortality between persons with and without diabetes is illustrated by the fact that a person without diabetes at age 50 has a smaller lifetime risk of cancer than a person aged 50 with diabetes. Thus, the differences in cancer occurrence between persons with and without diabetes are of quantitatively smaller importance than the differences in mortality.

  7. Pancreatic cancer: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejs, Guenter J

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has an incidence of approximately 10 per 100,000 population per year. This number pertains to Europe, North America and parts of South America (Argentina). Men are more often afflicted than women (female:male ratio of about 1:1.5, though reports vary). There has been a very small but steady increase in the incidence over the last 50 years. Unfortunately, numbers for incidence and mortality are still practically identical for this cancer. The peak of incidence is between 60 and 80 years of age. In absolute numbers, there are 8,000 cases diagnosed annually in Germany, and 33,000 in the US. Pancreatic cancer at pancreatic cancer include high-fat diet, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, hereditary pancreatitis, family history of pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. In chronic pancreatitis, the risk for pancreatic cancer is increased 20-fold, in hereditary pancreatitis it is 60-fold higher than in the general population. In a kindred with 2 first-degree relatives with pancreatic cancer, the risk for pancreatic cancer for other members of that kindred is 7-fold higher.

  8. Study of sex in clinic epidemiology of gastric cancer%胃癌性别差异临床流行病学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王媛; 张永贞; 许翊; 韩小友

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discuss the influence of sex in gastric cancer via the epidemiology and clinical data analysis of gastric cancer patients. Methods The clinical data of 242 gastric cancer patients was collected from Shanxi provincial tumor hospital between 1997 to 1998. Every patient filled in gastric cancer epidemiology form by professional-staff direction, which included personal characteristics, food habits, farmalial history of cancer and other informations. Results The average age of male gastric cancer patients was 6 years older than the females'. Male ulcer type gastric cancer patients were more than the females' (120 vs 38, P < 0.01). There was no different in cell types, differentiation, tumor stage and the clinical pathological features of lymph node metastasis. Male alcoholic drinkers, tea drinkers and smokers were more than the females' . There was no different in sex in tumor familial history and dietary habits of water, well-done food, sour food, vegetables, fruits and amount of radiation of meats, eggs and milk. Conclusion This research reveals the characteristics of sex in the epidemiology of gastric cancer. It is very important and significant not only in the research of gastric cancer etiology, but also in the prevention and intervention of gastric cancer.%目的 分析胃癌患者流行病学及临床资料,探讨不同性别胃癌发病情况.方法 收集山西省肿瘤医院1997年1月至1998年12月诊治的242例胃癌患者的临床病理数据,每位患者由专业工作人员帮助填写胃癌流行病学调查表,获取个人特点、饮食生活习惯、肿瘤家族史等信息.结果 男性患者平均年龄比女性患者大6岁;溃疡型胃癌男性多于女性(120例、38例,P<0.01),在细胞类型、分化程度、浸润程度及淋巴结转移临床病理特征中,男女无区别;男性饮酒、饮茶及吸烟的比例显著高于女性;生活饮水、热食习惯、进食酸菜、新鲜蔬菜和水果、肉蛋奶摄入量等饮食

  9. Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Jordan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wang, Andrew Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rosenman, Julian G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Carpenter, William R. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Godley, Paul A. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of <25%, 25%-50%, and >50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with <25% likelihood, and T3-T4 patients had 18% higher odds. Prostatectomy use increased in recent years. Patients aged 76-80 years were likely to be managed conservatively, even those with a >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3-T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely

  10. Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of 50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with 50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3–T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

  11. Epidemiology of gastroenterologic cancer in Henan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Bang Lu; Xi-Bin Sun; Di-Xin Dai; Shi-Kuan Zhu; Qiu-Ling Chang; Shu-Zheng Liu; Wen-Jie Duan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the mortality rates of gastroenterologic cancers for the period between 1974 and 1999, in Henan Province, China and its epidemiologic features.METHODS: Information on death of patients with cancer was provided by the county-city registries. Population data were provided by the local police bureau. All the deaths of cancer registered were classified according to the threedigit rubric of the ICD-9. Cancer mortality rates reported herein were age-adjusted, using the world population as standard and weighted piecewise linear regression analysis.RESULTS: Total cancer age-adjusted mortality rates were 195.91 per 100 000 for males and 124.36 per 100 000 for females between 1996 and 1998. During the period of 19741999, a remarkable decrease took place in esophageal carcinoma, stomach cancer remained essentially stable and liver cancer, a moderate increase. Colorectal cancer was slightly increased over the last two decades.CONCLUSION: The population-based cancer registry can give an accurate picture of cancer in Henan Province, by providing a set of analyses of selected cancer mortality data as a source of reference for researchers in cancer, public health and health care services.

  12. Yersinia enterocolitica: Epidemiological Studies and Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiqur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica is the most common bacteriological cause of gastrointestinal disease in many developed and developing countries. Although contaminated food is the main source of human infection due to Y. enterocolitica, animal reservoir and contaminated environment are also considered as other possible infection sources for human in epidemiological studies. Molecular based epidemiological studies are found to be more efficient in investigating the occurrence of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in natural samples, in addition to conventional culture based studies.

  13. Epidemiología del dolor por cáncer Epidemiology of cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Reyes Chiquete

    2011-04-01

    therapeutic, or else to that pain associated with non-oncological diseases linked to cancer. This review represents a critical analysis of epidemiological studies on the prevalence of cancer pain in the world population. Great variations are shown in prevalence, perhaps because of methodological issues that hinder the comparison of results. In others words, by different criteria used to conceptualize and characterize cancer pain, the contrasts among the study population and data collection methods. If we add to this that there are different types of pain therapeutics and may differ from one hospital to another, the validity and consistency of the reports are limited considerably. Mexican society little known about the prevalence of cancer pain and on personal and socioeconomic bias involved in this terrible disease. Whereas existing studies in the literature, we suggest that epidemiological investigations should be conducted under strict methodological control, studying the different age groups, type of pain, intensity, oncology diagnosis, clinical stage, used anticancer therapeutics, drug therapy and nonpharmacologic analgesic; without forgetting the adjuvant drugs associated with this management.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiubo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available PC (pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies.

  15. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. PMID:27614953

  16. Epidemiology and biology of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, W M; Janicek, M F; Mirhashemi, R

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide, cancer of the cervix is the second leading cause of cancer death in women: each year, an estimated 500,000 cases are newly diagnosed. Among populations, there are large differences in incidence rates of invasive cervical cancer: these reflect the influence of environmental factors, screening Papanicolaou (Pap) tests, and treatment of pre-invasive lesions. The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, and 51 have been recovered from more than 95% of cervical cancers. We have made great strides in understanding the molecular mechanism of oncogenesis of this virus, focusing on the action of the E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins. These oncoproteins function by inactivating cell cycle regulators p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb), thus providing the initial event in progression to malignancy. Cervical cancers develop from precursor lesions, which are termed squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and are graded as high or low, depending on the degree of disruption of epithelial differentiation. Viral production occurs in low-grade lesions and is restricted to basal cells. In carcinomas, viral DNA is found integrated into the host genome, but no viral production is seen. The well-defined pre-invasive stages, as well as the viral factors involved at the molecular level, make cervical carcinoma a good model for investigating immune therapeutic alternatives or adjuvants to standard treatments. PMID:10225296

  17. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Pirie, K.;

    2012-01-01

    Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected w...

  18. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  19. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer; Epidemiologie kolorektaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Colorectal tumors are among the most frequently encountered forms of cancer worldwide. With approximately 57,000 new cases every year, they represent the most frequent type of cancer in Germany, ranking before breast cancer (approximately 46,000) and lung cancer (approximately 37,000). Although global incidence is on the rise, in Germany it is only increasing among men, but not among women. The mortality rate (approximately 26,500 deaths annually) in Germany has declined among men for about the past 10 years and among women for about the past 20 years.The most important risk factors are familial history of colorectal and other tumors as well as lifestyle factors such as nutrition, obesity, inactivity,and smoking.Lifestyle-related risks offer a broad area for implementing primary preventive measures, which have not yet been adequately exhausted. Several proven (fecal occult blood test) and probably effective (endoscopic) methods are available for secondary prevention. Consistent encouragement of these possibilities for prevention could reduce incidence and mortality substantially and render colorectal tumors less frequent. (orig.) [German] Kolorektale Tumoren gehoeren weltweit zu den haeufigsten Krebsarten und sind mit jaehrlich ca.57000 Neuerkrankungsfaellen vor Brustkrebs (ca. 46000) und Lungenkrebs (ca. 37000) die haeufigste Krebsart in Deutschland.Waehrend die Inzidenz weltweit steigt, nimmt sie in Deutschland nur bei Maennern,nicht aber bei Frauen zu.Die Mortalitaet (jaehrlich ca.26500 Todesfaelle) geht hierzulande bei Maennern seit ca.10 Jahren, bei Frauen seit ca.20 Jahren zurueck. Die bedeutendsten Risikofaktoren sind familiaere Vorgeschichte an kolorektalen und anderen Tumoren sowie Lebensstilfaktoren wie Ernaehrung, Uebergewicht,Bewegungsmangel und Rauchen.Die lebensstilbedingten Risiken bieten breiten Raum fuer primaere Praevention, der bisher nur unzureichend ausgeschoepft ist.Auch fuer sekundaere Praevention stehen mehrere nachgewiesenermassen (Test auf

  20. Lung Cancer Epidemiology in Mainland China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingsheng Wang; Xiaoping Lin

    2006-01-01

    Lung cancer incidence has increased rapidly in China over the last 20 years, especially in females. Among the 183 registered worldwide populations, lung cancer incidence in males was ranked as the 73rd, 74th, 127th and 23rd respectively for Shanghai, Tianjin, Qidong and Hong Kong, and in females the 52nd, 13th, 102nd and 23rd. The sex ratio (M/F) ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 for most areas. The ratio of squamous/ adenocarcinoma was 2.01 in males and 0.67 in females in Tianjin, 0.97 and 0.28 in Hong Kong, 1.00 and 0.61 in the US white population and 1.18 and 0.49 in US blacks. Much research on risk factors have been conducted and documented including the following: genetic predisposition/polymorphism, smoking/coal soot and DNA adduct, cytochrome p450-1A1 (CYP1A1), glutathione S-transferase-M (GST-M), viral infection/HPV infection, high background radiation, family history, tobacco consumption, mental health, prior lung diseases, coal soot indoor air pollution, cooking fume indoor air pollution, hormones, diet, occupational exposure, outdoor air pollution, socioeconomic level/education, alcohol consumption and their interactions(addition/synergy). Based on current information we should carefully devise a plan to control lung cancer that can be put into practice.

  1. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatout, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associat...

  2. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatout I; Schubert M; Garbrecht N; Weigel MT; Jonat W; Mundhenke C; Günther V

    2015-01-01

    Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated a...

  3. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, CR; Bertesteanu, SVG; Mirea, D; Grigore, R; Ionescu, D.; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in human population in regards to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngo–esophagea...

  4. Sami lifestyle and health : epidemiological studies from northern Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Lena Maria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis was to expand the current knowledge of “traditional Sami” diet and lifestyle, and to test aspects of the Sami diet and lifestyle, specifically dietary pattern, macronutrient distribution and coffee consumption, in population-based epidemiological studies of mortality and incident cardiovascular disease and cancer in a general population. In Paper I, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 elderly Sami concerning their parent’s lifestyle and diet 50-70 year...

  5. [Environmental epidemiology of cancer in Puerto Rico: 1987-1988].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerame Vivas, M J

    1991-06-01

    An epidemiological analysis on cancer was run for the years 1987 and 1988 and for each municipal jurisdiction in Puerto Rico. Areas of pronounced incidence were examined on the basis of possible environmental cause-and-effect relationships. The cancer data examined were based on first diagnoses for cancer of all types, respiratory cancer and leukemia. The municipality of Cataño was salient in most incidences. Cataño lies downwind from the largest metropolitan urban center in Puerto Rico (population density 9,559 inhabitants per square mile), from the largest number of industries for the island, from past and present uncontrolled non-compliance air emissions, from the largest number of vehicles, and is surrounded by wetlands. Also salient were other municipalities of historical or current heavy industrial emission activity with lenient or non-existent environmental controls. PMID:1930477

  6. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer among Bahraini Women; Data from the Bahrain Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randah R. Hamadeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of breast cancer among the Bahraini female population in the years 2000‒2010 and examine its health policy implications. Methods: All breast cancer cases in the Bahrain Cancer Registry from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2010 were included. Results: There were 1,005 cases, 12.7% of which were detected by screening. The overall mean age at diagnosis was 50.9 years (95% confidence interval 50.1–51.6. The age-standardised incidence rate declined from 58.2 per 100,000 in 2000 to 44.4 per 100,000 in 2010. The majority of cases were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (76.9%. Of the registered cases, 44.1% and 48.1% had an unknown grade and stage, respectively. The five-year survival rate was 63 ± 2%. Conclusion: The low percentage of cases detected by screening merits further evaluation of Bahrain’s screening programme. More effort should be made to reduce the proportion of unknown stage and grade breast cancers. Future research has to be directed towards understanding the reasons for Bahrain having the highest incidence rate of breast cancer in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CARDIOESOPHAGEAL CANCER AND STOMACH CANCER IN ALTAY REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarev, A.; Shoyhet, Ya; Nechunaev, V.; Panasjan, A.; Tsyvkina, V.

    2007-01-01

    The article summarizes analytical results of morbidity and mortality of stomach cancer and cardioesophageal cancer in Altay region in comparison with Russian indices since 1990 to 2005. Downtrend of morbidity is registered morbidity was reduced on 10.000 (16 %) since 1990. At the same time specific increase of cardioesophageal cancer is registered including Altay region. Morbidity of cardioesophageal cancer is increased twice in Altay region. Different types of adenocarcinoma dominated (92 %)...

  8. Publication of new results from the INWORKS epidemiological study about the risk of cancer among nuclear industry workers chronically exposed to low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this cohort study, 308297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17?957 were due to solid cancers. Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated with protracted radiation exposures can help strengthen the foundation for radiation protection standards

  9. Epidemiology and early diagnosis of primary liver cancer in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, F.S.; Shen, K.N.

    1986-01-01

    Epidemiological studies in different areas in China have revealed several outstanding risk factors of PLC, i.e., HBV infection, pollution of drinking water, contamination of food by AFB1 and/or nitrosamines, and family predisposition. Accordingly, a program of HBV vaccination, improved supply of drinking water, better preservation and storage of food, and possibly chemoprevention for high-risk populations should be effective preventive measures. Studies have shown that frequent AFP screening in high-risk populations is highly recommended to detect early cases of PLC. According to research in Qidong, careful follow-up of the dynamic changes of AFP in individuals with persistent low levels of positive AFP is important for distinguishing other conditions from true PLC. Newer means for the localization of small-size PLC (under 5 cm), such as type B ultrasonography, nuclide scanning, computerized tomography, and hepatoangiography, represent remarkable progress in improving markedly the success of surgery and hence the survival rate of PLC patients. The advances in knowledge of PLC have been encouraging. Although much work remains to be done on the etiological agents and the mechanism of oncogenesis, it is time that larger scale control measures be put into effect in high-incidence areas to discover if one of the most common cancers in the world can be controlled. 62 references.

  10. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  11. Epidemiological and clinical profile of triple negative breast cancer at a cancer hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recent concept and the burning topic of research today. Various studies have been reported in western literature on TNBCs or the similar group of basal like cancers, all highlighting the poor prognostic features of this molecular subtype in comparison to the other types of breast cancers. However extensive data from India is lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical profile of TNBcs at our institute. Materials and Methods: Data on 171 patients of TNBCs registered at this hospital between 2005 and 2008 and followed up until December 2010 was collected and reviewed for epidemiological and clinical features. Results: The median age at presentation was 49 years (22-75 years. Sixty eight patients (40% had lump in the breast of less than 1 month duration. Fourteen (8% were nulliparous and 10 (7% patients had crossed the age of 30 years at first full-term pregnancy, 89 (52% were pre or peri-menopausal at presentation. Only 8 (5% patients had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. One hundred and six (62% patients were stage II, 26 (15% stage III, 21 (12% stage I and 18 (10% stage IV at presentation. One hundred and twenty eight patients (75% had early breast cancer eligible for surgery at presentation, 25 (15% were locally advanced and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT and 18 (10% were found to be metastatic. Modified radical mastectomy was the preferred surgical option by most patients (76% who underwent upfront surgery in our study. The pathological overall response rates (complete and partial response after NACT was 75% with complete response rate of 25% and there were no relapses in the complete responders. The median follow-up was 30 months (9-70 months. One hundred and twenty two patients (71% were alive at last follow-up, 34 (22% had relapsed, 18 (11% had died due to progressive disease. Thirty one patients (18% were lost to follow-up. Most of

  12. Bladder cancer risk in painters: a review of the epidemiological evidence, 1989-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, Cristina; Pira, Enrico; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2005-11-01

    Epidemiological studies on the potential association between painting and the risk of bladder cancer published after the Monograph of the International Agency for Research on Cancer N. 47 of 1989 have been systematically reviewed. These included four cohort studies on the incidence of bladder cancer among painters, with a pooled relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.03-1.18), based on 893 cases observed. The corresponding summary RR from four cohort studies on mortality was 1.23 (95% CI 1.11-1.37), based on 370 deaths. The pooled RR from 14 case-control studies and a pooled-analysis of other 11 case-control studies was 1.35 (95% CI 1.19-1.53), based on 465 cases exposed. Overall, the RR from all epidemiological studies was 1.17 (95% 1.11-1.27). Thus, recent epidemiological evidence indicates a moderate excess risk for bladder cancer in painters. Some studies, however, suggested that any such risk would have been greater for exposures in the distant past. Open issues for interpretation include residual confounding by social class and tobacco smoking, and understanding the time-risk relation. In particular, the potential residual risk related to exposure over the last two to three decades remains to be defined. PMID:16184465

  13. Methodological exploratory study applied to occupational epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of epidemiologic methods and techniques has been object of practical experimentation and theoretical-methodological reflection in health planning and programming process. Occupational Epidemiology is the study of the causes and prevention of diseases and injuries from exposition and risks in the work environment. In this context, there is no intention to deplete such a complex theme but to deal with basic concepts of Occupational Epidemiology, presenting the main characteristics of the analysis methods used in epidemiology, as investigate the possible determinants of exposition (chemical, physical and biological agents). For this study, the social-demographic profile of the IPEN-CNEN/SP work force was used. The knowledge of this reference population composition is based on sex, age, educational level, marital status and different occupations, aiming to know the relation between the health aggravating factors and these variables. The methodology used refers to a non-experimental research based on a theoretical methodological practice. The work performed has an exploratory character, aiming a later survey of indicators in the health area in order to analyze possible correlations related to epidemiologic issues. (author)

  14. Epidemiological studies of Czech miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasek, L. [National Radiation Protection Inst., Prague (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Lung cancer risk from radon was analysed in three cohorts of uranium (N=4320+5628) and burnt clay (N=915) miners. The follow-up of miners was extended up to 1990. Most of the cases (708) have been observed in the oldest (S) cohort followed since 1952. The other two cohorts, 18 years younger in average with substantially lower exposures, contributed 72 cases. Therefore, the main analyses of risk from radon were based on the S cohort. The data of the S cohort were subjected to checks both as for the individual exposures of the miners and the completeness of follow-up. The present mortality analyses from other causes suggest the follow-up is correct. The general patterns of mortality from violent deaths and diseases other than lung cancer show similar features in all the three cohorts, i.e. decreasing trend with time since first exposure in the first case, and increasing trend in the second one, confirming thus the healthy worker effect, in the first 20 years. A raised mortality was observed in later periods in respiratory and circulatory diseases and also in cancers other than lung cancer, suggesting that smoking habits among miners might be more frequent than in the general population. The estimates of lung cancer risk from radon exposure were based on relative linear models, where cumulative exposures were lagged by 5 years. The linear effect of cumulative exposure was substantially modified by time since exposure, exposure rate, and age at exposure. From the estimated intercept, it can be deduced that in the absence of exposure to radon, the estimated mortality from lung cancer in the cohort is about 1.5 times higher than in the general population. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Lungenkrebsrisiko bei Radonexposition wurde in drei Kohorten an Bergleuten von Uran- und Schiefertongruben analysiert (n=4320, 5628, 9159). Das follow up der Bergleute erfolgte bis zum Jahr 1990. Die meisten Krebsfaelle (708) wurden in der aelteren S-Kohorte, dessen follow up bereits 1952 begann

  15. Epidemiology of cancers among adolescents and young adults from a tertiary cancer center in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Randeep Singh; Rashmi Shirali; Sonali Chatterjee; Arun Adhana; Ramandeep Singh Arora

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Although cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is increasingly an area of focus, there is a paucity of clinical and epidemiological data from developing countries. Our objective was to analyze the geographical distribution, sex ratio, histology, and disease patterns of cancers in AYA. Materials and Methods: All patients aged 15-29 years with the diagnosis of cancer who were registered with two hospitals in New Delhi during a 12-month period from January 2014...

  16. The role of androgens and polymorphisms in the androgen receptor in the epidemiology of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testosterone binds to the androgen receptor in target tissue to mediate its effects. Variations in testosterone levels and androgen receptor activity may play a role in the etiology of breast cancer. Here, we review the epidemiologic evidence linking endogenous testosterone to breast cancer risk. Paradoxically, results from observational studies that have examined polymorphisms in the androgen receptor suggest that the low-activity androgen receptor increases breast cancer risk. We review the quality of this evidence and conclude with a discussion of how the androgen receptor and testosterone results coincide

  17. Assessment of exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds in epidemiological studies on breast cancer : a literature review and perspectives for the CECILE study

    OpenAIRE

    Bachelet, D.; Verner, M.-A.; Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, C.; Charlier, Corinne; Charbonneau, M; HADDAD, S; Guénel, P

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplastic disease in women representing 50,000 new cases each year in France. The well-established risk factors, as those related to the reproductive history, cannot account for all cases of breast cancer. Other environmental or lifestyle factors need to be explored in depth. Persistent organochlorine compounds (OCs) have attracted attention because of their endocrine disrupting properties that make them possible risk factors for breast cancer, but most epi...

  18. The association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and women cancer: the epidemiological evidences and putative mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Kyong Hye; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Ku, Bon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a chronic disease increasing rapidly worldwide, is well established as an important risk factor for various types of cancer. Although many factors impact the development of T2DM and cancer including sex, age, ethnicity, obesity, diet, physical activity levels, and environmental exposure, many epidemiological and experimental studies are gradually contributing to knowledge regarding the interrelationship between DM and cancer. The insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and chronic inflammation associated with diabetes mellitus are all associated strongly with cancer. The changes in bioavailable ovarian steroid hormone that occur in diabetes mellitus (the increasing levels of estrogen and androgen and the decreasing level of progesterone) are also considered potentially carcinogenic conditions for the breast, endometrium, and ovaries in women. In addition, the interaction among insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and ovarian steroid hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, could act synergistically during cancer development. Here, we review the cancer-related mechanisms in T2DM, the epidemiological evidence linking T2DM and cancers in women, and the role of antidiabetic medication in these cancers.

  19. A genetic epidemiologic study of hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.T. Njajou (Omer)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe goal of genetic epidemiology is to study the genetic etiology of diseases. There were t\\vo main aims for the present thesis. The first aim was to study the effects of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations on serum iron levels and disease associated conditions. Secondly, we aimed a

  20. Effects of Ruminant trans Fatty Acids on Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Epidemiological, Clinical, and Mechanistic Studies123

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Sarah K; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Lamarche, Benoît; Lock, Adam L.; Proctor, Spencer D.; Baer, David J

    2011-01-01

    There are 2 predominant sources of dietary trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply, those formed during the industrial partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils (iTFA) and those formed by biohydrogenation in ruminants (rTFA), including vaccenic acid (VA) and the naturally occurring isomer of conjugated linoleic acid, cis-9, trans-11 CLA (c9,t11-CLA). The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence base from epidemiological and clinical studies to determine whether intake of rTFA iso...

  1. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aswathy Sreedevi, Reshma Javed, Avani Dinesh Community Medicine, AIMS, Kochi, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kerala, India Abstract: Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55–59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence. Keywords: cervical cancer, HPV, screening, prevention, epidemiology, India

  2. Genetic-epidemiological evidence for the role of acetaldehyde in cancers related to alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, C J Peter

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol drinking increases the risk for a number of cancers. Currently, the highest risk (Group 1) concerns oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colorectum, and female breast, as assessed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Alcohol and other beverage constituents, their metabolic effects, and alcohol-related unhealthy lifestyles have been suggested as etiological factors. The aim of the present survey is to evaluate the carcinogenic role of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers, with special emphasis on the genetic-epidemiological evidence. Acetaldehyde, as a constituent of alcoholic beverages, and microbial and endogenous alcohol oxidation well explain why alcohol-related cancers primarily occur in the digestive tracts and other tissues with active alcohol and acetaldehyde metabolism. Genetic-epidemiological research has brought compelling evidence for the causality of acetaldehyde in alcohol-related cancers. Thus, IARC recently categorized alcohol-drinking-related acetaldehyde to Group 1 for head and neck and esophageal cancers. This is probably just the tip of the iceberg, since more recent epidemiological studies have also shown significant positive associations between the aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2 (rs671)*2 allele (encoding inactive enzyme causing high acetaldehyde elevations) and gastric, colorectal, lung, and hepatocellular cancers. However, a number of the current studies lack the appropriate matching or stratification of alcohol drinking in the case-control comparisons, which has led to erroneous interpretations of the data. Future studies should consider these aspects more thoroughly. The polymorphism phenotypes (flushing and nausea) may provide valuable tools for future successful health education in the prevention of alcohol-drinking-related cancers.

  3. Variable selection: Current practice in epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Walter (Stefan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSelection of covariates is among the most controversial and difficult tasks in epidemiologic analysis. Correct variable selection addresses the problem of confounding in etiologic research and allows unbiased estimation of probabilities in prognostic studies. The aim of this commentary i

  4. Epidemiological trends of hormone-related cancers in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadnik, Vesna; Krajc, Mateja

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of hormone-related cancers tends to be higher in the developed world than in other countries. In Slovenia, six hormone-related cancers (breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate, testicular, and thyroid) account for a quarter of all cancers. Their incidence goes up each year, breast and prostate cancer in particular. The age at diagnosis is not decreasing for any of the analysed cancer types. The risk of breast cancer is higher in the western part of the country, but no differences in geographical distribution have been observed for other hormone-related cancers. Furthermore, areas polluted with endocrine-disrupting chemicals that affect hormone balance such as PCBs, dioxins, heavy metals, and pesticides, do not seem to involve a greater cancer risk. We know little about how many cancers can be associated with endocrine disruptors, as there are too few reliable exposure studies to support an association. PMID:27331295

  5. Moderate alcohol consumption and breast cancer in women: from epidemiology to mechanisms and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Philip J; Zakhari, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that moderate alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk in women. Understanding the mechanistic basis of this relationship has important implications for women's health and breast cancer prevention. In this commentary, we focus on some recent epidemiologic studies linking moderate alcohol consumption to breast cancer risk and place the results of those studies within the framework of our current understanding of the temporal and mechanistic basis of human carcinogenesis. This analysis supports the hypothesis that alcohol acts as a weak cumulative breast carcinogen and may also be a tumor promoter. We discuss the implications of these mechanisms for the prevention and treatment of alcohol-related breast cancer and present some considerations for future studies. Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to benefit cardiovascular health and recently been associated with healthy aging. Therefore, a better understanding of how moderate alcohol consumption impacts breast cancer risk will allow women to make better informed decisions about the risks and benefits of alcohol consumption in the context of their overall health and at different stages of their life. Such mechanistic information is also important for the development of rational clinical interventions to reduce ethanol-related breast cancer mortality.

  6. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy

  7. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  8. Breast cancer in Brazil: epidemiology and treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio AP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adma Poliana Cecilio,1 Erika Tomie Takakura,1 Jaqueline Janaina Jumes,1 Jeane Wilhelm dos Santos,1 Ana Cristina Herrera,2 Vanessa Jacob Victorino,3 Carolina Panis11Laboratory of Inflammatory Mediators, State University o West Paraná, UNIOESTE, Campus Francisco Beltrão, Paraná, Brazil; 2Pontifícia Universidade Católica (PUC, Campus Londrina, Paraná, Brazil; 3School of Medicine, Sao Paulo University (FM-USP, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Notwithstanding the advances in tumor research, diagnosis, and treatment, breast cancer is still a challenge worldwide. This global burden of disease has been associated with population aging and the persistence of cancer-related behaviors. The number of women diagnosed with breast cancer has been estimated as increasing, especially in middle-income countries such as Brazil. Estimates from the Instituto Nacional de Câncer (INCA point to breast cancer as the major malignant neoplasia in Brazilian women and the main cause of death from cancer in the country. This fact has been associated with increased life expectancy, urbanization, and cancer-related behaviors. Given this scenario, it is clear that there is a need for identifying and discussing which factors have substantially contributed to this growing number of cases in Brazil, including access to treatment, prevention and early diagnosis, weaknesses of the local health policy, and intrinsic genetic peculiarities of the Brazilian population. This review aims to address the role of such factors.Keywords: breast cancer, treatment, prevention, epidemiology, Brazil, cancer screening, mammograms, health policies

  9. Epidemiology of breast cancer at the shaukat khanum memorial cancer hospital and research center, lahore, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the demographic and clinical features of females presenting with breast malignancies at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Center (SKMCH and RC), Lahore, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: SKMCH and RC, Lahore, from January 2008 to December 2012. Methodology: Demographic and clinical features of female breast cancer patients, registered at SKMCH and RC, were studied. Mean values, counts, and percentages were obtained. Results: Four-thousand, three-hundred and sixty-six female breast malignancies were recorded. Nearly 80.4% of the patients belonged to Punjab. Mean age at presentation was 48.6 ± 12.2 years, at menarche was 13.2 ± 1.2 years, and at first childbirth was 23.7 ± 4.8 years. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 29.0 ± 5.7 kg/m2. In 60.1%, history of breast feeding was positive. In 55.7%, there was no history of use of any Oral Contraceptive Pills (OCP)/Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Nearly 42.7% were postmenopausal, 85.2% had infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 49.6% had grade 3 tumor, 60.7% had stage II disease, and 37.3% were Estrogen Receptor (ER)/Progesterone Receptor (PR)+, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-. Family history of breast cancer was positive in 16.9% of the cases. Conclusion: The mean presenting age is lower than what has been recorded in the West. It may be worthwhile collating results from different institutions in order to study the epidemiology of the disease more extensively and develop cancer control and early detection programs. (author)

  10. Epidemiological study of venous thromboembolism in a big Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Overvad, Kim;

    Introduction: Epidemiological data on venous thromboembolism (VT), i.e. pulmonary emboli (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are sparse. We have examined VT-diagnoses registered in a big Danish Cohort study.  Methods: All first-time VT diagnoses in The Danish National Patient Register were...... identified among participants in the Danish cohort study "Diet, Cancer and Health" in which 57,053 50-64 years old persons were included 1993-7. Medical records were retrieved and reviewed by an experienced physician using a detailed standardized form, and information on the diagnostic work-up and presence...

  11. Research Strategies for Nutritional and Physical Activity Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to a series of controversial articles about nutritional epidemiology and cancer published in 2014, staff from the Environmental Epidemiology Branch initiated a series of meetings to refine programmatic priorities for human nutrition/physical activity and cancer etiology research in the near term.

  12. Psoriasis and comorbidities. Epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    as well. Indeed, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis, and patients with severe psoriasis have a shortened life expectancy. Although our knowledge of the pathogenesis of psoriasis has advanced significantly in the past decade, as have the pharmacological treatment......Psoriasis is a prevalent chronic inflammatory disease whose exact aetiology is not fully understood, but both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the onset and progression of the disease. At the skin level, psoriasis is characterized by localized or widespread thick raised...... silvery-white scaling and pruritic plaques and studies have shown that psoriasis negatively affects patients' quality of life, and depression occurs more often in patients with psoriasis. However, data have shown that psoriasis is a systemic disease which affects the joints, vasculature, and other tissues...

  13. Association between Soy Isoflavone Intake and Breast Cancer Risk for Pre- and Post-Menopausal Women: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Meinan Chen; Yanhua Rao; Yi Zheng; Shiqing Wei; Ye Li; Tong Guo; Ping Yin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conclusions drawn from meta-analyses on the association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk for pre- and post-menopausal women are not fully consistent. These meta-analyses did not explore the influence of different study designs on the pooled results on the basis of distinguishing between pre- and post-menopausal women. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis of 35 studies which reported results of association between soy isoflavone intak...

  14. Methodologic assessment of radiation epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies of the late effects of ionizing radiation have utilized the entire spectrum of situations in which man has been exposed. These studies have provided insights into the dependence of human effects upon not only dose to target tissues but also other dimensions of exposure, host characteristics, and time following exposure. Over the past three decades studies have progressed from the mere identification of effects to their measurement. Because investigators of human effects have no control over the exposure situation, validity must be sought in the consistency of findings among independent studies and with accepted biologic principles. Because exposure may be confounded with factors that are hidden from view, bias may enter into any study of human exposure. Avoidance of bias and attainment of sufficient power to detect relationships that are real are methodologic challenges. Many methodologic issues, e.g., those associated with the definition and measurement of specific end-points, or with the selection of appropriate controls, permeate epidemiologic work in all fields. Others, especially those concerned with the measurement of exposure, the patterning of events in time after exposure, and the prediction of events beyond the scope of existing observations give radiation epidemiology its distinctive character

  15. A Genetic Epidemiological Study of Behavioral Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Najaf

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHuman behavioural genetics aims to unravel the genetic and environmental contributions to variations in human behaviour. Behaviour is a complex trait, involving multiple genes that are affected by a variety of other factors. Genetic epidemiological research of behaviour goes back to Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911), who systematically studied heredity of human behaviour and mind, introducing major statistical concepts such as correlation and regression towards the mean. After a brie...

  16. Dietary assessment methods in epidemiologic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jee-Seon; Oh, Kyungwon; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2014-01-01

    Diet is a major lifestyle-related risk factor of various chronic diseases. Dietary intake can be assessed by subjective report and objective observation. Subjective assessment is possible using open-ended surveys such as dietary recalls or records, or using closed-ended surveys including food frequency questionnaires. Each method has inherent strengths and limitations. Continued efforts to improve the accuracy of dietary intake assessment and enhance its feasibility in epidemiological studies...

  17. Alcohol, tobacco and breast cancer – collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 58 515 women with breast cancer and 95 067 women without the disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K.; Tajima, K; Rohan, T.; Calle, E.E.; Heath, C W; Coates, R J; Liff, J. M.; Talamini, R.; N. Chantarakul; Koetsawang, S.; Rachawat, D.; Morabia, A.; L. Schuman; Stewart, W.

    2002-01-01

    COLLABORATORS (in alphabetical order of institution, study name, or location) Aichi Cancer Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan: N Hamajima, K Hirose, K Tajima; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, USA: T Rohan; American Cancer Society, GA, USA: EE Calle, CW Jr Heath; Atlanta, Emory University, GA, USA: RJ Coates, JM Liff; Aviano Cancer Center, Pordenone, Italy: R Talamini; Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand: N Chantarakul, S Koetsawang, D Rachawat; Breast Tumor Collaborative Study, Johns...

  18. Epidemiology, Incidence and Mortality of Breast Cancer in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries. PMID:27165207

  19. 山西省贲门癌遗传流行病学研究%Studies on hereditary epidemiology of cardia cancer in Shanxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王媛; 韩小友; 丁悌; 唐泽忠; 许翊; 王全红

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨山西省贲门癌发病因素中遗传因素的作用.方法 采用病例对照研究方法 ,对病例及对照的Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ级亲属所有成员的姓名、性别、出生和死亡日期以及疾病诊断与治疗进行调查.用Falconer法和Li-Mentel-Gart法计算贲门癌的遗传度和分离比.结果 (1)病例组Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ级亲属的贲门癌患病率分别是0.54%、0.04%、0.05%;病例组Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ级亲属的上消化道癌患病率分别为2.50%、0.36%、0.13%.贲门癌与上消化道癌患病呈现Ⅰ>Ⅱ>Ⅲ级亲属的趋势,表现为家族聚集性,男女性均如此.(2)贲门癌先证者Ⅰ级亲属患贲门癌的遗传度为11.71%,其中女性为14.72%,男性为14.01%;贲门癌先证者Ⅰ级亲属患上消化道癌的遗传度为13.87%,其中女性为23.08%,男性为11.49%,均低于25%,属低遗传肿瘤.(3)病例组同胞中上消化道分离比为0.0452,其中男性为0.0441,女性为0.0507,均低于0.25,不符合单基因遗传方式,属多基因遗传方式.结论 遗传因素是贲门癌的危险因素,但不是山西省贲门癌高发的主要危险因素.%Objective Studies on cardia-cancer caused by hereditary factors. Methods Case-control method was adopted,with information including name,sex,date of birth,date of death of all the Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ relatives of the patients,diagnosis and the treatment collected. The hereditary probability of cardia cancer and the separation degree were calculated by Falconer and Li-Mentel-Gart. Results (1) Prevalence rates of cardia-cancer on relative Ⅰ,relative Ⅱ,relative Ⅲ of cardia-cancer patients appeared to be 0.54%,0.04%,and 0.05% respectively. Prevalence rates of upper-digestive-tract-cancer of relative Ⅰ,relative Ⅱ,relative Ⅲ of cardia-cancer patients showed as: 2.50%,0.36% and 0.13% respectively. Data showed that relative Ⅰ> relative Ⅱ> relative Ⅲ and family cluster existed in both males and females. (2) Cardia-cancer hereditary probability of the relative

  20. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of cancer-associated thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, S; Pasi, J

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with malignant disease. First recognised by Bouillard in 1823 and later described by Trousseau in 1844, multiple studies have since provided considerable evidence for a clinical association between VTE and cancer. Across all cancers, the risk for VTE is elevated 7-fold; in certain malignancies, the risk for VTE may be increased up to 28-fold. Venous thromboembolism is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer; a...

  1. Epidemiological studies of groups with occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of man to radiation and the resulting risk of carcinogenesis continues to be of concern to the public. In this context, there is often a tendency to carry out epidemiological studies concerning the induction of cancer in radiation workers and members of the public which are not supported by a statistically valid data base or whose results are misinterpreted or misused. To assist national authorities in evaluating radiological risks, the Nuclear Energy Agency has sponsored a critical review of the methodologies for, and the limitations of, these epidemiological studies, and of the precautions to be adopted in interpreting their results. Prepared by a consultant, Dr. Joan M. Davies, the review focuses on the problems encountered when carrying out epidemiological studies on groups of workers occupationally exposed to radiations, and using their results for radiological protection purposes. It is published under the responsibility of the Secretary General of the OECD, and does not necessarily reflect the views of Member Governments. The primary objective is to provide background material to be used by national authorities that have responsibilities in the field of radiological protection as well as by other persons interested in this subject

  2. Aging and cancer in Uruguay: epidemiology and health screenings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to estimates by the UICC 2020 the annual number of new cases cancer worldwide will reach 20 million, of which 14 occur in developing countries, which must address the problem with little human and material resources. This increase, in particular the care burden will weigh in countries development, is the result, among other factors, the transition patterns epidemiological, accompanied by an increase in life expectancy at birth. This determines the prevalence of chronic and degenerative diseases within which highlights the cardiovascular and oncological diseases. In Uruguay, the life expectancy at birth has increased from 45 in 1900-75 to end of the century. In parallel we are witnessing a progressive aging of the population, with an increasing proportion of older age groups. taking population aged 65 or more, it represented 4.5% in 1908 and reached 21.2% in 2000 Similarly, cancer mortality has increased percentage, in 2001 representing 23.8% of total deaths. Depending on age, analyzed the increased risk of developing or dying from cancer in Uruguay and its impact is weighted mortality of seven locations more frequent. For each of these locations the percentage of deaths in the population of 65 or more years is as follows: lung 60.9%, breast 60.3%, prostate 91.4%, colorecto 78.3%, 72.3% stomach, esophagus 70.3%, 72.2% pancreas, averaging 69.4% overall. Some etiopathogenic aspects and care projections are discussed this onco-geriatric problems.

  3. Epidemiología del cáncer en adolescentes The epidemiology of cancer in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Cuevas-Urióstegui

    2003-01-01

    adolescent cancer epidemiology published during a period of 15 years (1985-1999. Time, place, and person variables were analyzed, as well as their relationships. RESULTS: Few papers on adolescent cancer epidemiology were found, likely due to the difficulty in registering cancer cases in the 12 to 18 year-old group. Either the 10-14 or the 15-19 year-old group has been analyzed in different studies; but the latter is more representative of teenagers. A higher incidence rate was found in this group (117.3 and 202.2 x 10(6 respectively. The main malignancies in the 15-19 year-old group were central nervous system tumors (CNST, leukemias, lymphomas, bone tumors, germ-cell tumors, and carcinomas. Incidence rates were higher in males and whites; an increasing trend was observed. Cancer mortality in this group is decreasing in the United States (2.0 or 3.2% per year. Survival is increasing in all groups of neoplasms. No data were available on cancer incidence in the 15-19 year-old group in Mexico; data were available only for the 10-14 year-old group. The main neoplasms are leukemias, lymphomas, bone tumors, and CNST (rates were 41.9, 29.9, 12.0, and 10.0 x 10(6, respectively. The mortality rate for the 1990-1994 period was 64.1 and the main neoplasms were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas. CONCLUSIONS: More studies are needed to address the descriptive epidemiology of cancer in teenagers.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of lung cancer and geographic variations with special reference to EGFR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in many countries. Although recent advances in targeted therapy against driver oncogenes have significantly improved patient outcome, cure of this disease is still exceptional. Although tobacco is a known cause of lung cancer, not all smokers develop lung cancer, and conversely many patients, especially Asian female patients with lung cancer, are lifetime never-smokers. Therefore, efforts to understand the basis for different susceptibilities to lung cancer among individuals with different genetic, biologic, ethnic, and social backgrounds are important to help develop effective preventive measures. Lung cancer in never-smokers has many different characteristics to lung cancer in smokers, such as adenocarcinoma predominance and high frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation yet low number of genetic changes. Epidemiologic studies suggest that East Asians are more susceptible to smoking-unrelated lung cancer but less susceptible to smoking-related lung cancer compared with Caucasians. Mutations in the EGFR gene are more common in Asian females and never-smokers. Our case-control study suggests that EGFR mutation occurs independent of smoking, and that the apparent low frequency of EGFR mutations in smokers may be the result of dilution by smoking-related lung cancer. The frequencies of three EGFR gene polymorphisms associated with increased protein expression are significantly different between East Asians and Caucasians, favoring lower protein expression in East Asians. Although these may be associated with preferred expression of the EGFR mutant allele, it is difficult to explain the frequent EGFR mutation in Asian patients. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) revealed several loci related to lung cancer susceptibility. In the future, GWAS may identify loci that are specifically related to EGFR-targeted carcinogenesis, leading to identification of carcinogens that induce EGFR

  5. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Ze Zhang; Guang-Fu Jin; Hong-Bing Shen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis.The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing,whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly,particularly in Western men.Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia,and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking,alcohol consumption,hot beverage drinking,and poor nutrition.In contrast,esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites,and the risk factors include smoking,obesity,and gastroesophageal reflux disease.In addition,Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds.However,comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future.Ethnic differences should he taken into account in preventive and clinical practices.

  6. Lung cancer epidemiology: contemporary and future challenges worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Didkowska, Joanna; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Mańczuk, Marta; Łobaszewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Over the last century, lung cancer from the rarest of diseases became the biggest cancer killer of men worldwide and in some parts of the world also of women (North America, East Asia, Northern Europe, Australia and New Zealand). In 2012 over 1.6 million of people died due to lung cancer. The cause-effect relationship between tobacco smoking and lung cancer occurrence has been proven in many studies, both ecological and clinical. In global perspective one can see the increasing tobacco consum...

  7. Epidemiology and management of depression in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in cancer patients especially those in terminal stage. Despite the large amount of studies on depression in cancer patients, there are a lot of unanswered questions with respect to diagnosis, prevalence and treatment. Diagnosing depression in c

  8. Measurement of spices and seasonings in India: opportunities for cancer epidemiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Leah M; Daniel, Carrie R; Kapur, Kavita; Chadha, Puneet; Shetty, Hemali; Graubard, Barry I; George, Preethi S; Osborne, Whitney; Yurgalevitch, Susan; Devasenapathy, Niveditha; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gupta, Prakash C; Mathew, Aleyamma; Sinha, Rashmi

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive components of many foods added during cooking have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antibacterial and chemopreventive properties. However, epidemiologic studies generally do not collect detailed information on these items, which include spices, chilies, coconuts, garlic, onions, and oils. Since India has some of the highest spice consumption in the world, we developed a computer-based food preparer questionnaire to estimate per capita consumption of 19 spices, chilies, coconuts, garlic, onions, and 13 cooking oils among 3,625 participants in the India Health Study, a multicenter pilot study in three regions of India. We observed notable regional differences in consumption of spices, chilies, coconut, garlic, and onions. In Trivandrum, over 95 percent of the participants consumed 12 different spices, while in New Delhi and Mumbai, 95 percent of participants consumed only four and five spices, respectively. Cooking oil use also varied, as ghee was most common in New Delhi (96.8%) followed by mustard seed oil (78.0%), while in Trivandrum the primary oil was coconut (88.5%) and in Mumbai it was peanut (68.5%). There was some variation in consumption by education, income, and religion. Using a novel method for assessing food items primarly added during cooking, we successfully estimated per capita consumption within an epidemiologic study. Based on basic science research and suggestive ecologic level data on cancer incidence and spice consumption, improving epidemiologic assessment of these potentially chemopreventive food items may enhance our understanding of diet and cancer risk.

  9. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkatout I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%. Clinical features: Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy: The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1. A sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis: The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Keywords: vulvar cancer, HPV infection, radical vulvectomy, groin dissection, sentinel lymph node biopsy, overall survival

  10. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: Danish Cancer in Primary Care cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Henry Jensen,1,2 Marie Louise Tørring,1 Mette Bach Larsen,3 Peter Vedsted11Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, 2Section for General Medical Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, 3Department of Public Health Programs, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers NOE, Denmark Background: In this paper, we describe the settings, content, and possibilities of the Danish Cancer in Primary Care (CaP cohort as well as some of the key findings so far. Further, we describe the future potential of the cohort as an international resource for epidemiological and health services research studies. Methods: The CaP cohort comprises information from three Danish subcohorts set up in 2004–2005, 2007–2008, and 2010 on newly diagnosed cancer patients aged 18 years or older. General practitioner (GP-reported and patient-reported data from six questionnaires generated information on causes and consequences of delayed diagnosis of cancer, and these data were supplemented with complete information on, eg, death, migration, health care utilization, medication use, and socioeconomic data from Denmark's comprehensive health and administrative registers. The cohort is followed up in terms of emigration, death, hospitalization, medication, and socioeconomics, and data are updated regularly. Results: In total, we identified 22,169 verified incident cancer cases. Completed GP questionnaires were returned for 17,566 (79% of the verified cases, and patient questionnaires were completed by 8,937 (40% respondents. Patients with participating GPs did not differ from patients with nonparticipating GPs in regard to one-year survival, comorbidity, or educational level. However, compared with nonparticipating GPs, patients listed with participating GPs were more likely to be women, younger, to have a higher disposable income, to have more regional or distant spread of tumors, were also more likely to have

  11. Epidemiological Aspects of Head and Neck Cancers Based on Radiotherapy Registry in Hospital of Hasanuddin University South of Sulawesi Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    A. St. Asmidar Anas; Bachtiar Murtala; Sri Oktawati; Harlina Ilmar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify epidemiological aspect of head and neck cancer defined as reported from a hospital-based radiotherapy registry in Hospital of Hasanuddin University South of Sulawesi Indonesia. The data were collected from medical records patient who treated with radiation therapy in a period of 2014-2015 with a view toward analyzing the sex, age, and site of cancers. Results described that a total of 187 cases were collected during the study period. The mea...

  12. The status of current epidemiological knowledge of radiocarcinogenecity: other, miscellaneous cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently available epidemiological data indicate low or intermediate levels of sensitivity for radiation-induced cancers of most tissues and organ systems other than lung, thyroid and female breast, and leukaemia. However, the estimated risks for these ''other, miscellaneous'' cancers may reflect deficiencies in the data as a result of small study populations, insufficient population dose to detect an effect, uncertainties in dosimetry or the confounding or modifying effects of unknown or unevaluated risk factors. Additional information is necessary to improve existing risk estimates for the malignancies in the other, miscellaneous category. This may be obtained by continued follow-up of the populations currently under study, application of new and developing molecular technologies to identify and quantify radiation exposures for individuals, and pooled or parallel analyses of multiple populations. Cancers of the following tissues are briefly discussed:- digestive system, genito-urinary system, brain or central nervous system, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, bone and skin. (Author)

  13. Cervical cancer and human papillomavirus: Epidemiological evidence and perspectives for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUÑOZ NUBIA

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a major public health problem, as it is the second most common cancer in women world-wide after breast cancer. About 80% of the half a million cases estimated to occur annually in the world, occur in developing countries. The epidemiological evidence linking human papillomavirus (HPV to cervical cancer is reviewed. It is concluded that over 90% of cervical cancers can be attributed to certain HPV types. HPV 16 accounts for the highest proportion (50% followed by HPV 18 (12%, HPV 45 (8% and HPV 31 (5%. The associations with these HPV types are very b and consistent with odds ratios over 15 in all case-control studies in high- and low-risk countries for cervical cancer. However, HPV is not a sufficient cause of this malignancy; certain cofactors are necessary for a proportion of HPV persistent infections to eventually progress to cancer. These include host factors such as histocompatibilidad types and immunological response, hormonal influences and infections with other sexually transmitted agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition, results from our studies carried out in Spain and Colombia support the hypothesis that male carriers of HPV play an important role in the development of cervical cancer in their wives. The recognition of the central role of HPV in cervical cancer has far-reaching implications for the primary and secondary prevention of this malignancy. Prophylactic and therapeutic HPV vaccines are now under development and HPV typing is being integrated into screening programmes in pilot studies in a few developed countries. In developing countries, well conducted conventional screening programmes remain the best approach for the control of cervical cancer until a safe and efficient HPV vaccine can be used in the general population.

  14. Analysis of oral cancer epidemiology in the US reveals state-specific trends: implications for oral cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditmyer Marcia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downward trends have been observed in oral cancer incidence and mortality in the US over the past 30 years; however, these declines are not uniform within this population. Several studies have now demonstrated an increase in the incidence and mortality from oral cancers among certain demographic groups, which may have resulted from increased risks or risk behaviors. This study examines the underlying data that comprise these trends, to identify specific populations that may be at greater risk for morbidity and mortality from oral cancers. Methods Oral cancer incidence and mortality data analyzed for this study were generated using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER program. Results While oral cancer incidence and mortality rates have been declining over the past thirty years, these declines have reversed in the past five years among some demographic groups, including black females and white males. Sorting of these data by state revealed that eight states exhibited increasing rates of oral cancer deaths, Nevada, North Carolina, Iowa, Ohio, Maine, Idaho, North Dakota, and Wyoming, in stark contrast to the national downward trend. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of data from these states revealed increasing rates of oral cancer among older white males, also contrary to the overall trends observed at the national level. Conclusion These results signify that, despite the declining long-term trends in oral cancer incidence and mortality nationally, localized geographic areas exist where the incidence and mortality from oral cancers have been increasing. These areas represent sites where public health education and prevention efforts may be focused to target these specific populations in an effort to improve health outcomes and reduce disparities within these populations.

  15. Recommendations for epidemiological studies on COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, P S; Rönmark, E; Eagan, T;

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been extensively studied, especially in Western Europe and North America. Few of these data are directly comparable because of differences between the surveys regarding composition of study populations, diagnostic criteria of the...... disease and definitions of the risk factors. Few community studies have examined phenotypes of COPD and included other ways of characterising the disease beyond that of spirometry. The objective of the present Task Force report is to present recommendations for the performance of general population...... studies in COPD in order to facilitate comparable and valid estimates on COPD prevalence by various risk factors. Diagnostic criteria in epidemiological settings, and standardised methods to examine the disease and its potential risk factors are discussed. The paper also offers practical advice for...

  16. Evaluation of primary HPV-DNA testing in relation to visual inspection methods for cervical cancer screening in rural China: an epidemiologic and cost-effectiveness modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Yoon-Jung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new lower-cost rapid-throughput human papillomavirus (HPV test (careHPV, Qiagen, Gaithersburg, USA has been shown to have high sensitivity for the detection of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Methods We assessed the outcomes and cost-effectiveness of careHPV screening in rural China, compared to visual inspection with acetic acid, when used alone (VIA or in combination with Lugol's iodine (VIA/VILI. Using data on sexual behaviour, test accuracy, diagnostic practices and costs from studies performed in rural China, we estimated the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER and associated lifetime outcomes for once-lifetime and twice-lifetime screening strategies, and for routine screening at 5-yearly, 10-yearly and IARC-recommended intervals. The optimal age range for once-lifetime screening was also assessed. Results For all strategies, the relative ordering of test technologies in reducing cervical cancer incidence and mortality was VIA (least effective; VIA/VILI; careHPV@1.0 pg/ml and careHPV@0.5 pg/ml (most effective. For once-lifetime strategies, maximum effectiveness was achieved if screening occurred between 35-50 years. Assuming a participation rate of ~70%, once-lifetime screening at age 35 years would reduce cancer mortality by 8% (for VIA to 12% (for careHPV@0.5 over the long term, with a CER of US$557 (for VIA to $959 (for careHPV@1.0 per life year saved (LYS compared to no intervention; referenced to a 2008 GDP per capita in Shanxi Province of $2,975. Correspondingly, regular screening with an age-standardised participation rate of 62% (which has been shown to be achievable in this setting would reduce cervical cancer mortality by 19-28% (for 10-yearly screening to 43-54% (using IARC-recommended intervals, with corresponding CERs ranging from $665 (for 10-yearly VIA to $2,269 (for IARC-recommended intervals using careHPV@1.0 per LYS. Conclusions This modelled analysis suggests that primary careHPV screening

  17. Existing data sources in clinical epidemiology: the Scandinavian Thrombosis and Cancer Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensvoll H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hilde Jensvoll,1,2 Marianne T Severinsen,3,4 Jens Hammerstrøm,5 Sigrid K Brækkan,1,2 Søren R Kristensen,4,6 Suzanne C Cannegieter,7 Kristine Blix,1,2 Anne Tjønneland,8 Frits R Rosendaal,1,7,9 Olga Dziewiecka,1 Kim Overvad,10,11 Inger Anne Næss,12 John-Bjarne Hansen1,21Department of Clinical Medicine, KG Jebsen – Thrombosis Research and Expertise Center (TREC, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, 2Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 3Department of Hematology, Aalborg University Hospital, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 5Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 6Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 7Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 8Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; 9Department of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 10Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 11Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 12Department of Hematology, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Although venous thromboembolism (VTE is a known common complication in cancer patients, there is limited knowledge on patient-related and cancer-specific risk factors in the general population. The Scandinavian Thrombosis and Cancer (STAC Cohort was established by merging individual data from three large Scandinavian cohorts (The Tromsø Study, the second Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. Here, we present the profile of the STAC cohort and provide age-specific incidence rates of VTE and cancerMethods: The STAC cohort includes 144,952 subjects aged 19–101 years

  18. Epidemiologic Studies of Isoflavones & Mammographic Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Tice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavones, phytoestrogens in soy beans with estrogen-like properties, have been examined for their cancer protective effects. Mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer. This review summarizes studies that have examined the association between isoflavones and breast density. Observational investigations in Hawaii and Singapore suggest slightly lower breast density among women of Asian descent with regular soy intake, but two larger studies from Japan and Singapore did not observe a protective effect. The findings from seven randomized trials with primarily Caucasian women indicate that soy or isoflavones do not modify mammographic density. Soy foods and isoflavone supplements within a nutritional range do not appear to modify breast cancer risk as assessed by mammographic density.

  19. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control Câncer de mama em mulheres mexicanas: estudo epidemiológico com controles de câncer cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Tovar-Guzmán

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.OBJETIVO: O câncer de mama (CM é uma das principais causas de morte por câncer em mulheres, no México, com aumento da incidência e da mortalidade nos últimos anos. O estudo realizado objetivou identificar possíveis fatores de risco

  20. Lung cancer epidemiology: contemporary and future challenges worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkowska, Joanna; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Mańczuk, Marta; Łobaszewski, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Over the last century, lung cancer from the rarest of diseases became the biggest cancer killer of men worldwide and in some parts of the world also of women (North America, East Asia, Northern Europe, Australia and New Zealand). In 2012 over 1.6 million of people died due to lung cancer. The cause-effect relationship between tobacco smoking and lung cancer occurrence has been proven in many studies, both ecological and clinical. In global perspective one can see the increasing tobacco consumption trend followed by ascending trends of lung cancer mortality, especially in developing countries. In some more developed countries, where the tobacco epidemics was on the rise since the beginning of the 20th century and peaked in its mid, in male population lung cancer incidence trend reversed or leveled off. Despite predicted further decline of incidence rates, the absolute number of deaths will continue to grow in these countries. In the remaining parts of the world the tobacco epidemics is still evolving what brings rapid increase of the number of new lung cancer cases and deaths. Number of lung cancer deaths worldwide is expected to grow up to 3 million until 2035. The figures will double both in men (from 1.1 million in 2012 to 2.1 million in 2035) and women (from 0.5 million in 2012 to 0.9 million in 2035) and the two-fold difference between sexes will persist. The most rapid increase is expected in Africa region (AFRO) and East Mediterranean region (EMRO). The increase of the absolute number of lung cancer deaths in more developed countries is caused mostly by population aging and in less developed countries predominantly by the evolving tobacco epidemic.

  1. Cancer Incidence - Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registries Limited-Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — SEER Limited-Use cancer incidence data with associated population data. Geographic areas available are county and SEER registry. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and...

  2. The nuclear industry and the risk of cancer in the Manche district - Cancer epidemiology and nuclear industry in the Manche district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposed a summarized version and a full version of a study on cancer epidemiology in the Manche district in which are located four nuclear sites of different nature and with different potential risks: the Flamanville nuclear plant (with the EPR under construction), the La Hague Areva nuclear fuel processing plant, the Manche storage site, and the Cherbourg arsenal. It describes the missions of the two cancer registries regarding the Manche region population (the general cancer registry for the Manche district, and the specialized registry of hematologic malignancies for the Basse-Normandie region), discusses the post-accidental management of a nuclear accident, presents the levels of the various basic indicators of cancer epidemiology survey (share of cancers in global mortality and factors of risk cancer, radio-induced cancers), compares cancer occurrence in the Manche district and in France and outlines some peculiarities of cancer occurrence in the Manche district, comments the cartography of cancer occurrence in the Manche district over the 1999-2010 period (solid cancers, hematologic malignancies)

  3. TP53 mutations as biomarkers for cancer epidemiology in Latin America: current knowledge and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitória; Azevedo E Silva Mendonça, Gulnar; de Moraes, Emanuela; Olivier, Magali; Hainaut, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    Due to particular social and economical development, and to the impact of globalization of lifestyles, Latin America shows a superposition of cancers that are frequent in low resource countries (gastric, oesophageal squamous cell and cervical cancers) and high resource countries (cancers of breast, colon and rectum, lung and prostate). Latin America thus offers opportunities for investigating the impact on changing lifestyle patterns on the occurrence of cancer. At the molecular level, mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are common in many cancers and their distribution can be informative of the nature of the mutagenic mechanisms, thus giving clues to cancer etiology and molecular pathogenesis. However most of the data available are derived from studies in industrialized countries. In this review, we discuss current trends on cancer occurrence in Latin American countries, and we review the literature available on TP53 mutations and polymorphisms in patients from Latin America. Overall, a total of 285 mutations have been described in 1213 patients in 20 publications, representing 1.5% of the total number of mutations reported world-wide. Except for hematological cancers, TP53 mutation frequencies are similar to those reported in other regions of the world. The only tumor site presenting significant differences in mutation pattern as compared to other parts of the world is colon and rectum. However, this difference is based on a single study with 35 patients. Recently, a characteristic TP53 mutation at codon 337 (R337H) has been identified in the germline of children with adrenocortical carcinoma in Southern Brazil. Further and better focused analyses of TP53 mutation patterns in the context of epidemiological studies, should help to improve our understanding of cancer etiology in order to develop appropriate health policies and public health programs in Latin America. PMID:15878142

  4. Workshop on The Epidemiology of the ATM Gene: Impact on Breast Cancer Risk and Treatment, Present Status and Future Focus, Lillehammer, Norway, 29 June 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) heterozygosity in cancer is uncertain. In vitro studies of cells from ATM heterozygotes provide strong evidence of radiation sensitivity. Some, but not all, clinical studies suggest an increased risk of breast cancer among ATM gene carriers, and this risk may be greater among those exposed to radiation. This possible excess risk of breast cancer associated with ATM heterozygosity constitutes the basis for several genetic epidemiological studies designed to clarify the role that the ATM gene plays in the etiology of breast and other cancers. The primary focus of this international, multidisciplinary, National Cancer Institute-sponsored workshop was to discuss ongoing and planned epidemiologic studies aimed at understanding the complexities of the ATM gene and its role in carcinogenesis. The invited participants were from diverse disciplines including molecular and clinical genetics, radiation biology and physics, epidemiology, biostatistics, pathology, and medicine. In the present meeting report, the aims of each project are described

  5. Epidemiological Assessments of Skin Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Qing; Cho, Eunyoung; Weinstock, Martin A.; Mashfiq, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHSs) to identifying epidemiological factors associated with multiple skin diseases, including skin cancer, psoriasis, and other inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of NHS articles published between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHSs have identified environmental and lifestyle factors related to psoriasis, supporting obesity and smoking as psoriasis risk factors; associations between psoriasis and diabetes, myocardial infarction, and Crohn’s disease, supporting psoriasis as a systemic disorder; and associations of pigmentary traits, ultraviolet radiation, and lifestyle factors such as citrus consumption with risk of skin cancer. Genetic studies have identified novel genetic loci for skin pigmentation (e.g., IRF4, SLC24A4, NID1, and EDNRB) and skin cancer (e.g., TET2 and HERC2-OCA2). Work continues on highly prevalent but less studied skin conditions such as rosacea, acne, and atopic dermatitis. The NHS results have influenced public health policies on indoor tanning devices. Conclusions. The NHSs have provided invaluable resources on skin disease population science and contributed to the etiological understanding of multiple skin disorders. PMID:27459457

  6. NASA Remote Sensing Data for Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Vicente, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the need for improved observations of environmental factors to better understand the links between human health and the environment, NASA has established a new program to significantly improve the utilization of NASA's diverse array of data, information, and observations of the Earth for health applications. This initiative, lead by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the following goals: (1) To encourage interdisciplinary research on the relationships between environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, vegetation) and health, (2) Develop practical early warning systems, (3) Create a unique system for the exchange of Earth science and health data, (4) Provide an investigator field support system for customers and partners, (5) Facilitate a system for observation, identification, and surveillance of parameters relevant to environment and health issues. The NASA Environment and Health Program is conducting several interdisciplinary projects to examine applications of remote sensing data and information to a variety of health issues, including studies on malaria, Rift Valley Fever, St. Louis Encephalitis, Dengue Fever, Ebola, African Dust and health, meningitis, asthma, and filariasis. In addition, the NASA program is creating a user-friendly data system to help provide the public health community with easy and timely access to space-based environmental data for epidemiological studies. This NASA data system is being designed to bring land, atmosphere, water and ocean satellite data/products to users not familiar with satellite data/products, but who are knowledgeable in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment. This paper discusses the most recent results of the interdisciplinary environment-health research projects and provides an analysis of the usefulness of the satellite data to epidemiological studies. In addition, there will be a summary of presently-available NASA Earth science data and a description of how it may be obtained.

  7. Cancer epidemiology and control in peninsular and island South-East Asia - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Malcolm A; Manan, Azizah Ab; Chow, Khuan Yew; Cornain, Santoso F; Devi, C R Beena; Triningsih, F X Ediati; Laudico, Adriano; Mapua, Cynthia A; Mirasol-Lumague, Maria Rica; Noorwati, S; Nyunt, Kan; Othman, Nor Hayati; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Sinuraya, Evlina Suzanna; Yip, Cheng Har; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2010-01-01

    Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, East Timor and the Philippines constitute peninsular and island South-East Asia. For reasons of largely shared ethnicity, with Chinese elements added to the basic Austromalaysian populations, as well as geographical contiguity, they can be usefully grouped together for studies of chronic disease prevalence and underlying risk factors. The fact of problems are shared in common, particularly regarding increasing cancer rates, underlines the necessity for a coordinated approach to research and development of control measures. To provide a knowledge base, the present review of available data for cancer registration, epidemiology and control was conducted. The most prevalent cancer site in males is the lung, followed by the liver, colon or the prostate in the majority of cases, while breast and cervical cancers predominate in most female populations. However, there are interesting differences among the racial groups, particularly regarding the stomach. General tendencies for increase in adenocarcinomas but decrease in squamous cell carcinomas and gastric cancer, point to change in environmental influence over time. Variation in risk factors depends to some extent on the level of economic development but overall the countries of the region face similar challenges in achieving effective cancer control. A major task is persuading the general populace of the efficacy of early detection and clinical treatment. PMID:20553070

  8. The changing epidemiology of Asian digestive cancers: From etiologies and incidences to preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2015-12-01

    Digestive cancers are a major health burden in Asia. Due to the presence of similar "infection-inflammation-cancer" pathways in the carcinogenesis process, eradicating infective pathogens or attenuating relevant inflammatory signaling pathways may reduce digestive cancer incidences and improve patient outcomes. The aim of this paper is to review the recent evidence regarding the epidemiology of three major digestive cancers in Asia: stomach cancer, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer. We focused on the incidence trends, the major etiologies, and especially the potential preventive strategies.

  9. Epidemiological research on radiation-induced cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    The late effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on cancer occurrence have been evaluated by epidemiological studies on three cohorts: a cohort of atomic bomb survivors (Life Span Study; LSS), survivors exposed in utero, and children of atomic bomb survivors (F1). The risk of leukemia among the survivors increased remarkably in the early period after the bombings, especially among children. Increased risks of solid cancers have been evident since around 10 years after the bombings and are still present today. The LSS has clarified the dose–response relationships of radiation exposure and risk of various cancers, taking into account important risk modifiers such as sex, age at exposure, and attained age. Confounding by conventional risk factors including lifestyle differences is not considered substantial because people were non-selectively exposed to the atomic bomb radiation. Uncertainty in risk estimates at low-dose levels is thought to be derived from various sources, including different estimates of risk at background levels, uncertainty in dose estimates, residual confounding and interaction, strong risk factors, and exposure to residual radiation and/or medical radiation. The risk of cancer in subjects exposed in utero is similar to that in LSS subjects who were exposed in childhood. Regarding hereditary effects of radiation exposure, no increased risk of cancers associated with parental exposure to radiation have been observed in the F1 cohort to date. In addition to biological and pathogenetic interpretations of the present results, epidemiological investigations using advanced technology should be used to further analyze these cohorts. PMID:26976124

  10. Isoforms of thyroxine-binding globulin as a model for molecular epidemiology of human cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The novel field of molecular epidemiology of human cancer risk has added a new branch to classical epidemiology by providing a direct link between human cancer and carcinogen exposure. It was estimated that about 80% of cancers are due to environmental factors. The blood proteins are almost certainly targets for modification in human cancer, and their identification and characterization will be of primary importance in the development of the new and rapidly evolving field of molecular epidemiology. Among blood proteins that are altered in human cancer, TBG occupies a special place because the level of human blood TBG is the most sensitive to intensification of biosynthesis and proliferation processes in organisms in different types of cancer. The increase of TBG concentration in cancer can be result from both activation of TBG biosynthesis in liver or altering of post translation glycosylation that prolongs protein survival time. The molecular basis for the change in the properties of TBG in cancer is unknown. These distinctive changes could have important consequences for the function of TBG in cancer and may help to develop more precise markers for monitoring pathological progression in this disease. Considerable variability and subtlety can occur in the carbohydrate composition and structure of serum glycoproteins in disease. This can be either as a major change, such as an increase in the number of oligosaccharide branches at a particular glycosylation site or as a minor change such as the addition of an extra fucose or sialic acid residue. Increased fucosylation has also been reported for transferrin and alpha-fetoprotein in liver cancer; thyroglobulin in thyroid cancer, IgG in myeloma, haptoglobin in ovarian cancer. The last own studies have shown that in clinically healthy teenagers born in Khojniki (137 Cs 185-555 kBq/m), we have found an unusual thyroid profile exhibiting increased levels of total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), and thyroxine

  11. East meets West: ethnic differences in epidemiology and clinical behaviors of lung cancer between East Asians and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhou; David C. Christian

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with large variation of the incidence and mortality across regions. Although the mortality of lung cancer has been decreasing, or steady in lhe US, it has been increasing in Asia for the past two decades. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, and other risk factors such as indoor coal buming, cooking fumes, and infections may play important roles in the development of lung cancer among Asian never smoking women. The median age of diagnosis in Asian patients with lung cancer is generally younger than Caucasian patients, particularly among never smokers. Asians and Caucasians may have different genetic susceptibilities to lung cancer, as evidenced from candidate polymorphisms and genome-wide association studies. Recent epidemiologic studies and clinical trials have shown consistently that Asian ethnicity is a favorable prognostic factor for overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), independent of smoking status. Compared with Caucasian patients with NSCLC, East Asian patients have a much higher prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (approximately 30% vs. 7%, predominantly among patients with adenocarcinoma and never-smokers), a lower prevalence of K-Ras mutation (less than 10% vs. 18%, predominantly among patients with adenocarcinoma and smokers), and higher proportion of patients who are responsive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ethnic differences in epidemiology and clinical behaviors should be taken into account when conducting global clinical trials that include different ethnic populations.

  12. Dietary exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds and health effects in women and their infants. Epidemiological studies on birth-weight, cancer incidence, and mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rylander, L.

    1997-05-01

    In Sweden the main exposure route for both polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and other persistent organochlorine compounds is through consumption of fatty fish species from the Baltic Sea (the eastern coast of Sweden). Cohorts of fishermen`s wives from the Swedish east and west coasts were established. Interviewed east and west coast cohort women ate locally caught fish at least twice as often as women from the general population. The east coast cohort women displayed during the period 1968-1989 an increased breast cancer incidence and mortality in ischemic heart disease as compared with the west coast cohort. Due to lack of individual data on exposure and confounding factors, it is not possible to conclude that the differences were caused by fish intake. Infants from the east coast cohort had during the period 1973-1991 an increased risk for low birth weight, as compared with infants from the west coast cohort. A nested case-referent study within the east coast cohort indicated an increased risk of low birth weight among infants born to mothers who reported a relatively high current intake of fish from the Baltic Sea, as well as among mothers who had grown up in a fishing village. Moreover, maternal 2,2`,4,4`,5,5`-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153, which was showed to be a feasible biomarker for exposure to PCB) concentrations in plasma drawn in 1995 and the estimated concentrations during the year of childbirth showed effects on the risk for having an infant with low birth weight. Employing alternative plausible kinetic models, an increased risk for low birth weight was observed at a CB-153 concentration in plasma during year of childbirth around 300-400 ng/g lipid. 117 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  13. The epidemiology of long- and short-term cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarlbæk, Lene; Christensen, Linda; Bruera, Eduardo;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In this study, we present data from a population-based cohort of incident cancer patients separated in long- and short-term survivors. Our aim was to procure denominators for use in the planning of rehabilitation and palliative care programs. Material and methods. A registry...... and sex. Two-year crude cancer survival seems as a clinically relevant cut point for characterizing potential "denominators" for rehabilitation or palliative care programs. From this cohort of incident cancer patients, and using two-year survival as a cut point, it could be estimated that 54% would...... candidate to a "care trajectory" focusing on rehabilitation and 46% a "care trajectory" focusing on palliative care at TOCD....

  14. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer among Females in Basrah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Habib, Omran; A Hameed, Lamis; A Ajeel, Narjis; Al-Hawaz, Mazin H; Al-Faddagh, Zaki A; N Nasr, Ghalib; Al-Sodani, Ali H; A Khalaf, Asaad; M Hasson, Hasson; Lname, Aida A; Abdul-Samad, Fname

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in females. Its incidence is higher in developed countries than in developing ones partly due to variation in risk exposure and partly due to better detection methods. Scattered evidence in Basrah, Iraq, suggests that breast cancer has been increasing at a significant pace in recent years. This study aimed to measure the current level of risk of breast cancer among females in Basrah and to describe the time trend over almost a decade of years. Data on breast cancer cases from all sources of cancer registration in Basrah governorate were compiled for the years 2005-2012. The data for each year were first checked separately for duplicate reporting of cases among various sources. Then the eight files were pooled together and checked again for any duplicate cases among years of registration. The final set of data contained 2,284 cases of breast cancer (2,213 female cases and 71 male cases). All patients were inhabitants of Basrah governorate at the time of diagnosis. Figures on the Basrah population were obtained from various sources including the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Planning and Developmental Collaboration and local household surveys. It was possible to have total population estimates for each year and by age and sex. The data were imported into SPSS (version 17) software. Age specific and year specific incidence rates were calculated. The age standardized incidence rate was also calculated using world population as the standard population to be 34.9 per 100,000 females. Age-wise, no case was reported among children aged less than 15 years and the incidence increased with advancing age reaching a peak of 123.8/100,000 females at the age range of 50-54 years. The time trend of the crude incidence rate showed only modest increased risk with passage of years and no age shift could be documented in this study. Breast cancer in females in Basrah is a significant health problem. The current incidence rate (crude, 23

  15. A CLINICO–EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CUTANEOUS MALIGNANCY – A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY AT GAUHATI MEDICAL COLLEGE & HOSPITAL, GUWAHATI, ASSAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayanika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The incidence of skin cancer has been increasing dramatically during the past two decades. Over the past three decades, more people have had skin cancer than all other cancers combined. Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon. The National Cancer Institute warns that from 40 to 50 percent of all Americans who live to age 65 years will develop at least one skin cancer if the current trend continues. As the incidence of skin cancers has been increasing every year, it is now more important than ever to define an accurate aetiology of skin cancer to pave the way for appropriate preventative measures to be taken. This study describes epidemiology, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis and prognosis of cutaneous malignancy. As an increasing body of literature points to an interplay between the cutaneous malignancy and its probable risk factors, pathology, diagnosis and prognosis.

  16. Divergent associations of height with cardiometabolic disease and cancer: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and global implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hu, Frank B; Schulze, Matthias B

    2016-05-01

    Among chronic non-communicable diseases, cardiometabolic diseases and cancer are the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although high BMI and waist circumference, as estimates of total and abdominal fat mass, are now accepted as predictors of the increasing incidence of these diseases, adult height, which also predicts mortality, has been neglected. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests that height is associated with lower cardiometabolic risk, but higher cancer risk, associations supported by mendelian randomisation studies. Understanding the complex epidemiology, biology, and pathophysiology related to height, and its association with cardiometabolic diseases and cancer, is becoming even more important because average adult height has increased substantially in many countries during recent generations. Among the mechanisms driving the increase in height and linking height with cardiometabolic diseases and cancer are insulin and insulin-like growth factor signalling pathways. These pathways are thought to be activated by overnutrition, especially increased intake of milk, dairy products, and other animal proteins during different stages of child development. Limiting overnutrition during pregnancy, early childhood, and puberty would avoid not only obesity, but also accelerated growth in children-and thus might reduce risk of cancer in adulthood. PMID:26827112

  17. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: A Review of Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govardhanan Nagaiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is an uncommon malignancy of the thyroid. Only 1-2% of thyroid cancers are anaplastic, but the disease contributes to 14–50% of the mortality with a median survival of 3 to 5 months. Most patients diagnosed with this disease are 65 years of age or older. The incidence of anaplastic thyroid cancer is decreasing worldwide. Most patients present with a rapidly growing neck mass, dysphagia, or voice change. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed focusing on the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer including historical review of treatment and outcomes and investigations of new agents and approaches. A total of sixteen chart review and retrospective studies and eleven prospective studies and/or clinical trials were reviewed. The current standard therapeutic approach is to consider the disease as systemic at time of diagnosis and pursue combined modality therapy incorporating cytoreductive surgical resection where feasible and/or chemoradiation either concurrently or sequentially. Doxorubicin is the most commonly used agent, with a response rate of 22%. Several new agents are currently under investigation. Referral of patients for participation in clinical trials is needed.

  18. Alcohol drinking and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Rinaldi, Sabina; Biessy, Carine; Allen, Naomi E.; Dossus, Laure; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Schuetze, Madlen; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Oustoglou, Erifili; Barbitsioti, Antonia; Saieva, Calogero; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Galasso, Rocco; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger Torhild; Sanchez, Soledad; Duell, Eric J.; Molina-Montes, Esther; Arriola, Larraitz; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Manjer, Jonas; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora; Wark, Petra A.; Norat, Teresa; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Alcohol intake may adversely affect the concentrations of endogenous sex hormones, and thus increase the risk of endometrial cancer. However, epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting results. Therefore, we investigated the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer ris

  19. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut: An Extension of the STROBE Statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Lachat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut.Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist.When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  20. The incidence rate of female breast cancer in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, United Kingdom; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Lincoln Hospital, Research and Development, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, United Kingdom Background: This study presents descriptive epidemiological data related to breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR, and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by the region and year of diagnosis. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological study of all Saudi female breast cancer cases from 2001 to 2008. The statistical analyses were conducted using descriptive statistics, a linear regression model, and analysis of variance with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA. Results: A total of 6,922 female breast cancer cases were recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The highest overall percentages (38.6% and 31.2% of female breast cancer cases were documented in women who were 30–44 and 45–59 years of age, respectively. The eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 26.6 per 100,000 women, followed by Riyadh at 20.5 and Makkah at 19.4. Jazan, Baha, and Asir had the lowest average ASIRs, at 4.8, 6.1, and 7.3 per 100,000 women, respectively. The region of Jouf (24.2%; CIR 11.2, ASIR 17.2 had the highest changes in CIR and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. While Qassim, Jazan and Tabuk recorded down-trending rates with negative values. Conclusion: There was a significant increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for female breast cancer between 2001 and 2008. The majority of breast cancer cases occurred among younger women. The region of Jouf had the greatest significant

  1. Retrospective epidemiological study of the X-Ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a large amount of epidemiological studies nowadays in the world which are devoted to the analysis of the medical effects and the radiation risk. But a few of them deal with the analysis of the medical diagnostic radiation influence on health. It is appropriate, for the large compared contingent of the patients and the possibility of comparing them in several decades after the exposure are necessary for the evaluation of the influence of small doses on health. Meanwhile the X-ray exposure of the population is one of the most important types of radiation influence among all the kinds and sources of radiation. It is characterized by high dose rate and the possibility of multiple influence on a weakened and diseased organism. In connection with that, the eleven of the indices of population health was analyzed for the first time in Russia. The population was influenced by different levels of X-ray exposure 10-50 years ago. The research was carried out in the two groups of the Tumen (Siberia) regions. These regions are more or less equal in the climatic; ecologic, social-economic and demographic conditions. Nevertheless, they are different even only in the value of accumulated doses of X-ray exposure of the population (mostly in 50-70s) more than three times. Disease and mortality cancer of population of the last ten years in the regions were analyzed. The regions were selected taking into account the absence of the influence of other possible negative environmental factors. The data are found as the result of the dosimetric and epidemiological studies, and the processing of the archive statistic information. These researches demonstrated that on the whole there is the considerable statistically proved rise of disease cancer in the regions with high level of long term accumulated doses of X-ray exposure of population. Inter-district differences in disease and mortality cancer run up to three times among people aged 60 and older. There are no statistically

  2. Retrospective epidemiological study of the X-Ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E. V.; Kalnitsky, S. A.; Shubic, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    There are a large amount of epidemiological studies nowadays in the world which are devoted to the analysis of the medical effects and the radiation risk. But a few of them deal with the analysis of the medical diagnostic radiation influence on health. It is appropriate, for the large compared contingent of the patients and the possibility of comparing them in several decades after the exposure are necessary for the evaluation of the influence of small doses on health. Meanwhile the X-ray exposure of the population is one of the most important types of radiation influence among all the kinds and sources of radiation. It is characterized by high dose rate and the possibility of multiple influence on a weakened and diseased organism. In connection with that, the eleven of the indices of population health was analyzed for the first time in Russia. The population was influenced by different levels of X-ray exposure 10-50 years ago. The research was carried out in the two groups of the Tumen (Siberia) regions. These regions are more or less equal in the climatic; ecologic, social-economic and demographic conditions. Nevertheless, they are different even only in the value of accumulated doses of X-ray exposure of the population (mostly in 50-70s) more than three times. Disease and mortality cancer of population of the last ten years in the regions were analyzed. The regions were selected taking into account the absence of the influence of other possible negative environmental factors. The data are found as the result of the dosimetric and epidemiological studies, and the processing of the archive statistic information. These researches demonstrated that on the whole there is the considerable statistically proved rise of disease cancer in the regions with high level of long term accumulated doses of X-ray exposure of population. Inter-district differences in disease and mortality cancer run up to three times among people aged 60 and older. There are no statistically

  3. Descriptive epidemiology of breast cancer in China: incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm diagnosed amongst women worldwide and is the leading cause of female cancer death. However, breast cancer in China is not comprehensively understood compared with Westernised countries, although the 5-year prevalence statistics indicate that approximately 11 % of worldwide breast cancer occurs in China and that the incidence has increased rapidly in recent decades. This paper reviews the descriptive epidemiology of Chinese breast cancer in terms of incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, and explores relevant factors such as age of manifestation and geographic locations. The statistics are compared with data from the Westernised world with particular emphasis on the United States and Australia. Potential causal agents responsible for differences in breast cancer epidemiology between Chinese and other populations are also explored. The need to minimise variability and discrepancies in methods of data acquisition, analysis and presentation is highlighted.

  4. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  5. Coordinating centers in cancer epidemiology research: the Asia Cohort Consortium coordinating center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Betsy; Smith, Briana R; Potter, John D

    2011-10-01

    Although it is tacitly recognized that a good coordinating center (CC) is essential to the success of any multisite collaborative project, very little study has been done on what makes a CC successful, why some CCs fail, or how to build a CC that meets the needs of a given project. Moreover, very little published guidance is available, as few CCs outside the clinical trial realm write about their work. The Asia Cohort Consortium (ACC) is a collaborative cancer epidemiology research project that has made strong scientific and organizational progress over the past 3 years by focusing its CC on the following activities: collaboration development; operations management; statistical and data management; and communications infrastructure and tool development. Our hope is that, by sharing our experience building the ACC CC, we can begin a conversation about what it means to run a CC for multi-institutional collaboration in cancer epidemiology, help other collaborative projects solve some of the issues associated with collaborative research, and learn from others. PMID:21803842

  6. Epidemiological Study of Thyroid Cancer in Coastal Water Born Periodic Region in Hebei%河北省沿海水源性高碘地区甲状腺癌流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫东; 刘冬梅; 何洪芹; 王景阳; 苑建磊

    2011-01-01

    目的:对河北省沿海水源性高碘地区2005年至2009年间甲状腺癌发病率和死亡率进行统计分析,了解其分布特征及变化趋势,为预防及干预甲状腺癌的发病提供基础.方法:采用描述流行病学的方法,对河北省沿海水源性高碘地区近5年甲状腺癌的发病率、标化发病率、死亡率、标化死亡率并进行分析.结果:2005年至2009年间河北省沿海水源性高碘地区平均发病率为3.000/10万,标化发病率为1.443/10万,男女粗发病率性剐比为1:3.070,平均死亡率为0.390/10万,标化死亡率为0.190/10万.研究显示,5年来男女甲状腺癌发病率呈逐年上升趋势,尤其女性35~50岁年龄组甲状腺癌为高发.结论:甲状腺癌发病率增长较快,尤其是对年轻女性影响更为明显;死亡率无明显变化.需积极寻求相关危险因素,采取相应预防、干预措施.降低发病率.%Objective: To investigate the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer in Hebei Province, which is an area with high iodine concentration in drinking water, from the year 2005 to 2009, in order to understand the distributional characteristics and change trends and provide a basis for the prevention and intervention measures. Methods: Descriptive epidemiological methods were used to analyze the incidence, standardized incidence, mortality, and standardized mortality of thyroid cancer in Hebei. Results: In the years 2005 to 2009, the average incidence rate of thyroid cancer in Hebei was 3.000/100,000. The standardized rate was 1.443/100,000, whereas the male to female ratio of crude incidence was 1:3.07, with an average mortality rate of 0.390/100,000, and a standardized mortality 0.190/100,000. Studies showed that the 5-year incidence of thyroid cancer in men and women displayed an increasing trend over the years, and a high incidence of thyroid cancer was seen particularly in women belonging to the age group of 35 years to 50 years. Conclusion: The incidence of

  7. Clinico epidemiological study of pitted keratolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Chandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pitted keratolysis is a common dermatological condition. However, very few studies are available on the clinical characteristics and epidemiological features of this disorder from India and abroad. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients from rural area of Kolar at Sri R.L.J.H. and S.N.R. Hospital, presenting with clinically distinctive lesions of pitted keratolysis were included in the study. Cases were interviewed with particular emphasis on triggering factors and findings were recorded. Investigations like Gram′s stain, culture studies, Wood′s ultraviolet light examination, histopathology etc, was done in selected cases to ascertain the clinical diagnosis. Results: Age of the patients varied from 20 to 40 years in 52% with male preponderance in 82% of cases. Duration of the disease varied from 15 days to five years, most of the patients were bare-footed farmers (62% of cases. Hyperhidrosis and pruritus were most frequently observed symptoms in 70% and 60% of patients. Most of the patients presented with the characteristic pits which varied from 1 to 50 in number in 56 % of cases, located predominantly on the pressure bearing areas in 92% of cases and depth of the pits varied from 1 to 2 mm in 60% of cases. Associated skin conditions recorded in present study were fissuring of soles in 38%, psoriasis 10%, dermatophyte infections in 6%, planter warts 6% and Corynebacterial triad and corn in 2% of patients each. Discussion: Affection of bare-footed individuals, male preponderance, presence of hyperhidrosis and occurrence of lesions over pressure bearing areas of soles, observed in the present study were consistent with earlier studies on the subject. However, pruritus as commonest presenting symptom reported by 60% patients in the present study, has not been documented in the previous studies. Conclusion: Pitted keratolysis is fairly common in bare footed male farmers of rural India. The condition is predominantly seen over the

  8. [Epidemiological cancer data online: an overview of information service in Germany and Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K

    2014-01-01

    Finding reliable data about cancer epidemiology on the World Wide Web is not an easy task. Information is often scattered, and sources are not always clear. This article gives a short overview of the most important websites that provide reliable data for Germany and Europe. Four internet sites are presented: The German Centre for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD), the Association of Population-Based Cancer Registries in Germany (GEKID), and two different websites created by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In combination, they provide comprehensive information about the distribution of cancer in Germany and Europe. PMID:24357168

  9. Cancer epidemiology and patient recruitment for hadron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient recruitment is an important issue in the feasibility study of a hadron therapy programme such as Med-AUSTRON. Data on cancer incidence in Europe, Austria, and neighbouring countries are reviewed for the most frequent tumors suitable for charged particle therapy. From these data, the numbers of potential patients suitable for MED-AUSTRON derived for each tumor site by applying the coefficients proposed in the EULIMA-1992 feasibility study. Whatever the assumptions made, a sufficient and adequate recruitment for MED-AUSTRON can be expected. However, an appropriate referring system has to be established within Austria and also in the neighbouring countries. (orig.)

  10. HOW TO DESCRIBE THE RESULTS OF OBSERVATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shal'nova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Principles and fundamentals of proper presentation of observational epidemiological study results are focused. Principles of observational study publication developed by expert epidemiologists (STROBE statement are explained in detail.

  11. Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer: Epidemiology and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Rostoker, Ran; Scheinman, Eyal J; LeRoith, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple metabolic disorders that drive cardiovascular disease, T2D and cancer. The doubling in the number of obese adults over the past 3 decades led to the recognition of obesity as a "disease". With over 42 million children obese or overweight, this epidemic is rapidly growing worldwide. Obesity and T2D are both associated together and independently with an increased risk for cancer and a worse prognosis. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies revealed potential factors that may explain the association between obesity-linked metabolic disorders and cancer risk. Studies based on the insulin resistance MKR mice, highlighted the roe of the insulin receptor and its downstream signaling proteins in mediating hyperinsulinemia's mitogenic effects. Hypercholesterolemia was also shown to promote the formation of larger tumors and enhancement in metastasis. Furthermore, the conversion of cholesterol into 27-Hydroxycholesterol was found to link high fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia with cancer pathophysiology. Alteration in circulating adipokines and cytokines are commonly found in obesity and T2D. Adipokines are involved in tumor growth through multiple mechanisms including mTOR, VEGF and cyclins. In addition, adipose tissues are known to recruit and alter macrophage phenotype; these macrophages can promote cancer progression by secreting inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. Better characterization on the above factors and their downstream effects is required in order to translate the current knowledge into the clinic, but more importantly is to understand which are the key factors that drive cancer in each patient. Until we reach this point, policies and activities toward healthy diets and physical activities remain the best medicine.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer: Epidemiology and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Rostoker, Ran; Scheinman, Eyal J; LeRoith, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple metabolic disorders that drive cardiovascular disease, T2D and cancer. The doubling in the number of obese adults over the past 3 decades led to the recognition of obesity as a "disease". With over 42 million children obese or overweight, this epidemic is rapidly growing worldwide. Obesity and T2D are both associated together and independently with an increased risk for cancer and a worse prognosis. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies revealed potential factors that may explain the association between obesity-linked metabolic disorders and cancer risk. Studies based on the insulin resistance MKR mice, highlighted the roe of the insulin receptor and its downstream signaling proteins in mediating hyperinsulinemia's mitogenic effects. Hypercholesterolemia was also shown to promote the formation of larger tumors and enhancement in metastasis. Furthermore, the conversion of cholesterol into 27-Hydroxycholesterol was found to link high fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia with cancer pathophysiology. Alteration in circulating adipokines and cytokines are commonly found in obesity and T2D. Adipokines are involved in tumor growth through multiple mechanisms including mTOR, VEGF and cyclins. In addition, adipose tissues are known to recruit and alter macrophage phenotype; these macrophages can promote cancer progression by secreting inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. Better characterization on the above factors and their downstream effects is required in order to translate the current knowledge into the clinic, but more importantly is to understand which are the key factors that drive cancer in each patient. Until we reach this point, policies and activities toward healthy diets and physical activities remain the best medicine. PMID:25903410

  13. A Genetic Epidemiological Study of Behavioral Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Amin (Najaf)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHuman behavioural genetics aims to unravel the genetic and environmental contributions to variations in human behaviour. Behaviour is a complex trait, involving multiple genes that are affected by a variety of other factors. Genetic epidemiological research of behaviour goes back to Sir

  14. Reliability of a Sleep Quality Questionnaire for Use in Epidemiologic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Girschik, Jennifer; Heyworth, Jane; Fritschi, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background The longer-term health impacts of poor sleep quality are of increasing interest, as evidence suggests that there are rising levels of sleep disturbance in the community. Studies have reported links between sleep quality and increased morbidity and mortality. However, the results of these studies are constrained by limitations in the measurement of sleep quality in epidemiologic studies. The Breast Cancer Environment and Employment Study (BCEES) has developed a sleep questionnaire t...

  15. Mouthrinses containing alcohol and oral cancer: revision of epidemiological studies Colutorios que contienen alcohol y cáncer bucal: revisión de estudios epidemiológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Adriana López de Blanc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong association between alcohol usage and the development of oral cancer (OC has been reported in numerous papers. As some mouthrinses contain significant amounts of ethanol, a possible relationship to this pathology has been considered. The purpose of the present paper is to analyze several epidemiological studies which evaluated the association between commercial mouthrinses and the etiology of OC. Although some authors report an association, most of the studies are unclear and sometimes contradictory. The controversial aspects regarding the role of alcohol in OC may also make difficult to find a clear relationship between the use of mouthrinses containing alcohol and OC.Existen numerosas publicaciones que informan una fuerte asociación entre el consumo de alcohol y el desarrollo del cáncer oral (CO. Debido a que algunos colutorios contienen cantidades significativas de etanol se ha considerado una posible relación entre su uso y esta patología. El propósito del presente trabajo es analizar algunos estudios epidemiológicos en los cuales se evaluó la posibilidad de que los colutorios comerciales puedan estar involucrados en la etiología del CO. Aunque algunos autores informan asociación, la mayoría de los estudios son poco claros y algunas veces contradictorios. Los aspectos controversiales respecto al papel del alcohol en el CO, dificultan el hallazgo de una relación directa entre el uso de los colutorios que contienen alcohol y el CO.

  16. Systems Biology Approaches to Epidemiological Studies of Complex Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongzhe

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology approaches to epidemiological studies of complex diseases include collection of genetic, genomic, epigenomic and metagenomic data in large-scale epidemiological studies of complex phenotypes. Designs and analyses of such studies raise many statistical challenges. This paper reviews some issues related to integrative analysis of such high dimensional and inter-related data sets and outline some possible solutions. I focus my review on integrative approaches for genome-wide gene...

  17. Global epidemiology, risk factors and prevention of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Newell Johnson

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Globacan [2002] database from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, shows 400,318 cases of oral and pharyngeal [excluding nasopharynx] cancer in the world annually, and 221,917 deaths.

  18. Recommendations for Cancer Epidemiologic Research in Understudied Populations and Implications for Future Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Damali N; Lam, Tram Kim; Brignole, Katy; Ashing, Kimlin T; Blot, William J; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Chen, Jarvis T; Dignan, Mark; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matthews, Alicia; Palmer, Julie R; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J; Schootman, Mario; Vilchis, Hugo; Vu, Alexander; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2016-04-01

    Medically underserved populations in the United States continue to experience higher cancer burdens of incidence, mortality, and other cancer-related outcomes. It is imperative to understand how health inequities experienced by diverse population groups may contribute to our increasing unequal cancer burdens and disparate outcomes. The National Cancer Institute convened a diverse group of scientists to discuss research challenges and opportunities for cancer epidemiology in medically underserved and understudied populations. This report summarizes salient issues and discusses five recommendations from the group, including the next steps required to better examine and address cancer burden in the United States among our rapidly increasing diverse and understudied populations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 573-80. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CEBP FOCUS SECTION, "MULTILEVEL APPROACHES TO ADDRESSING CANCER HEALTH DISPARITIES". PMID:27196089

  19. Gastric cancer in Scotland: changing epidemiology, unchanging workload.

    OpenAIRE

    Sedgwick, D M; Akoh, J A; Macintyre, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the changes in incidence of and mortality from gastric cancer in Scotland between 1978 and 1987 and in the operative workload in Lothian between 1979 and 1988. DESIGN--Analysis of national incidence statistics for gastric cancer derived from the Scottish national cancer registry, deaths from gastric cancer recorded by the registrar general for Scotland, and Lothian surgical audit data. SETTING--Scotland and Lothian Health Board area. PATIENTS--Patients in Scotland with...

  20. Epidemiologic evidence of cancer risk in textile industry workers: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Fedeli, Ugo; Fadda, Emanuela; Milan, Giovanni; Lange, John H

    2002-05-01

    A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies for textile industry workers was undertaken in an attempt to evaluate whether the cancer risk varies within the textile industry in relation to the job held or the textile fiber used. We combined studies published up until 1990, when an ad hoc IARC Monograph was issued, and those published after 1990 with the aim of appreciating evidence of reversing trends in cancer risk. Observed and expected cases reported in the original studies were summed up and the totals were divided to obtain a pooled relative risk (PRR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) estimated with a fixed-effect model. We calculated a chi-square test (chi2) of heterogeneity among studies. When PRR and chi2 were both significant, PRR and CI were calculated with a random-effect model and the source of heterogeneity was investigated. Lung cancer risk was around 0.4 in the first study on cotton workers published in 1936, around 0.7 in subsequent studies, mostly published in the 1970s and 1980s, and around 1.0 in the last studies published in the 1990s. Papers published in the 1970s and 1980s produced consistent risk estimates for lung cancer risk, which was significantly lower than 1.0 in workers exposed to cotton (PRR = 0.77; CI = 0.69-0.86) and wool dust (0.71; 0.50-0.92), as well as in carders and fiber preparers (0.73; 0.54-0.91), weavers (0.71; 0.56-0.85), and spinners and weavers (0.78; 0.66-0.91). Lung cancer PRRs did not significantly deviate from 1.0 in textile workers using synthetic fibers or silk, and in dyers. Increased PRRs were found for sinonasal cancer in workers exposed to cotton dust, and in workers involved in spinning or weaving (4.14; 1.80-6.49). PRR was 1.46 (1.10-1.82) for cancer of the digestive system in textile workers using synthetic fibers or silk, and 1.34 (1.10-1.59) for colorectal cancer in spinners and weavers. The increased bladder cancer PRR in dyers (1.39; 1.07-1.71) is generally attributed to textile dye exposure. In studies

  1. Body fatness as a cause of cancer: epidemiologic clues to biologic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Tim; Sedjo, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Carrying excess body fat is a leading cause of cancer. Epidemiologic evidence gives strong clues about the mechanisms that link excess adiposity to risk for several cancer sites. For postmenopausal breast cancer and endometrial cancer, the hyper-estrogenic state that is induced by excess body fatness is the likely cause. For esophageal cancer and gallbladder cancer, chronic local inflammation induced by acid reflux and gallstones is the likely cause, and for liver cancer, local inflammation induced by hepatic fatty infiltration is the likely cause. However, for several other cancers known to be associated with excess adiposity, including cancers of the colon, pancreas, ovary, kidney, and prostate, specific causes are not known. Possible candidates include elevated systemic or local tissue inflammation induced by adiposity and effects of the elevated levels of leptin, insulin, IGFs, and depressed immune function that are seen with excess adiposity. There is growing evidence that intentional weight loss not only reduces circulating levels of cancer-associated factors but that it also reduces cancer incidence and recurrence. Better research is needed to understand the mechanisms that link excess body fat to cancer risk as well as to understand the amount of weight loss needed for substantial cancer risk reduction. Finally, as we develop better understanding of the mediators of the effects of excess body fatness on cancer risk, we should identify pharmacologic interventions that target those mediators so that they can be used to complement weight loss in order to reduce cancer risk. PMID:25870250

  2. A CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF MENINGEAL TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The meninges surround and protect the central nervous system. They are composed of connective tissue proper and comprise three membranes the dura mater, the arachnoid and the pia mater. These membranes are composed of collagen fibres, a small number of elastic fires and endothelial cells. The incidence of intracranial tumors depends on the sources and methods used to collect the data. The general consensus is that the annual incidence rate of primary intracranial neoplasm is between 10 and 12 per 100,000 and these constitute approximately 9% of all primary cancers. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim is to study the most common signs that the patient presents in the clinic and to study the epidemiology of the disease. The material used in this study was obtained from 100 cases of intracranial tumours in various colleges of South of India, which I have worked. The sample was obtained over a period of 5 years from May 2007 to May 2012. The most common symptoms that were found in the present study was consistent headache and projectile vomiting. There were 9 grade 1 meningiomas, out of which 5 were meningothelial, microscopically composed of meningothelial cells with ovoid large pale nuclei with vacuoles of cytoplasmic invagination and inconspicuous cytoplasmic borders, the cells are arranged concentrically around calcified blood vessels or connective tissue.

  3. Solitary pulmonary nodule and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Part 1: epidemiology, morphological evaluation and cancer probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosmann, Marcos Pretto; Borba, Marcelle Alves; Macedo, Francisco Pires Negromonte; Liguori, Adriano de Araujo Lima; Villarim Neto, Arthur, E-mail: mosmann@gmail.com [Liga Norte Riograndense Contra o Cancer, Natal, RN (Brazil); Lima, Kenio Costa de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Saude Coletiva

    2016-01-15

    Solitary pulmonary nodule corresponds to a common radiographic finding, which is frequently detected incidentally. The investigation of this entity remains complex, since characteristics of benign and malignant processes overlap in the differential diagnosis. Currently, many strategies are available to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodules with the main objective of characterizing benign lesions as best as possible, while avoiding to expose patients to the risks inherent to invasive methods, besides correctly detecting cases of lung cancer so as the potential curative treatment is not delayed. This first part of the study focuses on the epidemiology, the morphological evaluation and the methods to determine the likelihood of cancer in cases of indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodule. (author)

  4. Solitary pulmonary nodule and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Part 1: epidemiology, morphological evaluation and cancer probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solitary pulmonary nodule corresponds to a common radiographic finding, which is frequently detected incidentally. The investigation of this entity remains complex, since characteristics of benign and malignant processes overlap in the differential diagnosis. Currently, many strategies are available to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodules with the main objective of characterizing benign lesions as best as possible, while avoiding to expose patients to the risks inherent to invasive methods, besides correctly detecting cases of lung cancer so as the potential curative treatment is not delayed. This first part of the study focuses on the epidemiology, the morphological evaluation and the methods to determine the likelihood of cancer in cases of indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodule. (author)

  5. Epidemiological studies. From experience in Hiroshima and Nagasaki to Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of epidemiological studies by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) on A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki over 60 years are described as they are conceivably useful for present health risk assessment, future measures and health problems in Fukushima. The studies conducted in the two Cities on total of about 120,000 people of survivors and unexposed control group have given following findings. Incidence of leukemia is increased several years after A-bomb exposure, and of diseases like thyroidal ones, cataract and solid cancers, at 10-20 years later. Individual dose assessment of these morbid people is established (DS02, Dosimetry published in 2003), which reveals the quantitative relationship between dose and incidence. This relationship is used as a reference to make up an international standard for protection of radiation hazard. Mean of excess relative risk (ERR) on linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis of solid cancers is around 0.4/Gy at age of 70 y for people exposed at age 30 y although there is a significant age and sex difference in ERR. As well as survivors, studies are performed on exposed fetuses and second generations from the exposed people, which show the increased incidence of newborn microcephaly from mothers exposed with high dose but overall health abnormality is not seen in offspring from exposed parents. Radiation exposure is mainly instantaneous in the two Cities and is mostly derived from neutron and gamma-ray, which are somehow different from that in Fukushima due to Nuclear Power Plant Accident. The latter involves long term external and internal exposures with alpha-, beta- and gamma-ray hereafter. The difference should be well recognized for risk assessment in Fukushima; exempli gratia (e.g.), at the same dose, instantaneous exposure is mentioned more risky than long term one. (T.T.)

  6. Recent incidence and descriptive epidemiological survey of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Saggu, Shalini; Rehman, Hasibur; Abbas, Zahid K.; Abid A. Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To review and analyze the pattern of breast cancer (BC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological review of BC of all diagnosed Saudi female cases from January 1990 to December 2014 was conducted at the Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA. This report contains information obtained from the Saudi Cancer Registry and from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Results: The number o...

  7. Epidemiology of gastric cancer and perspectives for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUÑOZ NUBIA

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent estimates of the world-wide incidence of cancer indicate that gastric cancer was in 1990 the second most frequent cancer in the world (after lung cancer, with about 900 000 new cases diagnosed every year. Steady declines in the rates have been observed everywhere in the last few decades, but the absolute number of new cases per year is increasing mainly because of ageing of the population. The exact causes of the decline of gastric cancer are not well understood, but must include improvements in diet, food storage (e.g., refrigeration and, possibly, the decline of Helicobacter pylori infection. Dietary modifications and, possibly, vitamin supplements remain one of the most important tool for the prevention of gastric cancer. Control of H. pylori infection, by means of eradication or immunization, is also likely to offer great potential for the prevention of this important malignancy.

  8. Bat Rabies in France: A 24-Year Retrospective Epidemiological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyne Picard-Meyer; Emmanuelle Robardet; Laurent Arthur; Gérald Larcher; Christine Harbusch; Alexandre Servat; Florence Cliquet

    2014-01-01

    Since bat rabies surveillance was first implemented in France in 1989, 48 autochthonous rabies cases without human contamination have been reported using routine diagnosis methods. In this retrospective study, data on bats submitted for rabies testing were analysed in order to better understand the epidemiology of EBLV-1 in bats in France and to investigate some epidemiological trends. Of the 3176 bats submitted for rabies diagnosis from 1989 to 2013, 1.96% (48/2447 analysed) were diagnosed p...

  9. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Alghamdi IG; Hussain II; Alghamdi MS; El-Sheemy MA

    2014-01-01

    Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK Background: The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized inc...

  10. The incidence rate of female breast cancer in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Alghamdi IG; Hussain II; Alghamdi MS; El-Sheemy MA

    2013-01-01

    Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, United Kingdom; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Lincoln Hospital, Research and Development, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, United Kingdom Background: This study presents descriptive epidemiological data related to breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 a...

  11. The high prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer at autopsy: implications for epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer in the Prostate-specific Antigen-era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J

    2015-12-15

    Widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening detects many cancers that would have otherwise gone undiagnosed. To estimate the prevalence of unsuspected prostate cancer, we reviewed 19 studies of prostate cancer discovered at autopsy among 6,024 men. Among men aged 70-79, tumor was found in 36% of Caucasians and 51% of African-Americans. This enormous prevalence, coupled with the high sensitivity of PSA screening, has led to the marked increase in the apparent incidence of prostate cancer. The impact of PSA screening on clinical practice is well-recognized, but its effect on epidemiologic research is less appreciated. Before screening, a larger proportion of incident prostate cancers had lethal potential and were diagnosed at advanced stage. However, in the PSA era, overall incident prostate cancer mainly is indolent disease, and often reflects the propensity to be screened and biopsied. Studies must therefore focus on cancers with lethal potential, and include long follow-up to accommodate the lead time induced by screening. Moreover, risk factor patterns differ markedly for potentially lethal and indolent disease, suggesting separate etiologies and distinct disease entities. Studies of total incident or indolent prostate cancer are of limited clinical utility, and the main focus of research should be on prostate cancers of lethal potential.

  12. BRAIN ASTROCYTOMAS : A STUDY OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FINDINGS, TREATMENT RESULTS AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN TEHRAN CANCER INSTITUTE'S RADIOTHERAPY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Amouzegar - Hashemi

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available - Astrocytomas, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, arc the most common brain tumors. Post-operative radiotherapy plays an important rote in their treatment. Records of all patients with a pathologic diagnosis of astrocytoma referred for radiotherapy from 1987-1992 were reviewed and prognostic factors with regard to recurrences were analyzed."nDuring the study period, 162 astrocytoma patients were treated by radiation in our department. Malc-to~fcmalc ratio was 1.4:1. Tlic disease was most prevalent in the 3rd ami 4th decades of life. Most tumors were in cerebral hemispheres and grade IV. In nearly all patients only CT scan had been used for diagnosis, and total resection had been performed."nRadiation dose was mostly 5,000-5,500 cGy by standard fractionation. Follotv-up was available for 91 patients, and in these patients CCNU (tomustine chemotherapy was prescribed for high-grade tumors. Tltrec-year local control was 77% . Grade, extent of surgery, and use of CCNU were statistically significant as prognostic factors. Also 4 GBM long-term survivors were found. Treatment of brain astrocytomas by radiation in our department was concluded to he reasonably successful.

  13. Taxpas: Epidemiological and Survival Data in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with a Docetaxel-Based Chemotherapy Regimen in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Devan Moodley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cancer among South African women. There is limited South African epidemiological data on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. Taxpas was a nonrandomized observational survey conducted in multiple centres in South Africa from April 2004 to December 2010. 1632 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer, with a median age of 51 years, were enrolled in the survey. Patients were treated on a docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The objective of the study was to assess epidemiological data and survival data. The incidence of TNBC was 14%. The one-year survival rate for the total cohort was 84%. The one-year survival rate for patients with early stage and metastatic breast cancer was recorded as 94% and 65%, respectively. Patients with TNBC stage III (all ages and stage IV (≤50 years had statistically significant worse 1-year survival rate compared to N-TNBC patients of the same age and stages. Conclusion. The incidence of TNBC in South Africa which is 14% is comparable to global incidence. The 1-year survival data for certain subgroups supports the literature saying that TNBC carries a worse prognosis compared to N-TNBC. Women ≤50 years diagnosed with late stage TNBC carried the worst prognosis in this survey.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology: Incidence, Mortality, Survival, and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Haggar, Fatima A.; Boushey, Robin P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the incidence, mortality, and survival rates for colorectal cancer are reviewed, with attention paid to regional variations and changes over time. A concise overview of known risk factors associated with colorectal cancer is provided, including familial and hereditary factors, as well as environmental lifestyle-related risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer? A review of the epidemiological, meta-analytic, and experimental evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guy D Eslick

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of Campylobacter-like organisms (Helicobacter pylori) more than two decades ago the possibility of a relationship with gastric cancer has been postulated, tested and supposedly proven. There have been numerous human studies of various designs from many countries around the world. Several meta-analyses have been published and more recently a small number of experimental animal studies were reported looking at the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer. Over the years, the human epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results; the metaanalyses have as one would expect produced similar pooled estimates; while the early experimental animal studies require replication. The exact mechanisms by which H pylori might cause gastric cancer are still under investigation and remain to be elucidated.

  16. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer

  17. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Monfrecola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer.

  18. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella, E-mail: gafabbro@unina.it [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Triassi, Maria [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Mauriello, Maria Chiara [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Torre, Guglielma [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Annunziata, Maria Carmela; Vita, Valerio De; Pastore, Francesco; D’Arco, Vincenza; Monfrecola, Giuseppe [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2010-11-24

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer.

  19. Gynaekologisk epidemiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological research has good possibilities in Denmark due to the fact that all people have a personal PIN code and due to our many National health registers. In gynaecology the National Register of Patients, the Birth Registry, IVF-registry, Cancer Registry and latest the National Prescription...... Database offer unique possibilities of linking exposure data with many clinical outcomes. Danish epidemiology has contributed with morbidity analyses on children concieved by in vitro fertilisation, pharmacoepidemiological studies on short and long term effects of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy...

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF HEAD AND NECK CANCERS AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saquib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common malignancy globally among adults and comprises 5% of all malignancies worldwide. There is scarcity of data regarding the clinico epidemiological profile of head and neck carcinomas in our population. The demographic presentation & exact prevalence of these malignancies in our population is not known. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the clinico - epidemiological profile of head and Neck carcinoma in Kashmiri ethnic population of India. MATERIAL & METHODS : This study was conducted at Cancer center at SMHS Srinagar, J & K, India from 2012 to 2014. The study included total of 106 patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC registered with the department from 2012 to 2014. It was a prospective and retrospective study. Patients having histopathological (HPE confirmation of the disease were enrolled for the study. All the demo graphic & clinical details of the recruited patients were studied thoroughly including history, physical examination, investigations and mode of treatment. RESULTS : Male to female ratio was 2.7:1. The mean age was 55.3 years. Among both males and females, the highest incidence of HNSCC was seen within the age group of 51 - 60 years. The most common primary site of disease was Oral Cavity – 36(33.96%, Larynx - 28 (26.41%, Pharynx in 16(15.09%, Nasopharynx in 10(9.43% , Sinonasal in 10(9.43%, and Tonsil in 6 cases(5.66%. Patients usually presented with advanced stage of disease {( S tage III, IV - (64.15% 68 versus stage I, II - (35.84% 38}. Tobacco consumption in any form was present in 89% of our population. Lack of balanced diet (28% and poor dental hygiene (50% and belonging to low socioeconomic class (57% were also thought to be significant factors for the disease burden. Most of our patients were treated with surgery followed by adjuvant chemo - radiotherapy (37.73%, chemo and radiotherapy (28.31%, radiotherapy alone (16.98% & surgery alone (9.4%. CONCLUSION

  1. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK Background: The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results: A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0, followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0, and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6. The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion: There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah

  2. Cancer incidence study in Mesa County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November of 1982 the Colorado Department of Health completed an epidemiologic investigation of leukemia, multiple myeloma, and cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas and colon in Mesa County, Colorado for the years 1970 to 1979. This investigation was performed in response to a concern that the presence of uranium mill tailings in some Mesa County homes presents a potential cancer hazard. The results of the investigation show that the incidence of multiple myeloma, colon, stomach and pancreatic cancer are not above expected rates. The incidence of leukemia is not above expected rates for the entire study period, 1970 to 1979. The incidence of lung cancer appears elevated when compared to the The Third National Cancer Survey data for Colorado but lower than expected when compared to Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data. To further examine the leukemia and lung cancer incidence findings, a case/control study was conducted. The controls consisted of colon, stomach and pancreatic cancer cases. The results of the leukemia case/control analysis show no association with the radiation exposure variables: occupational radiation exposure; uranium mining exposure; having ever lived in a type A home (uranium tailings home); and radiation therapy. The lung cancer case/control analysis shows a significant association with only the radiation exposure variable, uranium mining history, indicating cases were more likely to have been uranium miners than were controls. As with leukemia, the study found no association between lung cancer and living in a uranium mill tailings home. The relatively low radiation exposures typical of type A homes and the small number of persons exposed make it very difficult to establish, by epidemiologic methods, that a risk exists

  3. Epidemiology of prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Cramb, Susanna M; Dunn, Jeff; Gardiner, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine and compare available data on incidence, mortality and survival for countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Incidence data were obtained from GLOBOCAN 2008, other online data sources and individual cancer registries. Country-specific mortality statistics by individual year were sourced from the World Health Organization Statistical Information System Mortality Database. All incidence and mortality rates were directly age-standardised to the Segi World Standard population and joinpoint models were used to assess trends. Data on survival were obtained from country-specific published reports where available. Approximately 14% (122,000) of all prostate cancers diagnosed worldwide in 2008 were within the Asia-Pacific region (10 per 100,000 population), with three out of every four of these prostate cancer cases diagnosed in either Japan (32%), China (28%) or Australia (15%). There were also about 42,000 deaths due to prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region (3 per 100,000). For the nine countries with incidence trend data available, eight showed recent significant increases in prostate cancer incidence. In contrast, recent decreases in prostate cancer mortality have been reported for Australia, Japan and New Zealand, but mortality has increased in several other countries. The lack of population-based data across most of the countries in this region limits the ability of researchers to understand and report on the patterns and distribution of this important cancer. Governments and health planners typically require quantitative evidence as a motivation for change. Unless there is a widespread commitment to improve the collection and reporting of data on prostate cancer it is likely that the burden of prostate cancer will continue to increase. Enhancing knowledge transfer between countries where there are differentials in capacity, policy and experience may provide the necessary impetus and opportunity to overcome at least some of

  4. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed CDC’s Cervical Cancer Study Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... year. As part of CDC’s Cervical Cancer (Cx3) Study, we surveyed a sample of both health care ...

  5. Global epidemiology of hysterectomy: possible impact on gynecological cancer rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Kahlert, Johnny Abildgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that hysterectomy is the most common surgical procedure worldwide in gynecology, national reporting of the incidence rate of gynecological cancers rarely removes the proportion no longer at risk of the disease from the population-at-risk-denominator (ie. women who have had...... of gynecological cancer incidence rates, performed via removing the proportion of hysterectomized or oophorectomized women from the population-at-risk-denominator, the impact of prevention strategies may be masked or misinterpreted. Furthermore, since national cervical cancer screening guidelines are at least...

  6. Clinical Epidemiology Unit - overview of research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical Epidemiology Unit (CEU) conducts etiologic research with potential clinical and public health applications, and leads studies evaluating population-based early detection and cancer prevention strategies

  7. High-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: Definition and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Porten, SP; Cooperberg, MR

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer represents a large majority of patients diagnosed with this disease. Precise definition and risk stratification are paramount in this group as high-risk patients have higher rates of progression and mortality and may benefit from early identification and aggressive treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: The mainstay definitions of high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer are based on grade and stage. Recently, efforts have been made to incorporate ...

  8. Epidemiology of mouth cancer in 1989: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, P; Macfarlane, G J; Maisonneuve, P; Zheng, T; Scully, C.; Tedesco, B

    1990-01-01

    The oral cavity and pharynx combined is the sixth commonest site of cancer in both sexes. In many countries the mortality rate is increasing among younger men born since approximately 1910-1920. A causal role in the aetiology of mouth cancer has been established for tobacco use, both smoking and chewing, separately and in conjunction with betel-quid chewing; with alcohol consumption and, less certainly, with other factors such as poor oral hygiene, nutritional factors and certain occupational...

  9. Phytoestrogens: epidemiology and a possible role in cancer protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Adlercreutz, H.

    1995-01-01

    Because many diseases of the Western Hemisphere are hormone-dependent cancers, we have postulated that the Western diet, compared to a vegetarian or semivegetarian diet, may alter hormone production, metabolism, or action at the cellular level by some biochemical mechanisms. Recently, our interest has been mainly focused on the cancer-protective role of some hormonelike diphenolic phytoestrogens of dietary origin, the lignans and the isoflavonoids. The precursors of the biologically active co...

  10. Cervical cancer risk factors in Liangshan with epidemiological studies%凉山州妇女宫颈癌危险因素的流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅琪; 龚勋; 马燕; 罗连英; 廖国芳

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨凉山州妇女宫颈癌的危险因素.方法:采用回顾性流行病学问卷调查的形式,对80例住院患者进行临床流行病学调查,调查内容包括一般资料、既往病史、性行为和生育史、避孕史及吸烟史、生活习惯等,并以年龄、民族、居住地等为匹配条件选择对照组.结果:居住地、受教育程度、经济收入、孕次、食用腌制食品、被动吸烟、性生活后阴道冲洗等变量进入回归模型.结论:社会经济地位、多孕次、性生活卫生等因素与罹患宫颈癌有关.%Objective : To explore the cervical cancer risk factors in Liangshan , China. Methods : A retrospective epidemiological survey for 80 hospitalized paients was performed . Epidemiological survey included general information,past medical history, sexual and reproductive history, contraceptive history and smoking history, habits and so on. Results:The place of residence, education level, income, pregnancies, eating pickled foods, passive smoking, vaginal douching after sex and other variables were risk factor. Conclusion: The socio - economic status, number of pregnancies, sexual health and other factors are risk factors of cervical cancer.

  11. Cancer epidemiology from Guayaquil city, years 1990-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All sites cancer is in increase in Guayaquil, Ecuador, while the expectations of life when being born they go improving and being infectious contagious illnesses controlled continue adult it will be the increase the cancer like illness causing morbidity and death, in the year 2000 according to official publications the National Institute Statistical and Censuses (INEC) there were 56.420 deaths for different causes, 56.7% corresponded to masculine sex and 43.3% to feminine sex. All registered deaths in Ecuador during the year 2000, 10% corresponded to cancer in men and 14% was in women. According world statistical information it is calculated that in next twenty years, on the world population eight thousand millions inhabitants, annually twenty millions will appear new cancer cases, which twelve millions for this cause will die. For our cancer registry, of Guayaquil city, taking figures published in the periods 1990-2000, the numbers give annual incident cases they have had an increment in men 21% and in women 15%. The reason man/woman has stayed stable 0.6/1, that is to say the woman has more probability to suffer some type cancer that the man and this is due to the great impact gynecological carcinoma. (The author)

  12. Epidemiology of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    To design the services for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer, we need to understand the patterns of disease and the other clinical and managerial challenges of the patient group. Cancer occurring between the ages of 15 and 39 years is 4 times less rare than cancer occurring during the first 15 years of life and consists of 2% of all invasive cancer in Europe, about 66,000 patients in Europe each year. AYAs have a unique distribution of cancer types, including the peak in incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or germ cell tumors. The relative improvement in the survival rate in AYAs has not kept pace with that achieved in younger children, especially for acute leukemia, non-HLs, Ewing tumors and rhabdomyosarcoma. Etiological factors are under-researched and remain largely hypothetical. In this unique group of illnesses, improving AYA cancer management involves bridging interfaces. Since this has begun, outcomes have also begun to improve. The local nature of these interfaces determines the age group considered as AYA. Specific skills are necessary in the clinical, biological and psychosocial domains. Services need support from policy, clinical and administrative professionals. National policy and supranational groups such as SIOPE and ESMO are in constructive collaboration to develop this further. PMID:27595352

  13. Epidemiological Study of Greek University Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounenou, Kalliope; Koutra, Aikaterini; Katsiadrami, Aristea; Diacogiannis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, 805 Greek students participated by filling in self-report questionnaires studying depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), general health status (General Health Questionnaire), general psychopathology (Symptom Checklist-90-R), and personal demographic features. Some of the more prevalent findings…

  14. Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle M; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-01-01

    More than 250,000 new cases of primary malignant brain tumors are diagnosed annually worldwide, 77% of which are gliomas. A small proportion of gliomas are caused by the inheritance of rare high-penetrance genetic variants or high-dose radiation. Since 2009, inherited genetic variants in 10 regions near eight different genes have been consistently associated with glioma risk via genome-wide association studies. Most of these variants increase glioma risk by 20-40%, but two have higher relative risks. One on chromosome 8 increases risk of IDH-mutated gliomas sixfold and another that affects TP53 function confers a 2.5-fold increased risk of glioma. Functions of some of the other risk variants are known or suspected, but future research will determine functions of other risk loci. Recent progress also has been made in defining subgroups of glioma based on acquired alterations within tumors. Allergy history has been consistently associated with reduced glioma risk, though the mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Future studies will need to be large enough so that environmental and constitutive genetic risk factors can be examined within molecularly defined, etiologically homogeneous subgroups.

  15. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. PMID:24704294

  16. Ionizing radiation biomarkers for potential use in epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is a known human carcinogen that can induce a variety of biological effects depending on the physical nature, duration, doses and dose-rates of exposure. However, the magnitude of health risks at low doses and dose-rates (below 100 mSv and/or 0.1 mSv min-1) remains controversial due to a lack of direct human evidence. It is anticipated that significant insights will emerge from the integration of epidemiological and biological research, made possible by molecular epidemiology studies incorporating biomarkers and bioassays. A number of these have been used to investigate exposure, effects and susceptibility to ionizing radiation, albeit often at higher doses and dose rates, with each reflecting time-limited cellular or physiological alterations. This review summarises the multidisciplinary work undertaken in the framework of the European project DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) to identify the most appropriate biomarkers for use in population studies. In addition to logistical and ethical considerations for conducting large-scale epidemiological studies, we discuss the relevance of their use for assessing the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure at the cellular and physiological level. We also propose a temporal classification of biomarkers that may be relevant for molecular epidemiology studies which need to take into account the time elapsed since exposure. Finally, the integration of biology with epidemiology requires careful planning and enhanced discussions between the epidemiology, biology and dosimetry communities in order to determine the most important questions to be addressed in light of pragmatic considerations including the appropriate population to be investigated (occupationally, environmentally or medically exposed), and study design. The consideration of the logistics of biological sample collection, processing and storing and the choice of biomarker or bioassay, as well as awareness of

  17. Update on epidemiology classification, and management of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitham Gheriani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer represents approximately 0.5–1% of all human malignancy1. In the UK the incidence of thyroid cancer is 2-3 per 100,000 populations 2. In geographical areas of low iodine intake and in areas exposed to nuclear disasters the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher. Benign thyroid conditions are much more common. In the UK approximately 8 % of the population have nodular thyroid disease2. Nodular thyroid disease increases with age and is also more common in females and in geographical areas of low iodine intake. Primary thyroid malignancy can be broadly divided into 2 groups. The first group, which generally have much better prognosis, are the well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which includes papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma and Hürthle cell tumours. The second group includes the poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma like medullary thyroid carcinoma and the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Other rare tumours such as sarcomas, lymphomas and the extremely rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid should be included in the second group. Secondary or metastatic thyroid cancer can be from breast, lung, colon and kidney malignancies.

  18. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  19. Bladder cancer: epidemiology, staging and grading, and diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkali, Z.; Chan, T.; Manoharan, M.; Algaba, F.; Busch, C.; Cheng, L.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kriegmair, M.; Montironi, R.; Murphy, W.M.; Sesterhenn, I.A.; Tachibana, M.; Weider, J.

    2005-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variable natural history. At one end of the spectrum, low-grade Ta tumors have a low progression rate and require initial endoscopic treatment and surveillance but rarely present a threat to the patient. At the other extreme, high-grade tumors have a

  20. Stability and Reproducibility of the Measurement of Plasma Nitrate in Large Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yushan; Townsend, Mary K; Eliassen, A Heather; Wu, Tianying

    2013-04-01

    Inorganic nitrate has emerged as a therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease; however, nitrate can also metabolize to carcinogenic nitrosamines under pathologic conditions. Few large epidemiologic studies have examined circulating levels of nitrate in relation to cardiovascular disease and cancer. Data on the validity of nitrate measurement in blood samples collected in typical epidemiologic settings are needed before nitrate can be evaluated as an exposure in large epidemiologic studies. We measured plasma levels of nitrate in three pilot studies to evaluate its laboratory variability, stability with delayed processing, and reproducibility over time among women from the Nurses' Health Study and healthy female volunteers. Laboratory variability of nitrate levels was fairly low, with a coefficient variation (CV) of 7%. Plasma nitrate levels in samples stored as whole blood on ice for up to 48 hrs before processing were very stable; the overall intra-class correlation (ICC) from 0 to 48 hours was 0.89 (95%CI, 0.70-0.97). The within-person reproducibility over a one-year period was modest, with an ICC of 0.49 (95% CI, 0.33- 0.94). Our results indicate that measurement of nitrate in plasma is reliable and stable in blood samples with delayed processing up to 48 hours. Within-person reproducibility was modest but data from this study can be used for measurement error correction in subsequent analyses. The measurement of nitrate cannot be widely used in epidemiologic research without the documentation of its stability and reproducibility. PMID:24244804

  1. Epidemiological, clinical, pathological, and therapeutic aspects of gastric cancer in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Elmajjaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Gastric cancer is a relatively frequent cancer and has poor prognosis. The present study is the first Moroccan study to investigate the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, therapeutic characteristics, and outcomes of gastric cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study including 154 cases of gastric cancer treated at the National Institute of Oncology between January 2007 and December 2007. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 55 years (18-87 years and the sex ratio was 2.14. Risk factors were dominated by tobacco use (30.5% and gastric ulcer (4.5%. The average interval between symptom presentation and consultation was 8.7 months (1-48 months. The clinical symptoms were dominated by epigastric pain (88.7%, vomiting (62.3%, and weight loss (80.5%. Oeso-gastric fibroscopy was performed in all patients and showed an ulcerated aspect in 77.9% of the cases. The location of the tumor was antropyloric in 42.2% of the cases. The most common histology was adenocarcinoma (72.8%, followed by non-Hodgkin lymphoma (22%, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST; 3.2%, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET; 2%. Tumor stage was metastatic in 62% of the cases, locally advanced in 18.5% of the cases, and localized in only 8% of the cases; however, 11.5% of patients were not staged. Also, 46% of the patients with adenocarcinoma (n = 111 were not treated, 6.4% received chemotherapy first (non-resectable (one patient was operated, 20.6% received surgery first followed by adjuvant treatment, 4.5% received chemo-radiotherapy, 5.4% received chemotherapy only, and 27% received palliative chemotherapy. In the sub-group of patients diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 35, 48.5% received chemotherapy based on Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisone (CHOP regimen. In the sub-group diagnosed with GIST (n = 5 histology, all cases received surgery first and 2 cases received adjuvant chemotherapy based on doxorubicin. Finally

  2. A Comparison of Criteria to Identify Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cases from Medical Records and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Data base, 2007–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Hirko, Kelly A.; Soliman, Amr S; Banerjee, Mousumi; Ruterbusch, Julie; Harford, Joe B; Merajver, Sofia D; Schwartz, Kendra

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a relatively rare and extremely aggressive form of breast cancer that is diagnosed clinically. Standardization of clinical diagnoses is challenging, both nationally and internationally; moreover, IBC coding definitions used by registries have changed over time. This study aimed to compare diagnostic factors of IBC reported in a U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry to clinical criteria found in the medical records of all invasive ...

  3. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link.

  4. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link. PMID:26373570

  5. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Deodutta Roy; Marisa Morgan; Changwon Yoo; Alok Deoraj; Sandhya Roy; Vijay Kumar Yadav; Mohannad Garoub; Hamza Assaggaf; Mayur Doke

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PC...

  6. Sample size calculation for meta-epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, Bruno; Higgins, Julian P T; Tavernier, Elsa; Trinquart, Ludovic

    2016-01-30

    Meta-epidemiological studies are used to compare treatment effect estimates between randomized clinical trials with and without a characteristic of interest. To our knowledge, there is presently nothing to help researchers to a priori specify the required number of meta-analyses to be included in a meta-epidemiological study. We derived a theoretical power function and sample size formula in the framework of a hierarchical model that allows for variation in the impact of the characteristic between trials within a meta-analysis and between meta-analyses. A simulation study revealed that the theoretical function overestimated power (because of the assumption of equal weights for each trial within and between meta-analyses). We also propose a simulation approach that allows for relaxing the constraints used in the theoretical approach and is more accurate. We illustrate that the two variables that mostly influence power are the number of trials per meta-analysis and the proportion of trials with the characteristic of interest. We derived a closed-form power function and sample size formula for estimating the impact of trial characteristics in meta-epidemiological studies. Our analytical results can be used as a 'rule of thumb' for sample size calculation for a meta-epidemiologic study. A more accurate sample size can be derived with a simulation study.

  7. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurieshi, Mariya A; Khan, S M Salim; Masoodi, Muneer A; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Haq, Inaamul; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%), followed by colorectal cancer (16.4%) and lung cancer (13.2%) among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%), breast cancer (16.1%), and stomach cancer (10.4%) were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region.

  8. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya A. Qurieshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%, followed by colorectal cancer (16.4% and lung cancer (13.2% among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%, breast cancer (16.1%, and stomach cancer (10.4% were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region.

  9. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data

    OpenAIRE

    Qurieshi, Mariya A.; Khan, S. M. Salim; Muneer A. Masoodi; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Haq, Inaamul; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending ...

  10. International epidemiological studies on HIV, HCV and STI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van der Helm

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises international epidemiological studies on HIV, Hepatitis C (HCV) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) and the evaluation of STI diagnostic tests with the ultimate goal to decrease spread and disease burden of these infections. The main conclusions are: 1. Without the use of

  11. Epidemiological studies on the relation between diet and COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, C.

    2000-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. In the early 1990's several dietary factors were suggested to protect against COPD, based on proposed biological mechanisms and a small number of epidemiological studies. Antioxidants (e.g

  12. Arsenic in drinking water and urinary tract cancers: a systematic review of 30 years of epidemiological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic in drinking water is a public health issue affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This review summarizes 30 years of epidemiological studies on arsenic exposure in drinking water and the risk of bladder or kidney cancer, quantifying these risks using a meta-analytical framework. Methods Forty studies met the selection criteria. Seventeen provided point estimates of arsenic concentrations in drinking water and were used in a meta-analysis of bladder cancer incidence (7 studies) and mortality (10 studies) and kidney cancer mortality (2 studies). Risk estimates for incidence and mortality were analyzed separately using Generalized Linear Models. Predicted risks for bladder cancer incidence were estimated at 10, 50 and 150 μg/L arsenic in drinking water. Bootstrap randomizations were used to assess robustness of effect size. Results Twenty-eight studies observed an association between arsenic in drinking water and bladder cancer. Ten studies showed an association with kidney cancer, although of lower magnitude than that for bladder cancer. The meta-analyses showed the predicted risks for bladder cancer incidence were 2.7 [1.2–4.1]; 4.2 [2.1–6.3] and; 5.8 [2.9–8.7] for drinking water arsenic levels of 10, 50, and 150 μg/L, respectively. Bootstrapped randomizations confirmed this increased risk, but, lowering the effect size to 1.4 [0.35–4.0], 2.3 [0.59–6.4], and 3.1 [0.80–8.9]. The latter suggests that with exposures to 50 μg/L, there was an 83% probability for elevated incidence of bladder cancer; and a 74% probability for elevated mortality. For both bladder and kidney cancers, mortality rates at 150 ug/L were about 30% greater than those at 10 μg/L. Conclusion Arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk of bladder and kidney cancers, although at lower levels (<150 μg/L), there is uncertainty due to the increased likelihood of exposure misclassification at the lower end of the exposure curve. Meta

  13. The carcinogenic effect of aromatic amines: an epidemiological study on the role of o-toluidine and 4,4'-methylene bis (2-methylaniline) in inducing bladder cancer in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubino, G.F.; Scansetti, G.; Piolatto, G.; Pira, E.

    1982-04-01

    Cause-specific mortality of 906 workers first employed 1922-1970 in a dyestuff factory in Northern Italy was compared to national figures: a marked excess of bladder cancer was observed (36 observed vs 1.23 expected deaths). The mean latent period was 25 years. The excess was higher among those with longer duration of exposure. Some excess of mortality from lung cancer, laryngeal cancer, and esophageal cancer was also found, but a clear explanation could not be provided regarding the causal role of aromatic amines. Mortality from bladder cancer was very much higher among those exposed in benzidine and naphthylamines manufacture as compared to those only exposed in use or intermittent contact. Excess bladder cancer was also very high among workers in fuchsin manufacture. There is evidence that o-toluidine and 4,4'-methylene bis(2-methylaniline) should be implicated in such excess mortality. Caution in handling these compounds is therefore suggested and the need for further studies to confirm such findings is stressed.

  14. Recommendations for epidemiological studies on COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, P S; Rönmark, E; Eagan, T;

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been extensively studied, especially in Western Europe and North America. Few of these data are directly comparable because of differences between the surveys regarding composition of study populations, diagnostic criteria of the ...

  15. Smile line and occlusion: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Harati

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of such studies, it might be concluded that there is a significant and important relation between some occlusal parameters and smile design, which must be considered.

  16. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON VASECTOMY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGGuang-Hua

    1989-01-01

    In order to ascertain whether vasectomy presented any increased risk of diseases or long-term sequelae, we conducted from 1981 to 82 a large scale cross sectional prevalence study on coronary heart disease, hypertension and other diseases following

  17. Study of breast cancer incidence in patients of lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez, Olivier; Román, Antonio; Johnson, Simon R.; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Hirose, Masaki; Casanova, Álvaro; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Herranz, Carmen; Bueno-Moreno, Gema; Boni, Jacopo; Mateo, Francesca; Petit, Anna; Climent, Fina; Soler, Teresa; Vidal, August

    2016-01-01

    Molecular evidence has linked the pathophysiology of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) to that of metastatic breast cancer. Following on this observation, we assessed the association between LAM and subsequent breast cancer. An epidemiological study was carried out using three LAM country cohorts, from Japan, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The number of incident breast cancer cases observed in these cohorts was compared with the number expected on the basis of the country-specific incidence rate...

  18. Erythema Nodosum Epidemiology: 5-Years Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arife Öz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of septal panniculitis. Although triggering factors of EN are drugs, infections, malignancies, inflammatory diseases however disease is idiopathic in 32-72%. Factors are changing from region to region and from country to country. In this study, our aim was to investigate the etiologic factors and to evaluate the clinic and laboratory findings of EN. Methods: Sixty-six patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as EN in our department between 2005 and 2010 were included to this study. Demographic data and treatment were evaluated. Results: Fifty-two of 66 patients had underlying etiologic factors (Group 1 and 14 of were idiopatic (Group 2. Most common etiologic factor was Behçet’s disease (n=15, and followed by drug (n=13, sarcoidosis (n=10, upper respiratory tract infection (n=6, autoimmune disease (n=4, pregnancy (n=2, tuberculosis (n=2 in decreasing frequencies. In our study malignancy and inflammatory bowel disease are not appointed. Conclusion: Behcet’s disease is a rare cause of EN. In other studies in our country the idiopatic group was in majority. In our study because of finding the common etiologic factor as Behçet’s disease due to being of Behçet’s disease high prevalance (11-42/10000 in our country and existence of Behçet’s disease center in our faculty (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 87-90

  19. Epidemiological studies of exercise in diabetes prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Gang; Lakka, Timo A; Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas;

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing public health problems in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that the number of people with diabetes in the world will double in coming years, from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. Cardiovascular disease accounts...... for more than 70% of total mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes. The associations of physical activity, physical fitness, and changes in the lifestyle with the risk of type 2 diabetes have been assessed by a number of prospective studies and clinical trials in the past decade. Several studies have...... also evaluated the joint associations of physical activity, body mass index, and glucose levels with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies and clinical trials have shown that moderate or high levels of physical activity or physical fitness and changes in the lifestyle (dietary modification...

  20. Coffee and cardiovascular risk; an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.A. Bak (Annette)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis comprises several studies on the effect of coffee and caffeine on cardiovascular risk in general, and the effect on serum lipids, blood pressure and selected hemostatic variables in particular. The association between coffee use and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality was

  1. Erythema Nodosum Epidemiology: 5-Years Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arife Öz; Kenan Aydoğan; Şaduman Balaban Adım; Belçin İzol; Hayriye Sarıcaoğlu; Emel Bülbül Başkan; Şükran Tunalı

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Erythema nodosum (EN) is the most common type of septal panniculitis. Although triggering factors of EN are drugs, infections, malignancies, inflammatory diseases however disease is idiopathic in 32-72%. Factors are changing from region to region and from country to country. In this study, our aim was to investigate the etiologic factors and to evaluate the clinic and laboratory findings of EN. Methods: Sixty-six patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as EN in our depar...

  2. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Tehran: a three year study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghabaae M; Qelichnia Omrani H; Roostaeizadeh M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is the most common demyelinating disease of central nervous system. We prepared this study to find its epidemiologic pattern in the Iranian society.Methods: This case-series study involved 70 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis according to the McDonald criteria and admitted to the Iranian Center of Neurological Research at Imam Khomeini Hospital from 2002 to 2004. Informed consent was obtained prior to patients completing a questionnaire, which included ...

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF OCCUPATIONAL WORKERS IN TANNERY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YALAVARTHY PREMILA DEVI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health related status or events in specified population and the application of this study is to control health problems. In occupational epidemiology, the emphasis is on studies of population with particulars type of environmental exposure. Epidemiological studies of occupational workers in tannery industries were contucted to estimate the impact of working condition on the health of the workers. Individual characteristics like sex, age, physical condition, nutrition, personality, genetic factor, disease, lenght of service,nature of work done etc., that modify the effect of environmental factors are taken into consideration. Environmental factors like stress, shift work, human relationship, biological factors like bacterial, virus, parasites, accidental factors like hazard situation, speed, influence of alcohol, drugs and physical factors like noise, climate, work load, lighting, radiation are also taken into consideration. The record of company or trade union are used to study and indenfy indiduals with pas exposure to a specify hazard on the type of work. With the help of such record, retrospective cohort studies were carried out. The epidemiological studies revealed that the workers are suffering with cold feverm flue, headache, body pain, joint pain, demartitis, bronchitis, asthma, acute pharyngitis, acid burn, tuberculosis and injuries. The paritculars of incidence of diseases is more in respect of fever followed by cold & headache. the incidences are more among industrial worker than ther control group. The study also revealed that the workers foresee various diseases which are caused due to exposure to the pollutants in their work places. It is distressing to note that the workers still continue to work even under adverse enviromental surrounding and growing incidence of diseases. it can be related to socio-economic conditon.

  4. Epidemiological studies of some populations exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1984 September 19 and 20, a meeting was held at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, Pinawa, Manitoba to discuss current epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Twelve representatives from three countries attended the meeting and eleven papers were extensively discussed. The majority of these papers described studies of populations occupationally exposed to radiation. The report contains summaries of the papers presented and of the discussions that took place

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF KLAIBYA IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Anurag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Klaibya (Male Sexual dysfunction is the most burning problem among the sexual diseases because in this condition the person is unable to perform the coitus due to complete or partial lack of erection and/or rigidity and if coitus attempted it ends into failure and dissatisfaction. The incidence of Klaibya is increasing day by day with increase in the incidence of diabetes, Hypertension, peripheral vascular disorders, peripheral neuropathy, anxiety, stress, depression and their medications. Male sexual dysfunction is more prevalent in Hypertensive’s than Normotensive individuals, and several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of sexual dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Sexual dysfunction represents a major quality-of-life related health problem, and available data indicate that Hypertension is a major risk factor for Klaibya (Male sexual dysfunction in men. In the present study, the survey was carried out on 1000 subjects of general society to access the prevalence of Klaibya with and without hypertension.

  6. Solitary pulmonary nodule and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Part 1: epidemiology, morphological evaluation and cancer probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Pretto Mosmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solitary pulmonary nodule corresponds to a common radiographic finding, which is frequently detected incidentally. The investigation of this entity remains complex, since characteristics of benign and malignant processes overlap in the differential diagnosis. Currently, many strategies are available to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodules with the main objective of characterizing benign lesions as best as possible, while avoiding to expose patients to the risks inherent to invasive methods, besides correctly detecting cases of lung cancer so as the potential curative treatment is not delayed. This first part of the study focuses on the epidemiology, the morfological evaluation and the methods to determine the likelihood of cancer in cases of indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodule.

  7. Epidemiological overview, advances in diagnosis, prevention, treatment and management of epithelial ovarian cancer in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores; Espinosa-Romero, Raquel; Muñoz, Wendy Rosemary; Mendoza-Martínez, Roberto; Villar-Álvarez, Susana Del; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis; Isla-Ortiz, David; Márquez-Manríquez, Juan Pablo; Apodaca-Cruz, Ángel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has been underdiagnosed because it does not have a specific clinical presentation, and the signs and symptoms are similar to the irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic inflammatory disease. EOC is less common than breast and cervical cancer, but it is more lethal. On the whole, EOC has an early dissemination to peritoneal cavity, which delays a timely diagnosis and increases the rate of advanced diagnosed disease. The diagnosis usually surprises the women and the primary care physician. Therefore, it is necessary to count on prevention and early diagnosis programs. EOC has 80% response to surgical treatment, but nearly 70% of the patients may relapse in five years. The objectives of this document are presenting a summary of the EOC epidemiology and comment about advancements in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this cancer. That will raise awareness about the importance of this disease. PMID:27557390

  8. Costs and health effects of breast cancer interventions in epidemiologically different regions of Africa, North America, and Asia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.T.; Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Groot, C.A. de; Anderson, B.O.; Hortobagyi, G.N.

    2006-01-01

    We estimated the costs and health effects of treating stage I, II, III, and IV breast cancer individually, of treating all stages, and of introducing an extensive cancer control program (treating all stages plus early stage diagnosis) in three epidemiologically different world regions--Africa, North

  9. General statistical data structure for epidemiologic studies of DOE workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies to evaluate the occupational risks associated with employment in the nuclear industry are currently being conducted by the Department of Energy. Data that have potential value in evaluating any long-term health effects of occupational exposure to low levels of radiation are obtained for each individual at a given facility. We propose a general data structure for statistical analysis that is used to define transformations from the data management system into the data analysis system. Statistical methods of interest in epidemiologic studies include contingency table analysis and survival analysis procedures that can be used to evaluate potential associations between occupational radiation exposure and mortality. The purposes of this paper are to discuss (1) the adequacy of this data structure for single- and multiple-facility analysis and (2) the statistical computing problems encountered in dealing with large populations over extended periods of time

  10. GESDB: a platform of simulation resources for genetic epidemiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Po-Ju; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulations are routinely conducted to evaluate new statistical methods, to compare the properties among different methods, and to mimic the observed data in genetic epidemiology studies. Conducting simulation studies can become a complicated task as several challenges can occur, such as the selection of an appropriate simulation tool and the specification of parameters in the simulation model. Although abundant simulated data have been generated for human genetic research, currently there is no public database designed specifically as a repository for these simulated data. With the lack of such a database, for similar studies, similar simulations may have been repeated, which resulted in redundant work. Thus, we created an online platform, the Genetic Epidemiology Simulation Database (GESDB), for simulation data sharing and discussion of simulation techniques for genetic epidemiology studies. GESDB consists of a database for storing simulation scripts, simulated data and documentation from published articles as well as a discussion forum, which provides a platform for discussion of the simulated data and exchanging simulation ideas. Moreover, summary statistics such as the simulation tools that are most commonly used and datasets that are most frequently downloaded are provided. The statistics will be informative for researchers to choose an appropriate simulation tool or select a common dataset for method comparisons. GESDB can be accessed at http://gesdb.nhri.org.twDatabase URL: http://gesdb.nhri.org.tw. PMID:27242038

  11. Review of epidemiologic studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies at Los Alamos are directed toward understanding potential health risks associated with activities pertaining to national energy and defense needs. Currently this research focuses on evaluating the effects of plutonium exposure in man. The major programs consist of (1) epidemiologic studies of the incidence of disease and mortality among plutonium and other workers at six Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities (Los Alamos, Rocky Flats, Mound, Savannah River, Hanford, and Oak Ridge), and (2) measurement of plutonium and other radionuclides in human tissues. Currently, investigations of mortality for Pantex workers and the surrounding general population are also being conducted for DOE in support of an Environment Impact Statement. This paper places emphasis on the activities of the national epidemiologic study of plutonium workers. The purpose of the plutonium workers study is to: (1) investigate whether adverse health effects are associated with exposures to plutonium, (2) explore whether adverse health effects are associated with exposure to transuranic elements, other radioisotopes, and hazardous substances that are found in nuclear facilities making routine use of plutonium, and (3) to describe in detail the nature of such health effects should they be discovered

  12. GESDB: a platform of simulation resources for genetic epidemiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Po-Ju; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulations are routinely conducted to evaluate new statistical methods, to compare the properties among different methods, and to mimic the observed data in genetic epidemiology studies. Conducting simulation studies can become a complicated task as several challenges can occur, such as the selection of an appropriate simulation tool and the specification of parameters in the simulation model. Although abundant simulated data have been generated for human genetic research, currently there is no public database designed specifically as a repository for these simulated data. With the lack of such a database, for similar studies, similar simulations may have been repeated, which resulted in redundant work. Thus, we created an online platform, the Genetic Epidemiology Simulation Database (GESDB), for simulation data sharing and discussion of simulation techniques for genetic epidemiology studies. GESDB consists of a database for storing simulation scripts, simulated data and documentation from published articles as well as a discussion forum, which provides a platform for discussion of the simulated data and exchanging simulation ideas. Moreover, summary statistics such as the simulation tools that are most commonly used and datasets that are most frequently downloaded are provided. The statistics will be informative for researchers to choose an appropriate simulation tool or select a common dataset for method comparisons. GESDB can be accessed at http://gesdb.nhri.org.twDatabase URL: http://gesdb.nhri.org.tw.

  13. Assessing the first wave of epidemiological studies of nanomaterial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of early animal studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and air pollution epidemiology suggest that it is important to assess the health of ENM workers. Initial epidemiological studies of workers’ exposure to ENMs (<100 nm) are reviewed and characterized for their study designs, findings, and limitations. Of the 15 studies, 11 were cross-sectional, 4 were longitudinal (1 was both cross-sectional and longitudinal in design), and 1 was a descriptive pilot study. Generally, the studies used biologic markers as the dependent variables. All 11 cross-sectional studies showed a positive relationship between various biomarkers and ENM exposures. Three of the four longitudinal studies showed a negative relationship; the fourth showed positive findings after a 1-year follow-up. Each study considered exposure to ENMs as the independent variable. Exposure was assessed by mass concentration in 10 studies and by particle count in six studies. Six of them assessed both mass and particle concentrations. Some of the studies had limited exposure data because of inadequate exposure assessment. Generally, exposure levels were not very high in comparison to those in human inhalation chamber studies, but there were some exceptions. Most studies involved a small sample size, from 2 to 258 exposed workers. These studies represent the first wave of epidemiological studies of ENM workers. They are limited by small numbers of participants, inconsistent (and in some cases inadequate) exposure assessments, generally low exposures, and short intervals between exposure and effect. Still, these studies are a foundation for future work; they provide insight into where ENM workers are experiencing potentially adverse effects that might be related to ENM exposures

  14. Assessing the first wave of epidemiological studies of nanomaterial workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing, E-mail: shliou@nhri.org.tw [National Health Research Institutes, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (China); Tsai, Candace S. J. [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Science (United States); Pelclova, Daniela [Charles University in Prague, Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine (Czech Republic); Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Schulte, Paul A. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The results of early animal studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and air pollution epidemiology suggest that it is important to assess the health of ENM workers. Initial epidemiological studies of workers’ exposure to ENMs (<100 nm) are reviewed and characterized for their study designs, findings, and limitations. Of the 15 studies, 11 were cross-sectional, 4 were longitudinal (1 was both cross-sectional and longitudinal in design), and 1 was a descriptive pilot study. Generally, the studies used biologic markers as the dependent variables. All 11 cross-sectional studies showed a positive relationship between various biomarkers and ENM exposures. Three of the four longitudinal studies showed a negative relationship; the fourth showed positive findings after a 1-year follow-up. Each study considered exposure to ENMs as the independent variable. Exposure was assessed by mass concentration in 10 studies and by particle count in six studies. Six of them assessed both mass and particle concentrations. Some of the studies had limited exposure data because of inadequate exposure assessment. Generally, exposure levels were not very high in comparison to those in human inhalation chamber studies, but there were some exceptions. Most studies involved a small sample size, from 2 to 258 exposed workers. These studies represent the first wave of epidemiological studies of ENM workers. They are limited by small numbers of participants, inconsistent (and in some cases inadequate) exposure assessments, generally low exposures, and short intervals between exposure and effect. Still, these studies are a foundation for future work; they provide insight into where ENM workers are experiencing potentially adverse effects that might be related to ENM exposures.

  15. Epidemiologic application of verbal autopsy to investigate the high occurrence of cancer along Huai River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ding

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, the media repeatedly reported water pollution and "cancer villages" along the Huai River in China. Due to the lack of death records for more than 30 years, a retrospective survey of causes of death using verbal autopsy was carried out to investigate cancer rates in this area. Methods An epidemiologic study was designed to compare numbers of deaths and causes of death between the study areas with water pollution and the control areas without water pollution in S County and Y District in 2005. The study areas were selected based on the distribution of the Huai River and its tributaries. Verbal autopsy was used to assist cause of death (COD diagnoses and to verify mortality rates. The standard mortality rates (SMRs of cancer in the study area were compared with those in the control areas. In order to verify the difference between mortality rates due to cancers in the study and the control areas, patients who reported having cancer in the survey received a second diagnosis by national and provincial oncologists with pathological and laboratory examinations. Comparisons were made to determine if differential cancer prevalence rates in the study and control areas were similar to the difference in mortality due to cancer in these study and control areas. Mortality rates of cancers in study and control areas were also compared with national statistics for the rural population of China. Results Over five years, 3,301 deaths were identified, including 1,158 cancer deaths. The annual average SMRs of cancer in the study areas of S County and Y District were 277.8/100,000 and 223.6/100,000, respectively, which is three to four times higher than those in the control areas. In addition, a total of 626 cases of cancer in the study and control areas were confirmed. The prevalence rates of cancer were 545/100,000 and 128.1/100,000 per year in the study and control areas in S County, respectively, and 440.9/100,000 and 200/100,000 per

  16. Traumatic dental injuries in Serbian children: Epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Vuković Ana; Marković Dejan; Petrović Bojan; Apostolović Mirjana; Golijanin Ranko; Kanjevac Tatjana; Stojković Branislava; Perić Tamara; Blagojević Duška

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Comprehensive epidemiological data regarding factors associated with traumatic dental injuries are scarce. Objective. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and analyze the factors associated with traumatic dental injuries in Serbian children. Methods. Research included children and adolescents with traumatic dental injury aged 0-19 year during the period from 2003 to 2010, in four University Dental Centres in Serbia: Belgrad...

  17. Trends in the Utilization of Adjuvant Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy and/or External Beam Radiation Treatment in Stage I and II Endometrial Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The optimal adjuvant radiation treatment for endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains controversial. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VB) has emerged as an increasingly common treatment modality. However, the time trends for using VB, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy (VB+EBRT) have not been well characterized. We therefore examined the utilization trends of VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT for adjuvant RT in International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I and II EC over time. Methods and Materials: We evaluated treatment patterns for 48,122 patients with EC diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2005, using the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public use database. Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences by radiation type (VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT) and various demographic and clinical variables. Results: Analyses were limited to 9,815 patients (20.4%) with EC who met the inclusion criteria. Among women who received adjuvant RT, the proportion receiving VB increased yearly (12.9% in 1995 compared to 32.8% in 2005 (p < 0.0001). The increasing use of VB was proportional to the decreasing use of EBRT (56.1% in 1995 to 45.8% in 2005; p < 0.0001) and VB+EBRT (31.0% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2005; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This population-based report demonstrates an increasing trend in the use of VB in the adjuvant setting after hysterectomy for treatment of women with FIGO stage I II EC. VB alone appears to be replacing pelvic EBRT and VB+EBRT therapy in the management of stage I–II EC.

  18. Trends in the Utilization of Adjuvant Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy and/or External Beam Radiation Treatment in Stage I and II Endometrial Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Mehul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Cote, Michele L. [Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Ali-Fehmi, Rouba [Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Buekers, Thomas; Munkarah, Adnan R. [Department of Women' s Health Services, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed A., E-mail: melshai1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal adjuvant radiation treatment for endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains controversial. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VB) has emerged as an increasingly common treatment modality. However, the time trends for using VB, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy (VB+EBRT) have not been well characterized. We therefore examined the utilization trends of VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT for adjuvant RT in International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I and II EC over time. Methods and Materials: We evaluated treatment patterns for 48,122 patients with EC diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2005, using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public use database. Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences by radiation type (VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT) and various demographic and clinical variables. Results: Analyses were limited to 9,815 patients (20.4%) with EC who met the inclusion criteria. Among women who received adjuvant RT, the proportion receiving VB increased yearly (12.9% in 1995 compared to 32.8% in 2005 (p < 0.0001). The increasing use of VB was proportional to the decreasing use of EBRT (56.1% in 1995 to 45.8% in 2005; p < 0.0001) and VB+EBRT (31.0% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2005; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This population-based report demonstrates an increasing trend in the use of VB in the adjuvant setting after hysterectomy for treatment of women with FIGO stage I-II EC. VB alone appears to be replacing pelvic EBRT and VB+EBRT therapy in the management of stage I-II EC.

  19. HPV and Cervical Cancer Epidemiology - Current Status of HPV Vaccination in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sharmila; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Samanta, Luna; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CaCx) is the second most fatal cancer contributing to 14% of cancers in Indian females, which account for 25.4% and 26.5% of the global burden of CaCx prevalence and mortality, respectively. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV- strains 16 and 18) is the most important risk factor for precursors of invasive CaCx. Comprehensive prevention strategies for CaCx should include screening and HPV vaccination. Three screening modalities for CaCx are cytology, visual inspection with acetic acid, and HPV testing. There is no Indian national policy on CaCx prevention, and screening of asymptomatic females against CaCx is practically non-existent. HPV vaccines can make a major breakthrough in the control of CaCx in India which has high disease load and no organized screening program. Despite the Indian Government's effort to introduce HPV vaccination in the National Immunization Program and bring down vaccine cost, challenges to implementing vaccination in India are strong such as: inadequate epidemiological evidence for disease prioritization, duration of vaccine use, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance. This paper reviews the current epidemiology of CaCx and HPV in India, and the current status of HPV vaccination in the country. This article stresses the need for more research in the Indian context, to evaluate interventions for CaCx and assess their applicability, success, scalability and sustainability within the constraints of the Indian health care system. PMID:27644600

  20. Guidelines for a national epidemiological surveillance system of thyroid cancer in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the French Department of Health, a multidisciplinary Thyroid Cancer Committee, coordinated by the French Public Health Agency analysed the observed increase of thyroid cancer incidence in France and outlined the limits of the present case registration system. This Committee set up guidelines to improve the national surveillance system of thyroid cancer. The Committee analysed 4 models for the incidence survey, 3 of which have been excluded: a poor cost-benefit ratio precludes the constitution of a national registry dedicated to thyroid cancer; however, the Committee has recommended this model that still exists for thyroid cancer of the youth(under 19 years old), a national system base exclusively on pathological data would only be relevant after significant improvement of data collection, obligatory of all cases of thyroid cancer is inappropriate considering the fit prognosis of this cancer. A two level system is proposed with continuous registration of incident caes through the National Hospital Discharge survey, specific focused analysis of clinical and pathological data in case of a cluster alert in any given area. Whatever the system, it seems necessary to in general: propose a unique health registration number per patient, improve access to medical data, organize a national standardised collection of pathological findings, follow up the diagnosis practices related to thyroid cancer that have an impact on incidence rates. In conclusion, a reliable incidence survey and a follow up of diagnostic practices and of risk factors may provide a relevant model of epidemiological survey of thyroid cancers in France but such a system requires a long lasting strategic and financial involvement. (author)

  1. Systematic review of the epidemiological evidence comparing lung cancer risk in smokers of mentholated and unmentholated cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background US mentholated cigarette sales have increased considerably over 50 years. Preference for mentholated cigarettes is markedly higher in Black people. While menthol itself is not genotoxic or carcinogenic, its acute respiratory effects might affect inhalation of cigarette smoke. This possibility seems consistent with the higher lung cancer risk in Black men, despite Black people smoking less and starting smoking later than White people. Despite experimental data suggesting similar carcinogenicity of mentholated and non-mentholated cigarettes, the lack of convincing evidence that mentholation increases puffing, inhalation or smoke uptake, and the similarity of lung cancer rates in Black and White females, a review of cigarette mentholation and lung cancer is timely given current regulatory interest in the topic. Methods Epidemiological studies comparing lung cancer risk in mentholated and non-mentholated cigarette smokers were identified from MedLine and other sources. Study details were extracted and strengths and weaknesses assessed. Relative risk estimates were extracted, or derived, for ever mentholated use and for long-term use, overall and by gender, race, and current/ever smoking, and meta-analyses conducted. Results Eight generally good quality studies were identified, with valid cases and controls, and appropriate adjustment for age, gender, race and smoking. The studies afforded good power to detect possible effects. However, only one study presented results by histological type, none adjusted for occupation or diet, and some provided no results by length of mentholated cigarette use. The data do not suggest any effect of mentholation on lung cancer risk. Adjusted relative risk estimates for ever use vary from 0.81 to 1.12, giving a combined estimate of 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.84-1.02, n = 8, with no increase in males (1.01, 0.84-1.22, n = 5, females (0.80, 0.67-0.95, n = 5, White people (0.87, 0.75-1.03, n = 4

  2. Influence of radiation exposure on our society and epidemiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief epidemiological review of risk assessment of radiation was discussed with respect to two periods; before and after the establishment of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Selected topics were the studies of atomic bomb survivors and people living in the contaminated areas due to Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. An ethical view to ensure that potential social benefits of epidemiology are maximized was emphasized as well as a scientific view. On the other hand it should be recognized that there are the limitations of epidemiological studies on the basis of the observations on man in which the animal-experimental setting generally cannot be controlled over. Informing people about the professional confidence and caution of radiation exposure is needed to resolve social concern associated with low dose, low dose rate of radiation. Also there are guidelines for the investigation of clusters of adverse health events. In the future an appropriate strategy for decontamination might be expected to unusual radiation exposure as a consequence of a nuclear power plant accident. Justification for the implementations can be determined only through the assessment of the effects both on the environment and health of humans after the accident. (author)

  3. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  4. Incidence rate of ovarian cancer cases in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy51School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Al-Baha University, Kingdom of Saudia Arabia; 3Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital–Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, UKPurpose: This study provides descriptive epidemiological data, such as the percentage of cases diagnosed, crude incidence rate (CIR, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR of ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Patients and methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all ovarian cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR from January 2001–December 2008 was performed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance tests, Poisson regression, and simple linear modeling.Results: A total of 991 ovarian cancer cases were recorded in the SCR from January 2001–December 2008. The region of Riyadh had the highest overall ASIR at 3.3 cases per 100,000 women, followed by the Jouf and Asir regions at 3.13 and 2.96 cases per 100,000 women. However, Hail and Jazan had the lowest rates at 1.4 and 0.6 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. Compared to Jazan, the incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases was significantly higher (P<0.001 in the Makkah region at 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.13–9.83, followed by Riyadh at 6.3 (95% CI: 4.10–9.82, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia at 4.52 (95% CI: 2.93–6.98. The predicted annual CIR and ASIR for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia could be defined by the equations 0.9 + (0.07× years and 1.71 + (0.09× years, respectively.Conclusion: We observed a slight increase in the CIRs and

  5. Epidemiological studies of general population groups exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of man to radiation and the resulting risk of carcinogenesis continue to be of concern to the public. In this context, there is often a tendency to carry out epidemiological studies concerning the induction of cancer in radiation workers and members of the public which are not supported by a statistically valid data base or whose result are misinterpreted or misused. To assist national authorities in evaluating radiological risks, the Nuclear Energy Agency has sponsored a critical review of the methodologies for, and the limitations of, these epidemiological studies, and of the precautions to be adopted in interpreting their results. Prepared by two consultants, Dr. Joan M. Davies and Dr. Hazel Inskip, the review focuses on the problems encountered when carrying out epidemiological studies on groups of the general population exposed to radiation, and using their results for radiological protection purposes. The primary objective is to provide background material for national authorities who have responsibilities in the field of radiological protection, as well as to other persons interested in this subject. It is published under the responsibility of the Secretary General of the OECD, and does not necessarily reflect the views of Member Governments

  6. Epidemiologic contributions to recent cancer trends among HIV-infected people in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Hilary A.; Shiels, Meredith S.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected people have elevated risk for some cancers. Changing incidence of these cancers over time may reflect changes in three factors: HIV population demographic structure (e.g. age distribution), general population (background) cancer rates, and HIV-associated relative risks. We assessed the contributions of these factors to time trends for 10 cancers during 1996–2010. Design Population-based registry linkage study. Methods We applied Poisson models to data from the U.S. HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study to estimate annual percent changes (APCs) in incidence rates of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs: Kaposi sarcoma (KS), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and cervical cancer) and 7 non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs). We evaluated HIV-infected cancer trends with and without adjustment for demographics, trends in background rates, and trends in standardized incidence ratios (SIRs, to capture relative risk). Results Cancer rates among HIV-infected people rose over time for anal (APC 3.8%), liver (8.5%), and prostate (9.8%) cancers, but declined for KS (1996–2000: −29.3%; 2000–2010: −7.8%), NHL (1996–2003: −15.7%; 2003–2010: −5.5%), cervical cancer (−11.1%), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, −4.0%), and lung cancer (−2.8%). Breast and colorectal cancer incidence did not change over time. Based on comparison to adjusted models, changing demographics contributed to trends for KS and breast, colorectal, liver, lung, and prostate cancers (all p<0.01). Trends in background rates were notable for liver (APC 5.6%) and lung (−3.2%) cancers. SIRs declined for ADCs, HL (APC −3.2%), and lung cancer (−4.4%). Conclusions Demographic shifts influenced several cancer trends among HIV-infected individuals. Falling relative risks largely explained ADC declines, while background incidence contributed to some NADC trends. PMID:24300545

  7. Historical background and overview of epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognition of the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation dates from the early part of this century, when an increased frequency of skin cancer and leukemia was first reported in radiologists. In the interim, systematic epidemiological studies have disclosed additional carcinogenic effects in radiation workers, A-bomb survivors, patients exposed to diagnostic or therapeutic radiation, and other groups. The studies have provided sufficient data on dose-incidence relationships, the distribution of cancer in relation to age at irradiation and time after exposure, and organ-variations in susceptibility to enable attempts at quantitative assessment of the risks of low-level irradiation. Such assessments, although tentative and controversial, have exerted an important influence on developments in radiological protection

  8. Breast cancer risk associated with different HRT formulations: a register-based case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Thai Do; Möhner Sabine; Heinemann Lothar AJ; Dinger Juergen C; Assmann Anita

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently shown a modestly increased breast cancer risk associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Limited information is available about different formulations – particularly concerning different progestins. Methods A case-control study was performed within Germany in collaboration with regional cancer registries and tumor centers. Up to 5 controls were matched breast cancer cases. Conditional logistic regression analysis...

  9. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  10. Conducting Molecular Epidemiological Research in the Age of HIPAA: A Multi-Institutional Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer in African-American and European-American Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine B. Ambrosone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in African-American (AA women occurs at an earlier age than in European-American (EA women and is more likely to have aggressive features associated with poorer prognosis, such as high-grade and negative estrogen receptor (ER status. The mechanisms underlying these differences are unknown. To address this, we conducted a case-control study to evaluate risk factors for high-grade ER- disease in both AA and EA women. With the onset of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, creative measures were needed to adapt case ascertainment and contact procedures to this new environment of patient privacy. In this paper, we report on our approach to establishing a multicenter study of breast cancer in New York and New Jersey, provide preliminary distributions of demographic and pathologic characteristics among case and control participants by race, and contrast participation rates by approaches to case ascertainment, with discussion of strengths and weaknesses.

  11. Epidemiologic characteristics of oral cancer:single-center analysis of 4097 patients from the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Ming Song; Fan Gao; AnKui Yang; WenKuan Chen; ShuWei Chen; Huan Li; Xing Zhang; ZhongYuan Yang; XinLin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is a common type of head and neck cancers. Knowing its epidemiologic characteristics is crucial to preventing, diagnosing, and treating this cancer. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteris‑tics of oral cancer in South China. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 4097 oral cancer patients treated at the Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center between 1960 and 2013. We compared the age of onset, sex ratio, pathologic type, and primary tumor location among three subcultural areas (Guangfu, Hakka, and Chaoshan) and between an economically developed region and a less‑developed one in Guangdong. Results: Overall, oral cancer had a male‑to‑female ratio of approximately 2:1, and this ratio decreased over time. Oral cancer occurred mostly in patients of 45–64 years old (54.5%), and the percentage of older patients gradually increased over time. The most common tumor location was the tongue. Squamous cell carcinoma was the predomi‑nant pathologic type. The percentage of blood type O in oral cancer patients was lower than that in the healthy pop‑ulation. The male‑to‑female ratio in the Chaoshan area was higher than that in the Guangfu and Hakka areas, whereas the age of disease onset in Guangfu was higher than that in Hakka and Chaoshan. The male‑to‑female ratio was lower and the age of disease onset was higher in the economically developed region than in the less‑developed region. Conclusion: The incidence of oral cancer in South China presents typical characteristics to which doctors should pay attention when diagnosing and treating oral cancer patients.

  12. Suggestions for an adequate risk communication - experiences based on German epidemiological studies on childhood cancer and neighbourhood to nuclear power plants; Empfehlungen fuer eine gute Risikokommunikation - Erfahrungen anhand deutscher Studien zu Krebs bei Kindern und Wohnortnaehe zu Kernkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaatsch, P. [Deutsches Kinderkrebsregister, Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    From the example of the German studies on childhood cancer in the vicinity of nuclear power plants general principles for adequate risk communication could be derived. It is particularly important to explain the complexity of the issue to the public in an adequate way, when dealing with topics of such an emotionally loaded nature. Some rules are required, when explaining the nature of risk to the layman, the press, politicians, or scientists from other fields. The main principle is to create a basis of trustfulness, whereupon results can be presented. In this contribution we derive general and proven specific recommendations for adequate risk communication on the basis of experiences made at the German Childhood Cancer Registry. (orig.)

  13. Use of breath hydrogen and methane as markers of colonic fermentation in epidemiologic studies: circadian patterns of excretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Marchand, L.; Wilkens, L. R.; Harwood, P.; Cooney, R V

    1992-01-01

    Fermentation in the large bowel has been postulated to play a protective role against colon cancer. Hydrogen and methane are end products of this fermentation process and are absorbed into the bloodstream and excreted via expired air in the breath. Breath levels of hydrogen and, to a lesser extent, methane correlate strongly with colonic fermentation and may serve as useful biomarkers for this process. In a preliminary study to assess the usefulness of these two markers in epidemiologic studi...

  14. [Cervix uteri cancer in Poland--epidemiological opening balance and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkowska, Joanna; Wojciechowska, Urszula; Zatoński, Witold

    2006-09-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of death among young and middle-aged females. In case of some cancer sites there is a possibility of undertaking an intervention, which would diminish the risk of death--to this group belongs first of all malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri. The date of beginning first cervix uteri cancer screening in Poland is approaching, therefore presenting epidemiological opening balance and possible scenarios of changes it worthwhile. This work uses data on morbidity and mortality due to malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri cancer in Polish population. Time trends analysis was based on so-called "breakpoint" (joinpoint analysis). Cervix uteri cancer mortality trend is characterized by two breakpoints (1971 and 1993). In the period of 1963-1970 there was an increase of mortality and then after the trend reversed: percentage decline was estimated at the level of 0.8% yearly in 1971-1992 and 2.4% yearly in 1993-2002. Hypothetical scenarios of changes in cervix uteri cancer mortality show, that lack of intervention will cause mortality among Polish females at the level recorded in Finland 25 years ago. Optimistic variant would allow on diminishing mortality in Poland down to the level observed currently in Finland, in around 30 years. Implementing preventive cervix uteri cancer screening is currently the most urgent challenge of public health. If the preventive screening program will still be in the phase of plans and projects, then in 30 years time Poland will be in the point which Finland reached in the end of 1970s, and our civilizing underdevelopment will reach half a century.

  15. Epidemiology, etiology and study of clinical findings of headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffarpoor M

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In a cross-sectional epidemiological study of headache disorders in neurology clinic of Fatemieh hospital of Semnan (August 22-November 20.1996, information on types of headaches, quality, severity, location, duration, frequency, precipitating factors, age of onset, influence of menstruation and pregnancy, positive familial history, use of oral contraceptive pills and other epidemiological factors including socioeconomic and age/sex composition was collected. The presence of any types of headaches was ascertained by a clinical interview and examination using the operational diagnostic criteria of the International Headaches Society. The prevalence of migraine and tension type headache was also analysed in relation to variables of life style (physical activity and sleep pattern and associated signs and symptoms (nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. In this study migraine and tension headache were also compared in variable aspects with each other. 1 Headache was more prevalent in women than men (F/M=3/1. 2 The most common types of headache included: tension type headache (41.4%, migraine (31.2% and unclassified headaches (17.2%. 3 Migraine and T.T.H were more prevalent in early adult life and middle ages. 4 In both migraine and tension type headache the time profiles (duration, frequency, age of onset, quality and location were like that noted in textbook and previous studies. 5 In both migraine and tension type headache the most conspicuous precipitating factor was stress and mental tension and frequent headaches were accompanied with psychiatric problems (e.g depression and or anxiety. 6 Nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia were the most common associated symptoms in both of them. 7 Positive familial history and aggravation of headache in perimenstual period were more commonly seen in patients with migraine than tension type headache. In conclusion using the operational diagnostic criteria of International Headache Society in

  16. Epidemiologic factors of colorectal cancer in a county hospital in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Leşe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the most common digestive cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the colorectal cancer’s frequency relatedto age, gender, personal or family history, and also to blood group of the patients operated in the County Emergency Hospital of BaiaMare, Romania. Material and methods: The records of 512 patients with cancer of the colon, rectal cancer and synchronous colorectal cancerwere studied retrospectively in a period of 15 years, admitted to The Department of Surgery in The County Emergency Hospital of Baia Mare,Romania. Results: Colorectal cancers have been found to be more frequent in women under the age of 50 and in men above this age (p=0.004.In urban environments the right colon cancer (59.62% and rectal cancer (55.87% were more frequently encountered. Tumor location had analmost even distribution: 30% right colon, 35.45% left colon, 34.96% rectal cancer and 0.78% synchronous cancers. The association with personaland family history was statistically insignificant, except asthma which was considered a protective factor (p<0.001 for colorectal cancer.The abidance in blood groups shows proportional distribution with their representation in the population of our country, but family historyof colorectal cancer was found only in O and A groups. Conclusions: The study ascertains the left to right shift of the large bowel cancers, theincreasing of medium age of patients and high incidence of colorectal cancer in women under the age of 50 years. Asthma may be a protectivefactor for colorectal cancer, especially for right colon cancer, and genetic factors are present only in patients with O and A blood groups .

  17. Recent incidence and descriptive epidemiological survey of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggu, Shalini; Rehman, Hasibur; Abbas, Zahid K.; Ansari, Abid A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To review and analyze the pattern of breast cancer (BC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological review of BC of all diagnosed Saudi female cases from January 1990 to December 2014 was conducted at the Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA. This report contains information obtained from the Saudi Cancer Registry and from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Results: The number of women with BC increased steadily from 1990-2010. On the basis of the number of cases, the percentage distribution of BC appears to be increasing. There were 1152 female BC cases in 2008 in comparison with 1308 in 2009, and 1473 in 2010. Breast cancer ranked first among females accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers (5378) in the year 2010. The average age at the diagnosis of BC was 48; weighted average was 49.8, and range 43-52. Conclusion: Among Saudi patients, there was a significant increase in the number of cases of BC, which occurs at an earlier age than in Western countries. Continued vigilance, mammographic screening, and patient education are needed to establish early diagnosis and perform optimal treatment. PMID:26446327

  18. Is bioelectrical impedance accurate for use in large epidemiological studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merchant Anwar T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Percentage of body fat is strongly associated with the risk of several chronic diseases but its accurate measurement is difficult. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is a relatively simple, quick and non-invasive technique, to measure body composition. It measures body fat accurately in controlled clinical conditions but its performance in the field is inconsistent. In large epidemiologic studies simpler surrogate techniques such as body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio are frequently used instead of BIA to measure body fatness. We reviewed the rationale, theory, and technique of recently developed systems such as foot (or hand-to-foot BIA measurement, and the elements that could influence its results in large epidemiologic studies. BIA results are influenced by factors such as the environment, ethnicity, phase of menstrual cycle, and underlying medical conditions. We concluded that BIA measurements validated for specific ethnic groups, populations and conditions can accurately measure body fat in those populations, but not others and suggest that for large epdiemiological studies with diverse populations BIA may not be the appropriate choice for body composition measurement unless specific calibration equations are developed for different groups participating in the study.

  19. Drug abuse in Nigeria: a review of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pela, O A; Ebie, J C

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the available literature on the epidemiology of drug abuse in Nigeria. Depending on the definition used, substances which are abused include antibiotics, antidiarrhoeals, laxatives, pain-relieving drugs, sedatives, amphetamines and cannabis. This review is, however, limited to studies on substances which alter behaviour or mood. These drugs include cannabis, sedative-hypnotics, amphetamines and alcohol. For some classes of drugs there has been a noticeable shift in patterns of drug abuse, for example, from abuse of methaqualone to barbiturates. The abuse of volatile solvents and other substances has also been noted. The review shows that there is no age limit among drug abusers. Studies on the influence of social class have been contradictory. Factors which indicate a predisposition to initial drug use have been similar to those reported in other cultures. Although the studies agreed on the classes of drugs abused and the changing patterns of drug abuse, there has been no uniform reporting system. This situation is attributed to financial constraints. Large-scale surveys which should incorporate most of the core items in any epidemiological study on substance abuse have been suggested. PMID:6985029

  20. Review of salt consumption and stomach cancer risk:Epidemiological and biological evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qin Wang; Paul D Terry; Hong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Stomach cancer is still the fourth most common cancer; thus, it remains an important public health burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The remarkable geographic variations in the rates of stomach cancer indicate that dietary factors, including a range of food groups to which salt and/or nitrates have been added, may affect stomach cancer risk. In this paper, we review the results from ecologic, case-control and cohort studies on the relationship between salt or salted foods and stomach cancer risk. The majority of ecological studies indicated that the average salt intake in each population was closely correlated with gastric cancer mortality. Most casecontrol studies showed similar results, indicating a moderate to high increase in risk for the highest level of salt or salted food consumption. The overall results from cohort studies are not totally consistent, but are suggestive of a moderate direct association. Since salt intake has been correlated with Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection, it is possible that these two factors may synergize to promote the development of stomach cancer. Additionally, salt may also cause stomach cancer through directly damaging gastric mucus, improving temporary epithelial proliferation and the incidence of endogenous mutations, and inducing hypergastrinemia that leads to eventual parietal cell loss and progression to gastric cancer. Based on the considerable evidence from ecological, case-control and cohort studies worldwide and the mechanistic plausibility, limitation on salt and salted food consumption is a practical strategy for preventing gastric cancer.

  1. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients f

  2. First molecular epidemiological study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Libya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Amro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a major public health problem in Libya. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, epidemiological features of CL outbreaks in Libya including molecular identification of parasites, the geographical distribution of cases and possible scenarios of parasite transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 450 patients that came from 49 areas distributed in 12 districts in north-west Libya. The patients' ages ranged from 9 months to 87 years (median age 25 years; 54% of the cases were males. Skin scrapings spotted on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 was amplified and subsequently characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis. In total, 195 samples were successfully identified of which 148 (75.9% were Leishmania major, and 47 (24.1% Leishmania tropica. CL cases infected with L. major were found in all CL areas whereas L. tropica cases came mainly from Al Jabal Al Gharbi (46.4%, Misrata (17.8% and Tarhuna districts (10.7%. A trend of seasonality was noticed for the infections with L. major which showed a clear peak between November and January, but was less pronounced for infections by L. tropica. CONCLUSION: The first molecular study on CL in Libya revealed that the disease is caused by L. major and L. tropica and the epidemiological patterns in the different foci were the same as in other Mediterranean foci of CL.

  3. Epidemiological studies on syncope--a register based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology and prognosis of ‘fainting’ or syncope has puzzled physicians over the years. Is fainting dangerous? This is a question often asked by the patient--and the answer is ‘it depends on a lot of things’. The diverse pathophysiology of syncope and the underlying comorbidites of the pat......The epidemiology and prognosis of ‘fainting’ or syncope has puzzled physicians over the years. Is fainting dangerous? This is a question often asked by the patient--and the answer is ‘it depends on a lot of things’. The diverse pathophysiology of syncope and the underlying comorbidites...... from smaller studies from different clinical settings with wide differences in patient morbidity. Through the extensive Danish registries we examined the characteristics and prognosis of the patients hospitalized due to syncope in a nationwide study. The aims of the present thesis were to investigate...... thesis demonstrated that the ICD-10 discharge diagnosis could reliably identify a cohort of patients admitted for syncope and that the discharge code carried a high number of unexplained cases despite use of numerous tests. The last studies showed that syncope is a common cause for hospital contact...

  4. Vitamin D and Physical Activity in Patients With Colorectal Cancer: Epidemiological Evidence and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Notwithstanding major improvements in the early detection and treatment of CRC, an important proportion of patients who received a diagnosis of localized disease ultimately have a recurrence and die, underscoring the need of new therapeutic approaches. Vitamin D and physical activity (PA) have emerged as 2 potential interventions for both prevention and treatment of CRC. Plausible biological mechanisms have been described for the antineoplastic effects of vitamin D and PA, and a wealth of epidemiological evidence indicates that 25(OH)D (the main circulating form of vitamin D) and PA levels are inversely associated with CRC risk. Recent efforts have now focused on the role of vitamin D and PA as adjunct treatments after a CRC diagnosis. Observational studies evaluating prediagnosis and postdiagnosis circulating 25(OH)D levels among patients with CRC of all stages have found that subjects with levels in the highest quantiles have improved overall and CRC-specific survival compared with those with levels in the lowest quantiles. Similarly, prospective studies of PA have found that higher levels of postdiagnosis PA are associated with lower overall and CRC-specific mortality in patients with nonmetastatic CRC. Meta-analyses of the observational studies of 25(OH)D and postdiagnosis PA have confirmed significant protective associations against overall and CRC-specific mortality, as well as significant dose-response relationships. No randomized controlled trial of vitamin D or PA using survival outcomes as endpoints has been completed to date. Two randomized, placebo-controlled trials of vitamin D in patients with metastatic CRC assessing patient survival as an endpoint are underway: the first is a phase II trial comparing high-dose vitamin D3 (8000 IU/d for 2 weeks followed by 4000 IU/d) versus standard dose (400 IU/d), and the second is a phase I-II trial comparing

  5. Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, G; Patterson, B; Subar, A

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 200 studies that examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and cancers of the lung, colon, breast, cervix, esophagus, oral cavity, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and ovary are reviewed. A statistically significant protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption was found in 128 of 156 dietary studies in which results were expressed in terms of relative risk. For most cancer sites, persons with low fruit and vegetable intake (at least the lower one-fourth of the population) experience about twice the risk of cancer compared with those with high intake, even after control for potentially confounding factors. For lung cancer, significant protection was found in 24 of 25 studies after control for smoking in most instances. Fruits, in particular, were significantly protective in cancers of the esophagus, oral cavity, and larynx, for which 28 of 29 studies were significant. Strong evidence of a protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption was seen in cancers of the pancreas and stomach (26 of 30 studies), as well as in colorectal and bladder cancers (23 of 38 studies). For cancers of the cervix, ovary, and endometrium, a significant protective effect was shown in 11 of 13 studies, and for breast cancer a protective effect was found to be strong and consistent in a meta analysis. It would appear that major public health benefits could be achieved by substantially increasing consumption of these foods.

  6. Incidence and Mortality and Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Pournamdar, Zahra; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries. PMID:27165206

  7. Incidence and Mortality and Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Pournamdar, Zahra; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries.

  8. Obesity and liver cancer risk. An evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiologic evidence among the Japanese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increased interest in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, its common co-morbid condition, obesity, has recently attracted much attention as a risk factor for liver cancer. Recent studies also suggest that obesity may play a role in the development of liver cancer in alcoholic cirrhosis or viral hepatitis and in the general population. We systematically reviewed epidemiologic studies on overweight/obesity and liver cancer among Japanese populations. Original data were obtained by searching the MEDLINE (PubMed) and Ichushi databases, complemented by manual searches. The evaluation was performed in terms of the magnitude of association in each study and the strength of evidence ('convincing', 'probable', 'possible' or 'insufficient'), together with biologic plausibility. Among nine cohort studies identified, five (four on patients with chronic liver disease and one on local residents) reported a weak to strong positive association, while four (one on patients with hepatitis B and three on local residents) found no association [summary relative risk for one unit increase in body mass index (kg/m2) 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.10]. All three case-control studies identified (two on cirrhotic patients and one on atomic bomb survivors) reported a strong positive association (summary relative risk 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.53). Overall, the summary relative risk was estimated at 1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.20), and overweight/obese individuals had a relative risk of 1.74 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.28) compared with those who had normal/low weight. We conclude that overweight or obesity 'probably' increases the risk of primary liver cancer, to a moderate degree, among the Japanese population. (author)

  9. [Reactive changes in psychological condition and behaviour in children of parents with cancer--results of an epidemiological survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelt, Corinna; Ernst, Johanna Christine; Beierlein, Volker; Inhestern, Laura; Holes, Sarah; Möller, Birgit; Romer, Georg; Koch, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Children of cancer patients are at risk for developing psychological symptoms. The parental appraisal of the child's psychological condition is a key variable for the utilization of child-centred psychosocial services. This study aimed at the systematic analysis of parental appraisals of changes in the emotional condition or behaviour of their children. We conducted an epidemiologic survey with a sample size of 1,809 patients with different cancer diagnoses, giving information about 2,581 children aged 21 years or younger at time of diagnosis. Quantitative information on children's distress during the disease and on changes in psychological condition or behaviour and qualitative information on the kind of changes were analysed. About half of the children were considered to be psychologically strongly affected during the disease. For about 25 % negative changes in psychological condition or behaviour are reported, positive changes are reported for 20 % of the children. Negative changes are most frequently described in young children (up to five years), positive changes are most frequently described in young adults (18 to 21 years). The results indicate that from the cancer parent's view many children are substantially distressed. Thus, the implementation of additional preventive psychosocial services seems reasonable and necessary. PMID:22950334

  10. Epidemiological results on diesel exhaust and lung cancer: A synopsis; Epidemiologische Ergebnisse zu Dieselmotoremissionen und Lungenkrebs: Eine Synopse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nold, A.; Bochmann, F. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    This synopsis summarises the results of epidemiological studies of an assumed association between diesel exhaust and lung cancer and presents dose-response relationships which have so far been identified. The authors provide information about problems related to limit-value setting for and measurement of diesel exhaust and refer to exposure estimates for certain branches of industry in the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States. The questions and results are to enrich the discussion on this complex issue. (orig.) [German] Diese Synopse gibt eine Uebersicht ueber die Ergebnisse epidemiologischer Studien zu einem vermuteten Zusammenhang zwischen Dieselmotoremissionen (DME) und Lungenkrebs sowie ueber bisher ermittelte Dosis-Wirkung-Beziehungen. Informationen zur Grenzwert- und Messproblematik von DME sowie Expositionsabschaetzungen fuer bestimmte Branchen in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland bzw. in den USA werden dargestellt. Die aufgezeigten Fragen und Ergebnisse sollen die Diskussion ueber dieses komplexe Thema unterstuetzen. (orig.)

  11. Aspartame: a safety evaluation based on current use levels, regulations, and toxicological and epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, B A; Burdock, G A; Doull, J; Kroes, R M; Marsh, G M; Pariza, M W; Spencer, P S; Waddell, W J; Walker, R; Williams, G M

    2007-01-01

    Aspartame is a methyl ester of a dipeptide used as a synthetic nonnutritive sweetener in over 90 countries worldwide in over 6000 products. The purpose of this investigation was to review the scientific literature on the absorption and metabolism, the current consumption levels worldwide, the toxicology, and recent epidemiological studies on aspartame. Current use levels of aspartame, even by high users in special subgroups, remains well below the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority established acceptable daily intake levels of 50 and 40 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. Consumption of large doses of aspartame in a single bolus dose will have an effect on some biochemical parameters, including plasma amino acid levels and brain neurotransmitter levels. The rise in plasma levels of phenylalanine and aspartic acid following administration of aspartame at doses less than or equal to 50 mg/kg bw do not exceed those observed postprandially. Acute, subacute and chronic toxicity studies with aspartame, and its decomposition products, conducted in mice, rats, hamsters and dogs have consistently found no adverse effect of aspartame with doses up to at least 4000 mg/kg bw/day. Critical review of all carcinogenicity studies conducted on aspartame found no credible evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. The data from the extensive investigations into the possibility of neurotoxic effects of aspartame, in general, do not support the hypothesis that aspartame in the human diet will affect nervous system function, learning or behavior. Epidemiological studies on aspartame include several case-control studies and one well-conducted prospective epidemiological study with a large cohort, in which the consumption of aspartame was measured. The studies provide no evidence to support an association between aspartame and cancer in any tissue. The weight of existing evidence is that aspartame is safe at current levels of consumption as a nonnutritive

  12. Epidemiological evidence of a relationship between type-1 diabetes mellitus and cancer: a review of the existing literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon-Dseagu, V. L.; Shelton, N.; Mindell, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the epidemiological evidence relating to type-1 diabetes (T1DM) and cancer incidence and mortality. Mortality rates among those with T1DM are higher in every age group compared with the general population; the majority of this mortality is due to factors related to the consequences of diabetes, such as cardiovascular and renal disease. For over 100 years, researchers have explored the relationships between diabetes and cancer and although there is now a large body of work...

  13. Shift work and cancer: Night work and breast cancer – results from a large prospective study in the Dutch general working population. Oral presentations: Day 1: Wednesday, September 7, 2011. 22nd International Conference on Epidemiology in Occupational Health EPICOH 2011 September 7-9, 2011, Oxford, UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.; Vroome, E. de; Weerd, M. de; Koppes, L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Despite the current debate, few prospective studies on night work and breast cancer have been performed, and the scientific evidence is limited. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the relation between night work and breast cancer in the general working population. Method

  14. Development of infrastructure for epidemiological studies in Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 raised worldwide concern about the health effects of the radiation fallout. International collaborations were established between scientist; to investigate the long-term consequences of the accident. However, lack of knowledge abut the mechanisms of data collection and the quality of basic epidemiological tools, such as mortality and cancer incidence, has been recognized as a major limitation for the conduct of epidemiological investigations according to international standards in the Newly Independent States (NIS). In the framework of a collaboration which aims to develop and implement epidemiological infrastructure in Belarus, the Russian Federation and he Ukraine, a survey on cancer registration techniques was conducted. A system of compulsory reporting of all new cases of cancer was introduced in 1953 throughout hie former Soviet Union for health planning purposes. This cancer registration system, however, was developed entirely independent from similar activities in other parts of hie World. In each of the countries surveyed, a nationwide network of regional dispensary-based cancer registries exists. Cancer registration in the NIS relies on passive reporting from hospital and laboratory sources. Death certificates are searched actively. Whereas: in Belarus and the Ukraine computerized cancer registration has been developed in recent years, cancer registration in most areas of the Russian Federation is still a manual operation. Although computerization was identified as the major objective in all tree countries, further efforts are required to assess the completeness and the quality of the information collected. The introduction of internationally recognized classifications wold considerably improve the comparability with registries in other parts of the World. In addition to preparing annual statistics for health planning purposes, cancer registries should consider reporting cancer incidence for research purposes following

  15. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields. PMID:26344172

  16. Epidemiologic Study of One Million American Workers and Military Veterans Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John D.

    2015-02-27

    A pilot study was completed demonstrating the feasibility of conducting an epidemiologic study assessing cancer and other disease mortality among nearly one million US veterans and workers exposed to ionizing radiation, a population 10 times larger than atomic bomb survivor study with high statistical power to evaluate low dose rate effects. Among the groups enumerated and/or studied were: (1) 194,000 Department of Energy Uranium Workers; (2) 6,700 Rocketdyne Radiation Workers; (3) 7,000 Mound Radiation Workers; (4) 156,000 DOE Plutonium Workers; (5) 212,000 Nuclear Power Plant Workers; (6) 130,000 Industrial Radiography Workers; (7) 1.7 million Medical Workers and (8) 135,000 Atomic Veterans.

  17. A Clinico- Epidemiological Study Of Filarial Related Orthopaedic Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patond K.R

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological study was undertaken to study the incidence and distribution of orthopaedic manifestations of filariasis in an endemic area. A total of 207 cases were clinically examined and investigated. Patients were divided into three groups , viz., Group A: Orthopaedic manifestations with no history of filariasis . Group B: Orthopaedic manifestations with history of filariasis such as microfilaraemia or filarial fevers etc., Group C: Orthopaedic manifestations with chronic manifestations such as elephantiasis, hydrocele etc. To confirm filarial etiology, all the cases were examined for the presence of filarial antibody by indirect ELISA using wuchereda bancrofti microfilarial excretory- secretary antigen (wd Mf ESAg . A total of 61 of 102 patients of Group A, 14 of 21 patients of group B, and 73 of 84 patients of Group C were positive for filarial antibody. This study showed the prevalence of filarial antibody in about 71.4% of various orthopaedic manifestations.

  18. Asymptomatic infection with American cutaneous leishmaniasis: epidemiological and immunological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika I; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is a major public health problem caused by vector-borne protozoan intracellular parasites from the genus Leishmania, subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. Asymptomatic infection is the most common outcome after Leishmania inoculation. There is incomplete knowledge of the biological processes explaining the absence of signs or symptoms in most cases while other cases present a variety of clinical findings. Most studies of asymptomatic infection have been conducted in areas of endemic visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, asymptomatic ACL infection has been neglected. This review is focused on the following: (1) epidemiological studies supporting the existence of asymptomatic ACL infection and (2) immunological studies conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for controlling the parasite and avoiding tissue damage. PMID:27759762

  19. Myasthenia Gravis: a population-based epidemiological study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rutledge, S

    2016-02-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a disorder affecting components of the neuromuscular junction. Epidemiological studies show rising incidence and prevalence rates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and prevalence of MG in the Republic of Ireland. Data sources included patient lists from consultant neurologists and ophthalmologists, a neuroimmunology laboratory, general practitioners and the Myasthenia Gravis Association. A total of 1,715 cases were identified, of which 706 definite, probable or possible autoimmune and congenital MG cases were included. The overall prevalence rate from the data obtained is 15.38\\/100,000. The study demonstrated a female preponderance (female:male of 1.3: 1) and some geographical variation within Ireland. The average incidence rate for the years 2000 to 2009 was 11.3 per year; the rate for the current decade is 18 per year. The increasing number of diagnoses may be due to improved access to diagnostic investigations and increasing awareness of the clinical manifestations.

  20. Malignant bowel obstruction in advanced cancer patients: epidemiology, management, and factors influencing spontaneous resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuca A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Tuca1, Ernest Guell2, Emilio Martinez-Losada3, Nuria Codorniu41Cancer and Hematological Diseases Institute, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Palliative Care Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 3Palliative Care Unit, Institut Català Oncologia Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català Oncologia L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO is a frequent complication in advanced cancer patients, especially in those with abdominal tumors. Clinical management of MBO requires a specific and individualized approach that is based on disease prognosis and the objectives of care. The global prevalence of MBO is estimated to be 3% to 15% of cancer patients. Surgery should always be considered for patients in the initial stages of the disease with a preserved general status and a single level of occlusion. Less invasive approaches such as duodenal or colonic stenting should be considered when surgery is contraindicated in obstructions at the single level. The priority of care for inoperable and consolidated MBO is to control symptoms and promote the maximum level of comfort possible. The spontaneous resolution of an inoperable obstructive process is observed in more than one third of patients. The mean survival is of no longer than 4–5 weeks in patients with consolidated MBO. Polymodal medical treatment based on a combination of glucocorticoids, strong opioids, antiemetics, and antisecretory drugs achieves very high symptomatic control. This review focuses on the epidemiological aspects, diagnosis, surgical criteria, medical management, and factors influencing the spontaneous resolution of MBO in advanced cancer patients.Keywords: malignant bowel obstruction, cancer, intestinal obstruction, bowel occlusion

  1. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): An extension of the STROBE statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, V.; Egger, M.; McCormack, V.; Farmer, P.B.; Ioannidis, J.P.; Kirsch-Volders, M.; Matullo, G.; Phillips, D.H.; Schoket, B.; Stromberg, U.; Vermeulen, R.; Wild, C.; Porta, M.; Vineis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility, and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating the interactions between external and/or endogenous agent

  2. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): An extension of the STROBE statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, V.; Egger, M.; McCormack, V.; Farmer, P.B.; Ioannidis, J.P.; Kirsch-Volders, M.; Matullo, G.; Phillips, D.H.; Schoket, B.; Stromberg, U.; Vermeulen, R.; Wild, C.; Porta, M.; Vineis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating interactions between external and / or endogenous agents a

  3. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): An extension of the STROBE statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, V.; Egger, M.; McCormack, V.; Farmer, P.B.; Ioannidis, J.P.; Kirsch-Volders, M.; Matullo, G.; Phillips, D.H.; Schoket, B.; Stromberg, U.; Vermeulen, R.; Wild, C.; Porta, M.; Vineis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2012; 42 (1): 1-16 SUMMARY POINTS: Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating inter

  4. Epidemiological studies of the respiratory effects of air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, M D

    1996-05-01

    Environmental epidemiological studies of the health effects of air pollution have been major contributors to the understanding of such effects. The chronic effects of atmospheric pollutants have been studied, but, except for the known respiratory effects of particulate matter (PM), they have not been studied conclusively. There are ongoing studies of the chronic effects of certain pollutant classes, such as ozone, acid rain, airborne toxics, and the chemical form of PM (including diesel exhaust). Acute effects on humans due to outdoor and indoor exposures to several gases/fumes and PM have been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. However, the effects of these environmental factors on susceptible individuals are not known conclusively. These acute effects are especially important because they increase the human burden of minor illnesses, increase disability, and are thought to decrease productivity. They may be related to the increased likelihood of chronic disease as well. Further research is needed in this latter area, to determine the contributions of the time-related activities of individuals in different microenvironments (outdoors, in homes, in transit). Key elements of further studies are the assessment of total exposure to the different pollutants (occurring from indoor and outdoor source) and the interactive effects of pollutants. Major research areas include determination of the contributions of indoor sources and of vehicle emissions to total exposure, how to measure such exposures, and how to measure human susceptibility and responses (including those at the cellular and molecular level). Biomarkers of exposures, doses and responses, including immunochemicals, biochemicals and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) adducts, are beginning to promote some basic knowledge of exposure-response, especially the mechanisms. These will be extremely useful additions to standard physiological, immunological, and clinical instruments, and the understanding of biological

  5. Descriptive Study on the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Coal-producing Area in Eastern Yunnan, China%滇东产(燃)煤区农民肺癌流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继华; 张云生; 李云; 殷国青; 李玥冰; 宁伯福; 国家敏

    2011-01-01

    .37%,主要从事农业生产和做饭、喂养牛猪等室内家务工作,吸烟、职业危害不是女性肺癌的丰要发病因素,但可能是男性肺癌发病比女性严重的影响因素.结论 肺癌高发与室内外烟煤污染、家族易感性有关联,吸烟、采煤、炼焦不是女性肺癌的主要因素.%Background and objective Xuanwei county is located at Late Permian coal-accumulating area in eastern Yunnan and western Guizhou, China.The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei county is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).Recent years, the pollution and the higher mortality rate of lung cancer has been watched in the area around Xuanwei,and there is no report about whether the epidemic levels and the pathogen of lung cancer in other area of eastern Yunnan is similar to that in xuanwei.The aim of this study is to epidemic levels and cause of lung cancer in coal-producing area in the east of Yunnan province.Methods 382 study units (nature villages) were selected by stratified cluster random sampling from coalproducing area in eastern Yunnan province, China.The villagers who were aged 30-79 years with no history of lung cancer were enrolled.AlI the participants received an initial single-view posterior-anterior chest radiograph and administered a questionnaire survey (which involves the information of demography, household and fuel use, lifestyle, tobacco and occupational exp osure history, family and personal medical history, etc.The subjects with a positive screen by chest x-ray underwent to have a computed tomography scan of the chest and biopsy examination.The confidence interval of the standardized rate ratio were adopted to evaluate the statistical significance of differences in different regions.Results 5 2, 833 villagers were surveyed and screened with X-ray.604 of them were suspicious lung cancer with an initial

  6. Dose Reconstruction for the Million Worker Epidemiologic Study: Status and Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouville, A.; Toohey, Richard E.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold L.; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hagemeyer, Derek A.; Leggett, Richard W.; Miller, Donald L.; Mumma, Michael T.; Napier, Bruce A.; Pryor, Kathryn H.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Schauer, David A.; Sherbini, Sami; Stram, Daniel; Thompson, James L.; Till, John E.; Yoder, Craig; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-02-16

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans (the Million-Worker study) is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time, and not acutely as was the case for Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiological study is cancer mortality but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide unbiased estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses and their accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the Million-Worker study are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 years. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, DOE workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma-ray or x-ray sources, for certain of the study groups there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that require internal radiation dosimetry measures. Scientific Committee 6-9 has been established by NCRP to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the Million-Worker study. The Committee’s report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Reports 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the Committee is to provide guidelines to the various groups of dosimetrists involved in the various components of the Million

  7. Magnetic field effects on humans: epidemiological study design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budinger, T.F.; Wong, P.; Yen, C.K.

    1978-10-01

    This report presents details of the study design and methods for a retrospective epidemiological study on the health effects, if any, of stationary and alternating magnetic fields produced by man-made devices such as cyclotrons, controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR), high voltage-high current transmission lines, magnetohydrodynamic devices (MHD), energy storage systems, and isotope separation facilities. The magnetic fields to which the workers can be exposed are as high as 10,000 gauss and the anticipated increase in magnetic fields associated with the environment and transmission lines near these devices is a few times the natural earth magnetic field. Thus the objectives include acquisition of low exposure data which can be used to evaluate any risks to the population incidentally exposed to environmental increases in magnetic fields, as well as an acquisition of high exposure data to be used in determining allowable exposure standards for the technical personnel working at CTR and MHD facilities. From the present status of knowledge on biological effects of magnetic fields, it is not possible to extrapolate or rationally conclude maximum permissible exposure levels for magnetic device workers and the population at large. There are no known previous studies of the effects of long-term exposure to magnetic fields involving large samples and matched controls. Thus this human epidemiological study was commenced in 1977 in parallel with experimental studies on biological and medical effects of magnetic fields being conducted by Dr. T. Tenforde and co-workers at LBL, by investigators at Battelle Northwest, and smaller projects at a number of laboratories around the world. The data base for the exposed population is comprised of approximately 1,000 cyclotron and bubble chamber workers.

  8. Quality control for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornkessel, C; Blettner, M; Breckenkamp, J;

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of an epidemiological study, dosemeters were used for the assessment of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. To check the correct dosemeter's performance in terms of consistency of recorded field values over the entire study period, a quality control strategy...... was developed. In this paper, the concept of quality control and its results is described. From the 20 dosemeters used, 19 were very stable and reproducible, with deviations of a maximum of +/-1 dB compared with their initial state. One device was found to be faulty and its measurement data had to be excluded...... from the analysis. As a result of continuous quality control procedures, the confidence in the measurements obtained during the field work was strengthened significantly....

  9. 体力活动与结肠癌关系前瞻性研究的Meta分析%Epidemiological prospective studies on physical activities and the risk of colon cancer: a Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨万水; 谭玉婷; 刘大可; 高姗; 高静; 项永兵

    2010-01-01

    目的 索体力活动与结肠癌发生的病因学联系.方法 集和整理1979-2009年国内外公开发表的体力活动与结肠癌关系的队列研究文献,开展Meta分析.其中,各文献RR值的合并采用倒方差法或DerSimonian-Laird method(D-L)法,剂量-反应关系的评价采用方差加权的最小二乘法.结果 入Meta分析的文献共28篇.与低体力活动者相比,男、女性高体力活动者结肠癌RR值分别为0.75(95%CI:0.66~0.86)、0.85(95%CI:0.76~0.95).高质量文献分析显示体力活动与结肠癌,男性RR=0.74(95%CI:0.61~0.90)、女性接近统计学意义的RR=0.99(95%CI:0.95~1.02).男、女性中均未观察到明显的剂量-反应关系,趋势检验分别为P=0.142和P=0.417.结肠亚部位分析结果显示,增加体力活动与男性近端(右侧)结肠癌与远端(左侧)结肠癌发生均有关联,合并RR值分别为0.62(95%CI:0.45~0.85)和0.74(95%CI:0.56~0.99).结论 增加体力活动可以降低结肠癌发生的危险性.%Objective To explore the relationship between physical activity(PA) and the risk of colon cancer. Methods Cohort studies on physical activity and risk of colon cancer were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Bio-medicine and Chinese Wanfang databases from January 1979 to December 2009. Results from the individual studies were synthetically combined in our study. Inverse variance weighting was used in fixed effects model and the random effects estimate was based on the DerSimonian-Laird method. Variance-weighted least squares method was used for trend test of summarized dose-response data. Results A total of 28 studies were included in our analysis. An inverse association between physical activities and the risk of colon cancer was observed with the relative risks (RR) as 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.86] in males and 0.85(95%CI: 0.76-0.95)in females, respectively. However, the findings from those documents with high quality showed significant and

  10. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Research Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview In 2016, it ... Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer .) The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study ( CCSS ), funded by the National ...

  11. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years) and Older (>40 Years) Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Wang; Yu Ren; Hongyuan Li; Ke Zheng; Jun Jiang; Tianning Zou; Binlin Ma; Hui Li; Qilun Liu; Jianghua Ou; Ling Wang; Wei Wei; Jianjun He; Guosheng Ren

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multi...

  12. Epidemiologic evidence for chloroprene carcinogenicity: review of study quality and its application to risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, John Arthur

    2009-09-01

    This article evaluates the quality and weight of evidence associated with epidemiologic studies of cancer among occupational cohorts exposed to chloroprene. The focus is on liver, lung, and lymphohematopoietic cancers, which had been increased in early studies. Literature searches identified eight morbidity/mortality studies covering seven chloroprene-exposed cohorts from six countries. These studies were summarized and their quality was assessed using the 10 criteria suggested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The limitations within this literature (primarily the early studies) included crude exposure assessment, incomplete follow-up, uncertain baseline rates, and uncontrolled confounding by factors such as smoking, drinking, and co-exposure to benzene and vinyl chloride. Four cohorts were studied by the same group of investigators, who reported no overall increased associations for any cancers. This four-cohort study was by far the most rigorous, having the most comprehensive exposure assessment and follow-up and the most detailed documentation. This study also contained the two largest cohorts, including an American cohort from Louisville, Kentucky, that ranked at or near the top for each of the 10 quality criteria. There was evidence of a strong healthy worker effect in the four-cohort study, which could have hidden small excess risks. Small increased risks were suggested by internal or company-specific analyses, but these were most likely caused by uncontrolled confounding and low baseline rates. Overall, the weight of evidence does not support any substantial link between chloroprene exposure and cancer, but inconsistencies and a lack of control for major confounders preclude drawing firmer conclusions.

  13. An epidemiological study of dengue in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Kumar; Nagpal, B N; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Anvikar, Anup; Das, Aparup; Singh, Himmat; Anushrita; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Tuli, N R; Telle, Olivier; Yadav, N K; Valecha, Neena; Paul, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Delhi, the capital of India, is an important metropolitan hub for major financial and sociocultural exchanges, offering challenging threats to current public health infrastructure. In recent past, an upsurge of dengue cases in Delhi posed a significant menace to the existing dengue control policies. To reform the control strategies and take timely intervention to prevent future epidemics, an epidemiological study on the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in selected population was conducted. The aim of the study was to investigate and assess the epidemiology of dengue infection and to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in Delhi. In this study, around 50 confirmed dengue cases, a total of 2125 individuals as household and neighbourhood contacts, with or without dengue febrile illness, were finger pricked and serologically detected as dengue positive or negative using SD Duo Bioline Rapid Diagnostic Test (SD Inc, Korea) with NS1, IgM & IgG combo test, which detected dengue virus antigen and antibodies to dengue virus in human blood. Out of 2125 individuals, 768 (36.1%) individuals showed positive dengue test with past (25.5%), primary (1.88%) or secondary (8.8%) dengue infections. Higher percentage of IgG was found in age groups 15-24 years and 25-50 years (36% each). Infants (dengue infection was either primary or secondary. On the basis of these results, it may be hypothesized that there are large number of asymptomatic dengue infections in the community as compared to reported symptomatic cases in Delhi. For the effective control of dengue transmission in such community like Delhi where dengue epidemics have frequently been encountered, it is essential to ascertain the proportion of asymptomatic dengue infections which may act as a reservoir for dengue transmission, as well as threat for developing dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). PMID:26433076

  14. An epidemiological study of dengue in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Kumar; Nagpal, B N; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Anvikar, Anup; Das, Aparup; Singh, Himmat; Anushrita; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Tuli, N R; Telle, Olivier; Yadav, N K; Valecha, Neena; Paul, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Delhi, the capital of India, is an important metropolitan hub for major financial and sociocultural exchanges, offering challenging threats to current public health infrastructure. In recent past, an upsurge of dengue cases in Delhi posed a significant menace to the existing dengue control policies. To reform the control strategies and take timely intervention to prevent future epidemics, an epidemiological study on the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in selected population was conducted. The aim of the study was to investigate and assess the epidemiology of dengue infection and to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic and symptomatic dengue infections in Delhi. In this study, around 50 confirmed dengue cases, a total of 2125 individuals as household and neighbourhood contacts, with or without dengue febrile illness, were finger pricked and serologically detected as dengue positive or negative using SD Duo Bioline Rapid Diagnostic Test (SD Inc, Korea) with NS1, IgM & IgG combo test, which detected dengue virus antigen and antibodies to dengue virus in human blood. Out of 2125 individuals, 768 (36.1%) individuals showed positive dengue test with past (25.5%), primary (1.88%) or secondary (8.8%) dengue infections. Higher percentage of IgG was found in age groups 15-24 years and 25-50 years (36% each). Infants (dengue infection was either primary or secondary. On the basis of these results, it may be hypothesized that there are large number of asymptomatic dengue infections in the community as compared to reported symptomatic cases in Delhi. For the effective control of dengue transmission in such community like Delhi where dengue epidemics have frequently been encountered, it is essential to ascertain the proportion of asymptomatic dengue infections which may act as a reservoir for dengue transmission, as well as threat for developing dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF).

  15. An epidemiological evaluation of salivary gland cancer in the Netherlands (1989-2010)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Mischa; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relative 5-year survival rate of salivary gland cancer is moderate at best. This study was set up to evaluate whether the improvements in diagnosis and treatment in the last decades impacted the incidence, mortality and survival of salivary gland cancer. Methods: Data on patients wit

  16. Epidemiology of childhood and adolescent cancer in Bangladesh, 2001-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Hossain (Mohammad Sorowar); M. Begum (Mamtaz); M.M. Mian (Md Mahmuduzzaman); S. Ferdous (Shameema); S. Kabir (Shahinur); H.K. Sarker (Humayun Kabir); S. Karim (Sabina); S. Choudhury (Salma); A. Khan (Asaduzzaman); Z.J. Khan (Zohora Jameela); H.E. Karim-Kos (Henrike)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cancer burden among children and adolescents is largely unknown in Bangladesh. This study aims to provide a comprehensive overview on childhood and adolescent cancers and to contribute to the future strategies to deal with these diseases in Bangladesh. Methods: Data on malign

  17. Progress against cancer in the Netherlands since the late 1980s: an epidemiological evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim-Kos, H.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Louwman, M.W.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Vries, E. de

    2012-01-01

    Progress against cancer through prevention and treatment is often measured by survival statistics only instead of analyzing trends in incidence, survival and mortality simultaneously because of interactive influences. This study combines these parameters of major cancers to provide an overview of th

  18. Statin use and breast cancer survival: a nationwide cohort study in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    McMenamin, Una C.; Murray, Liam J; Hughes, Carmel M.; Cardwell, Chris R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preclinical evidence suggests that statins could delay cancer progression. Previous epidemiological findings have been inconsistent and some have been limited by small sample sizes, as well as certain time-related biases. This study aimed to investigate whether breast cancer patients who were exposed to statins had reduced breast cancer-specific mortality. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 15,140 newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer patients diagnosed from 20...

  19. An overview of the epidemiological studies in DRUID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    .g. Northern, Western, Southern and Eastern Europe) will be compared in order to reveal any differences regarding use of psychoactive substances. Disclaimer This abstract has been produced under the project “Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines” (DRUID) financed by the European Community......Objectives: To describe the various epidemiological studies within the DRUID project (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines). Methods: Several methodological approaches are used both for estimating the prevalence of drug driving and the accident risk for drug impaired drivers......, each with different sensitivity and specificity. Results: The prevalence in the general population is described my means of a literature review. The prevalence of drug driving is estimated by means of road side surveys and a travel survey and the prevalence of drugs in injury accidents is estimated...

  20. Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal cancers in Iran: A Sub site analysis of 76t cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To define the sub site distribution of upper gastrointestinal cancers in three provinces of Tran. METHODS: The study was carried out in three provinces in Tran: Ardabil, Golestan, and Tehran. Tn Arbabil and Golestan, the data was collected from the sole referral center for gastrointestinal cancers and the local cancer registry. For Tehran province, data from two major private hospitals were used. All gastric and esophageal cancer patients diagnosed during the period from September 2000 and April 2002 were included in the study. RESULTS: A total of 761 patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers were identified, 314 from Ardabil, 261 from Golestan, and 186 from Tehran. In Tehran, the relative rate of cancer increased from the upper esophagus to the distal stomach. In Golestan, the reverse pattern was observed. In Ardabil, the mid portion (distal esophagus and proximal stomach) was involved most frequently. CONCLUSION: There were considerable variations in the sub site of upper gastrointestinal cancers in the three provinces studied. We cannot provide any explanation for this variation. Further research aimed at explaining the discrepancies in sub site distribution of upper gastrointestinal cancers may help identify important risk factors.

  1. Epidemiología del cáncer en adolescentes The epidemiology of cancer in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    María Luisa Cuevas-Urióstegui; Miguel Angel Villasís-Keever; Arturo Fajardo-Gutiérrez

    2003-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Revisar los artículos publicados sobre la epidemiología del cáncer en adolescentes en el ámbito mundial. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se revisó la literatura médica (Medline) nacional e internacional para un periodo de 15 años (1985-1999). Se calcularon frecuencias. RESULTADOS: En general se conoce poco de la epidemiología del cáncer en adolescentes porque es difícil el registro de los casos que se presentan en el grupo de 12 a 18 años. Como adolescentes se ha tomado al grupo de 10 a 14 o el...

  2. Pontiac fever: an operational definition for epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Laurence

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pontiac fever is usually described in epidemic settings. Detection of Pontiac fever is a marker of an environmental contamination by Legionella and should thereby call for prevention measures in order to prevent outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. The objective of this study is to propose an operational definition of Pontiac fever that is amenable to epidemiological surveillance and investigation in a non epidemic setting. Methods A population of 560 elderly subjects residing in 25 nursing homes was followed during 4 months in order to assess the daily incidence of symptoms associated, in the literature, with Pontiac fever. The water and aerosol of one to 8 showers by nursing home were characterized combining conventional bacterial culture of Legionella and the Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH technique that used oligonucleotides probes specific for Legionellaceae. A definition of Pontiac fever was devised based on clinical symptoms described in epidemic investigations and on their timing after the exposure event. The association between incidence of Pontiac fever and shower contamination levels was evaluated to test the relevance of this definition. Results The proposed definition of Pontiac fever associated the following criteria: occurrence of at least one symptom among headache, myalgia, fever and shivers, possibly associated with other 'minor' symptoms, within three days after a shower contaminated by Legionella, during a maximum of 8 days (minimum 2 days. 23 such cases occurred during the study (incidence rate: 0.125 cases per person-year [95% CI: 0.122–0.127]. A concentration of Legionella in water equal to or greater than 104.L-1 (FISH method was associated with a significant increase of incidence of Pontiac fever (p = 0.04. Conclusion Once validated in other settings, the proposed definition of Pontiac fever might be used to develop epidemiological surveillance and help draw attention on sources of

  3. Bat rabies in France: a 24-year retrospective epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Picard-Meyer

    Full Text Available Since bat rabies surveillance was first implemented in France in 1989, 48 autochthonous rabies cases without human contamination have been reported using routine diagnosis methods. In this retrospective study, data on bats submitted for rabies testing were analysed in order to better understand the epidemiology of EBLV-1 in bats in France and to investigate some epidemiological trends. Of the 3176 bats submitted for rabies diagnosis from 1989 to 2013, 1.96% (48/2447 analysed were diagnosed positive. Among the twelve recognised virus species within the Lyssavirus genus, two species were isolated in France. 47 positive bats were morphologically identified as Eptesicus serotinus and were shown to be infected by both the EBLV-1a and the EBLV-1b lineages. Isolation of BBLV in Myotis nattereri was reported once in the north-east of France in 2012. The phylogenetic characterisation of all 47 French EBLV-1 isolates sampled between 1989 and 2013 and the French BBLV sample against 21 referenced partial nucleoprotein sequences confirmed the low genetic diversity of EBLV-1 despite its extensive geographical range. Statistical analysis performed on the serotine bat data collected from 1989 to 2013 showed seasonal variation of rabies occurrence with a significantly higher proportion of positive samples detected during the autumn compared to the spring and the summer period (34% of positive bats detected in autumn, 15% in summer, 13% in spring and 12% in winter. In this study, we have provided the details of the geographical distribution of EBLV-1a in the south-west of France and the north-south division of EBLV-1b with its subdivisions into three phylogenetic groups: group B1 in the north-west, group B2 in the centre and group B3 in the north-east of France.

  4. Dairy foods, calcium, and colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, E.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Beeson, W.L.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Colditz, G.A.; Folsom, A.R.; Fraser, G.E.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Pietinen, P.; Potter, J.D.; Rohan, T.E.; Terry, P.; Toniolo, P.; Virtanen, M.J.; Willet, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Wu, K.; Yaun, S.-S.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Studies in animals have suggested that calcium may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, results from epidemiologic studies of intake of calcium or dairy foods and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: We pooled the primary data from 10 cohort studies in five c

  5. Biomarkers of genotoxicity of urban air pollution. Overview and descriptive data from a molecular epidemiology study on populations exposed to moderate-to-low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: the AULIS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrtopoulos, S.A.; Georgiadis, P.; Autrup, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to high pollution levels is associated with increased risk of cancer, especially lung cancer. However, under conditions of moderate or low air pollution, epidemiologic evidence does not permit reliable conclusions. Biomarker-based population ......-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), no simple correlation with biomarkers of genotoxicity existed and suggest that additional factors made a significant contribution to the overall genotoxic burden....

  6. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  7. Epidemiology of lung cancer in India: Focus on the differences between non-smokers and smokers: A single-centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Noronha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lung cancer has varied epidemiology depending on the geographic region. Globally, there have been important changes in incidence trends amongst men and women, histology, and incidence in non-smokers. Indian epidemiological data on lung cancer is scarce. Aims: We set out to study the epidemiological patterns and clinical profile of lung cancer in India. Materials and Methods: We interviewed patients discussed in the thoracic oncology multidisciplinary meetings between 2008 and 2009. Demographic data, smoking history, place of residence, histology, stage at presentation, and treatment details were collected. Data was entered and analyzed in SPSS. Results: There were 489 patients, with a median age of 56 years, of which 255 (52% were non-smokers and 234 (48% were smokers. One hundred and thirty-three patients had consumed smokeless tobacco. The male-to-female ratio was 3.5:1. Sixty-nine patients (14.1% were incorrectly diagnosed and treated with anti-tuberculosis treatment, which delayed the diagnosis of lung cancer by four months. Eight percent of patients had small-cell carcinoma; of the 92% patients with non-small-cell carcinoma (NSCLC, the most common histology was adenocarcinoma (43.8%, followed by squamous cell (26.2%, large cell (2.1% and other (8.3%. Eighteen percent of patients were diagnosed by cytology, therefore were diagnosed as NSCLC, without further histologic subtyping. Most patients (43% were in Stage III at presentation. Lung followed by bone were the common sites of metastases. The majority of the patients (49% received palliative chemotherapy. Among definitive therapy, concurrent chemo-radiation (13% was offered more frequently than surgery (6%. Conclusion: Considerably higher numbers of Indian patients with lung cancer are non-smokers, compared to the West. The global trend of rise in adenocarcinoma is paralleled in India. Non-tobacco-related risk factors need further investigation.

  8. Epidemiological study on acute cutaneous leishmaniasis in Morocco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kholoud Kahime; Samia Boussaa; Haddou Nhammi; Ali Boumezzough

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare the epidemiological features of anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) caused by Leishmania tropica, and zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) due to Leishmania major in Morocco. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of ZCL and ACL cases reported during the last ten years in Morocco (2004–2013). Epidemiological data were analyzed by using Pearson's correlation method as well as Tukey test and digital maps were produced for incidence repartition calculated by using ArcMap GIS version 10. Results: A total of 41 656 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were notified between 2004 and 2013 in Morocco. The mean incidence was 139 cases/100 000 population/10 years and it was significantly higher in 2010. In the spatial context, ACL form was the most common in Morocco, while ZCL was the most important in terms of the number of reported cases. For both forms, the highest incidence occurred in females and children (0–14 years). When analyzed according to the number of cases in each province, Errachidia (8 728 cases) and Azilal (3 523 cases) were the most affected by ZCL and ACL, respectively, while the highest incidence was noted in Zagora (231 cases/100 000 pop-ulation/10 years) and in Chichaoua (97 cases/100 000 population/10 years), for ZCL and ACL, respectively. Maps of incidence repartition were performed to identify the risk area of ZCL and ACL. Conclusions: ZCL and ACL are still major health problems in Morocco. We highlight the spatiotemporal change of cutaneous leishmaniasis incidence through the country during the last ten years and we underline the correlation between ZCL incidence and the percentage of rural population in Morocco.

  9. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  10. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years) and Older (>40 Years) Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyuan; Zheng, Ke; Jiang, Jun; Zou, Tianning; Ma, Binlin; Li, Hui; Liu, Qilun; Ou, Jianghua; Wang, Ling; Wei, Wei; He, Jianjun; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. There were 2,682 young (≤40 years) cases and 9,527 older cases at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Young patients had a greater tumor diameter at diagnosis, and a higher probability of axillary lymph node and distant metastasis (P menarche was earlier, they had lower marriage rates, fewer pregnancies and births, and a lower breastfeeding rate (P 40 years) female breast cancer patients in West China. As some of these results differ from those found in the western female population, it is likely that the mechanism of tumorigenesis of young female breast cancer patients in West China may differ from that in western developed countries. Further investigation into the regional differences in breast cancer tumorigenesis is warranted. PMID:27031236

  11. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years and Older (>40 Years Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wang

    Full Text Available The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. There were 2,682 young (≤40 years cases and 9,527 older cases at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Young patients had a greater tumor diameter at diagnosis, and a higher probability of axillary lymph node and distant metastasis (P 40 years female breast cancer patients in West China. As some of these results differ from those found in the western female population, it is likely that the mechanism of tumorigenesis of young female breast cancer patients in West China may differ from that in western developed countries. Further investigation into the regional differences in breast cancer tumorigenesis is warranted.

  12. Comparison of Clinicopathological Features and Treatments between Young (≤40 Years) and Older (>40 Years) Female Breast Cancer Patients in West China: A Retrospective, Epidemiological, Multicenter, Case Only Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Ren, Yu; Li, Hongyuan; Zheng, Ke; Jiang, Jun; Zou, Tianning; Ma, Binlin; Li, Hui; Liu, Qilun; Ou, Jianghua; Wang, Ling; Wei, Wei; He, Jianjun; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of young cases of breast cancer is higher in China compared to the western world. We aimed to explore differences in risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes of young female breast cancer compared to older patients in West China. We collected clinical information from 12,209 female breast cancer patients in West China, including risk factors, clinicopathological features and treatment modes, from January 2010 to December 2012. Chi-square tests and the multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied for statistical analysis. There were 2,682 young (≤40 years) cases and 9,527 older cases at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Young patients had a greater tumor diameter at diagnosis, and a higher probability of axillary lymph node and distant metastasis (P 40 years) female breast cancer patients in West China. As some of these results differ from those found in the western female population, it is likely that the mechanism of tumorigenesis of young female breast cancer patients in West China may differ from that in western developed countries. Further investigation into the regional differences in breast cancer tumorigenesis is warranted.

  13. East meets West: ethnic differences in prostate cancer epidemiology between East Asians and Caucasians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomomi Kimura

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in Western countries.The reported incidence in Asia is much lower than that in African Americans and European Caucasians.Although the lack of systematic prostate cancer screening system in Asian countries explains part of the difference,this alone cannot fully explain the-lower incidence in Asian immigrants in the United States and west-European countries compared to the black and non-Hispanic white in those countries,nor the somewhat better prognosis in Asian immigrants with prostate cancer in the United States.Soy food consumption,more popular in Asian populations,is associated with a 25% to 30% reduced risk of prostate cancer.Prostatespecific antigen(PSA) is the only established and routinely implemented clinical biomarker for prostate cancer detection and disease status.Other biomarkers,such as urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 RNA,may increase accuracy of prostate cancer screening compared to PSA alone.Several susceptible loci have been identified in genetic linkage analyses in populations of countries in the West,and approximately 30 genetic polymorphisms have been reported to modestly increase the prostate cancer risk in genomewide association studies.Most of the identified polymorphisms are reproducible regardless of ethnicity.Somatic mutations in the genomes of prostate tumors have been repeatedly reported to include deletion and gain of the 8p and 8q chromosomal regions,respectively; epigenetic gene silencing of glutathione Stransferase Pi (GSTP1); as well as mutations in androgen receptor gene.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis,aggressiveness,and prognosis of prostate cancer remain largely unknown.Gene-gene and/or gene-environment interactions still need to be learned.In this review,the differences in PSA screening practice,reported incidence and prognosis of prostate cancer,and genetic factors between the populations in East and West factors are discussed.

  14. East meets West: ethnic differences in prostate cancer epidemiology between East Asians and Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Kimura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in Western countries. The reported incidence in Asia is much lower than that in African Americans and European Caucasians. Although the lack of systematic prostate cancer screening system in Asian countries explains part of the difference, this alone cannot fully explain the lower incidence in Asian immigrants in the United States and west-European countries compared to the black and non-Hispanic white in those countries, nor the somewhat better prognosis in Asian immigrants with prostate cancer in the United States. Soy food consumption, more popular in Asian populations, is associated with a 25% to 30% reduced risk of prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen(PSA is the only established and routinely implemented clinical biomarker for prostate cancer detection and disease status. Other biomarkers, such as urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 RNA, may increase accuracy of prostate cancer screening compared to PSA alone. Several susceptible loci have been identified in genetic linkage analyses in populations of countries in the West, and approximately 30 genetic polymorphisms have been reported to modestly increase the prostate cancer risk in genome-wide association studies. Most of the identified polymorphisms are reproducible regardless of ethnicity. Somatic mutations in the genomes of prostate tumors have been repeatedly reported to include deletion and gain of the 8p and 8q chromosomal regions, respectively; epigenetic gene silencing of glutathione S-transferase Pi(GSTP1; as well as mutations in androgen receptor gene. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis, aggressiveness, and prognosis of prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Gene-gene and/or gene-environment interactions still need to be learned. In this review, the differences in PSA screening practice, reported incidence and prognosis of prostate cancer, and genetic factors between the populations in East and

  15. An Epidemiological Study of Psychiatric Disorders in Hamadan Province , 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Mohammadi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The burden of psychiatric disorders in the developed countries has been identified by the screening questionnaires and standard clinical interviews at a high level, but the epidemiological studies of psychiatric disorders in our country are brief and their numbers are few. Planning for providing essential mental health services to the people requires us to be knowledgeable about the present status of psychiatric disorders in the society. The objective of this research was to carry out the epidemiological study of the psychiatric disorders in the individuals 18 years and above in urban and rural areas of Hamadan province. 664 individuals selected through randomized clustered and systematic sampling methods among the existing families of Hamadan province and the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS questionnaires completed by the clinical psychologist. The diagnosis of the disorders was based on DSM-IV classification criteria.The results of the study showed that the overall prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the province was 11.28% (17.2% in women , 5.8% in men. The anxiety and mood disorders with 5.87 and 2.71% respectively had the highest prevalence in the province. The prevalence of psychotic disorders in this study was 0.60% , neuro- cognitive disorders 1.35% and dissociative disorders 0.75%. In the group of mood disorders, major depression with 2.56% and in the group of anxiety disorders, phobia with 2.56% had the higher prevalence. This study showed that 8.13% of studied individuals suffered from at least one of the psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the province among the individuals in the age group of 66 years and above was 13.33%, individuals whose spouses had passed away 18.75%, urban residents of province 9.81%, illiterate individuals 12.80% and housewife individuals 12.31% was more than other individuals in the sample. Being aware of this matter reveals the responsibility of the

  16. An investigation of breast cancer risk factors in Cyprus: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjisavvas Andreas; Loizidou Maria A; Middleton Nicos; Michael Thalia; Papachristoforou Rena; Kakouri Eleni; Daniel Maria; Papadopoulos Panayiotis; Malas Simon; Marcou Yiola; Kyriacou Kyriacos

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy affecting women worldwide. It is also the leading cancer in females in Cyprus, with approximately 400 new cases diagnosed annually. It is well recognized that genetic variation as well as environmental factors modulate breast cancer risk. The main aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between recognized risk factors and breast cancer among Cypriot women. This is the first epidemiological investigati...

  17. Analysis of oral cancer epidemiology in the US reveals state-specific trends: implications for oral cancer prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Ditmyer Marcia; O'Malley Susan; Kingsley Karl; Chino Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Downward trends have been observed in oral cancer incidence and mortality in the US over the past 30 years; however, these declines are not uniform within this population. Several studies have now demonstrated an increase in the incidence and mortality from oral cancers among certain demographic groups, which may have resulted from increased risks or risk behaviors. This study examines the underlying data that comprise these trends, to identify specific populations that ma...

  18. Validity of self reported male balding patterns in epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Leavy Justine E; Matassa Julia; Taylor Rosalind; Fritschi Lin

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Several studies have investigated the association between male pattern baldness and disease such as prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. Limitations in the lack of standardized instruments to measure male pattern baldness have resulted in researchers measuring balding patterns in a variety of ways. This paper examines the accuracy and reliability of assessment of balding patterns by both trained observers and men themselves, using the Hamilton-Norwood classification...

  19. On the biological effects of cosmic rays: Epidemiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforto, A. M.; Signorini, C.

    1991-04-01

    The determination of the biological effects of cosmic rays and other natural radiation to resolve the more general problem of the consequences on human health, from the basis of ionizing radiation, is addressed. Difficulties relating to an epmidemiological study are outlined and results are discussed particularly concerning their inconsistency. In particular, high and low doses are discussed, referencing the Hiroshima bomb, the HBRA (High Background Radiation Area), and the CA (Control Area). High and low regions are discussed for the case of cancer.

  20. Loss of partner and breast cancer prognosis - a population-based study, Denmark, 1994-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M H; Bidstrup, P E; Frederiksen, K;

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which experiencing a stressful life event influences breast cancer prognosis remains unknown, as the findings of the few previous epidemiological studies are inconsistent. This large population-based study examines the association between a common major life event, loss of a partner...... and breast cancer recurrence and all-cause mortality.......The extent to which experiencing a stressful life event influences breast cancer prognosis remains unknown, as the findings of the few previous epidemiological studies are inconsistent. This large population-based study examines the association between a common major life event, loss of a partner...

  1. Pertinence of an epidemiological study to estimate the sanitary consequences of the contamination by radium of the kindergarten situated at the 12 Chomel street (Paris 7.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of available exposure data and actual models of risk evaluation, the results do not allow to think that a leukemia risk or death by lung cancer attributable to ionizing radiation exposure could be detectable by an epidemiological study in the population of children having frequented the day nursery contaminated by radium. (N.C.)

  2. Descriptive Study on the Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Coal-producing Area in Eastern Yunnan, China%滇东产(燃)煤区农民肺癌流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继华; 张云生; 李云; 殷国青; 李玥冰; 宁伯福; 国家敏

    2011-01-01

    .37%,主要从事农业生产和做饭、喂养牛猪等室内家务工作,吸烟、职业危害不是女性肺癌的丰要发病因素,但可能是男性肺癌发病比女性严重的影响因素.结论 肺癌高发与室内外烟煤污染、家族易感性有关联,吸烟、采煤、炼焦不是女性肺癌的主要因素.%Background and objective Xuanwei county is located at Late Permian coal-accumulating area in eastern Yunnan and western Guizhou, China.The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuanwei county is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).Recent years, the pollution and the higher mortality rate of lung cancer has been watched in the area around Xuanwei,and there is no report about whether the epidemic levels and the pathogen of lung cancer in other area of eastern Yunnan is similar to that in xuanwei.The aim of this study is to epidemic levels and cause of lung cancer in coal-producing area in the east of Yunnan province.Methods 382 study units (nature villages) were selected by stratified cluster random sampling from coalproducing area in eastern Yunnan province, China.The villagers who were aged 30-79 years with no history of lung cancer were enrolled.AlI the participants received an initial single-view posterior-anterior chest radiograph and administered a questionnaire survey (which involves the information of demography, household and fuel use, lifestyle, tobacco and occupational exp osure history, family and personal medical history, etc.The subjects with a positive screen by chest x-ray underwent to have a computed tomography scan of the chest and biopsy examination.The confidence interval of the standardized rate ratio were adopted to evaluate the statistical significance of differences in different regions.Results 5 2, 833 villagers were surveyed and screened with X-ray.604 of them were suspicious lung cancer with an initial

  3. Consumption of dietary fat and meat and risk of ovarian cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilsing, A.M.J.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Schouten, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evidence that links dietary factors to ovarian cancer is conflicting, but several epidemiologic studies suggested that consumption of dietary fat and meat may increase risk of ovarian cancer. Objective: We studied associations of intakes of total fat and sources and subtypes of fat, fres

  4. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): an extension of the STROBE Statement.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H.; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel,; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Provenance: Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed by European Journal of Clinical Investigation, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine, Mutagenesis, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, European Journal of Epidemiology. In order to encourage dissemination of this extension to the STROBE Statement, this article has also been published by European Journal of Clinical Investigation, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine, Mutagenesis, Journal of Epide...

  5. Standard procedures for pooling health physics data for epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study are: (1) to determine the availability of dosimetry data and supporting documentation at multiple facilities; (2) to develop criteria and methods for optimally retrieving data; (3) to evaluate and document the quality and completeness of data and dosimetry programs; (4) to put dosimetry data (e.g., external, whole body counting, and bioassay data) from various facilities in a single format for epidemiologic analysis; and (5) to document all work for peer review. To achieve these objectives, a ''Dosimetry Records and Radiation Hazards Questionnaire'' was developed to send to the facilities under study. Responses to this questionnaire are used to develop data retrieval criteria and methods, and to retrieve data. Dose data are reformatted into Standard Intermediate Dosimetry Files for editing and characterization. Evaluations of dosimetry programs are performed concurrently. Results of these steps are brought together and analysis files created. Status of this work in the context of the Department of Energy 5-Rem Study is reported. The standard procedures are applicable to single- as well as multiple-facility studies

  6. Epidemiology and Survival Analysis of Jordanian Female Breast Cancer Patients Diagnosed from 1997 to 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Sharkas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Jordanian women, yet survival data are scarce. This study aims to assess the observed five-year survival rate of breast cancer in Jordan from 1997 to 2002 and to determine factors that may influence survival. Methods: Data were obtained from the Jordan Cancer Registry (JCR, which is a population-based registry. From 1997-2002, 2121 patients diagnosed with breast cancer were registered in JCR. Relevant data were collected from JCR files, hospital medical records and histopathology reports. Patient's status, whether alive or dead, wasascertained from the Department of Civil Status using patients’ national numbers (ID. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS (version 10. Survival probabilities by age, morphology, grade, stage and other relevant variables were obtained with the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The overall five-year survival for breast cancer in Jordan, regardless of the stage or grade was 64.2%, meanwhile it was 58% in the group aged less than 30 years. The best survival was in the age group 40-49 years (69.3%. The survival for adenocarcinoma was 57.4% and for medullary carcinoma, it was 82%. The survival rate approximated 73.8% for well-differentiated, 55.6% for anaplastic, and 58% for poorly differentiated cancers. The five-year survival rate was 82.7% for stage I, 72.2% for stage II, 58.7% for stage III, and 34.6% for stage IV cancers.Conclusion: According to univariate analysis, stage, grade, age and laterality of breast cancer significantly influenced cancer survival. Cox regression analysis revealed that stage, grade and age factors correlated with prognosis, while laterality showed no significant effect on survival. Results demonstrated that overall survival was relatively poor. We hypothesized that this was due to low levels of awareness and lack of screening programs.

  7. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICO-PATHOLOGICAL PATTERN OF CARCINOMA OESOPHAGUS IN A RURAL TERTIARY CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothandapani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal cancer is one of the least studied and deadliest cancers worldwide, because of its aggressive nature. It ranks sixth among all cancers in mortality. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES/THE AIMS OF THIS STUDY IS TO ANALYSE AND STUDY 1. The incidence of carcinoma oesophagus, age and sex wise; 2. The clinical presentation of carcinoma oesophagus; 3. The common sites of occurrence; 4. The pathological pattern of carcinoma oesophagus. METHODS/PLACE OF STUDY Department of General Surgery, Chennai Medical College Hospital, Irungalur, Trichy. METHOD OF COLLECTION OF DATA A retrospective analytical study of 76 patients, diagnosed with carcinoma oesophagus, admitted in Surgery Department was done and study period was from April 2010 to March 2016. INCLUSION CRITERIA/ALL AGE GROUPS 1. Both male and female; 2. Patients proven Ca Oesophagus endoscopically. EXCLUSION CRITERIA 1. Benign strictures of oesophagus. 2. Advanced Ca Oesophagus patients. RESULTS Among 76 patients with carcinoma oesophagus, males of 6th decade were more prevalent; 71 patients presented with dysphagia (85.4%, the most common symptom. Mild oesophagus (38/76 patients being the commonest site. Squamous cell cancer formed 67 (89% of all cancers. CONCLUSION Epidemiology of cancer oesophagus in our centre was similar to incidence worldwide. Clinically, dysphagia and weight loss were most common symptoms. Due to its aggressive nature and late stage of presentation increases the mortality worldwide.

  8. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: an epidemiological perspective: the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Rovsing, Hans;

    2007-01-01

    registered health parameters since 1976. In 1993, standardized, lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine were recorded. There were 1533 men and 2618 women. METHODS: Statistical correlations were made between degenerative spondylolisthesis, and physical, occupational, and general epidemiological data. RESULTS...

  9. The Oral Health Burden in the United States: A Summary of Recent Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Daniel J.; Weintraub, Jane A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews recent large-scale epidemiological surveys of oral health in the United States, outlines risk factors for oral disease, and makes recommendations for future surveys. Discussion is limited to dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss, edentulism, oral cancer, and orofacial clefts. (Author/MSE)

  10. Information on radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer: the advantages of the linked medicare and SEER data. Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Freeman, J L; Goodwin, J S

    1999-05-01

    Several studies have found underutilization of radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer; but there are concerns about the completeness of various databases on radiotherapy. We used the linked Medicare-SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database to compare information on receipt of radiotherapy after diagnosis of breast cancer. More than 18% of women identified by Medicare data as receiving radiotherapy were not so identified by SEER, and 7% of those identified as receiving radiotherapy by SEER were not identified by Medicare. Risk of discordance on radiotherapy information between the two data sets was especially high in women receiving breast-conserving surgery. The combined SEER-Medicare database gives a more complete picture on the use of radiotherapy. The previously reported geographic variations in the use of radiotherapy for breast cancer may be due in part to underreporting of radiotherapy in some areas.

  11. Optimizing malarial epidemiological studies in areas of low transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amerasinghe, Priyanie H; Alifrangis, Michael; van der Hoek, Wim;

    2005-01-01

    Malaria risk factor studies have traditionally used microscopy readings of blood slides as the measure of malaria infection in humans, although alternatives are available. There is the need for an assessment of how the use of these alternative diagnostic approaches will influence the efficiency a...... risk factor in this area was the location of houses relative to confirmed vector breeding sites. At the peak of the transmission season, the results pointed in the same direction, irrespective of the diagnostic method used. However, the importance of distance from the breeding site...... was not statistically significant when microscopy was used, which can be explained by the lower prevalence of microscopy positivity in comparison to the prevalence of ELISA- and PCR-positivity. This study suggests that in low-transmission areas, such as Sri Lanka, smaller sample sizes can be used for epidemiological...... research studies using PCR instead of microscopy to estimate parasite prevalence. This efficiency gain has to be weighed against the higher cost and complexity of the PCR. PCR cannot replace microscopy as the standard diagnostic procedure at the field level. ELISA is not directly comparable with microscopy...

  12. What we know from epidemiological studies on cancer and residential exposure to radiofrequency fields Qué sabemos a partir de los estudios epidemiológicos sobre la exposición residencial a ondas de radiofrecuencia y su relación con el cáncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pollán Santamaría

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses epidemiological studies on residential exposure to radiofrequency fields and its possible association with cancer are commented. Most of these studies are ecologic. They use the distance to the power station as a surrogated measure of exposure. Possible confounders other than sex and age are rarely considered. For these reasons, it is difficult to infer causality from their results. Very often the study was a carried out due to the observation of cluster of cancer cases. Some of these clusters were reanalysed yielding different conclusions, showing their methodological weakness.En esta revisión se presentan y comentan los estudios existentes sobre la exposición residencial a campos de radiofrecuencia con relación a un posible aumento de incidencia o de mortalidad por cáncer. La mayor parte de estos estudios son de naturaleza ecológica, con una medida de exposición indirecta: la distancia a las antenas. El control de posibles factores de confusión más allá de la edad y el sexo es bastante limitado. Por estas razones, los resultados de estos estudios no tienen una fácil interpretación causal. Muchas veces el estudio fue motivado por la aparición de una agregación inusual de casos de cáncer. Algunos de estos clusters fueron reanalizados llegando a conclusiones diferentes, lo que demuestra la debilidad metodológica de este tipo de estudios.

  13. Epidemiological study of bancroftian filariasis in Recife, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Maciel

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti in Pernambuco was first documented in 1952 (Azevedo & Dobbin 1952, and since then it has been reported in surveys carried out in selected areas of Recife. Several surveys were carried out from 1981 to 1991 by SUCAM. In the 1985 SUCAM's report the disease is considered under control. The CPqAM Filariasis Research Program was established in 1985 and a filarial survey was carried out in the town of Olinda, Greater Recife. In order to verify the real epidemiological situation, a study was conducted in the city of Recife. 21/36 of the Special Zones of Social Interest (ZEIS, were randomly selected for the present study. From 10,664 persons screened, 683 were positive and the prevalence rate for microfilaraemia (mf varied from 0.6% to 14.9%. A mean mf prevalence of 6.5%, showed that the infection occurs in a wide geographic distribution in Greater Recife and that the intensity of transmission is a real and potential threat to public health in affected communities. Mf rate among males and females differed significantly. Due to the rapid increase in population, unplanned urban settlements, poor sanitary facilities and the favorable geographical conditions to the development of the vector, filariasis may actually be increasing in Recife.

  14. Cognition and Vascular Risk Factors: An Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Vicario

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an epidemiological approach to identify the negative impact of the vascu