WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer effects modified

  1. Effect of modified surgical method on subcutaneous hydrops of patients with breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Li; Hua-Feng Pan; Gui-Lan Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Through prospective randomized clinical study,to observe the preventive effect of improved surgical method to subcutaneous hydrops after modified radical mastec tomy. Method: A total of 80 cases of patients who have done modified radical mastectomy were selected, and randomly divided them into study group (40 cases) and control group (40 cases), then adopted different surgical methods as followed respectively, to observe the daily drainage volume at the first 3 d after ...

  2. Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells Modified with Tumor-Associated Antigen Gene Demonstrates Enhanced Antitumor Effect Against Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunotherapy using dendritic cell (DC vaccine has the potential to overcome the bottleneck of cancer therapy. METHODS: We engineered Lewis lung cancer cells (LLCs and bone marrow–derived DCs to express tumor-associated antigen (TAA ovalbumin (OVA via lentiviral vector plasmid encoding OVA gene. We then tested the antitumor effect of modified DCs both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that in vitro modified DCs could dramatically enhance T-cell proliferation (P < .01 and killing of LLCs than control groups (P < .05. Moreover, modified DCs could reduce tumor size and prolong the survival of LLC tumor-bearing mice than control groups (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively. Mechanistically, modified DCs demonstrated enhanced homing to T-cell–rich compartments and triggered more naive T cells to become cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which exhibited significant infiltration into the tumors. Interestingly, modified DCs also markedly reduced tumor cells harboring stem cell markers in mice (P < .05, suggesting the potential role on cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that DCs bioengineered with TAA could enhance antitumor effect and therefore represent a novel anticancer strategy that is worth further exploration.

  3. Effect of modified surgical method on subcutaneous hydrops of patients with breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Through prospective randomized clinical study,to observe the preventive effect of improved surgical method to subcutaneous hydrops after modified radical mastec tomy. Method: A total of 80 cases of patients who have done modified radical mastectomy were selected, and randomly divided them into study group (40 cases and control group (40 cases, then adopted different surgical methods as followed respectively, to observe the daily drainage volume at the first 3 d after surgery; when the drainage volume ≤ 20 mL, 24 h after surgery, removed the drainage tubes, to record the drainage days, total cases who occured subcutaneous hydrops and all adverse events after surgery. Results: Study group: the first 3 d of daily drainage volume declined quickly, and were accordingly less than that in control group; and ≤ 50 mL/24 h on the third day. Drainage total days median (4 d were less than that in control group (7 d; subcutaneous hydrops occurrence rate was only 2%, which wasgreatly lower than that in control group (14%, statistics difference had significance. Through the comparison between study group and control group, this surgical method improvement will not bring any surgical safety problems, such as hematoma, wound infection, skin flap necrosis and upper limb LOM etc. Only extended the surgical time slightly. While in control group, drainage tubes fell into the dead space or were blocked frequently, then induced hydrops; but in study group, due to the suture of latissimus dorsi leading edge and chestwall, dead space disappeared at this spot, drainage tube were not blocked any more. Conclusion: In mastectomy and axillary lymph dissection, due to axillary dissection, ligation might lead to open lymphatic tissue, added that suture fixed latissimus dorsi leading edge and skin flap leading to disappeared dead space, compared with traditional surgical method, this improved surgical method could obviously reduce the occurrence rate of hydrops

  4. Effects of chemically modified nanostructured PLGA on functioning of lung and breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lijuan Zhang,1 Thomas J Webster21Department of Chemistry, 2School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USABackground: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanotopographies with alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption on the functioning of healthy and cancerous lung and breast cells, including adhesion, proliferation, apoptosis, and release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which promotes tumor angiogenesis and secretion.Methods: We used a well established cast-mold technique to create nanoscale surface features on PLGA. Some of the nanomodified PLGA films were then exposed to alginate and chitosan. Surface roughness and the presence of protein was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Surface energy was quantified by contact angle measurement.Results: Nanostructured PLGA surfaces with 23 nm features decreased synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells compared with conventional PLGA. Preadsorbing alginate further decreased cancer cell function, with nanostructured PLGA preadsorbed with alginate achieving the greatest decrease in synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells. In contrast, compared with nonmodified smooth PLGA, healthy cell functions were either not altered (ie, breast or were enhanced (ie, lung by use of nanostructured features and alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption.Conclusion: Using this technique, we developed surface nanometric roughness and modification of surface chemistry that could selectively decrease breast and lung cancer cell functioning without the need for chemotherapeutics. This technique requires further study in a wide range of anticancer and regenerative medicine applications.Keywords: breast, lung, cancer, nanotechnology, alginate, chitosan

  5. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  6. Anticancer Effects of the Nitric Oxide-Modified Saquinavir Derivative Saquinavir-NO against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Rothweiler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease inhibitor saquinavir shows anticancer activity. Although its nitric oxide-modified derivative saquinavir-NO (saq-NO was less toxic to normal cells, it exerted stronger inhibition of B16 melanoma growth in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice than saquinavir did. Saq-NO has been shown to block proliferation, upregulate p53 expression, and promote differentiation of C6 glioma and B16 cells. The anticancer activity of substances is frequently hampered by cancer cell chemoresistance mechanisms. Therefore, we here investigated the roles of p53 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, and breast cancer resistance protein 1 (BCRP1 in cancer cell sensitivity to saq-NO to get more information about the potential of saq-NO as anticancer drug. Saq-NO exerted anticancer effects in lower concentrations than saquinavir in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Neither p53 mutation or depletion nor expression of P-gp, MRP1, or BCRP1 affected anticancer activity of saq-NO or saquinavir. Moreover, saq-NO sensitized P-gp-, MRP1-, or BCRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy. Saq-NO induced enhanced sensitization of P-gp- or MRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy compared with saquinavir, whereas both substances similarly sensitized BCRP1-expressing cells. Washout kinetics and ABC transporter ATPase activities demonstrated that saq-NO is a substrate of P-gp as well as of MRP1. These data support the further investigation of saq-NO as an anticancer drug, especially in multidrug-resistant tumors.

  7. Anticancer Effects of the Nitric Oxide-Modified Saquinavir Derivative Saquinavir-NO against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothweiler, Florian; Michaelis, Martin; Brauer, Peter; Otte, Jürgen; Weber, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Wiese, Michael; Kreuter, Jörg; Al-Abed, Yousef; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2010-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor saquinavir shows anticancer activity. Although its nitric oxide-modified derivative saquinavir-NO (saq-NO) was less toxic to normal cells, it exerted stronger inhibition of B16 melanoma growth in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice than saquinavir did. Saq-NO has been shown to block proliferation, upregulate p53 expression, and promote differentiation of C6 glioma and B16 cells. The anticancer activity of substances is frequently hampered by cancer cell chemoresistance mechanisms. Therefore, we here investigated the roles of p53 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein 1 (BCRP1) in cancer cell sensitivity to saq-NO to get more information about the potential of saq-NO as anticancer drug. Saq-NO exerted anticancer effects in lower concentrations than saquinavir in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Neither p53 mutation or depletion nor expression of P-gp, MRP1, or BCRP1 affected anticancer activity of saq-NO or saquinavir. Moreover, saq-NO sensitized P-gp-, MRP1-, or BCRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy. Saq-NO induced enhanced sensitization of P-gp- or MRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy compared with saquinavir, whereas both substances similarly sensitized BCRP1-expressing cells. Washout kinetics and ABC transporter ATPase activities demonstrated that saq-NO is a substrate of P-gp as well as of MRP1. These data support the further investigation of saq-NO as an anticancer drug, especially in multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:21170266

  8. Enhancement of radiomodulatory effect through liposome encapsulated radio-modifier on cancer bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Rapthap, C.; Sharan, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    Efficacy of a radioprotective drug, 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG), in its free form and after its encapsulation into liposomes have been studied in normal and cancer bearing mice. Cancer was induced in micy by oral administration of aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN) for 3 months. Radioprotection afforded by free MPG and liposome encapsulated MPG (LEM) in normal and cancerous tissue were evaluated by monitoring levels of glutathione (GSH) and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) enzyme and state of structural organization of chromatin. The results of our studies reveal that in cancerous tissues LEM afforded better radioprotection than the free form of MPG. (orig.)

  9. Enhancement of radiomodulatory effect through liposome encapsulated radio-modifier on cancer bearing mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Rapthap, C. [North-Eastern Hill Univ., Shillong (India). Immunology Lab.; Srivastava, P.N. [Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India); Sharan, R.N. [North-Eastern Hill Univ., Shillong (India). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1999-07-01

    Efficacy of a radioprotective drug, 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG), in its free form and after its encapsulation into liposomes have been studied in normal and cancer bearing mice. Cancer was induced in micy by oral administration of aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN) for 3 months. Radioprotection afforded by free MPG and liposome encapsulated MPG (LEM) in normal and cancerous tissue were evaluated by monitoring levels of glutathione (GSH) and {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) enzyme and state of structural organization of chromatin. The results of our studies reveal that in cancerous tissues LEM afforded better radioprotection than the free form of MPG. (orig.)

  10. "Nail" and "comb" effects of cholesterol modified NIPAm oligomers on cancer targeting liposomes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang; Deng, Lin; Moosa, Basem; Wang, Guangchao; Mashat, Afnan; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    Thermosensitive liposomes are a promising approach to controlled release and reduced drug cytotoxicity. Low molecular weight N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) oligomers (NOs) with different architectures (main chain NOs (MCNOs) and side chain NOs (SCNOs)) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and radical polymerization and then separately used to prepare thermosensitive liposomes. A more controlled and enhanced release was observed for both NO liposomes compared to pristine ones. Two release mechanisms depending on the oligomer architecture, namely "nail" for MCNOs and "comb" for SCNOs, are proposed. In addition to thermosensitivity, the cancer targeting property of NO liposomes was achieved by further biotinylation of the delivery system. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. iRGD-modified lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles loaded with isoliquiritigenin to enhance anti-breast cancer effect and tumor-targeting ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao F

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fei Gao,1–3 Jinming Zhang,3 Chaomei Fu,3 Xiaoming Xie,4 Fu Peng,1–3 Jieshu You,1,2 Hailin Tang,1,2,4 Zhiyu Wang,5 Peng Li,6 Jianping Chen1–3 1School of Chinese Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, 3College of Pharmacy, Chengdu University of Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, 4Department of Breast Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, 5Department of Mammary Disease, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, 6State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL, a natural anti-breast cancer dietary compound, has poor delivery characteristics and low bioavailability. In order to promote the therapeutic outcome of ISL, a tumor-targeting lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticle (NP system modified by tumor-homing iRGD peptides has been developed. The hybrid NPs were prepared by a modified single-step nanoprecipitation method to encapsulate ISL. iRGD peptides were anchored on the surface by a postinsertion method (ISL-iRGD NPs. The stable lipid–polymer structure of ISL-iRGD NPs, with high encapsulation and loading efficiency, was confirmed. Compared to free ISL and non-iRGD-modified counterparts, ISL-iRGD NPs showed higher cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis against the different type of breast cancer cells. This was attributable to higher cellular accumulation mediated by the iRGD-integrin recognition and the nanoscale effect. More importantly, based on the active tumor-tissue accumulation by iRGD peptides and the prolonged in vivo circulation by the stealth nanostructure, ISL-iRGD NPs displayed higher tumor-growth inhibition efficiency in 4T1-bearing breast-tumor mouse

  12. Joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners: lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladislav Tomasek; Agnes Rogel; Margot Tirmarche; Dominique Laurier

    2006-01-01

    The present analysis was conducted in the frame of European project 'Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiologic and experimental data'. The overall goal of the project related to uranium miners was the evaluation of lung cancer dose-response relationship and of dose rate effects among European uranium miners exposed to low doses and low dose rates of radon decay products. In addition, modifying factors like attained age, age at exposure and time since exposure were investigated. The joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners was conducted mainly in order to increase the statistical power and to allow a more detailed description of the variation of dose-response relationship in time. (N.C.)

  13. Joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners: lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladislav Tomasek [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Agnes Rogel; Margot Tirmarche; Dominique Laurier [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    The present analysis was conducted in the frame of European project 'Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiologic and experimental data'. The overall goal of the project related to uranium miners was the evaluation of lung cancer dose-response relationship and of dose rate effects among European uranium miners exposed to low doses and low dose rates of radon decay products. In addition, modifying factors like attained age, age at exposure and time since exposure were investigated. The joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners was conducted mainly in order to increase the statistical power and to allow a more detailed description of the variation of dose-response relationship in time. (N.C.)

  14. Modifying radionuclide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasser, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    This project involves a study of the relationship of physiological and environmental factors to the metabolism and effects of radionuclides. We have studied placental transfer and suckling as pathways of americium entry into the newborn or juvenile rat. Rats were injected intravenously with 5 μCi of 241 Am while nulliparous (30 days prior to mating), pregnant (day 19 of gestation), or lactating (1 day after parturition), and subsequent litters were killed to determine 241 Am retention. A deficit in reproductive performance was observed in the group injected before mating, as evidenced by reduced number and weight of offspring

  15. Association between serious psychological distress and nonparticipation in cancer screening and the modifying effect of socioeconomic status: Analysis of anonymized data from a national cross-sectional survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masaki; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakaya, Naoki; Fujimori, Maiko; Higuchi, Yuji; Kakeda, Kyoko; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Yamada, Norihito

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear whether individuals who have serious psychological distress (SPD) are less likely to participate in screening tests for gastric cancer, lung cancer, and other types of cancer. Of the few studies that have examined the association between SPD and participation in cancer screening, none have reported modifying effects of educational, marital, or employment status. The authors analyzed a national representative data set from the 2010 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions of Japan., including individuals aged association between SPD and participation in cancer screening, and multivariate analyses stratified by socioeconomic status also were conducted. SPD was significantly associated with a lower odds ratio (OR) for participation in screening for colorectal cancer (OR, 0.743; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.638-0.866), gastric cancer (OR, 0.823; 95% CI, 0.717-0.946), and lung cancer (OR, 0.691; 95% CI, 0.592-0.807). Only educational status significantly modified the effect of SPD on participation in these 3 types of cancer screening (P American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. RGD-modified liposomes enhance efficiency of aclacinomycin A delivery: evaluation of their effect in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chan Feng,1,* Xiaoyan Li,2,* Chunyan Dong,1 Xuemei Zhang,1 Xie Zhang,1 Yong Gao11Department of Oncology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, 2Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: In this study, long-circulating Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD-modified aclacinomycin A (ACM liposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method. Their morphology, particle size, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release were investigated. The RGD-ACM liposomes was about 160 nm in size and had the visual appearance of a yellowish suspension. The zeta potential was -22.2 mV and the encapsulation efficiency was more than 93%. The drug-release behavior of the RGD-ACM liposomes showed a biphasic pattern, with an initial burst release and followed by sustained release at a constant rate. After being dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4 and kept at 4°C for one month, the liposomes did not aggregate and still had the appearance of a milky white colloidal solution. In a pharmacokinetic study, rats treated with RGD-ACM liposomes showed slightly higher plasma concentrations than those treated with ACM liposomes. Maximum plasma concentrations of RGD-ACM liposomes and ACM liposomes were 4,532 and 3,425 ng/mL, respectively. RGD-ACM liposomes had a higher AUC0–∞ (1.54-fold, mean residence time (2.09-fold, and elimination half-life (1.2-fold when compared with ACM liposomes. In an in vivo study in mice, both types of liposomes inhibited growth of human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 cells and markedly decreased tumor size when compared with the control group. There were no obvious pathological tissue changes in any of the treatment groups. Our results indicate that RGD-modified ACM liposomes have a better antitumor effect in vivo than their unmodified counterparts.Keywords: RGD, aclacinomycin A, long-circulating liposomes, pharmacokinetic, tumor

  17. Polymorphisms in base excision repair genes as colorectal cancer risk factors and modifiers of the effect of diets high in red meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Asgeir; Joshi, Amit D; Corral, Román; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Le Marchand, Loïc; Baron, John A; Martinez, Maria Elena; Haile, Robert W; Ahnen, Dennis J; Sandler, Robert S; Lance, Peter; Stern, Mariana C

    2010-12-01

    A diet high in red meat is an established colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factor. Carcinogens generated during meat cooking have been implicated as causal agents and can induce oxidative DNA damage, which elicits repair by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Using a family-based study, we investigated the role of polymorphisms in 4 BER genes (APEX1 Gln51His, Asp148Glu; OGG1 Ser236Cys; PARP Val742Ala; and XRCC1 Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln) as potential CRC risk factors and modifiers of the association between diets high in red meat or poultry and CRC risk. We tested for gene-environment interactions using case-only analyses (n = 577) and compared statistically significant results with those obtained using case-unaffected sibling comparisons (n = 307 sibships). Carriers of the APEX1 codon 51 Gln/His genotype had a reduced CRC risk compared with carriers of the Gln/Gln genotype (odds ratio (OR) = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.03-0.69, P = 0.015). The association between higher red meat intake (>3 servings per week) and CRC was modified by the PARP Val762Ala single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; case-only interaction P = 0.026). This SNP also modified the association between higher intake of high-temperature cooked red meat (case-only interaction P = 0.0009). We report evidence that the BER pathway PARP gene modifies the association of diets high in red meat cooked at high temperatures with risk of CRC. Our findings suggest a contribution to colorectal carcinogenesis of free radical damage as one of the possible harmful effects of a diet high in red meat. ©2010 AACR.

  18. Coffee consumption, gender, and Parkinson's disease mortality in the cancer prevention study II cohort: the modifying effects of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G; O'Reilly, Eilis J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Calle, Eugenia E; Rodriguez, Carmen; Thun, Michael J

    2004-11-15

    Caffeine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease in men but not in women. This gender difference may be due to an interaction between caffeine and use of postmenopausal estrogens. The authors prospectively assessed the relation between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease mortality among participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a cohort of over 1 million people enrolled in 1982. Causes of deaths were ascertained through death certificates from January 1, 1989, through 1998. Parkinson's disease was listed as a cause of death in 909 men and 340 women. After adjustment for age, smoking, and alcohol intake, coffee consumption was inversely associated with Parkinson's disease mortality in men (p(trend) = 0.01) but not in women (p = 0.6). In women, this association was dependent on postmenopausal estrogen use; the relative risk for women drinking 4 or more cups (600 ml) of coffee per day compared with nondrinkers was 0.47 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.80; p = 0.006) among never users and 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 2.30; p = 0.34) among users. These results suggest that caffeine reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease but that this hypothetical beneficial effect may be prevented by use of estrogen replacement therapy.

  19. [Effects of modified bazhen decoction in assistant with enteral nutrition on the growth hormone, the nutritional state, and the immune function in patients with gastric cancer after operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-xing; Li, Jian-ping

    2011-10-01

    To observe the effects of modified Bazhen Decoction (BZD) in assistant with enteral nutrition (EN) on the growth hormone, the nutritional state, and the immune function in patients with gastric cancer after operation. The prospective, random, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial was adopted. 88 patients receiving gastric cancer operation were randomly assigned to the parenteral nutrition group (Group A, 27 cases), the EN group (Group B, 30 cases), and the comprehensive group (Group C, BZD in assistant with EN, 31 cases). Isocaloric and isonitrogenous parenteral nutritional support was given to patients in Group A from the operation day to the ninth day. Isocaloric and isonitrogenous EN was given to patients in Group B and C from the second day of operation till the ninth day. 100 mL BZD was nasal fed to patients in Group C during the second day to the ninth day after operation. The levels of the growth hormone, immune indices such as IgA, IgG, CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+/CD8+, etc., and nutritional indices such as serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, etc. were detected in the three groups one day before operation, on the 1st day after operation, and on the tenth day after operation. The levels of IgA, IgG, CD4+, and CD4+/CD8+, serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin decreased more than before operation in the three groups, with statistical difference (Pnutrition state and the immune function.

  20. Does family history of cancer modify the effects of lifestyle risk factors on esophageal cancer? A population-based case-control study in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, M.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kampman, E.; Zhou, J.Y.; Han, R.Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.F.; Gu, X.P.; Liu, A.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Kok, F.J.; Zhao, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    A population-based case-control study on esophageal cancer has been conducted since 2003 in Jiangsu Province, China. The aim of this analysis is to provide further evidence on the relationship between family history of cancer in first-degree relatives (FH-FDRs) and the risk of esophageal cancer, and

  1. Does family history of cancer modify the effects of lifestyle risk factors on esophageal cancer? a population-based case-control study in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ming, W.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kampman, E.; Zhou, Y.I.; Han, R.Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.F.; Gu, X.P.; Liu, Ai-Min; Veer, van 't P.; Kok, F.J.; Zhao, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    A population-based case–control study on esophageal cancer has been conducted since 2003 in Jiangsu Province, China. The aim of this analysis is to provide further evidence on the relationship between family history of cancer in first-degree relatives (FH-FDRs) and the risk of esophageal cancer, and

  2. Immediately modifiable risk factors attributable to colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Lai, Pei Kuan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to estimate potential reductions in case incidence of colorectal cancer attributable to the modifiable risk factors such as alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity amongst the Malaysian population. Gender specific population-attributable fractions (PAFs) for colorectal cancer in Malaysia were estimated for the three selected risk factors (physical inactivity, overweight, and alcohol consumptions). Exposure prevalence were sourced from a large-scale national representative survey. Risk estimates of the relationship between the exposure of interest and colorectal cancer were obtained from published meta-analyses. The overall PAF was then estimated, using the 2013 national cancer incidence data from the Malaysian Cancer Registry. Overall, the mean incidence rate for colorectal cancer in Malaysia from 2008 to 2013 was 21.3 per 100,000 population, with the mean age of 61.6 years (±12.7) and the majority were men (56.6%). Amongst 369 colorectal cancer cases in 2013, 40 cases (20 men, 20 women), 10 cases (9 men, 1 woman) or 20 cases (16 men,4 women) would be prevented, if they had done physical exercises, could reduce their body weight to normal level or avoided alcohol consumption, assuming that these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. It was estimated that 66 (17.8%;66/369) colorectal cancer cases (42 men, 24 women) who had all these three risk factors for the last 10 years would have been prevented, if they could control these three risk factors through effective preventive measures. Findings suggest that approximately 18% of colorectal cancer cases in Malaysia would be prevented through appropriate preventive measures such as doing regular physical exercises, reducing their body weight to normal level and avoiding alcohol consumption, if these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. Scaling-up nationwide public health campaigns tailored to increase physical activity, controlling body weight within normal

  3. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossing, Mary A; Malone, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we will assess whether modifiable factors, including body weight, physical activity, smoking and breast reconstruction, influence risk of arm lymphedema among women treated for breast cancer...

  4. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossing, Mary

    2003-01-01

    .... In this study, we will assess whether modifiable factors, including body weight, physical activity, smoking and breast reconstruction, influence risk of arm Lymphedema among women treated for breast cancer...

  5. Breast Cancer Risk From Modifiable and Non-Modifiable Risk Factors among Women in Southeast Asia: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindrea, Ricvan Dana; Aryandono, Teguh; Lazuardi, Lutfan

    2017-12-28

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine breast cancer risk from modifiable and non-modifiable factors among women in Southeast Asia. Methods: This meta-analysis was performed on research articles on breast cancer risk factors in PubMed, ProQuest and EBSCO databases published between 1997 and October 2017. Pooled odds ratios (OR) are calculated using fixed and random-effect models. Data were processed using Review Manager 5.3 (RevMan 5.3). Results: From a total of 1,211 articles, 15 studies (1 cohort and 14 case control studies) met the criteria for systematic review. Meta-analysis results showed that of the known modifiable risk factors for breast cancer, parity (nulipara) had the highest odd ratio (OR = 1.85 [95% CI 1.47-2.32]) followed by body mass index (overweight) (OR = 1.61 [95% CI 1.43-1.80]) and use of oral contraceptives (OR = 1.27 [95% CI 1.07-1.51]). Of non-modifiable risk factors, family history of breast cancer had the highest odd ratio (OR = 2.53 [95% CI 1.25-5.09]), followed by age (≥ 40 years) (OR = 1.53 [95% CI 1.34-1.76]) and menopausal status (OR = 1.44 [95% CI 1.26-1.65]). Conclusion: This analysis confirmed associations between both modifiable risk factors (parity, body mass index and use of oral contraceptives) and non-modifiable risk factors (family history of breast cancer, age and menopausal status) with breast cancer. Creative Commons Attribution License

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism: associations with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer and the modifying effects of diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Karen; Slattery, Martha L; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Bigler, Jeannette; Levin, Theodore R; Wolff, Roger K; Albertsen, Hans; Potter, John D; Samowitz, Wade S

    2007-08-01

    This study investigated associations between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) colon cancer and genetic polymorphisms relevant to one-carbon metabolism and thus, potentially the provision of methyl groups and risk of colon cancer. Data from a large, population-based case-control study (916 incident colon cancer cases and 1,972 matched controls) were used. Candidate polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), transcobalamin II (TCNII), methionine synthase (MTR), reduced folate carrier (RFC), methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) were evaluated. CIMP- or CIMP+ phenotype was based on five CpG island markers: MINT1, MINT2, MINT31, p16 and MLH1. The influence of specific dietary factors (folate, methionine, vitamin B(12) and alcohol) on these associations was also analyzed. We hypothesized that polymorphisms involved in the provision of methyl groups would be associated with CIMP+ tumors (two or more of five markers methylated), potentially modified by diet. Few associations specific to CIMP+ tumors were observed overall, which does not support the hypothesis that the provision of methyl groups is important in defining a methylator phenotype. However, our data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR 1,298A > C, interacting with diet, may be involved in the development of highly CpG-methylated colon cancers. AC and CC genotypes in conjunction with a high-risk dietary pattern (low folate and methionine intake and high alcohol use) were associated with CIMP+ (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3-3.4 versus AA/high risk; P-interaction = 0.03). These results provide only limited support for a role of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of CIMP colon cancer.

  7. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors)

  8. Complications after modified radical mastectomy in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatty, I.; Shaharyar; Ibrahim, M.; Chaudhry, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of complications, particularly the lymphedema of the arm, after modified radical mastectomy in early breast cancer patients who have not been given post-operative radiotherapy to axilla. Design: Hospital based descriptive study. Results: Median age of these patients was 47 years with a range of 25-58 years. Majority of these patients were stage II (84%) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent type of cancer (88%). Fifty-six percent of these patients had high grade tumors. None of the patients received radiotherapy to axilla after modified radical mastectomy. Early complications documented from history and medical record revealed that seroma formation was the most frequent early complication seen after modified radical mastectomy (20%). Frequent late complications included anterior chest tightness (56%), shoulder dysfunction (36%), lymphedema (26%) and sensory loss (22%). Shoulder dysfunction included limited range of movement in all 18 patients. Gross multiple restrictions were seen in 11 (61.11%) of these patients. Conclusion: It is concluded from this study that lymphedema and shoulder dysfunction are the two major complications in patients of early breast cancer who have undergone modified radical mastectomy without post-operative axillary radiation. (author)

  9. Specific internalization and synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel-encapsulated chitosan-modified polymeric nanocarriers: a novel approach in cancer chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asthana, Shalini; Gupta, Pramod K.; Konwar, Rituraj; Chourasia, Manish K.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocarriers can be surface engineered to increase endocytosis for applications in delivery of chemotherapeutics. This study investigated the chitosan (CS)-mediated effects on the anticancer efficacy and uptake of docetaxel-loaded nanometric particles ( 5-fold) in intracellular uptake as well as antitumor efficacy of modified nanoparticles (NPs) that explicate the possibility of saccharide marker-mediated tumor targeting along with synergism via proapoptotic effect of CS. Additionally, high positivity of optimized tailored nanocarrier (+23.3 ± 2.02 mV, 242.8 ± 9.42 nm) may have accounted for the increased adsorption-mediated endocytosis, preferably toward tumor cells with negative potential. Developed drug carrier system showed high stability in human blood which is in compliance with mucoadhesive property of CS. Transmission electron microscopy technique was applied to observe shape and morphological features of NPs. Furthermore, in vivo tissue toxicity study revealed safe use of drug at 20 mg/kg dose in nanoparticulate form. Moreover, the enhanced in vitro uptake of these NPs and their cytotoxicity against the tumor cells along with synergistic effect of CS clearly suggest that CS-modified carrier system is a promising candidate for preclinical studies to achieve wider anti-tumor therapeutic window and lower side effects

  10. Taurine-modified Ru(ii)-complex targets cancerous brain cells for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enming; Hu, Xunwu; Roy, Sona; Wang, Peng; Deasy, Kieran; Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Zhang, Ye

    2017-05-30

    The precision and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is essential for the treatment of brain tumors because the cancer cells are within or adjacent to the delicate nervous system. Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the brain that serves the central nervous system (CNS). A taurine-modified polypyridyl Ru-complex was shown to have optimized intracellular affinity in cancer cells through accumulation in lysosomes. Symmetrical modification of this Ru-complex by multiple taurine molecules enhanced the efficiency of molecular emission with boosted generation of reactive oxygen species. These characteristic features make the taurine-modified Ru-complex a potentially effective photosensitizer for PDT of target cancer cells, with outstanding efficacy in cancerous brain cells.

  11. Modifying effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalendo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that irradiation of Hela cells with stimulating doses of 0,1 Gy changes the cells' response to the subsequent radiation effect of greater value: instead of DNA synthesis inhibition stimulation takes place. Modifying effect of preliminary irradiation with 0,1 Gy manifests it self only in case if there is a certain time interval not less than 3 minutes and not more than 10 minutes (3-5 minutes is optimal interval). Data on modifying effect with 0,1 Gy at subcellular and cellular-population levels are presented. 21 refs.; 6 figs

  12. A polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-poly(styrene/acrylamide copolymer nanosphere for co-delivering of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitor with remarkable additive tumor regression effect against liver cancer in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang SY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shuyan Liang,* Jun Hu,* Yuanyuan Xie, Qing Zhou, Yanhong Zhu, Xiangliang Yang National Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer immunotherapy based on nanodelivery systems has shown potential for treatment of various malignancies, owing to the benefits of tumor targeting of nanoparticles. However, induction of a potent T-cell immune response against tumors still remains a challenge. In this study, polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-styrene/acrylamide (PS copolymer nanospheres were developed as a delivery system of unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β receptor I inhibitors for cancer immunotherapy. TGF-β receptor I inhibitors (LY2157299, LY were encapsulated to the PS via hydrophobic interaction, while CpG oligodeoxynucleotides were loaded onto the PS through electrostatic interaction. Compared to the control group, tumor inhibition in the PS-LY/CpG group was up to 99.7% without noticeable toxicity. The tumor regression may be attributed to T-cell activation and amplification in mouse models. The results highlight the additive effect of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitors co-delivered in cancer immunotherapy. Keywords: CpG, TGF-β receptor I inhibitor, Pst-AAm copolymer nanosphere, immunotherapy

  13. Co-regulation of histone-modifying enzymes in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul B M M K Islam

    Full Text Available Cancer is characterized by aberrant patterns of expression of multiple genes. These major shifts in gene expression are believed to be due to not only genetic but also epigenetic changes. The epigenetic changes are communicated through chemical modifications, including histone modifications. However, it is unclear whether the binding of histone-modifying proteins to genomic regions and the placing of histone modifications efficiently discriminates corresponding genes from the rest of the genes in the human genome. We performed gene expression analysis of histone demethylases (HDMs and histone methyltransferases (HMTs, their target genes and genes with relevant histone modifications in normal and tumor tissues. Surprisingly, this analysis revealed the existence of correlations in the expression levels of different HDMs and HMTs. The observed HDM/HMT gene expression signature was specific to particular normal and cancer cell types and highly correlated with target gene expression and the expression of genes with histone modifications. Notably, we observed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and lysine 27 separated preferentially expressed and underexpressed genes, which was strikingly different in cancer cells compared to normal cells. We conclude that changes in coordinated regulation of enzymes executing histone modifications may underlie global epigenetic changes occurring in cancer.

  14. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60 Co γ radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 μg/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400μ/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 Gγ. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the α coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 μg/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data obtained in vitro showed a

  15. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  16. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC-associated breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations that confers a two- to threefold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion....... We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). METHODS: Using genotype data from 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77...

  17. Effect of Modifying Factors on Radiosensitive Biochemical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romantsev, E. F.; Filippovich, I. V.; Zhulanova, Z. I.; Blokhina, V. D.; Trebenok, Z. A.; Kolesnikov, E. E.; Sheremetyevskaya, T. N.; Nikolsky, A. V.; Zymaleva, O. G. [Institute of Biophysics, USSR Ministry of Health, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1971-03-15

    Some of the radioprotective aminothiols are now routine pharmacopoeial drugs and are used in clinics to decrease the radiation reaction which appears as a side effect during the radiotherapy of cancer. The action of effective modifying agents on radiosensitive biochemical reactions in the organisms of mammals, in principle, cannot be different from the same effects of the protectors on biochemical systems of the human organism. The effect of modifying agents is mediated by biochemical systems. The administration of radioprotective doses of MEA to rats before irradiation results in a significant normalization of the excretion in urine of degradation products of nucleic acids (so-called Dische-positive compounds), the excretion of which sharply rises after irradiation. The curve of the radioprotective effect of MEA (survival rate after administration of radioprotectors at different intervals of time) completely corresponds to curves of the accumulation of MEA which is bound (by mixed disulphide links) to the proteins of liver mitochondria, to proteins of the nuclear-sap, to the hyaloplasm of rat thymus and to the nuclear ribosomes of the spleen. After MEA administration the curve of the biosynthesis of deoxycytidine represents a mirror reflection of the curve of MEA bound to proteins of the thymus hyaloplasm by means of mixed disulphide links. The mechanism of action of such modifying factors as MEA in experiments on mammals is mediated to a great degree through the temporary formation of mixed disulphide links between the aminothiol and the protein component of enzymes in different biochemical systems. (author)

  18. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [de

  19. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; Pelectrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, without increasing operative time. Harmonic scalpel can be recommended as a preferential surgical instrument in modified radical mastectomy.

  20. Care of the cancer survivor: metabolic syndrome following hormone-modifying therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Redig, Amanda J.; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates metabolic syndrome as a long-term cancer risk factor but also suggests that certain cancer therapies may increase patients’ risk of developing metabolic syndrome secondary to cancer therapy. In particular, breast cancer and prostate cancer are driven in part by sex hormones, thus treatment for both diseases is often based on hormone-modifying therapy. Androgen suppression therapy in men with prostate cancer is associated with dyslipidemia, increasing risk of cardi...

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified natural killer cell-based immunotherapy and immunological synapse formation in cancer and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfang; Tian, Shuo; Zhang, Kai; Xiong, Wei; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Chen, Zhiying; Han, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the body's immune defenses. Current chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell immunotherapy shows strong promise for treating various cancers and infectious diseases. Although CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy is rapidly gaining attention, its clinical applications are mainly focused on preclinical investigations using the NK92 cell line. Despite recent advances in CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, cost and severe toxicity have hindered its widespread use. To alleviate these disadvantages of CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, additional cytotoxic cell-mediated immunotherapies are urgently needed. The unique biology of NK cells allows them to serve as a safe, effective, alternative immunotherapeutic strategy to CAR-modified T cells in the clinic. While the fundamental mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity and side effects of CAR-modified T and NK cell immunotherapies remain poorly understood, the formation of the immunological synapse (IS) between CAR-modified T or NK cells and their susceptible target cells is known to be essential. The role of the IS in CAR T and NK cell immunotherapies will allow scientists to harness the power of CAR-modified T and NK cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases. In this review, we highlight the potential applications of CAR-modified NK cells to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and discuss the challenges and possible future directions of CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy, as well as the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of CAR-modified T cell- or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and side effects, with a focus on the CAR-modified NK cell IS.

  2. Hyaluronic acid-modified zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for potential lung cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ranwei; Liu, Tiecheng; Wang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Novel tumor-targeting zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles modified with hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed (HA-ZP), with the aim of combining the drug-loading property of ZP and the tumor-targeting ability of HA to construct a tumor-targeting paclitaxel (PTX) delivery system for potential lung cancer therapy. The experimental results indicated that PTX loading into the HA-ZP nanoparticles was as high as 20.36%±4.37%, which is favorable for cancer therapy. PTX-loaded HA-ZP nanoparticles increased the accumulation of PTX in A549 lung cancer cells via HA-mediated endocytosis and exhibited superior anticancer activity in vitro. In vivo anticancer efficacy assay revealed that HA-ZP nanoparticles possessed preferable anticancer abilities, which exhibited minimized toxic side effects of PTX and strong tumor-suppression potential in clinical application.

  3. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Risk-modifying factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Ruediger; Hillemanns, Peter [Hannover Medical School, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hannover (Germany); Vaske, Bernhard [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael; Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Parameter zu identifizieren, die Spaetschaeden nach Radiotherapie, ein unguenstiges

  4. Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    tumor promotion in adult life is influenced by prior exposure to carcinogens in early life . The main purpose of this project is to investigate whether...development of triple- negative breast cancers (TNBC). Major findings: Preliminary data acquired through the support of this grant indicate that: 1...methylation of genes associated with the TNBC phenotype in offspring; Aim 2: To examine the combinatorial effects of gestational and postpubertal

  5. BRAF V600E mutation in papillary thyroid cancer and its effect on postoperative radioiodine (131I) therapy: Should we modify our therapeutic strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Ayala, Maite; Expósito Rodríguez, Amaia; Bilbao González, Amaia; Mínguez Gabiña, Pablo; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, Teresa; Rodeño Ortiz de Zarate, Emilia; García Carrillo, Maitane; Barrios Treviño, Borja

    2018-03-19

    The BRAF V600E mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has been associated with resistance to 131 I. Our aim was to quantify the response to 131 I after surgery in patients who had the mutation (BRAF+) and those who did not have the mutated gene (BRAF-). A prospective cohort study was designed, from September 2015 to February 2016, which included patients with PTC receiving therapy after surgical treatment. Variables were described for age, gender, histology, tumor stage, thyroglobulin values before, 48h after and 6months after 131 I; absorbed dose and % activity on days 2 and 7 and elimination time. 41 patients giving in total 67 thyroid remnants were included. 61% were BRAF+. In stagesiii and iv, 80% were BRAF+. In lateral resection, 100% were BRAF+. The number of nodes was higher in BRAF+: 3.4 vs 1.2 (P=.01). The classic variant was predominant in BRAF+ (91.7% vs 8.3%, P=.03). 85.7% vs 14.3% of BRAF+ had desmoplastic reaction (P=.02). The BRAF+ had a lower absorbed dose than the administered activity (5.4Gy/MBq vs 20Gy/MBq, P=.02); lower% activity with respect to the unit of mass at 2 (0.046%/g vs 0.103%/g, P=.02) and at 7days (0.006%/gr vs 0.034%/gr, P=.04) CONCLUSIONS: The mutation of the BRAF V600E gene is related with greater resistance to postoperative treatment with 131 I since the onset of the disease. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The prospects for the research on chemical modifiers of cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yizun

    2002-01-01

    The current clinical statue of chemical modifiers of cancer treatment is described. It should enable greater enhancement ratios to be attained clinically. To search for less toxic and more potent sensitizers for radiotherapy and chemotherapy will be improved the cancer treatment. Phase I, II and III clinical trials with TPZ, one of the bioreductive drugs, has shown the benefit to patients with cancer

  7. Factors modifying the risk of lung cancer associated to radon in the french cohort of uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacquier, B.; Rogel, A.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Acker, A.

    2008-01-01

    The radon is classified lung carcinogen for man, but questions stay about the effects for low doses irradiation.The results of the analysis radon-lung cancer and the factors modifying on this relationship in the French cohort of miners followed until to 1999 is reported. This analysis confirms that the risk lung cancer is different according the period of exposure. A best precision in the measurement of exposure after 1956 could explain this difference. (N.C.)

  8. Modifiers of radiation effects in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Norman J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Hall, Eric J.

    2017-11-01

    World events, including the threat of radiological terrorism and the fear of nuclear accidents, have highlighted an urgent need to develop medical countermeasures to prevent or reduce radiation injury. Similarly, plans for manned spaceflight to a near-Earth asteroid or journey to Mars raise serious concerns about long-term effects of space radiation on human health and the availability of suitable therapeutic interventions. At the same time, the need to protect normal tissue from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy has driven considerable research into the design of effective radioprotectors. For more than 70 years, animal models of radiation cataract have been utilized to test the short and long-term efficacy of various radiation countermeasures. While some compounds, most notably the Walter Reed (WR) class of radioprotectors, have reported limited effectiveness when given before exposure to low-LET radiation, the human toxicity of these molecules at effective doses limits their usefulness. Furthermore, while there has been considerable testing of eye responses to X- and gamma irradiation, there is limited information about using such models to limit the injurious effects of heavy ions and neutrons on eye tissue. A new class of radioprotector molecules, including the sulfhydryl compound PrC-210, are reported to be effective at much lower doses and with far less side effects. Their ability to modify ocular radiation damage has not yet been examined. The ability to non-invasively measure sensitive, radiation-induced ocular changes over long periods of time makes eye models an attractive option to test the radioprotective and radiation mitigating abilities of new novel compounds.

  9. Monitoring modifiable risk factors for breast cancer: an obligation for health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Guerra Guerrero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SYNOPSIS Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common disease in women and constitutes the second leading cause of cancer death in this population. The factors that contribute to the risk of occurrence are divided into nonmodifiable and modifiable factors. Although there are interventions in primary care to prevent the disease, these measures have not produced the desired changes in women’s health. This article reviews the major modifiable risk factors for breast cancer and describes how these factors can affect the incidence of cancer in women. This information shows that modifiable risk factors (such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and use of alcohol and tobacco can influence the occurrence of breast cancer, in part depending on the life stage of a woman, including menopausal status. Timely prevention at the primary care level is one of the most important areas on which health professionals need to focus in order to help reduce the incidence of breast cancer.

  10. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Huang

    Full Text Available Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery.A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs for continuous outcomes.A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01, seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70; P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01 and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59; P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85.Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for

  11. Safety of total laparoscopic modified radical hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kitagawa

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Total laparoscopic modified radical hysterectomy is safe and feasible for the treatment of early stage endometrial cancer. This procedure can be an alternative to total laparoscopic hysterectomy, especially when the uterus must be removed completely.

  12. Effective gravitational coupling in modified teleparallel theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Habib; Capozziello, Salvatore; D'Agostino, Rocco; Luongo, Orlando

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, we consider an extended form of teleparallel Lagrangian f (T ,ϕ ,X ) , as function of a scalar field ϕ , its kinetic term X and the torsion scalar T . We use linear perturbations to obtain the equation of matter density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. The gravitational coupling is modified in scalar modes with respect to the one of general relativity, albeit vector modes decay and do not show any significant effects. We thus extend these results by involving multiple scalar field models. Further, we study conformal transformations in teleparallel gravity and we obtain the coupling as the scalar field is nonminimally coupled to both torsion and boundary terms. Finally, we propose the specific model f (T ,ϕ ,X )=T +∂μϕ ∂μϕ +ξ T ϕ2 . To check its goodness, we employ the observational Hubble data, constraining the coupling constant, ξ , through a Monte Carlo technique based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Hence, fixing ξ to its best-fit value got from our numerical analysis, we calculate the growth rate of matter perturbations and we compare our outcomes with the latest measurements and the predictions of the Λ CDM model.

  13. Risk of Cause-Specific Death in Individuals with Cancer-Modifying Role Diabetes, Statins and Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Jari; Niskanen, Leo; Auvinen, Anssi

    2017-12-15

    Both diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer are common diseases and they frequently occur in the same patients. We investigated the all-cause and cause-specific mortality dynamics in relation to baseline DM, statin use and metformin use. The study population consisted of 39,900 incident cancer cases from Finland, 19,822 patients were free of DM at the start of follow-up and 20,078 had DM. Mortality from all causes, and cancer, cardiovascular (CVD) and other causes was analysed using Poisson regression model with the following variables: sex, age, DM, statin and metformin usage in baseline, cancer type and stage and calendar period. Statin usage was associated with a reduced cancer-specific mortality with incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.69-0.74), IRR for CVD mortality was 0.95 (0.88-1.02) and for other causes 0.64 (0.56-0.74). In a sub-population of DM patients, IRR for metformin in all-cause mortality was 0.74 (0.71-0.78), in cancer mortality 0.75 (0.72-0.79), in CVD mortality 0.75 (0.68-0.83) and other causes 0.68 (0.60-0.78). In conclusion, our register-based study of survival after cancer diagnosis showed that patients with diabetes had substantially poorer outcome in all measures. An association between baseline statin usage and lower all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality was modified by cancer type. The effect of statin use was largest for breast and colorectal cancer. Metformin usage in a subpopulation of oral antidiabetic users was in general associated with lower mortality, but this association was modified by cancer type. The association was strongest for liver, colorectal and breast cancer. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Some Effects of a Modified Workweek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jack M.

    1977-01-01

    Reports on a study that included examination of the degree of change in selected aspects of job satisfaction and organizational performance after the organization adopted a form of modified workweek. (Author/IRT)

  15. Smoking may modify the association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival from ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Warren, Graham W; Koziak, Jennifer M; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased mortality. Less is known of the impact of smoking on recurrence risk and interaction with chemotherapy treatment. We examined these associations in ovarian cancer. Patients were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry between 1978 and 2010 and were oversampled for less-common histologic ovarian tumor types. Medical records were abstracted for 678 eligible patients on lifestyle, medical and cancer treatment, and review of pathology slides was performed for 605 patients. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age at diagnosis, race, stage and residual disease. Among patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (N=432), current smoking was significantly associated with shorter duration of overall (OS; HR, 8.56; 95% CI, 1.50-48.7) and progression-free (PFS; HR, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.05-31.4) survival from mucinous ovarian cancer only. There was no significant association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. However, among patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (N=44), current smokers had shorter PFS (HR, 4.32; 95% CI, 1.36-13.8; N=32 progressed/9 censored events) compared to never smokers, but the HRs were not statistically different across smoking categories (P interaction=0.87). Adverse associations were observed between smoking status and OS or PFS among patients with mucinous ovarian cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. No significant effect was found from neoadjuvant chemotherapy on PFS overall; however, smoking may modify this association. Although needing replication, these findings suggest that patients may benefit from smoking cessation interventions prior to treatment with chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Multicountry Ecological Study of Cancer Incidence Rates in 2008 with Respect to Various Risk-Modifying Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Grant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational and ecological studies are generally used to determine the presence of effect of cancer risk-modifying factors. Researchers generally agree that environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of physical activity, and low serum 25-hdyroxyvitamin D levels are important cancer risk factors. This ecological study used age-adjusted incidence rates for 21 cancers for 157 countries (87 with high-quality data in 2008 with respect to dietary supply and other factors, including per capita gross domestic product, life expectancy, lung cancer incidence rate (an index for smoking, and latitude (an index for solar ultraviolet-B doses. The factors found to correlate strongly with multiple types of cancer were lung cancer (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer, energy derived from animal products (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer, inverse with two, latitude (direct correlation with six types, inverse correlation with three, and per capita gross national product (five types. Life expectancy and sweeteners directly correlated with three cancers, animal fat with two, and alcohol with one. Consumption of animal products correlated with cancer incidence with a lag time of 15–25 years. Types of cancer which correlated strongly with animal product consumption, tended to correlate weakly with latitude; this occurred for 11 cancers for the entire set of countries. Regression results were somewhat different for the 87 high-quality country data set and the 157-country set. Single-country ecological studies have inversely correlated nearly all of these cancers with solar ultraviolet-B doses. These results can provide guidance for prevention of cancer.

  17. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a modified microelectromechanical systems mirror for detection of bladder cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Xie, Huikai; Fedder, Gary K.; Pan, Yingtian

    2003-11-01

    Experimental results of a modified micromachined microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror for substantial enhancement of the transverse laser scanning performance of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) are presented. Image distortion due to buckling of MEMS mirror in our previous designs was analyzed and found to be attributed to excessive internal stress of the transverse bimorph meshes. The modified MEMS mirror completely eliminates bimorph stress and the resultant buckling effect, which increases the wobbling-free angular optical actuation to greater than 37°, exceeding the transverse laser scanning requirements for EOCT and confocal endoscopy. The new optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscope allows for two-dimensional cross-sectional imaging that covers an area of 4.2 mm × 2.8 mm (limited by scope size) and at roughly 5 frames/s instead of the previous area size of 2.9 mm × 2.8 mm and is highly suitable for noninvasive and high-resolution imaging diagnosis of epithelial lesions in vivo. EOCT images of normal rat bladders and rat bladder cancers are compared with the same cross sections acquired with conventional bench-top OCT. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of EOCT for in vivo imaging diagnosis and precise guidance for excisional biopsy of early bladder cancers.

  18. Effects of preparation process on performance of rubber modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanbing; Luo, Guobao; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    The rational utilization of waste rubber tire is essential for the environmental protection. Utilizing rubber particles to modify asphalt can not only improve asphalt performance, but also help the recycling of waste materials. Considering the effect of different preparation process parameters on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, this paper analyzes the effects of the shear temperature, shear time and shear rate on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, and provided a reference for its preparation.

  19. Hyaluronan-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for bimodal breast cancer imaging and photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rui-Meng Yang,1,* Chao-Ping Fu,2,* Jin-Zhi Fang,1 Xiang-Dong Xu,1 Xin-Hua Wei,1 Wen-Jie Tang,1 Xin-Qing Jiang,1 Li-Ming Zhang2 1Department of Radiology, Guangzhou First People’s Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, 2School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Theranostic nanoparticles with both imaging and therapeutic abilities are highly promising in successful diagnosis and treatment of the most devastating cancers. In this study, the dual-modal imaging and photothermal effect of hyaluronan (HA-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-SPIONs, which was developed in a previous study, were investigated for CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Heat is found to be rapidly generated by near-infrared laser range irradiation of HA-SPIONs. When incubated with CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, HA-SPIONs exhibited significant specific cellular uptake and specific accumulation confirmed by Prussian blue staining. The in vitro and in vivo results of magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal ablation demonstrated that HA-SPIONs exhibited significant negative contrast enhancement on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal effect targeted CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer. All these results indicated that HA-SPIONs have great potential for effective diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, surface functionalization, bioactive glycosaminoglycan, magnetic resonance imaging, cellular uptake, breast carcinoma

  20. Cisplatin Loaded Hyaluronic Acid Modified TiO2 Nanoparticles for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enling Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel tumor-targeting titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles modified with hyaluronic acid (HA were developed to explore the feasibility of exploiting the pH-responsive drug release property of TiO2 and the tumor-targeting ability of HA to construct a tumor-targeting cisplatin (CDDP delivery system (HA-TiO2 for potential neoadjuvant chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. The experimental results indicated that CDDP release from the HA-TiO2 nanoparticles was significantly accelerated by decreasing pH from 7.4 to 5.0, which is of particular benefit to cancer therapy. CDDP-loaded HA-TiO2 nanoparticles increased the accumulation of CDDP in A2780 ovarian cancer cells via HA-mediated endocytosis and exhibited superior anticancer activity in vitro. In vivo real-time imaging assay revealed that HA-TiO2 nanoparticles possessed preferable tumor-targeting ability which might potentially minimize the toxic side effects of CDDP in clinical application.

  1. Air pollution: a potentially modifiable risk factor for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajersztajn, Laís; Veras, Mariana; Barrozo, Ligia Vizeu; Saldiva, Paulo

    2013-09-01

    Economic growth and increased urbanization pose a new risk for cancer development: the exposure of high numbers of people to ambient air pollution. Epidemiological evidence that links air pollution to mortality from lung cancer is robust. An ability to produce high-quality scientific research that addresses these risks and the ability of local health authorities to understand and respond to these risks are basic requirements to solve the conflict between economic development and the preservation of human health. However, this is currently far from being achieved. Thus, this Science and Society article addresses the possibilities of expanding scientific networking to increase awareness of the risk of lung cancer that is promoted by air pollution.

  2. Study of Antiultraviolet Asphalt Modifiers and Their Antiageing Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxuan Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation causes serious ageing problems on pavement surface. In recent years, different UV blocking materials have been used as modifiers to prevent asphalt ageing during the service life of the pavement. In this study, three different materials have been used as modifiers in base asphalt to test their UV blocking effects: layered double hydroxides (LDHs, organomontmorillonite (OMMT, and carbon black (CB. UV ageing was applied to simulate the ageing process and softening point, penetration, ductility, DSR (Dynamic Shear Rheometer test, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR test were conducted to evaluate the anti-UV ageing effects of the three UV blocking modifiers. Physical property tests show that base asphalt was influenced more seriously by UV radiation compared to the modified asphalt. DSR test results indicate that the complex modulus of asphalt before UV ageing is increased because of modifiers, while the complex modulus of base asphalt after UV ageing is higher than that of the modified asphalt, which shows that the UV blocking modifiers promote the antiageing effects of asphalt. FTIR test reveals that the increment of carbonyl groups and sulfoxide groups of modified asphalt is less than that in base asphalt. Tests indicate the best UV blocking effect results for samples with LDHs and the worst UV blocking effect results for samples with CB.

  3. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  4. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  5. Detection of cancer cells using a peptide nanotube–folic acid modified graphene electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the preparation of a graphene electrode modified with a new conjugate of peptide nanotubes and folic acid for the selective detection of human cervical cancer cells over-expressing folate receptors. The functionalization of peptide nanotubes with folic acid was confirmed...... by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The peptide nanotube–folic acid modified graphene electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The modification of the graphene electrode with peptide nanotube–folic acid led to an increase in the current signal....... The human cervical cancer cells were bound to the modified electrode through the folic acid–folate receptor interaction. Cyclic voltammograms in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3/4 as a redox species demonstrated that the binding of the folate receptor from human cervical cancer cells to the peptide nanotube...

  6. Magnesium in drinking water modifies the association between nitrate ingestion and risk of death from esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yen-Hsiung; Chen, Pei-Shih; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on esophageal cancer risk occurrence. A matched cancer case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from esophageal cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All esophageal cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2006 through 2010 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Mg in drinking water were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Mg exposure via drinking water. Evidence of an interaction was noted between drinking water NO(3)-N and Mg intake. This is the first study to report effect modification by Mg intake originating from drinking water on an association between NO(3)-N exposure and increased risk mortality attributed to esophageal cancer.

  7. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Sharpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  8. Quercetin-Based Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Enhanced Inhibition of Doxorubicin-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zehua; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Bhat, Chinmay; Vahermo, Mikko; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kemell, Marianna; Fontana, Flavia; Janoniene, Agne; Petrikaite, Vilma; Salonen, Jarno; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Hirvonen, Jouni; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-02-01

    One of the most challenging obstacles in nanoparticle's surface modification is to achieve the concept that one ligand can accomplish multiple purposes. Upon such consideration, 3-aminopropoxy-linked quercetin (AmQu), a derivative of a natural flavonoid inspired by the structure of dopamine, is designed and subsequently used to modify the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles. This nanosystem inherits several advanced properties in a single carrier, including promoted anticancer efficiency, multiple drug resistance (MDR) reversing, stimuli-responsive drug release, drug release monitoring, and enhanced particle-cell interactions. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is efficiently loaded into this nanosystem and released in a pH-dependent manner. AmQu also effectively quenches the fluorescence of the loaded DOX, thereby allowing the use of the nanosystem for monitoring the intracellular drug release. Furthermore, a synergistic effect with the presence of AmQu is observed in both normal MCF-7 and DOX-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Due to the similar structure as dopamine, AmQu may facilitate both the interaction and internalization of PSi into the cells. Overall, this PSi-based platform exhibits remarkable superiority in both multifunctionality and anticancer efficiency, making this nanovector a promising system for anti-MDR cancer treatment. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Haemochromatosis HFE gene polymorphisms as potential modifiers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk and onset age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zumin; Johnstone, Daniel; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Spigelman, Allan D; Groombridge, Claire; Milward, Elizabeth A; Olynyk, John K; Suchy, Janina; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Lubinski, Jan; Scott, Rodney J

    2009-07-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is characterized by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes; however, variation in disease expression suggests that there are potential modifying factors. Polymorphisms of the HFE gene, which cause the iron overload disorder hereditary haemochromatosis, have been proposed as potential risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). To understand the relationship between HNPCC disease phenotype and polymorphisms of the HFE gene, a total of 362 individuals from Australia and Poland with confirmed causative MMR gene mutations were genotyped for the HFE C282Y and H63D polymorphisms. A significantly increased risk of developing CRC was observed for H63D homozygotes when compared with combined wild-type homozygotes and heterozygotes (hazard ratio = 2.93, p = 0.007). Evidence for earlier CRC onset was also observed in H63D homozygotes with a median age of onset 6 years earlier than wild type or heterozygous participants (44 vs. 50 years of age). This effect was significant by all tests used (log-rank test p = 0.026, Wilcoxon p = 0.044, Tarone-Ware p = 0.035). No association was identified for heterozygosity of either polymorphism and limitations on power-prevented investigation of C282Y homozygosity or compound C282Y/H63D heterozygosity. In the Australian sample only, women had a significantly reduced risk of developing CRC when compared with men (hazard ratio = 0.58, p = 0.012) independent of HFE genotype for either single nucleotide polymorphisms. In conclusion, homozygosity for the HFE H63D polymorphism seems to be a genetic modifier of disease expression in HNPCC. Understanding the mechanisms by which HFE interrelates with colorectal malignancies could lead to reduction of disease risk in HNPCC.

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Singh, Saurabh; Rai, Yogesh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  11. Enhancement of the radiation-lethal effect of hypoxic cancer cells by some nitroheterocyclic compounds. Part of a coordinated programme on the improvement of radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiricuta, I.

    1981-12-01

    The possibilities to enhance the lethal effect of ionizing radiation on hypoxic cells by electron-affinic compounds have stimulated the investigations for finding new chemicals with radiobiological and pharmacological features as adequate as possible. On the other hand, the experimental studies and clinical trials had shown that the aerobic toxicity seems to be the major limiting factor in the use of large doses of radiosensitizers required to achieve significant therapeutic efficiency. The investigations in the present paper were attempted to join these two main directions of research and comprised the syntheses of new nitroheterocyclic compounds with potential radiosensitization properties and the knowledge of biochemical alterations involved in the producing of aerobic toxicity of radiosensitizers aiming to find practical solutions to enhance the efficiency of radiotherapy. Several newly synthesized compounds were tested for their radiosensitizing effect. The experiments carried out on hypoxic cells V 79 showed that only 1-(hydroxyethyl-2'-phosphate)-2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole, dipotassium salt displayed an enhancement ratio of 1.17 (at 8 mM), but lower than in case of parent compound, metronidazole (enhancement ratio = 1.53). It was shown that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers interfere with the cellular energy metabolism. These interferences were found dependent on the electron affinity of drugs. In addition, those radiosensitizers producing a decrease in oxygen consumption caused a supplementary oxygenation of both normal and tumour tissues. It is concluded that the improvement of therapeutic efficiency of radiosensitizers by reducing their aerobic toxicity might be achieved by diminishing their effects on the energy metabolism or by the stimulation of this metabolism and restoration of tissue redox equilibrium

  12. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2016-05-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng-1 ml cm2, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2-20 ng ml-1. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  13. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Malhotra, Bansi D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com [Nanobioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Delhi 110042 (India); Yadav, Birendra K. [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, Delhi 110085 (India); Mishra, Sandeep [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-05-16

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng{sup −1} ml cm{sup 2}, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2–20 ng ml{sup −1}. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  14. Modified Single Stapler Technique in Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbaba, D.; Ersoy, P.E.; Gundogdu, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    Technical difficulties during colorectal surgery increase the complication rates. We introduce a modified single stapler technique for patients in whom technical problems are encountered while performing double stapler technique. Before pelvic dissection, descending colon is divided at minimum 10 cm proximal to the tumoral segment. Tumor specific mesorectal excision is performed and two purse string sutures are placed at the distal margin with an interval of 1 - 2 cm. After introducing a circular stapler via the anus, the distal purse string suture is tied around the central shaft of the stapler and the proximal purse string suture around the colonic lumen. After the resection is completed between the two sutures, the anvil shaft is connected to the central shaft and the stapler is closed and fired. None of the patients had an anastomotic leak. This technique may be a safe alternative particularly in patients with narrow pelvis and distal tumors. (author)

  15. Passive smoking and cooking oil fumes (COF) may modify the association between tea consumption and oral cancer in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa; He, Baochang; Hu, Zhijian; Huang, Jiangfeng; Liu, Fangping; Yan, Lingjun; Lin, Zheng; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Lin, Lisong; Zhang, Zuofeng; Cai, Lin

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the confounding effects of passive smoking and COF exposure on association between tea and oral cancer in Chinese women. A case-control study including 207 female oral cancer cases and 480 age-matched controls was performed in Fujian, China. Data were collected with a structured questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. The effects of tea consumption on oral cancer were, respectively, adjusted for Model-1 and Model-2 using logistic regression analysis. Model-1 did not adjusted for passive smoking and COF; Model-2 included the variables in Model-1, passive smoking and COF. Tea consumption was associated with a decreased risk of oral cancer in females: The OR was 0.498 (95 % CI 0.312-0.795) for Model-1 and 0.565 (95 % CI 0.352-0.907) for Model-2. The ORs for all the categories of tea consumption estimated by Model-2 were slightly higher than Model-1. When stratified by passive smoking, the statistically significant association between tea drinking and oral cancer was only emerged in non-passive smoking women. Stratification by COF found tea drinking was still associated with a decreased risk of oral cancer for women who have light-COF exposure, but an increased risk for those who subjected to heavy exposure. A negative, multiplicative interaction was found between tea consumption and COF exposure for oral cancer, but not found between tea consumption and passive smoking. Tea consumption reduces the risk of oral cancer in Chinese women, but this effect is modified by the carcinogenic effects of passive smoking and COF exposure.

  16. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  17. Genetically modified vaccines augment the efficacy of cancer surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2009), s. 199-200 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genetically modified vaccines * cancer surgery and chemotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  18. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  19. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  20. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts h...

  1. Preferential recognition of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal modified DNA in the cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammad; Shahab, Uzma; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-11-01

    The structural perturbations in DNA molecule may be caused by a break in a strand, a missing base from the backbone, or a chemically changed base. These alterations in DNA that occurs naturally can result from metabolic or hydrolytic processes. DNA damage plays a major role in the mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and various other patho-physiological conditions. DNA damage can be induced through hydrolysis, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive carbonyl metabolites including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). 4-HNE is an important lipid peroxidation product which has been implicated in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis processes. The present study examines to probe the presence of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal damaged DNA (HNE-DNA) in various cancer subjects. In this study, the purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the action of 4-HNE. The DNA was incubated with 4-HNE for 24 h at 37°C temperature. The binding characteristics of cancer auto-antibodies were assessed by direct binding and competitive inhibition ELISA. DNA modifications produced hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and decreased fluorescence intensity. Cancer sera exhibited enhanced binding with the 4-HNE modified calf thymus DNA as compared to its native conformer. The 4-HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the auto-antibody induction in cancer patients. The HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Joon; Kim, Jong-Sung; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Samyong

    2014-05-01

    Higher caregiver burden is associated with poor quality of life among family caregivers. However, in Korea, very few studies have examined factors associated with caregiver burden. The present study investigated factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients, particularly modifiable factors as a potential target of intervention strategies. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was performed. Sixty-four family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to the hospice-palliative care unit of a university hospital in South Korea were included. To identify caregiver burden, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (CRA) was used in this study. Time spent in providing care per day, number of visits per week from other family members, family functioning, and a positive subscale, self-esteem, of the CRA were deemed as modifiable factors. Other sociodemographic, caregiving characteristics of the subjects were non-modifiable factors. Longer time spent providing care per day, fewer weekly visits from other family members, poor family functioning, and low self-esteem were considered as modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden. Low monthly income and the spouse being the family caregiver were non-modifiable factors. Our study has practical significance in that it identifies modifiable factors that can be used to devise intervention strategies. Developing and applying such intervention strategies for alleviating the factors associated with high caregiver burden could be important for improving the quality of life of both patients and their families.

  3. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  4. Breast Cancer and Modifiable Lifestyle Factors in Argentinean Women: Addressing Missing Data in a Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquet, Julia Becaria; Tumas, Natalia; Osella, Alberto Ruben; Tanzi, Matteo; Franco, Isabella; Diaz, Maria Del Pilar

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have evidenced the effect of modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet, breastfeeding and nutritional status on breast cancer risk. However, none have addressed the missing data problem in nutritional epidemiologic research in South America. Missing data is a frequent problem in breast cancer studies and epidemiological settings in general. Estimates of effect obtained from these studies may be biased, if no appropriate method for handling missing data is applied. We performed Multiple Imputation for missing values on covariates in a breast cancer case-control study of Córdoba (Argentina) to optimize risk estimates. Data was obtained from a breast cancer case control study from 2008 to 2015 (318 cases, 526 controls). Complete case analysis and multiple imputation using chained equations were the methods applied to estimate the effects of a Traditional dietary pattern and other recognized factors associated with breast cancer. Physical activity and socioeconomic status were imputed. Logistic regression models were performed. When complete case analysis was performed only 31% of women were considered. Although a positive association of Traditional dietary pattern and breast cancer was observed from both approaches (complete case analysis OR=1.3, 95%CI=1.0-1.7; multiple imputation OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.2-1.7), effects of other covariates, like BMI and breastfeeding, were only identified when multiple imputation was considered. A Traditional dietary pattern, BMI and breastfeeding are associated with the occurrence of breast cancer in this Argentinean population when multiple imputation is appropriately performed. Multiple Imputation is suggested in Latin America’s epidemiologic studies to optimize effect estimates in the future. PMID:27892664

  5. Generated effect modifiers (GEM's) in randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an "effect modifier". Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  7. Fertility effects of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Donald E; Hacker, Neville

    2003-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are a subfertile group, and most treatments have the potential to adversely affect gonadal function. As cancer treatment becomes more effective and survival rates improve there are more cancer survivors in the reproductive age group for whom parenting is an important consideration. This article outlines the effects on fertility of cancer treatments and techniques to minimise the risk of infertility. The overall prospects for younger cancer sufferers to either retain their fertility or have genetic offspring is now better than ever before, due to advances in assisted reproductive technology, the appropriate use of fertility sparing surgery and other techniques to reduce the toxicity of therapy on the reproductive organs. These advances raise new moral and ethical concerns that must be considered before advising cancer sufferers of the options for preserving reproductive capacity.

  8. Citrate- and Succinate-Modified Carbonate Apatite Nanoparticles with Loaded Doxorubicin Exhibit Potent Anticancer Activity against Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Mehbuba Hossain

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable inorganic apatite-based particle complex is popular for its pH-sensitivity at the endosomal acidic environment to facilitate drug release following cellular uptake. Despite being a powerful anticancer drug, doxorubicin shows severe off-target effects and therefore would need a carrier for the highest effectiveness. We aimed to chemically modify carbonate apatite (CA with Krebs cycle intermediates, such as citrate and succinate in order to control the growth of the resultant particles to more efficiently carry and transport the anticancer drug into the cancer cells. Citrate- or succinate-modified CA particles were synthesized with different concentrations of sodium citrate or sodium succinate, respectively, in the absence or presence of doxorubicin. The drug loading efficiency of the particles and their cellular uptake were observed by quantifying fluorescence intensity. The average diameter and surface charge of the particles were determined using Zetasizer. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Citrate-modified carbonate apatite (CMCA exhibited the highest (31.38% binding affinity for doxorubicin and promoted rapid cellular uptake of the drug, leading to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration 1000 times less than that of the free drug in MCF-7 cells. Hence, CMCA nanoparticles with greater surface area enhance cytotoxicity in different breast cancer cells by enabling higher loading and more efficient cellular uptake of the drug.

  9. Metabolic signature of breast cancer cell line MCF-7: profiling of modified nucleosides via LC-IT MS coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleiter Christoph H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer, like other diseases accompanied by strong metabolic disorders, shows characteristic effects on cell turnover rate, activity of modifying enzymes and DNA/RNA modifications, resulting also in elevated amounts of excreted modified nucleosides. For a better understanding of the impaired RNA metabolism in breast cancer cells, we screened these metabolites in the cell culture supernatants of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and compared it to the human mammary epithelial cells MCF-10A. The nucleosides were isolated and analyzed via 2D-chromatographic techniques: In the first dimension by cis-diol specific boronate affinity extraction and subsequently by reversed phase chromatography coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer. Results Besides the determination of ribonucleosides, additional compounds with cis-diol structure, deriving from cross-linked biochemical pathways, like purine-, histidine- and polyamine metabolism were detected. In total, 36 metabolites were identified by comparison of fragmentation patterns and retention time. Relation to the internal standard isoguanosine yielded normalized area ratios for each identified compound and enabled a semi-quantitative metabolic signature of both analyzed cell lines. 13 of the identified 26 modified ribonucleosides were elevated in the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7 cells, with 5-methyluridine, N2,N2,7-trimethylguanosine, N6-methyl-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine and 3-(3-aminocarboxypropyl-uridine showing the most significant differences. 1-ribosylimidazole-4-acetic acid, a histamine metabolite, was solely found in the supernatants of MCF-10A cells, whereas 1-ribosyl-4-carboxamido-5-aminoimidazole and S-adenosylmethionine occurred only in supernatants of MCF-7 cells. Conclusion The obtained results are discussed against the background of pathological changes in cell metabolism, resulting in new perspectives for modified nucleosides and related metabolites as possible

  10. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos-Manuel; Pérez-Chávez, Ernesto; Fuente-Vera, Tania-Angélica De-la

    2016-01-01

    According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. This was a case-control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases) and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls). The analysis comprised: Tumor (s), anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI); moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ) was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9-227.1). Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers.

  11. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Manuel Ortiz-Mendoza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. Aim: To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls. The analysis comprised: Tumor (s, anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI; moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Results: The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9-227.1. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers.

  12. Generated effect modifiers (GEM’s) in randomized clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Eva; Tarpey, Thaddeus; Su, Zhe; Ogden, R. Todd

    2017-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial (RCT), it is often of interest not only to estimate the effect of various treatments on the outcome, but also to determine whether any patient characteristic has a different relationship with the outcome, depending on treatment. In regression models for the outcome, if there is a non-zero interaction between treatment and a predictor, that predictor is called an “effect modifier”. Identification of such effect modifiers is crucial as we move towards precision medicine, that is, optimizing individual treatment assignment based on patient measurements assessed when presenting for treatment. In most settings, there will be several baseline predictor variables that could potentially modify the treatment effects. This article proposes optimal methods of constructing a composite variable (defined as a linear combination of pre-treatment patient characteristics) in order to generate an effect modifier in an RCT setting. Several criteria are considered for generating effect modifiers and their performance is studied via simulations. An example from a RCT is provided for illustration. PMID:27465235

  13. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  14. Perspective on a Modified Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity Testing Strategy for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Rodney A; Halpern, Wendy G; Rao, Gautham K

    2016-05-01

    The intent of cancer immunotherapy (CIT) is to generate and enhance T-cell responses against tumors. The tumor microenvironment establishes several inhibitory pathways that lead to suppression of the local immune response, which is permissive for tumor growth. The efficacy of different CITs, alone and in combination, stems from reinvigorating the tumor immune response via several mechanisms, including costimulatory agonists, checkpoint inhibitors, and vaccines. However, immune responses to other antigens (self and foreign) may also be enhanced, resulting in potentially undesired effects. In outbred mammalian pregnancies, the fetus expresses paternally derived alloantigens that are recognized as foreign by the maternal immune system. If unchecked or enhanced, maternal immunity to these alloantigens represents a developmental and reproductive risk and thus is a general liability for cancer immunotherapeutic molecules. We propose a tiered approach to confirm this mechanistic reproductive liability for CIT molecules. A rodent allopregnancy model is based on breeding 2 different strains of mice so that paternally derived alloantigens are expressed by the fetus. When tested with a cross-reactive biotherapeutic, small molecule drug, or surrogate molecule, this model should reveal on-target reproductive liabilities if the pathway is involved in maintaining pregnancy. Alternatively, allopregnancy models with genetically modified mice can be interrogated for exquisitely specific biotherapeutics with restricted species reactivity. The allopregnancy model represents a relatively straightforward approach to confirm an expected on-target reproductive risk for CIT molecules. For biotherapeutics, it could potentially replace more complex developmental and reproductive toxicity testing in nonhuman primates when a pregnancy hazard is confirmed or expected. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Involvement of epigenetic modifiers in the pathogenesis of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Andreas C.; Almstrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer manifests mainly in young adults as a seminoma or non-seminoma. The solid tumors are preceded by the presence of a non-invasive precursor cell, the carcinoma in situ cell (CIS), which shows great similarity to fetal germ cells. It is therefore hypothesized that the CIS...... of epigenetic modifiers with a focus on jumonji C enzymes in the development of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer in men....... cell is a fetal germ cell that has been arrested during development due to testicular dysgenesis. CIS cells retain a fetal and open chromatin structure, and recently several epigenetic modifiers have been suggested to be involved in testicular dysgenesis in mice. We here review the possible involvement...

  16. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene and modified atmosphere packaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some sweet peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) are chilling sensitive and can develop injury when stored at temperatures less than 7°C. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) (650 ppb) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on chilling injuries (CI) of sweet pepper during 30 ...

  17. Polypropylene-modified kaolinite composites: Effect of chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PP/kaolinite compounds were prepared by the melt intercalation method. The effects of modified clay on properties of the prepared composites were studied. The XRD results showed that the treatment with the ammonium salt caused the return to the initial state of the clay. The thermogravimetric analysis thermograms (TGA) ...

  18. Effect of Activebag® Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-11-30

    Nov 30, 2014 ... 1University of Nairobi, Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection P.O Box ... Conclusion: Packaging mangoes in Activebag® after harvest at ripe stage was effective in delaying most of the ... to modify the O2 and CO2 levels within the package ... and sugar consumption in packaged commodities.

  19. Activation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway by Silk Fibroin Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles in Hepatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin (SF is a protein with bulky hydrophobic domains and can be easily purified as sericin-free silk-based biomaterial. Silk fibroin modified chitosan nanoparticle (SF-CSNP, a biocompatible material, has been widely used as a potential drug delivery system. Our current investigation studied the bio-effects of the SF-CSNP uptake by liver cells. In this experiment, the characterizations of SF-CSNPs were measured by particle size analysis and protein assay. The average size of the SF-CSNP was 311.9 ± 10.7 nm, and the average zeta potential was +13.33 ± 0.3 mV. The SF coating on the SF-CSNP was 6.27 ± 0.17 μg/mL. Moreover, using proteomic approaches, several proteins involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway were identified by analysis of differential protein expressions of HepG2 cell uptake the SF-CSNP. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the SF-CSNP may be involved in liver cancer cell survival and proliferation.

  20. Modified methylene blue injection improves lymph node harvest in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpei; Huang, Pinjie; Zheng, Zongheng; Chen, Tufeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nodal metastases in rectal cancer plays an important role in accurate staging and prognosis, which depends on adequate lymph node harvest. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the feasibility and survival benefit of improving lymph node harvest by a modified method with methylene blue injection in rectal cancer specimens. One hundred and thirty-one patients with rectal cancer were randomly assigned to the control group in which lymph nodes were harvested by palpation and sight, or to the methylene blue group using a modified method of injection into the superior rectal artery with methylene blue. Analysis of clinicopathologic records, including a long-term follow-up, was performed. In the methylene blue group, 678 lymph nodes were harvested by simple palpation and sight. Methylene blue injection added 853 lymph nodes to the total harvest as well as 32 additional metastatic lymph nodes, causing a shift to node-positive stage in four patients. The average number of lymph nodes harvested was 11.7 ± 3.4 in the control group and 23.2 ± 4.7 in the methylene blue group, respectively. The harvest of small lymph nodes (rectal cancer, especially small node and metastatic node retrieval, which provided more accurate staging. However, it was not associated with overall survival. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Does calcium in drinking water modify the association between nitrate in drinking water and risk of death from colon cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chen, Pei-Shih; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether calcium (Ca) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on colon cancer risk. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from colon cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All colon cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2003 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to the cases by gender, year of birth and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Ca in drinking water have been collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cases and controls was assumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Ca exposure via drinking water. We observed evidence of an interaction between drinking water NO(3)-N and Ca intake via drinking water. This is the first study to report effect modification by Ca intake from drinking water on the association between NO(3)-N exposure and risk of colon cancer mortality.

  2. Exosomes derived from tumor cells genetically modified to express Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen: a novel vaccine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Aya; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Inaba, Toshio; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Sugiura, Kikuya

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential of exosomes derived from the tumor cells, which had been genetically modified to express a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, as a cancer vaccine aimed at overcoming the weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens. We transfected B16 melanoma cells with a plasmid encoding the M. tuberculosis antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). The secreted exosomes bearing both tumor-associated antigens and the pathogenic antigen (or their epitopes) were collected. When the exosomes were injected into foot pads of mice, they significantly (p exosomes significantly suppressed (p exosomes derived from the non-transfected B16 cells showed no effect on tumor growth, although both exosomes should have similar tumor antigens. Exosomes bearing both tumor antigens and the M. tuberculosis antigen (or their epitopes) have a high potential as a candidate for cancer vaccine to overcome the immune escape by tumor cells.

  3. Effect of ?-cyclodextrin on Rheological Properties of some Viscosity Modifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, G. Chandra Sekhara; Ramadevi, K.; Sirisha, K.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins are a group of novel excipients, extensively used in the present pharmaceutical industry. Sometimes they show significant interactions with other conventional additives used in the formulation of dosage forms. The effect of β-cyclodextrin on the rheological properties of aqueous solutions of some selected viscosity modifiers was studied in the present work. β-cyclodextrin showed two different types of effects on the rheology of the selected polymers. In case of natural polymers ...

  4. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsueh-Ju; Yang, Chao-Chun; Wang, Ling-Wei; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0) months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%). Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%). No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC. PMID:25793192

  5. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Ju Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC. We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0 months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%. Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%. No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC.

  6. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-08-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of Un

  7. Modified enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols for patients with obstructive colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Dai; Tagawa, Kyoko; Inada, Kentaro; Nasu, Keiichi; Seyama, Yasuji; Maeshiro, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Sachio; Inoue, Satoru; Umekita, Nobutaka

    2017-02-16

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols are now well-known to be useful for elective colorectal surgery, as they result in shorter hospital stays without adversely affecting morbidity. However, the efficacy and safety of ERAS protocols for patients with obstructive colorectal cancer have yet to be clarified. We evaluated 122 consecutive resections for obstructive colorectal cancer performed between July 2008 and November 2012 at Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital. Patients with rupture or impending rupture and those who received simple colostomy were excluded. The first set of 42 patients was treated based on traditional protocols, and the latter 80 according to modified ERAS protocols. The main endpoints were length of postoperative hospital stay, postoperative short-term morbidity, rate of readmission within 30 days, and mortality. Differences in modified ERAS protocols relative to traditional care include intensive preoperative counseling (by both surgeons and anesthesiologists), perioperative fluid management (avoidance of sodium/fluid overload), shortening of postoperative fasting period and early provision of oral nutrition, intraoperative warm air body heating, enforced postoperative mobilization, stimulation of gut motility, early removal of urinary catheter, and a multidisciplinary team approach to care. Median (interquartile range) postoperative hospital stay was 10 (10-14.25) days in the traditional group, and seven (7-8.75) days in the ERAS group, showing a 3-day reduction in hospital stay (p < 0.01). According to the Clavien-Dindo classification, overall incidences of grade 2 or higher postoperative complications for the traditional and ERAS groups were 15 and 10% (p = 0.48), and 30-day readmission rates were 0 and 1.3% (p = 1.00), respectively. As for mortality, one patient in the traditional group died and none in the ERAS group (p = 0.34). Modified ERAS protocols for obstructive colorectal cancer reduced hospital stay

  8. Can modified gravity from extra dimensions explain dark matter effects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S.; Bharadwaj, S.; Pal, S.

    2006-01-01

    Observations on galaxy rotation curves and X-ray profiles of galaxy clusters over several decades have shown us that there exists a need for non-luminous (dark) matter. Cosmological observations also point towards the existence of dark components of two kinds - dark matter and dark energy - which, together, seem to be most of what is there the universe. However, for several years, there has been a line of thought which proposes modified gravity as an alternative to dark matter. In this article, we show, how the effective Einstein equations which arise in the context of the currently fashionable warped braneworld models, can explain the effects of dark matter as a manifestation of the consequences of the existence of extra dimensions. Finally, in order to distinguish between the effects of material dark matter and modified gravity, we calculate gravitational lensing in our modified gravity theory and show distinct differences in the deflection angles. If confirmed with observations, our results may shed new light on the existence of extra dimensions and dark matter. (authors)

  9. Poloxamer surface modified trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for the effective delivery of methotrexate in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenglong; Xiong, Yuyuan; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2017-06-01

    The present work is an effort to explore the poloxamer-modified trimethyl chitosan (TMC) encapsulated MTX for osteosarcoma treatment in order to improve the therapeutic efficacy and minimize severe toxicity associated with the clinical usage of MTX. The methotrexate-loaded pluronic-chitosan nanoparticles (MTCN) was nanosized and exhibited a controlled release of drug from the carrier system. The MTCN showed higher accumulation in cell cytoplasm region evident by the high red fluorescence indicating its uptake through energy-dependent endocytosis process. MTCN exhibited the increased cytotoxicity in MG63 cells compared free MTX due to its enhanced cellular uptake. Especially, MTCN exhibited a superior apoptosis effect with bright chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation was observed and showed remarkably higher apoptosis (∼48%) compared to that of free drug. The results of this investigation clearly demonstrate that the poloxamer-modified trimethyl chitosan (TMC) seems to have a great potential as a drug carrier in cancer chemotherapy. The present research work offers immense scope for further exploitation of poloxamer-modified trimethyl chitosan (TMC) in future for the development of nanoparticulate drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Development of generic quality indicators for patient-centered cancer care by using a RAND modified Delphi method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uphoff, Eleonora P. M. M.; Wennekes, Lianne; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Wollersheim, Hub C. H.; Hermens, Rosella P. M. G.; Ottevanger, Petronella B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing attention to patient-centered care, the needs of cancer patients are not always met. Using a RAND modified Delphi method, this study aimed to systematically develop evidence-based indicators, to be used to measure the quality of patient-centered cancer care as a first step toward

  11. Neurological Toxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Otsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with particular regard to oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE (version 3.0. The evaluation was especially focused on grade 2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The estimated median treatment time to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 7.3 months. The estimated median cumulative dose to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 931 mg/m 2 . This study clarified the treatment time from first dose as well as the cumulative dose of oxaliplatin leading to grade 2 neuropathy. It may be important to institute some clinical countermeasures when grade 2 neuropathy occurs so as to reduce the chance of progression to irreversible grade 3 neuropathy.

  12. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  13. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy

  14. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated wit...

  15. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani-; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  16. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Kaufman, B.; Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A.; Olsson, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Jaworska, K.; Durda, K.; Gronwald, J.; Huzarski, T.; Cybulski, C.; Byrski, T.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T.R.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Lange, J.L. de; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, A.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Leone, M.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Pauw, A. de; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Dreyfus, H.; Ferrer, S.F.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Sokolowska, J.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.; John, E.M.; Southey, M.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C.F.; Tea, M.K.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Fink-Retter, A.; Hansen, T.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Johannsson, O.T.; Offit, K.; Sarrel, K.; Gaudet, M.M.; Vijai, J.; Robson, M.; Piedmonte, M.R.; Andrews, L.; Cohn, D.; Demars, L.R.; Disilvestro, P.; Rodriguez, G.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Agata, S.; Imyanitov, E.; Isaacs, C.; Janavicius, R.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Ramus, S.J.; Sucheston, L.; Karlan, B.Y.; Gross, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Beattie, M.S.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Gadzicki, D.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Deissler, H.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Kast, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Simard, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Tomlinson, G.E.; Weitzel, J.; Garber, J.E.; Olopade, O.I.; Rubinstein, W.S.; Tung, N.; Blum, J.L.; Narod, S.A.; Brummel, S.; Gillen, D.L.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V.S.; Couch, F.J.; Radice, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Greene, M.H.; Loud, J.T.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Gerdes, A.M.; Thomassen, M.; Jensen, U.B.; Skytte, A.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Lee, A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  17. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Paluch-Shimon, [No Value; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Ramony Cajal, Teresa; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  18. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.-P. Shimon (Shani-Paluch); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); H. Olsson; U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Byrski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); A. Jager (Agnes); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); M. Léone (Mélanie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); A. de Pauw (Antoine); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.F. Ferrer; M.-A. Collonge-Rame; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); A. Miron (Alexander); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Sarrel (Kara); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); D.E. Cohn (David); L.R. DeMars (Leslie); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); G. Tomlinson (Gail); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); N. Tung (Nadine); J.L. Blum (Joanne); S. Narod (Steven); S. Brummel (Sean); D.L. Gillen (Daniel); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. Lee (Andrew); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk inwomen carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and

  19. Population attributable risk of breast cancer in white women associated with immediately modifiable risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaser Sally L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen/progestin replacement therapy (EPRT, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and breast-feeding duration differ from other factors associated with breast cancer in being immediately modifiable by the individual, thereby representing attractive targets for future breast cancer prevention efforts. To justify such efforts, it is vital to quantify the potential population-level impacts on breast cancer considering population variations in behavior prevalence, risk estimate, and baseline incidence. Methods For each of these four factors, we calculated population attributable risk percents (PARs using population-based survey (2001 and cancer registry data (1998–2002 for 41 subpopulations of white, non-Hispanic California women aged 40–79 years, and ranges of relative risk (RR estimates from the literature. Results Using a single RR estimate, subpopulation PARs ranged from 2.5% to 5.6% for hormone use, from 0.0% to 6.1% for recent consumption of >= 2 alcoholic drinks daily, and 4.6% to 11.0% for physical inactivity. Using a range of RR estimates, PARs were 2–11% for EPRT use, 1–20% for alcohol consumption and 2–15% for physical inactivity. Subpopulation data were unavailable for breastfeeding, but PARs using published RR estimates ranged from 2% to 11% for lifetime breastfeeding >= 31 months. Thus, of 13,019 breast cancers diagnosed annually in California, as many as 1,432 attributable to EPRT use, 2,604 attributable to alcohol consumption, 1,953 attributable to physical inactivity, and 1,432 attributable to never breastfeeding might be avoidable. Conclusion The relatively feasible lifestyle changes of discontinuing EPRT use, reducing alcohol consumption, increasing physical activity, and lengthening breastfeeding duration could lower population breast cancer incidence substantially.

  20. Breast cancer surgery effect over professional activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Dias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast cancer is responsible for 25% of all cancers and is the most prevalent in the female population. Due to treatment advances and early diagnoses, survival rates have improved, however this condition impacts work absenteeism due to the productive age of these women. The main factors responsible for work absenteeism are physical complications due to surgical treatment. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of surgical breast cancer treatments on occupation, to characterize the degree of work absenteeism and to investigate the type of relation between surgical technique and absenteeism’s main causes. Method: Cross-sectional study with 74 women diagnosed with breast cancer. A semi-structured interview was used to collect information regarding surgical and clinical aspects, sociodemographic data, work behavior and physical therapy treatments. The data was organized on Microsoft Excel and analyzed by frequency and chi-squared test. The significance level considered was p ≤ 0.05. Results: Breast cancer was most common on the left side (51%, Madden modified radical mastectomy was the most common (50% and lymph node resection was present in 93.2% of cases. The most frequent post-surgery complications were pain, problems with scarring, sensitivity alterations, ROM limitation, lymphedema and seroma. Only 58% of women were treated with physical therapy and 60% withdrew from professional activities, 23% abandoned work, 26% changed their work role and 14% retired due to the disease. Conclusion: The present study suggests the existence of a direct relation between treatment and work absenteeism.

  1. Green tea’s effects in the breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pardos-Sevilla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals like catechins from green tea might modify the epigenome and transcirptome of tumoral cells. The objective of the present review is to retrospectively evaluate literature examining the mechanisms throughout the green tea could exert a protective effect on breast cancer risk. In this work, more than 100 articles published during the last 15 years that relate tea consumption and breast cancer prevalence and development have been analysed. Green tea polyphenols can reduce risk of breast cancer throughout the inhibition of estrogenic and chemotoxic activity in liver, stimulation of metabolic pathway of glutathione conjugation, improvement of the metabolic syndrome, as well as control of immune system regulation, oxidative stress and DNA methylation. Although in vitro and animal studies show the potential ability of green tea polyphenols to act against breast cancer, the lack of experiments in humans, are the major factors in limiting us to conduct dietary recommendations based on scientific evidence for the management of patients with breast cancer.

  2. Dietary fat-dependent transcriptional architecture and copy number alterations associated with modifiers of mammary cancer metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Ryan A; Merrill, Michele La; Hunter, Kent W

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among environmental factors, body composition and intake of specific dietary components like total fat are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer and metastasis. We previously showed...... fat. To elucidate diet-dependent genetic modifiers of mammary cancer and metastasis risk, global gene expression profiles and copy number alterations from mammary cancers were measured and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) identified. Functional candidate genes that colocalized with previously...... detected metastasis modifiers were identified. Additional analyses, such as eQTL by dietary fat interaction analysis, causality and database evaluations, helped to further refine the candidate loci to produce an enriched list of genes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of metastatic mammary cancer...

  3. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment KidsHealth / For Parents / Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment What's in this article? Hair Loss Skin Problems ...

  4. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Pretherapy interventions to modify salivary dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Fox, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a common side effect of cancer therapies. Salivary secretions are reduced rapidly after starting head and neck radiotherapy. Salivary gland dysfunction has also been linked to bone marrow transplantation and to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Salivary gland stimulation during radiation has been suggested as a means of reducing radiation damage. Results of an ongoing study investigating the effects of pilocarpine on radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction suggest that parotid function was preserved, but not submandibular/sublingual function. Also, patients receiving pilocarpine had less frequent oral complaints. Further research is necessary to develop means of preventing or alleviating the salivary side effects of cancer therapies. 37 references

  5. The Low Chamber Pancreatic Cancer Cells Had Stem-Like Characteristics in Modified Transwell System: Is It a Novel Method to Identify and Enrich Cancer Stem-Like Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs or cancer-initiating cells (CICs play an important role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. It is important to construct an effective method to identify and isolate CSCs for biotherapy of cancer. During the past years, many researchers had paid more attention to it; however, this method was still on seeking. Therefore, compared to the former methods that were used to isolate the cancer stem cell, in the present study, we tried to use modified transwell system to isolate and enrich CSCs from human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1. Our results clearly showed that the lower chamber cells in modified transwell system were easily forming spheres; furthermore, these spheres expressed high levels of stem cell markers (CD133/CD44/CD24/Oct-4/ESA and exhibited chemoresistance, underwent epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and possessed the properties of self-renewal in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Therefore, we speculated that modified transwell assay system, as a rapid and effective method, can be used to isolate and enrich CSCs.

  6. Gene-diet-interactions in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism modify colon cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Amy Y; Scherer, Dominique; Poole, Elizabeth; Potter, John D; Curtin, Karen; Makar, Karen; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-04-01

    The importance of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) in colorectal carcinogenesis is emphasized by observations that high dietary folate intake is associated with decreased risk of colon cancer (CC) and its precursors. Additionally, polymorphisms in FOCM-related genes have been repeatedly associated with risk, supporting a causal relationship between folate and colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated ten candidate polymorphisms with defined or probable functional impact in eight FOCM-related genes (SHMT1, DHFR, DNMT1, MTHFD1, MTHFR, MTRR, TCN2, and TDG) in 1609 CC cases and 1974 controls for association with CC risk and for interaction with dietary factors. No polymorphism was statistically significantly associated with overall risk of CC. However, statistically significant interactions modifying CC risk were observed for DNMT1 I311V with dietary folate, methionine, vitamin B2 , and vitamin B12 intake and for MTRR I22M with dietary folate, a predefined one-carbon dietary pattern, and vitamin B6 intake. We observed statistically significant gene-diet interactions with five additional polymorphisms. Our results provide evidence that FOCM-related dietary intakes modify the association between CC risk and FOCM allelic variants. These findings add to observations showing that folate-related gene-nutrient interactions play an important role in modifying the risk of CC. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Modifiable correlates of perceived cognitive function in breast cancer survivors up to 10 years after chemotherapy completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneghan, Ashley; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Becker, Heather; Kesler, Shelli; King, Elisabeth

    2018-04-01

    Cognitive changes following breast cancer treatment are likely multifactorial and have been linked to emotional factors, biophysiological factors, and fatigue, among others. Little is known about the contributions of modifiable factors such as stress, loneliness, and sleep quality. The purpose of this study was to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived stress, loneliness, and sleep quality on perceived cognitive function (PCF) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) after chemotherapy completion. In this observational study, BCS 6 months to 10 years post chemotherapy were recruited from the community. We measured perceived stress, loneliness, sleep quality, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and PCF. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and mediation analyses utilizing ordinary least square regression. Ninety women who were on average 3 years post chemotherapy completion participated in the study. Moderate to largely negative correlations were found between PCF and the psychosocial and sleep variables (r values ranged from - 0.31 to - 0.70, p values < .0009). Mediation analyses revealed that stress and daytime sleepiness both directly and indirectly impact PCF and that loneliness and sleep quality only have indirect effects (through anxiety and fatigue). Our findings suggest that perceived cognitive changes following breast cancer treatment are multifactorial and that higher stress levels, loneliness, daytime sleepiness, and poorer sleep quality are linked to worse perceived cognitive functioning. Also, stress, loneliness, and sleep quality may affect cognitive functioning through a shared psychobiological pathway. Interventions targeting stress, loneliness, and sleep quality may improve perceived cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

  8. Results of a clinical trial comparing conservative and modified radical mastectomy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xianghui; Wang Yuezhen; Wu Lie; Zhu Yuan; Yang Hongjian; Zou Dehong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The influence of conservative mastectomy plus postoperative radiation (CM + RT) in local control, distant failure, cosmetic and psychological outcome for early stage breast cancer was evaluated comparing with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Between January 1998 and December 2003, 68 early stage breast cancer patients underwent CM + RT. During the save period, 76 similar patients were treated by modified radical mastectomy (MRM + RT). The cosmetic results evaluated as 'excellent', 'fair' or 'poor' using specific guide lines together with their psychological changes. Sex life and marital stability were also recorded. All patients were female with median age of 44.5 years (range, 28-62 years). Guidelines for patient selection reported by National Breast Cancer Cooperative Group was adhered to. In general, CM consisted of wide local excision with the breast conserved and postoperative radiotherapy to the entire breast with tangential fields followed by a boost to the tumor bed. All patients also received adjuvant chemotherapy with CAF. Patients with positive ER or PR assay results received tamoxifen for 5 years. In the 76 MRM + RT patients, the post operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy were given as clinically indicated. Results: There was no failure locally in all. In CM + RT group, the cause of failure was bone metastasis in 1 and mutiple metastasis in 2. In the MRM + RT group, the cause of failure was bone metastasis in 2, brain metastasis in 1 and mutiple metastases in 1. The cosmetic scores were 91.2% excellent, 5.6% fair and 2.9% poor. Conclusions: Breast preservation by conservative mastectomy is preferable to mastectomy in appropriately selected patients as it provides equivalent survival but giving good cosmetic results. (authors)

  9. Population attributable risk of modifiable risk factors associated with invasive breast cancer in women aged 45-69 years in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Louise F; Page, Andrew N; Dunn, Nathan A M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Protani, Melinda M; Taylor, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    To quantify the population attributable risk of key modifiable risk factors associated with breast cancer incidence in Queensland, Australia. Population attributable fractions (PAFs) for high body mass index (BMI), use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity were calculated, using prevalence data from a representative survey of women attending mammographic screening at BreastScreen Queensland in 2008 and relative risk estimates sourced from published literature. Attributable cancers were calculated using 'underlying' breast cancer incidence data for 2008 based on Poisson regression models, adjusting for the inflation of incidence due to the effects of mammographic screening. Attributable burden of breast cancer due to high body mass index (BMI), use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity. In Queensland women aged 45-69 years, an estimated 12.1% (95% CI: 11.6-12.5%) of invasive breast cancers were attributable to high BMI in post-menopausal women who have never used HRT; 2.8% (95% CI: 2.7-2.9%) to alcohol consumption; 7.6% (95% CI: 7.4-7.9%) to inadequate physical activity in post-menopausal women and 6.2% (95% CI: 5.5-7.0%) to current use of HRT after stratification by BMI and type of HRT used. Combined, just over one quarter (26.0%; 95% CI: 25.4-26.6%) of all invasive breast cancers in Queensland women aged 45-69 years in 2008 were attributable to these modifiable risk factors. There is benefit in targeting prevention strategies to modify lifestyle behaviours around BMI, physical activity, HRT use and alcohol consumption, as a reduction in these risk factors could decrease invasive breast cancer incidence in the Queensland population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aptamer-modified nanoparticles and their use in cancer diagnostics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemann, Christine; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-06

    Aptamers are single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) oligonucleotides, which are able to bind their target with high selectivity and affinity. Owing to their multiple talents, aptamers combined with nanoparticles are nanosystems well qualified for the development of new biomedical devices for analytical, imaging, drug delivery and many other medical applications. Because of their target affinity, aptamers can direct the transport of aptamer-nanoparticle conjugates. The binding of the aptamers to the target "anchors" the nanoparticle-aptamer conjugates at their site of action. In this way, nanoparticle-based bioimaging and smart drug delivery are enabled, especially by use of systematically developed aptamers for cancer-associated biomarkers. This review article gives a brief overview of recent relevant research into aptamers and trends in their use in cancer diagnostics and therapy. A concise description of aptamers, their development and functionalities relating to nanoparticle modification is given. The main part of the article is dedicated to current developments of aptamer-modified nanoparticles and their use in cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  11. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cell pigment epithelium-derived factor cytotherapy modifies genetic and epigenetic profiles of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolochevska, Olga; Shearer, Joseph; Ellis, Jayne; Fokina, Valentina; Shah, Forum; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Figueiredo, Marxa L

    2014-03-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) are promising tools for delivery of cytotherapy against cancer. However, ASCs can exert profound effects on biological behavior of tumor cells. Our study aimed to examine the influence of ASCs on gene expression and epigenetic methylation profiles of prostate cancer cells as well as the impact of expressing a therapeutic gene on modifying the interaction between ASCs and prostate cancer cells. ASCs were modified by lentiviral transduction to express either green fluorescent protein as a control or pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as a therapeutic molecule. PC3 prostate cancer cells were cultured in the presence of ASC culture-conditioned media (CCM), and effects on PC3 or DU145. Ras cells were examined by means of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, EpiTect methyl prostate cancer-focused real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays, and luciferase reporter assays. ASCs transduced with lentiviral vectors were able to mediate expression of several tumor-inhibitory genes, some of which correlated with epigenetic methylation changes on cocultured PC3 prostate cancer cells. When PC3 cells were cultured with ASC-PEDF CCM, we observed a shift in the balance of gene expression toward tumor inhibition, which suggests that PEDF reduces the potential tumor-promoting activity of unmodified ASCs. These results suggest that ASC-PEDF CCM can promote reprogramming of tumor cells in a paracrine manner. An improved understanding of genetic and epigenetic events in prostate cancer growth in response to PEDF paracrine therapy would enable a more effective use of ASC-PEDF, with the goal of achieving safer yet more potent anti-tumor effects. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of modified penoplasty for concealed penis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Li, Ning; Luo, Yi-Ge; Wang, Hong; Tang, Xian-Ming; Chen, Jia-Bo; Dong, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Qiang; Dong, Kun; Su, Cheng; Yang, Ti-Quan

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of modified penoplasty in the management of concealed penis. We retrospectively reviewed 96 consecutive patients with concealed penis, which had been surgically corrected between July 2013 and July 2015. All patients underwent modified Shiraki phalloplasty. All patients were scheduled for regular follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgery. Data on the patients' age, operative time, postoperative complications, and parents' satisfaction grade were collected and analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 17.4 months (range 7-31 months). The mean operative time was 63.2 ± 8.7 min. The mean perpendicular penile length was 1.89 ± 0.77 cm preoperatively and 4.42 ± 0.87 cm postoperatively, with an improved mean length of 2.5 ± 0.68 cm in the flaccid state postoperatively (p penis can achieve maximum utilization of prepuce to assure coverage of the exposed penile shaft. It has fewer complications, achieving marked asthetics, and functional improvement. It is a relatively ideal means for treating concealed penis.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is an important public health problem. Several screening methods have been shown to be effective in reducing colorectal cancer mortality. The objective of this review was to assess the cost-effectiveness of the different colorectal cancer screening methods and to

  15. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Physical Activity and Gastrointestinal Cancers: Primary and Tertiary Preventive Effects and Possible Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Steindorf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cancers account for 37% of all cancer deaths worldwide, underlining the need to further investigate modifiable factors for gastrointestinal cancer risk and prognosis. This review summarizes the corresponding evidence for physical activity (PA, including, briefly, possible biological mechanisms. Despite high public health relevance, there is still a scarcity of studies, especially for tertiary prevention. Besides the convincing evidence of beneficial effects of PA on colon cancer risk, clear risk reduction for gastroesophageal cancer was identified, as well as weak indications for pancreatic cancer. Inverse associations were observed for liver cancer, yet based on few studies. Only for rectal cancer, PA appeared to be not associated with cancer risk. With regard to cancer-specific mortality of the general population, published data were rare but indicated suggestive evidence of protective effects for colon and liver cancer, and to a lesser extent for rectal and gastroesophageal cancer. Studies in cancer patients on cancer-specific and total mortality were published for colorectal cancer only, providing good evidence of inverse associations with post-diagnosis PA. Overall, evidence of associations of PA with gastrointestinal cancer risk and progression is promising but still limited. However, the already available knowledge further underlines the importance of PA to combat cancer.

  17. Traumatic Neuroma in a Breast Cancer Patient After Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ku Sang [Dept. of Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hyunee [Dept. of Pathology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Traumatic neuromas are rare benign lesions that develop from non-neoplastic proliferation of axons, schwann cells, and fibroblasts at the proximal end of transected or injured nerves as a result of trauma or surgery. We present the case of a traumatic neuroma in a 47-year-old female who was treated with a right modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer 14 years ago. Ultrasound examination revealed an oval-shaped hypoechoic nodule at the 9-O'clock position in the right chest wall. Color Doppler imaging showed no increased blood flow and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination revealed no fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in this nodule. The typical histologic findings were present.

  18. Traumatic Neuroma in a Breast Cancer Patient After Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee; Kim, Ku Sang; Yim, Hyunee

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare benign lesions that develop from non-neoplastic proliferation of axons, schwann cells, and fibroblasts at the proximal end of transected or injured nerves as a result of trauma or surgery. We present the case of a traumatic neuroma in a 47-year-old female who was treated with a right modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer 14 years ago. Ultrasound examination revealed an oval-shaped hypoechoic nodule at the 9-O'clock position in the right chest wall. Color Doppler imaging showed no increased blood flow and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination revealed no fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in this nodule. The typical histologic findings were present.

  19. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  20. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing......, and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA)-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation) loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo...

  1. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study

  2. Satisfactory surgical outcome of T2 gastric cancer after modified D2 lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shupeng; Wu, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaona; Ding, Xuewei; Liang, Han

    2017-04-01

    Though D2 lymphadenectomy has been increasingly regarded as standard surgical procedure for advanced gastric cancer (GC), the modified D2 (D1 + 7, 8a and 9) lymphadenectomy may be more suitable than D2 dissection for T2 stage GC. The purpose of this study is to elucidate whether the surgical outcome of modified D2 lymphadenectomy was comparable to that of standard D2 dissection in T2 stage GC patients. A retrospective cohort study with 77 cases and 77 controls matched for baseline characteristics was conducted. Patients were categorized into two groups according to the extent of lymphadenectomy: the modified D2 group (mD2) and the standard D2 group (D2). Surgical outcome and recurrence date were compared between the two groups. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 71.4% for patients accepted mD2 lymphadenectomy and 70.1% for those accepted standard D2, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that curability, tumor size, TNM stage and postoperative complications were independently prognostic factors for T2 stage GC patients. Patients in the mD2 group tended to have less intraoperative blood loss (P=0.001) and shorter operation time (P<0.001) than those in the D2 group. While there were no significant differences in recurrence rate and types, especially lymph node recurrence, between the two groups. The surgical outcome of mD2 lymphadenectomy was equal to that of standard D2, and the use of mD2 instead of standard D2 can be a better option for T2 stage GC.

  3. Calcitriol increases Dicer expression and modifies the microRNAs signature in SiHa cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Duarte, Ramiro José; Cázares-Ordoñez, Verna; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra; Díaz, Lorenza; Ortíz, Víctor; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Larrea, Fernando; Avila, Euclides

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in cancer biology. Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, regulates microRNAs expression in tumor cells. In the present study we asked if calcitriol would modify some of the components of the microRNA processing machinery, namely, Drosha and Dicer, in calcitriol-responsive cervical cancer cells. We found that calcitriol treatment did not affect Drosha mRNA; however, it significantly increased Dicer mRNA and protein expression in VDR-positive SiHa and HeLa cells. In VDR-negative C33-A cells, calcitriol had no effect on Dicer mRNA. We also found a vitamin D response element in Dicer promoter that interacts in vitro to vitamin D and retinoid X receptors. To explore the biological plausibility of these results, we asked if calcitriol alters the microRNA expression profile in SiHa cells. Our results revealed that calcitriol regulates the expression of a subset of microRNAs with potential regulatory functions in cancer pathways, such as miR-22, miR-296-3p, and miR-498, which exert tumor-suppressive effects. In summary, the data indicate that in SiHa cells, calcitriol stimulates the expression of Dicer possibly through the vitamin D response element located in its promoter. This may explain the calcitriol-dependent modulation of microRNAs whose target mRNAs are related to anticancer pathways, further adding to the various anticancer mechanisms of calcitriol.

  4. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  5. Cancer surgeons' distress and well-being, II: modifiable factors and the potential for organizational interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Rebecca S; Baser, Ray; Li, Yuelin; Scardino, Peter T; Brown, Arthur E; Kissane, David W

    2011-05-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the prevalence of burnout among surgical oncologists at a comprehensive cancer center was 42% and psychiatric morbidity 27%, and high quality of life (QOL) was absent for 54% of surgeons. Here we examine modifiable workplace factors and other stressors associated with burnout, psychiatric morbidity, and low QOL, together with interest in interventions to reduce distress and improve wellness. Study-specific questions important for morale, QOL, and stressors associated with burnout were included in an anonymous Internet-based survey distributed to the surgical faculty at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Among the 72 surgeons who responded (response rate of 73%), surgeons identified high stress from medical lawsuits, pressure to succeed in research, financial worries, negative attitudes to gender, and ability to cope with patients' suffering and death. Workplace features requiring greatest change were the reimbursement system, administrative support, and schedule. Work-life balance and relationship issues with spouse or partner caused high stress. Strongest correlations with distress were a desire to change communication with patients and the tension between the time devoted to work versus time available to be with family. Surgeons' preferences for interventions favored a fitness program, nutrition consultation, and increased socialization with colleagues, with less interest in interventions conventionally used to address psychological distress. Several opportunities to intervene at the organizational level permit efforts to reduce burnout and improve QOL.

  6. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe_3O_4) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Mousavi, Majid; Kheirjou, Somayyeh; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe_3O_4 was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T_2) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T_2-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l"−"1) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. • MNPs were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. • Modified and unmodified Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior. • T_2 decrease as MNPs concentration increase, this led to MR signal enhancement. • Modified

  7. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Vijai, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer...... carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part...

  8. Improved Anticancer Photothermal Therapy Using the Bystander Effect Enhanced by Antiarrhythmic Peptide Conjugated Dopamine-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiantao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Yang, Lingyan; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chen, Liliang; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Guan-Wen; Yan, Junyan; Sawettanun, Saranta; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts toward developing novel near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing nanomaterials, improvement in therapeutic efficiency remains a formidable challenge in photothermal cancer therapy. This study aims to synthesize a specific peptide conjugated polydopamine-modified reduced graphene oxide (pDA/rGO) nanocomposite that promotes the bystander effect to facilitate cancer treatment using NIR-activated photothermal therapy. To prepare a nanoplatform capable of promoting the bystander effect in cancer cells, we immobilized antiarrhythmic peptide 10 (AAP10) on the surface of dopamine-modified rGO (AAP10-pDA/rGO). Our AAP10-pDA/rGO could promote the bystander effect by increasing the expression of connexin 43 protein in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells. Because of its tremendous ability to absorb NIR absorption, AAP10-pDA/rGO offers a high photothermal effect under NIR irradiation. This leads to a massive death of MCF-7 cells via the bystander effect. Using tumor-bearing mice as the model, it is found that NIR radiation effectively ablates breast tumor in the presence of AAP10-pDA/rGO and inhibits tumor growth by ≈100%. Therefore, this research integrates the bystander and photothermal effects into a single nanoplatform in order to facilitate an efficient photothermal therapy. Furthermore, our AAP10-pDA/rGO, which exhibits both hyperthermia and the bystander effect, can prevent breast-cancer recurrence and, therefore, has great potential for future clinical and research applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Modified graphene/polyimide nanocomposites: reinforcing and tribological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting; Xin, Yuanshi; Li, Tongsheng; Nutt, Steven; Su, Chao; Chen, Haiming; Liu, Pei; Lai, Zuliang

    2013-06-12

    By taking advantage of design and construction of strong graphene-matrix interfaces, we have prepared modified graphene/polyimide (MG/PI) nanocomposites via a two-stage process consisting of (a) surface modification of graphene and (b) in situ polymerization. The 2 wt % MG/PI nanocomposites exhibited a 20-fold increase in wear resistance and a 12% reduction in friction coefficient, constituting a potential breakthrough for future tribological application. Simultaneously, MG also enhanced thermal stability, electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties, including tensile strength, Young's modulus, storage modulus, and microhardness. Excellent thermal stability and compatibility of interface, strong covalent adhesion interaction and mechanical interlocking at the interface, as well as homogeneous and oriented dispersion of MG were achieved here, contributing to the enhanced properties observed here. The superior wear resistance is ascribed to (a) tribological effect of MG, including suppression effect of MG in the generation of wear debris and protective effect of MG against the friction force, and (b) the increase in mechanical properties. In light of the relatively low cost and the unique properties of graphene, the results of this study highlight a pathway to expand the engineering applications of graphene and solve wear-related mechanical failures of polymer parts.

  10. Benefits of gene transduction of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cancer vaccine using genetically modified dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Iwahashi, Makoto; Nakamura, Masaki; Matsuda, Kenji; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ueda, Kentaro; Naka, Teiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2007-10-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key cytokine for the generation and stimulation of dendritic cells (DCs), and it may also play a pivotal role in promoting the survival of DCs. In this study, the feasibility of creating a cancer vaccine using DCs adenovirally transduced with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene and the GM-CSF gene was examined. In addition, the effect of the co-transduction of GM-CSF gene on the lifespan of these genetically modified DCs was determined. A cytotoxic assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was performed in a 4-h 51Cr release assay. The apoptosis of DCs was examined by TdT-mediated dUTP-FITC nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. CEA-specific CTLs were generated from PBMCs stimulated with genetically modified DCs expressing CEA. The cytotoxicity of these CTLs was augmented by co-transduction of DCs with the GM-CSF gene. Co-transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs inhibited apoptosis of these DCs themselves via up-regulation of Bcl-x(L) expression, leading to the extension of the lifespan of these DCs. Furthermore, the transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs also suppressed the incidence of apoptosis of DCs induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta-1). Immunotherapy using these genetically modified DCs may therefore be useful with several advantages as follows: i) adenoviral toxicity to DCs can be reduced; ii) the lifespan of vaccinated DCs can be prolonged; and iii) GM-CSF may protect DCs from apoptosis induced by tumor-derived TGFbeta-1 in the regional lymph nodes.

  11. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collée (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  12. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  13. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In

  14. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  15. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we

  16. Can vitamin A modify the activity of docetaxel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Lemancewicz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of breast cancer. On the other hand, the vitamin A family compounds play the essential roles in many biological processes in mammary gland. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of all-trans retinol, carotenoids (beta-carotene, lycopene and retinoids (9-cis, 13-cis and all-trans retinoic acid on the activity of docetaxel and to compare these effects with the estradiol and tamoxifen actions on human ER(+ MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. The evaluation was based on [3H] thymidine incorporation and the proliferative activity of PCNA and Ki 67 positive cells. In our study, the incorporation of [3H] thymidine into cancer cells was inhibited to 50% by 0.2, 0.5 and 1 microM of docetaxel in the 24-hour culture and addition of estradiol (0.001 microM didn't influence the results. However, addition of tamoxifen caused a statistically significant decrease of the percentage of the proliferating cells in the culture medium with 0.2 and 0.5 microM of docetaxel (38.99 +/- 2.84%, p<0.01 and 40.67 +/- 5.62%, p<0.01 in comparison to the docetaxel only group. The above-mentioned observations were also confirmed with the use of the immunohistochemical investigations. Among the examined vitamin A family compounds, the simultaneous application of beta-carotene (0.1 microM and docetaxel (0.2 microM resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of proliferating cells (40.25 +/- 14.62%, p<0.01. Lycopene (0.1 microM, which stimulates the growth of breast cancer cells in a 24-hour culture, had an inhibitory effect (42.97 +/- 9.58%, p<0.01 when combined with docetaxel (0.2 microM. Although, beta-carotene and lycopene belong to the different chemical groups, they surprisingly had a similar inhibitory influence on both growth and proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells when combined with docetaxel. The application of docetaxel either with beta-carotene or

  17. Study on effective modifiers for damaging salts in mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Rodgriguez-Navarro

    2014-01-01

    The use of crystallization modifiers for the prevention or mitigation of salt crystallization damage has recently received a lot of research interest in the field of building conservation. However, the use of crystallization modifiers mixed in a lime-based mortar, is still a very new field of

  18. Hofmeister effects on the glucose oxidase hydrogel-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Aimi; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    We describe the consistent effect of salts in the electrolyte solution on glucose oxidation current production in the redox hydrogel-modified electrode containing glucose oxidase as an electrocatalyst and Os complex mediator. The ions affect not only on the electron transfer between the enzyme and the Os complex, but also on the hydrogel structure. This study found that the degree of the effect can be characterized by Hofmeister series. The relative decrease in oxidization current is the lowest in the middle of the Hofmeister series, and increases monotonically on either side. An increase of ionic strength inhibits the electron transfer from the active site of glucose oxidase to Os complex. In addition to this, the kosmotropic anions, which are strongly hydrated, caused hydrogel deswelling (shrinking). The more chaotropic an ion is, the more it adsorbs to uncharged parts of polymer/enzyme with dispersion force, and the swelling of the hydrogel decreases the catalytic current. This study impacts the design of hydrogel electrode and selection of electrolyte ions for bioelectronic applications.

  19. Alcohol use and drunk driving: the modifying effect of impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moan, Inger Synnøve; Norström, Thor; Storvoll, Elisabet E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to examine how an increase in the frequency of heavy drinking episodes affects the incidence of drunk driving and (b) to examine whether the effect of alcohol use on drunk driving is contingent on impulsivity. Two waves of the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study were applied (N = 2,603; response rate: 67%), when the respondents were on average 17 (1994) and 28 (2005) years of age. Measurements consisted of self-reported heavy episodic drinking, drunk driving, and impulsivity. The first difference method was applied to estimate the association between heavy episodic drinking and drunk driving. This means that changes in the frequency of drunk driving were regressed on changes in the frequency of drinking. In this way, the effects of time-invariant confounders were eliminated. The results showed that every additional episode of heavy drinking was associated with a 2.6% increase in the frequency of drunk driving. The increase for males was significantly higher than among females. The analyses supported the hypothesis that impulsivity modifies the association between alcohol use and drunk driving. The association between drinking and drunk driving is significantly stronger among those with a high score on impulsivity compared with those who have a low score.

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Cancer Exosomes Using a Novel Modified Aptamer-based Array (SOMAscanTM) Platform*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Stone, Timothy C.; Katilius, Evaldas; Smith, Breanna C.; Gordon, Bridget; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2014-01-01

    We have used a novel affinity-based proteomics technology to examine the protein signature of small secreted extracellular vesicles called exosomes. The technology uses a new class of protein binding reagents called SOMAmers® (slow off-rate modified aptamers) and allows the simultaneous precise measurement of over 1000 proteins. Exosomes were highly purified from the Du145 prostate cancer cell line, by pooling selected fractions from a continuous sucrose gradient (within the density range of 1.1 to 1.2 g/ml), and examined under standard conditions or with additional detergent treatment by the SOMAscanTM array (version 3.0). Lysates of Du145 cells were also prepared, and the profiles were compared. Housekeeping proteins such as cyclophilin-A, LDH, and Hsp70 were present in exosomes, and we identified almost 100 proteins that were enriched in exosomes relative to cells. These included proteins of known association with cancer exosomes such as MFG-E8, integrins, and MET, and also those less widely reported as exosomally associated, such as ROR1 and ITIH4. Several proteins with no previously known exosomal association were confirmed as exosomally expressed in experiments using individual SOMAmer® reagents or antibodies in micro-plate assays. Western blotting confirmed the SOMAscanTM-identified enrichment of exosomal NOTCH-3, L1CAM, RAC1, and ADAM9. In conclusion, we describe here over 300 proteins of hitherto unknown association with prostate cancer exosomes and suggest that the SOMAmer®-based assay technology is an effective proteomics platform for exosome-associated biomarker discovery in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24505114

  1. Modifiers of the healthy worker effect and expression of the internal healthy worker effect in a female nuclear worker cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques Guy

    Though well-documented among numerous cohorts of male workers, little is known about how the healthy worker effect (HWE) and the internal HWE is expressed among cohorts of female workers. This investigation examines characteristics of the HWE and the internal HWE in a cohort of 12,668 female nuclear workers. The HWE, which was estimated by assessing SMRs for all causes of death combined, was found to be modified by race, occupational class and length of follow-up. Smaller variations in the HWE were observed for age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, monitored status, and interruption of monitoring. Examination of SMRs for all cancers combined revealed that the HWE was modified by race, occupational class, monitored status, interruption of monitoring, and length of follow-up. Smaller variations were observed for age at hire and length of employment. Investigators often try to circumvent the HWE by employing internal comparisons; that is, by directly comparing the mortality of subgroups within a defined occupational cohort with one another. However, internal comparisons are not necessarily free from certain biases related to the HWE. If employees are selected on the basis of health into subgroups which serve as the basis for internal comparisons, then a form of internal comparison bias, called the internal healthy worker effect (Stewart et al, 1991; Wilkinson, 1992) may occur. In this investigation, the expression of the internal HWE was examined by estimating the extent to which survival time was modified by the variables under study. Using the Cox PH model, time to death from all causes was found to be modified by occupational class and length of employment but not by race, age at hire, monitored status, or interruption of monitoring. Time to death from all cancers was found to be modified by race and interruption of monitoring but not by age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, or monitored status. These results are important because

  2. Effects of Using Modified Items to Test Students with Persistent Academic Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Compton, Elizabeth; McGrath, Dawn; Bruen, Charles; Hinton, Kent; Palmer, Porter; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel; Roach, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using modified items in achievement tests to enhance accessibility. An experiment determined whether tests composed of modified items would reduce the performance gap between students eligible for an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) and students not eligible, and the…

  3. A modified VMAT adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer patients based on CT-CT image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Xiance; Han, Ce; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Yan, Huawei; Xie, Congying

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a modified adaptive radiotherapy (ART) by replanning in the initial CT (iCT) with new contours from a repeat CT (rCT) based on CT-CT image fusion for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients underwent volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Nine NPC patients underwent VMAT treatment with a rCT at 23rd fraction were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric differences for replanning VMAT plans in the iCT and in the rCT were compared. Volumetric and dosimetric changes of gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of this modified ART were also investigated. No dosimetric differences between replanning in the iCT and in the rCT were observed. The average volume of GTV decreased from 78.83 ± 38.42 cm 3 in the iCT to 71.44 ± 37.46 cm 3 in the rCT, but with no significant difference (p = 0.42).The average volume of the left and right parotid decreased from 19.91 ± 4.89 cm 3 and 21.58 ± 6.16 cm 3 in the iCT to 11.80 ± 2.79 cm 3 and 13.29 ± 4.17 cm 3 in the rCT (both p < 0.01), respectively. The volume of other OARs did not shrink very much. No significant differences on PTV GTV and PTV CTV coverage were observed for replanning with this modified ART. Compared to the initial plans, the average mean dose of the left and right parotid after re-optimization were decreased by 62.5 cGy (p = 0.05) and 67.3 cGy (p = 0.02), respectively, and the V5 (the volume receiving 5 Gy) of the left and right parotids were decreased by 7.8% (p = 0.01) and 11.2% (p = 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference on the dose delivered to other OARs. Patients with NPC undergoing VMAT have significant anatomic and dosimetric changes to parotids. Repeat CT as an anatomic changes reference and re-optimization in the iCT based on CT-CT image fusion was accurate enough to identify the volume changes and to ensure safe dose to parotids

  4. Targeted Delivery of Auristatin-Modified Toxins to Pancreatic Cancer Using Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kratschmer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Treatment with the first-line agent, gemcitabine, is often unsuccessful because it, like other traditional chemotherapeutic agents, is non-specific, resulting in off-target effects that necessitate administration of subcurative doses. Alternatively, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE and monomethyl auristatin F (MMAF are highly toxic small molecules that require ligand-targeted delivery. MMAE has already received FDA approval as a component of an anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate, brentuximab vedotin. However, in contrast to antibodies, aptamers have distinct advantages. They are chemicals, which allows them to be produced synthetically and facilitates the rapid development of diagnostics and therapeutics with clinical applicability. In addition, their small size allows for enhanced tissue distribution and rapid systemic clearance. Here, we assayed the toxicity of MMAE and MMAF conjugated to an anti-transferrin receptor aptamer, Waz, and an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor aptamer, E07, on the pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2, and BxPC3. In vitro, our results indicate that these aptamers are a viable option for the targeted delivery of toxic payloads to pancreatic cancer cells.

  5. Zinc-Modified Nanotransporter of Doxorubicin for Targeted Prostate Cancer Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Skalickova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the preparation of chitosan nanoparticles used as carriers for doxorubicin for targeted cancer delivery. Prepared nanocarriers were stabilized and functionalized via zinc ions incorporated into the chitosan nanoparticle backbone. We took the advantage of high expression of sarcosine in the prostate cancer cells. The prostate cancer targeting was mediated by the AntiSar antibodies decorated surface of the nanocage. Formation of the chitosan nanoparticles was determined using a ninhydrin assay and differential pulse voltammetry. Obtained results showed the strong effect of tripolyphosphine on the nanoparticle formation. The zinc ions affected strong chitosan backbone coiling both in inner and outer chitosan nanoparticle structure. Zinc electrochemical signal depended on the level of the complex formation and the potential shift from −960 to −950 mV. Formed complex is suitable for doxorubicin delivery. It was observed the 20% entrapment efficiency of doxorubicin and strong dependence of drug release after 120 min in the blood environment. The functionality of the designed nanotransporter was proven. The purposed determination showed linear dependence in the concentration range of Anti-sarcosine IgG labeled gold nanoparticles from 0 to 1000 µg/mL and the regression equation was found to be y = 3.8x − 66.7 and R2 = 0.99. Performed ELISA confirmed the ability of Anti-sarcosine IgG labeled chitosan nanoparticles with loaded doxorubicin to bind to the sarcosine molecule. Observed hemolytic activity of the nanotransporter was 40%. Inhibition activity of our proposed nanotransporter was evaluated to be 0% on the experimental model of S. cerevisiae. Anti-sarcosine IgG labeled chitosan nanoparticles, with loaded doxorubicin stabilized by Zn ions, are a perspective type of nanocarrier for targeted drug therapy managed by specific interaction with sarcosine and metallothionein for prostate cancer.

  6. Physical exercise : effects in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise plays an important role in cancer prevention as well as in the prevention and treatment of cancer related fatigue during and after treatment. Some of these effects are presented in the thesis of M.J. Velthuis. In Part I effects of physical exercise on anthropometric measurements

  7. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  8. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  9. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...... tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an approximately 25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk...

  10. Silica-modified Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo cancer hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Jung-Chih; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    In this study, sulfide-based magnetic Fe-doped CaS nanoparticles modified with a silica layer were investigated for cancer hyperthermia. A polyvinyl pyrrolidone polymer was used as the coupling agent. The developed nanoparticles contained 11.6 wt% iron concentration, and their X-ray diffraction pattern was similar to those of CaS and Fe–CaS nanoparticles. The average particle size was approximately 47.5 nm and homogeneously dispersed in aqueous solutions. The major absorption bands of silica were observed from the FTIR spectrum. The magnetic properties and heating efficiency were also examined. The specific absorption ratio of nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 mg/mL at 37 °C in an ethanol carrier fluid was 37.92 W/g, and the nanoparticles would raise the temperature to over 45 °C within 15 min. A cytotoxicity analysis revealed that the nanoparticles had good biocompatibility, which indicated that the nanoparticles did not affect cell viability. The therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles were investigated using in vitro and animal studies. Cells seeded with nanoparticles and treated under an AC magnetic field revealed a percentage of cytotoxicity (60%) that was significantly higher from that in other groups. In the animal study, during a hyperthermia period of 15 days, tumor-bearing Balb/c mice that were subcutaneously injected with nanoparticles and exposed to an AC magnetic field manifested a reduction in tumor volume. The newly developed silica-modified Fe–CaS nanoparticles can thus be considered a promising and attractive hyperthermia thermoseed.

  11. Subgroup effects of occupational therapy-based intervention for people with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marc Sampedro; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen; la Cour, Karen

    2018-01-01

    cancer (N = 242) and found no overall effects on ADL ability. However, heterogeneity of treatment effect may disguise subgroup differences. Objective: To investigate whether subgroups of people with advanced cancer gain positive effects from the ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention’ on ADL ability. Material....... Results: The ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention’ had no statistically significant effect in the six subgroups. Modifying effects of age (0.30 [95% CI: −0.05 to 0.64]) and gender (0.23 [95% CI: −0.11 to 0.57]) were not found. Conclusion: There were no subgroup effects of the ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention......’on ADL motor ability. Some indications suggest greater effects for those aged below 69 years; however, this result should be interpreted with caution....

  12. Effect of One versus Two Drain Insertion on Postoperative Seroma Formation after Modified Radical Mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farzaneh ebrahimifard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modified radical mastectomy (MRM is still one of globally accepted surgical techniques for breast cancer and in some selected patient is the gold standard type of surgery. The most frequent complication of this procedure is seroma under skin flaps or in the axilla as reported as much as 30% in some studies. The use of closed suction drainage system to reduce the incidence of this complication has been routinely accepted by surgeons; however, length of catheter stay and the number of catheters inserted in the wound are still controversial. The present study compares the results of single versus double drain insertion in patients undergoing MRM for breast cancer.Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 100 women with breast cancer who were candidate for MRM surgery during 2007-2010 referred to Modarres hospital, Tehran, Iran as a randomized group matched controlled trial.Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, BMI, and tumor weight (P=0.406 (Table 1. Similarly, the difference between the two groups was insignificant in tumor size (T and number of lymph nodes involved (P=0.145. There was no significant difference between the two groups in timing of axillary drain removal (P=0.064. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in mean aspirated fluid (P=0.071 and mean aspirated sera (P=0.484 after removal of drains.Conclusion: This study revealed one drain insertion in MRM surgery is as effective as two drain and probably less morbidity and cost.

  13. Semisynthesis of SY-1 for investigation of breast cancer stem cell selectivity of C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoli; Borgström, Björn; Månsson, Linda; Persson, Lo; Oredsson, Stina; Hegardt, Cecilia; Strand, Daniel

    2014-07-18

    Salinomycin, a naturally occurring polyether ionophore was recently found to selectively reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells, a phenotype associated with breast cancer stem cells. Subsequent studies from our group showed that chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin, located at the C-ring, can enhance the activity of derivatives against breast cancer cells over 5-fold compared to the native structure. Access to C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues is thus of interest from both a mechanistic and a synthetic perspective. Here, we report efficient strategies for gram scale synthesis of the natural product SY-1 (20-deoxy salinomycin), and a saturated analogue, 18,19-dihydro SY-1, for a comparative in vitro investigation of the biological profiles of these compounds with that of salinomycin. Across several assays, the deoxygenated structures required higher concentrations to elicit similar cellular responses to that of salinomycin. Similarly to salinomycin, SY-1 or 18,19-dihydro SY-1 treatment was found to reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells with essentially complete selectivity up to ∼IC25. Importantly, the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells showed a pronounced U-shaped dose response curve for salinomycin and its derivatives, but not for paclitaxel. The concentration for maximum response in this assay followed differences in IC50 for salinomycin and its analogues, which emphasizes the importance of taking concentration dependence into account when comparing effects on the CD44(+)/CD24(-) phenotype. Small differences in the global conformation within the triad of compounds investigated together with differences in activity across assays emphasize the importance of substitution at C20 for the activity of salinomycin and its derivatives.

  14. Modifiable risk factors and colorectal adenomas among those at high risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified several modifiable risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in the general population. However, associations between modifiable risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary patterns, and colorectal neoplasms in two

  15. Dithiolethione modified valproate and diclofenac increase E-cadherin expression and decrease proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moody, Terry W.; Switzer, Christopher; Santana-Flores, Wilmarie; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Berna, Marc; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, Robert T.; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Yeh, Grace C; Roberts, David D.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Wink, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of dithiolethione-modified valproate, diclofenac and sulindac on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were investigated. Sulfur(S)-valproate and S-diclofenac at 1 μg/ml concentrations significantly reduced prostaglandin (PG)E2 levels in NSCLC cell lines A549 and NCI-H1299 as did the COX-2 inhibitor DuP-697. In vitro, S-valproate, S-diclofenac and S-sulindac half-maximally inhibited the clonal growth of NCI-H1299 cells at 6, 6 and 15 μg/ml, respectively. Using the MTT assay, 10...

  16. Facilitating enrollment in a Cancer Registry through modified consent procedures: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanec, Susan; Daly, Barbara; Meropol, Neal J; Step, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Research registries are increasingly important in medical research and are essential to the mission of cancer centers. However, designing enrollment and data collection procedures that are consistent with ethical norms and regulatory requirements yet are efficient and cost effective is a major challenge. Current standard consent forms can be a barrier to enrollment because of their length, multiple components, and technical language. We pilot tested an IRB-approved registry booklet and simplified one-page, tiered consent form, allowing for choice of extent of participation. The booklet was mailed to patients with breast cancer as part of their routine information packet prior to the first clinic appointment. A research nurse met with 27 patients at initial treatment to review the booklet, answer questions, obtain informed consent, and collect quality of life data. The consent rate was 78% with 21 patients enrolling in the study. Twelve of the 21 patients (57%) did not read the booklet prior to the visit. The 9 patients (43%) who had read the booklet prior to arrival found it easy to understand. The multi-stage, simplified consent process and data collection were acceptable to these patients and readily integrated into clinical operations. An easy-to-read registry booklet may be an effective guide for discussion, but in-person consent procedures and further testing of the approach are required.

  17. Lifestyle and cancer: effect of parental divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Chen, Bowang

    2006-12-01

    According to previous studies, divorced individuals have increased risks of cancers related to alcohol and tobacco consumption and sexual habits, but the increases are balanced with decreased risks of many common cancers. In the present study, cancer risks were analyzed for 0-70-year-old offspring of divorced parents, on the basis the Swedish Family-Cancer Database with cancer data from the years 1958 to 2002. We calculated standardized incidence ratios for cancer among offspring of divorced parents (19,000 cancer patients) and compared them with offspring of stably married parents (121,000 cancer patients). Standardized incidence ratios were adjusted for many factors, including socio-economic status. Offspring of divorced parents were divided into groups depending on whether their mothers, fathers or both had had children with different partners. Offspring of divorced parents had an increased risk of upper aerodigestive tract, esophageal, anal, pancreatic, lung and cervical cancers. Decreased risks were noted for Hodgkin's disease and bone cancer. For Hodgkin's disease, the data suggest protective effects through early exposure to childhood pathogens but for bone cancer mechanisms remain to be established. The overall cancer risk for offspring of divorced parents was at or above unity. The results show that offspring of divorced parents have increased cancer risks at tobacco-related, alcohol-related and sex-related sites, in analogy to their parent, but they lack decreased risks at common sites, experienced by their parents. Divorce is becoming increasingly common in many countries and any deviant cancer patterns among offspring of divorced parents will have an impact on the population risk.

  18. Effect of nanosilica particles on polypropylene polymer modified asphalt mixture performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Bala

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of nanosilica particles on the performance characteristics of polymer modified asphalt binders. In this study, control 80/100 binder were modified with polypropylene polymer and nanosilica particles at concentration of 0%–4%. Both nanosilica particles and polypropylene polymer were added by weight of total bitumen content. The asphalt performance tests flexural four point beam fatigue test, indirect tensile strength, indirect tensile stiffness modulus and draindown tests are conducted to evaluate the effect of nanosilica particles. The results of the study shows that nanosilica particles improves the fatigue properties of polypropylene polymer modified binder. This indicates that nanosilica particles have significant effect on improving the performance properties of polymer modified binders. Also, the result reveals that thermoplastic polymer polypropylene with nanosilica particles when used as bitumen modifiers improve the performance and durability of asphalt mixtures. Keywords: Polypropylene, Fatigue cracking, Stiffness modulus, Modified asphalt, Draindown

  19. Components and modifiers of the healthy worker effect: evidence from three occupational cohorts and implications for industrial compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Chiarelli, A.M.; Lindsay, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined the components and modifiers of the healthy worker effect using mortality data from three occupational cohorts: the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited followed between 1950 and 1981, a 10% sample of the Canadian labor force followed between 1965 and 1979, and workers at the Eldorado Resources Limited Beaverlodge uranium mine followed between 1950 and 1980. Two important components of the healthy worker effect have been identified in these cohorts, namely, initial selection of and continuing employment of healthy individuals. There is less evidence for a contribution from the existence of differential risk factors among employed individuals as compared with the general population. The healthy worker effect is, however, substantially modified by time since employment, sex, age, specific cause of death, and specific occupation. Because of this variation, it is inappropriate to account for the healthy worker effect by a single parameter, and all of the above factors must be taken into account in any appropriate analysis. When the only available comparison group for an occupational cohort is the general population, the healthy worker effect is unlikely to have any substantial influence on the process of assessing causality for any observed association or attributing cause in an individual case. This would be particularly true for cancer, and even more so for lung cancer, a disease often associated with industrial compensation cases

  20. GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TRADE POLICY EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    George Frisvold; Jeanne Reeves

    2015-01-01

    Where approved, producers have adopted genetically modified (GM) crops extensively. Yet, areas not adopting GM crops account for large shares of production and consumption. GM crops differ from previous agricultural innovations because consumers may perceive them as fundamentally different from (and potentially inferior to) conventionally grown crops. Many countries maintain restrictions on production and importation of GM crops. GM crop adoption affects producers and consumers, not only thro...

  1. Effect of Modifying Prosthetic Socket Base Materials by Adding Nanodiamonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The curing process of prosthetic socket base materials requires attention owing to a series of associated problems that are yet to be addressed and solved. However, to date, few relevant studies have been reported. In this paper, nanodiamonds modified with a silane coupling agent were dispersed into a prosthetic socket base material, and the performance of the modified base materials was investigated. Adding a predetermined amount of nanodiamonds to the prosthetic socket base material increased the glass transition temperature, improved the mechanical properties of the cured base material, and reduced the influence of the volatile gas formed during the curing process on the environment. With increasing nanodiamond contents, the glass transition temperature increased and the mechanical properties improved slightly. Owing to the high thermal conductivity of the nanodiamonds, the localized heat, as a result of the curing process, could be dissipated and released. Thus, adding nanodiamonds led to a more uniform temperature field forming in the curing system. This improved the curing process and reduced the formation of volatile monomers, thereby decreasing the adverse impact of the generated volatile gases on the environment. All of these provide a potential strategy for modifying prosthetic socket base materials.

  2. Folic acid modified gelatine coated quantum dots as potential reagents for in vitro cancer diagnostics

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gerard, Valerie A

    2011-11-10

    Abstract Background Gelatine coating was previously shown to effectively reduce the cytotoxicity of CdTe Quantum Dots (QDs) which was a first step towards utilising them for biomedical applications. To be useful they also need to be target-specific which can be achieved by conjugating them with Folic Acid (FA). Results The modification of QDs with FA via an original "one-pot" synthetic route was proved successful by a range of characterisation techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy, fluorescence life-time measurements, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The resulting nanocomposites were tested in Caco-2 cell cultures which over-express FA receptors. The presence of FA on the surface of QDs significantly improved the uptake by targeted cells. Conclusions The modification with folic acid enabled to achieve a significant cellular uptake and cytotoxicity towards a selected cancer cell lines (Caco-2) of gelatine-coated TGA-CdTe quantum dots, which demonstrated good potential for in vitro cancer diagnostics.

  3. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah D

    2006-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  4. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah

    2004-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  5. Progranulin and its biological effects in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian; Perez-Juarez, Carlos Eduardo; Gerton, George L; Diaz-Cueto, Laura

    2017-11-07

    Cancer cells have defects in regulatory mechanisms that usually control cell proliferation and homeostasis. Different cancer cells share crucial alterations in cell physiology, which lead to malignant growth. Tumorigenesis or tumor growth requires a series of events that include constant cell proliferation, promotion of metastasis and invasion, stimulation of angiogenesis, evasion of tumor suppressor factors, and avoidance of cell death pathways. All these events in tumor progression may be regulated by growth factors produced by normal or malignant cells. The growth factor progranulin has significant biological effects in different types of cancer. This protein is a regulator of tumorigenesis because it stimulates cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, malignant transformation, resistance to anticancer drugs, and immune evasion. This review focuses on the biological effects of progranulin in several cancer models and provides evidence that this growth factor should be considered as a potential biomarker and target in cancer treatment.

  6. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein, E-mail: ahrezayan@ut.ac.ir [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, Majid [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kheirjou, Somayyeh [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amoabediny, Ghasem [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee [Department of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnejad, Javad [Department of Life Science Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T{sub 2}-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l{sup −1}) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. • MNPs were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. • Modified and unmodified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior. • T{sub 2} decrease as MNPs

  7. Effect of aerobic exercise on cancer-related fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaivika Govindbhai Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is the most common side effect of cancer treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, selected biologic response modifiers. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on cancer-related fatigue in patients of the solid tumor after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods: After screening for cancer-related fatigue, 34 patients fulfilled the inclusive criteria and were assigned into two groups (n = 17 recruited in the intervention group and n = 17 in control group. The intervention group received aerobic exercise program which included treadmill walking with low to moderate intensity (50%–70% of maximum heart rate, for 20–40 min/day for 5 days/week. Control group were taught stretching exercises of hamstrings, gastrocnemius, and soleus (to be done at home and were encouraged to remain active. Outcome measures such as brief fatigue inventory (BFI, 6-min walk test, and functional assessment of cancer therapy-general (FACT-G were taken at baseline and after 6-weeks. Results: The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test for within group and Mann–Whitney U-test for between group comparisons. The results of this study showed that there was a significant reduction in cancer-related fatigue BFI score (P < 0.0001,, also there was significant improvement in the physical performance as in 6-min walk distance (P < 0.0001 and quality of life, FACT-G score (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise for 6 weeks has beneficial effects on cancer-related fatigue in patients with solid tumor after chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  8. Effect of Waste Plastic as Bitumen Modified in Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mohd Ezree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to investigate the engineering properties of the asphalt mixtures containing waste plastic at different percentages i.e. 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% by weight of bitumen. The experimental tests performed in the study were stability, tensile strength, resilient modulus and dynamic creep test. Results showed that the mixture with 4% plastic has the highest stability (184kN. However, the stability slightly decreases with the increase of plastic additive. On the other hand, the highest tensile strength among the modified asphaltic concrete is 1049kPa (8% plastic added. The modified asphalt mixture with 8% plastic has the highest resilient modulus, which is 3422 MPa (25°C and 494Mpa (40°C. Where the highest creep modulus recorded is 73.30Mpa at 8% plastic added. It can be concluded that the addition of 8% plastic gave the highest value properties of asphalt mixture. Finally, it can be said that 8% plastic is the optimum value adding.

  9. Modified international e-Delphi survey to define healthcare professional competencies for working with teenagers and young adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Feltbower, Richard G; Aslam, Natasha; Raine, Rosalind; Whelan, Jeremy S; Gibson, Faith

    2016-05-03

    To provide international consensus on the competencies required by healthcare professionals in order to provide specialist care for teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer. Modified e-Delphi survey. International, multicentre study. Experts were defined as professionals having worked in TYA cancer care for more than 12 months. They were identified through publications and professional organisations. Round 1, developed from a previous qualitative study, included 87 closed-ended questions with responses on a nine-point Likert scale and further open-ended responses to identify other skills, knowledge and attitudes. Round 2 contained only items with no consensus in round 1 and suggestions of additional items of competency. Consensus was defined as a median score ranging from 7 to 9 and strength of agreement using mean absolute deviation of the median. A total of 179 registered to be members of the expert panel; valid responses were available from 158 (88%) in round 1 and 136/158 (86%) in round 2. The majority of participants were nurses (35%) or doctors (39%) from Europe (55%) or North America (35%). All 87 items in round 1 reached consensus with an additional 15 items identified for round 2, which also reached consensus. The strength of agreement was mostly high for statements. The areas of competence rated most important were agreed to be: 'Identify the impact of disease on young people's life' (skill), 'Know about side effects of treatment and how this might be different to those experienced by children or older adults' (knowledge), 'Honesty' (attitude) and 'Listen to young people's concerns' (aspect of communication). Given the high degree of consensus, this list of competencies should influence education curriculum, professional development and inform workforce planning. Variation in strength of agreement for some competencies between professional groups should be explored further in pursuit of effective multidisciplinary team working. Published by the BMJ

  10. Single-Layer Pentacene Field-Effect Transistors Using Electrodes Modified With Self-assembled Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asadi, Kamal; Wu, Yu; Gholamrezaie, Fatemeh; Rudolf, Petra; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Pentacene field-effect transistor performance can be improved by modifying metal electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. The dominant role in performance is played by pentacene morphology rather than the work function of the modified electrodes. With optimized processing conditions,

  11. GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TRADE POLICY EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Frisvold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Where approved, producers have adopted genetically modified (GM crops extensively. Yet, areas not adopting GM crops account for large shares of production and consumption. GM crops differ from previous agricultural innovations because consumers may perceive them as fundamentally different from (and potentially inferior to conventionally grown crops. Many countries maintain restrictions on production and importation of GM crops. GM crop adoption affects producers and consumers, not only through technological change, but also through trade policy responses. This article reviews open economy analyses of impacts of GM crops. To varying degrees, commodities are segmented into GM, conventionally grown, and organic product markets. Recent advances in trade modeling consider the consequences of market segmentation, along with consequences of GM crop import restrictions, product segregation requirements, and coexistence policies.

  12. Drug Repositioning for Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanli, Beste; Grøtli, Morten; Boren, Jan; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias; Arga, Kazim Y; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2018-01-01

    Drug repositioning has gained attention from both academia and pharmaceutical companies as an auxiliary process to conventional drug discovery. Chemotherapeutic agents have notorious adverse effects that drastically reduce the life quality of cancer patients so drug repositioning is a promising strategy to identify non-cancer drugs which have anti-cancer activity as well as tolerable adverse effects for human health. There are various strategies for discovery and validation of repurposed drugs. In this review, 25 repurposed drug candidates are presented as result of different strategies, 15 of which are already under clinical investigation for treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). To date, zoledronic acid is the only repurposed, clinically used, and approved non-cancer drug for PCa. Anti-cancer activities of existing drugs presented in this review cover diverse and also known mechanisms such as inhibition of mTOR and VEGFR2 signaling, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling, COX and selective COX-2 inhibition, NF-κB inhibition, Wnt/β-Catenin pathway inhibition, DNMT1 inhibition, and GSK-3β inhibition. In addition to monotherapy option, combination therapy with current anti-cancer drugs may also increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for drug discovery in terms of time- and cost-efficiency comparing to conventional drug discovery and development process.

  13. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  14. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  15. Validation study of the modified injection technique for internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong BB

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bin-Bin Cong,1,2,* Xiao-Shan Cao,1,2,* Peng-Fei Qiu,1 Yan-Bing Liu,1 Tong Zhao,1 Peng Chen,1 Chun-Jian Wang,1 Zhao-Peng Zhang,1 Xiao Sun,1 Yong-Sheng Wang1 1Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, 2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Abstract: According to the hypothesis of internal mammary sentinel lymph node (IM-SLN lymphatic drainage pattern, a modified radiotracer injection technique (periareolar intraparenchyma, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance was established. To verify the accuracy of the hypothesis and validate the modified radiotracer injection technique and to observe whether the lymphatic drainage of the whole breast parenchyma could reach to the same IM-SLN, different tracers were injected into different locations of the breast. The validation study results showed that the correlation and the agreement of the radiotracer and the fluorescence tracer are significant (case-base, rs =0.808, P<0.001; Kappa =0.79, P<0.001. It proved that the lymphatic drainage from different location of the breast (the primary tumor, the subareolar plexus reached the same IM-SLNs and the hypothesis of IM-SLN lymphatic drainage pattern (ie, IM-SLN receives lymphatic drainage from not only the primary tumor area, but also the entire breast parenchyma. In other words, it validated the accuracy of our modified radiotracer injection technique. Keywords: breast cancer, internal mammary, sentinel lymph node biopsy, visualization rate

  16. Lycopene intake and prostate cancer risk : Effect modification by plasma antioxidants and the XRCC1 genotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M.; Ward, Kevin C.; Terry, Paul D.; van Gils, Carla H.; Taylor, Jack A.; Mandel, Jack S.

    2006-01-01

    Lycopene has been associated with reduced prostate cancer risk, although the results ofepidemiological studies have varied We hypothesize that an effect of lycopene may be modified by XRCC1 genotype and other antioxidants. We used a food-frequency questionnaire to assess lycopene intake in a

  17. Validation of modified forms of the PedsQL generic core scales and cancer module scales for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer or a blood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Jane E; King, Madeleine T; Smith, Narelle F

    2009-03-01

    To validate two health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures, the PedsQL Generic Core and Cancer Module adolescent forms (13-18 years), after modification for 16-25-year-old adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer or a blood disorder. AYA patients and nominated proxies were recruited from three Sydney hospitals. Modified forms were administered by telephone or in clinics/wards. Analyses included correlations, factor analysis, and analysis of variance of known-groups (defined by the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale). Eighty-eight patients and 79 proxies completed questionnaires. Factor structures consistent with those of the unmodified forms confirmed construct validity. Cronbach's alpha ranged 0.81-0.98. Inter-scale correlations were as hypothesized, confirming discriminant validity. Statistically significant differences between groups with mild, moderate, and severe symptoms (P < 0.05) confirmed clinical validity. These modified forms provide reliable and valid measures of HRQOL in AYA with cancer or a blood disorder, suitable for clinical trials, research, and practice.

  18. Synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its inhibition of liver cancer characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-09-17

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR). By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil), we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  19. Effective control of modified palygorskite to NH4+-N release from sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zheng, Tianyuan; Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Xilai

    2014-01-01

    Sediment capping is an in situ treatment technology that can effectively restrain nutrient and pollutant release from the sediment in lakes and reservoirs. Research on sediment capping has focused on the search for effective, non-polluting and affordable capping materials. The efficiency and mechanism of sediment capping with modified palygorskite in preventing sediment ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) release to surface water were investigated through a series of batch and sediment capping experiments. Purified palygorskite and different types of modified palygorskite (i.e. heated, acid-modified and NaCI-modified palygorskite) were used in this investigation. Factors affecting control efficiency, including the temperature, thickness and grain size of the capping layer, were also analysed. The batch tests showed that the adsorption of NH4+-N on modified palygorskite achieved an equilibration in the initial 45 min, and the adsorption isotherm followed the Freundlich equation. Sediment capping experiments showed that compared with non-capped condition, covering the sediment with modified palygorskite and sand both inhibited NH4+-N release to the overlying water. Given its excellent chemical stability and strong adsorption, heated palygorskite, which has a NH4+-N release inhibition ratio of 41.3%, is a more effective sediment capping material compared with sand. The controlling effectiveness of the modified palygorskite increases with thicker capping layer, lower temperature and smaller grain size of the capping material.

  20. The Emerging Facets of Non-Cancerous Warburg Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Jamshidi, Neema; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gao, Xin; Gojobori, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The Warburg effect (WE), or aerobic glycolysis, is commonly recognized as a hallmark of cancer and has been extensively studied for potential anti-cancer therapeutics development. Beyond cancer, the WE plays an important role in many other cell

  1. Effects of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of modified Hayward black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir [University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Debnath, Ujjal [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Department of Mathematics, Howrah (India)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we analyze the effects of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a modified Hayward black hole. These thermal fluctuations will produce correction terms for various thermodynamical quantities like entropy, pressure, internal energy, and specific heats. We also investigate the effect of these correction terms on the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we study the phase transition for the modified Hayward black hole. It is demonstrated that the modified Hayward black hole is stable even after the thermal fluctuations are taken into account, as long as the event horizon is larger than a certain critical value. (orig.)

  2. Factors influencing and modifying the decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Jaju, Prajakta D; Li, Shufeng; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-05-01

    Across cancers, the decision to pursue genetic testing is influenced more by subjective than objective factors. However, skin cancer, which is more prevalent, visual, and multifactorial than many other malignancies, may offer different motivations for pursuing such testing. The primary objective was to determine factors influencing the decision to receive genetic testing for skin cancer risk. A secondary objective was to assess the impact of priming with health questions on the decision to receive testing. We distributed anonymous online surveys through ResearchMatch.org to assess participant health, demographics, motivations, and interest in pursuing genetic testing for skin cancer risk. Two surveys with identical questions but different question ordering were used to assess the secondary objective. We received 3783 responses (64% response rate), and 85.8% desired testing. Subjective factors, including curiosity, perceptions of skin cancer, and anxiety, were the most statistically significant determinants of the decision to pursue testing (P < .001), followed by history of sun exposure (odds ratio 1.85, P < .01) and history of skin cancer (odds ratio 0.5, P = .01). Age and family history of skin cancer did not influence this decision. Participants increasingly chose testing if first queried about health behaviors (P < .0001). The decision to pursue hypothetical testing may differ from in-clinic decision-making. Self-selected, online participants may differ from the general population. Surveys may be subject to response bias. The decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer is primarily determined by subjective factors, such as anxiety and curiosity. Health factors, including skin cancer history, also influenced decision-making. Priming with consideration of objective health factors can increase the desire to pursue testing. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles modified with silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Rayssa Souza; Arantes, Tatiane Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Full text: With the emergence of resistant microbial organisms to multiple antibiotics, different shapes of silver nanoparticles are among the most promising antimicrobial agents that have been developed from nanotechnology. Besides the silver nanoparticles oxide nanoparticles such as zinc oxide (ZnO) is gaining prominence due to its bactericidal properties. [1-3]. Thus, this study aims to develop biomaterials from zinc oxide nanoparticles modified with silver with antimicrobial properties. The ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal processing by alkaline hydrolysis zinc acetate. Colloidal dispersions of silver nanoparticles were synthesized by the Turkevich method using sodium citrate to reduce silver nitrate at high pH and at 90 °C in the presence of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Both nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD and Raman spectra showed crystalline ZnO colloidal nanoparticles were obtained in the hexagonal phase. XRD measure showed cubic silver diffraction peaks cubic phase confirmed the presence of the silver nanoparticles decorated zinc oxide nanoparticles. SEM images showed ZnO nanoparticles presented a nanorod shapes with length around 80 nm decorated with spherical silver nanoparticles about 20 nm in diameter The results showed that crystalline zinc oxide colloidal nanoparticles with rod-like morphology and uniform decorated with silver spherical nanoparticles size were obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. Results of antibacterial tests indicate that the ZnO/Ag nanoparticles have antibacterial properties against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results demonstrated that the ZnO/Ag nanoparticles have potential use as biomaterials in medical/odontological applications. (author)

  4. Antimicrobial effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles modified with silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Rayssa Souza; Arantes, Tatiane Moraes, E-mail: rayssasouza.net@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: With the emergence of resistant microbial organisms to multiple antibiotics, different shapes of silver nanoparticles are among the most promising antimicrobial agents that have been developed from nanotechnology. Besides the silver nanoparticles oxide nanoparticles such as zinc oxide (ZnO) is gaining prominence due to its bactericidal properties. [1-3]. Thus, this study aims to develop biomaterials from zinc oxide nanoparticles modified with silver with antimicrobial properties. The ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal processing by alkaline hydrolysis zinc acetate. Colloidal dispersions of silver nanoparticles were synthesized by the Turkevich method using sodium citrate to reduce silver nitrate at high pH and at 90 °C in the presence of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Both nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD and Raman spectra showed crystalline ZnO colloidal nanoparticles were obtained in the hexagonal phase. XRD measure showed cubic silver diffraction peaks cubic phase confirmed the presence of the silver nanoparticles decorated zinc oxide nanoparticles. SEM images showed ZnO nanoparticles presented a nanorod shapes with length around 80 nm decorated with spherical silver nanoparticles about 20 nm in diameter The results showed that crystalline zinc oxide colloidal nanoparticles with rod-like morphology and uniform decorated with silver spherical nanoparticles size were obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. Results of antibacterial tests indicate that the ZnO/Ag nanoparticles have antibacterial properties against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results demonstrated that the ZnO/Ag nanoparticles have potential use as biomaterials in medical/odontological applications. (author)

  5. The effects of cancer and cancer therapy on male fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thachil, J.V.; Jewett, M.A.; Rider, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    Multimodality treatments have increased the survival of cancer patients in recent years. With cure the quality of life also should be taken into consideration. Maintenance of the reproductive capacity is of great concern to many young patients. Until now the cause of sterility was attributed to the long-term side effects of treatment when recovery could not be predicted. Pre-treatment sperm banking is advised routinely for many of these patients. Our own observation as well as a few other reports show that cancer itself seems to have an adverse effect on fertility before any form of treatment. As assessed by semen quality the majority of our patients were subfertile when first seen. Hence, sperm banking may be a poor guarantee for future reproduction in these patients

  6. Effectiveness of testis cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feucht, H.

    1983-04-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany there are about thousand to two-thousand incidences of testis cancer yearly. The screening (and examination) program currently used for the early detection of cancer includes the screening of malignant tumours of the testis. Since only males 45 years and older are invited to make use of the preventive measures, the most seriously affected age-group between twenty and forty is hereby not considered. The objective of this study is to find out which of the generally conceivable preventive measures could lead to an improvement of the present situation. The analysis shows that, for a diagnostic accuracy of 1 and a participation of 100%, the quantifyable cost of a yearly performed special screening is higher than the quantifyable cost savings achieved. A final judgement of other ways of execution is only possible when the diagnostic accuracy of suitable screening methods and the percentage of the participants of the groups of people concerned are known. (orig.)

  7. [Enhancing effect of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I modified liposomes on oral insulin absorption in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Ping, Qi-neng; Xu, Wen-fang

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the enhancing effect on insulin absorption through GI. tract in mice by using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) modified liposomes as the carrier. UEA1 modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was prepared by conjugating method of 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), then the modified compound (PE-UEA1) was incorporated into the conventional liposomes of insulin to obtain UEA1 modified liposomes. The agglutination test was performed to examine the UEA1 biological activities after synthesis and modification. When liposomes were applied to healthy mice or diabetic mice at insulin dose of 350 u x kg(-1) orally, the hypoglycemic effect was investigated according to the blood glucose level determination. The blood glucose levels of the healthy mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (84 +/- 15)% at 4 h, (78 +/- 11)% at 8 h and (90 +/- 12)% at 12 h after oral administration. The conventional liposomes and saline showed no effect. The blood glucose levels of the diabetic mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (73 +/- 7)% at 4 h, (74 +/- 9)% at 8 h, (86 +/- 9)% at 12 h after oral administration. The UEA1 modified liposomes promote the oral absorption of insulin due to the specific-site combination on M cell membrane.

  8. Unintended effects and their detection in genetically modified crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cellini, F; Chesson, A; Colquhoun, I

    2004-01-01

    The commercialisation of GM crops in Europe is practically non-existent at the present time. The European Commission has instigated changes to the regulatory process to address the concerns of consumers and member states and to pave the way for removing the current moratorium. With regard...... to the safety of GM crops and products, the current risk assessment process pays particular attention to potential adverse effects on human and animal health and the environment. This document deals with the concept of unintended effects in GM crops and products, i.e. effects that go beyond that of the original...

  9. The biological age linked to oxidative stress modifies breast cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Freire, María Del Mar; Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Gómez-Vecino, Aurora; Galvis-Jiménez, Julie Milena; Martín-Seisdedos, Carmen; Isidoro-García, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Patino-Alonso, María Carmen; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Mao, Jian-Hua; Prieto, Carlos; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Kaderali, Lars; Pérez-Losada, Jesús

    2018-03-14

    The incidence of breast cancer increases with age until menopause, and breast cancer is more aggressive in younger women. The existence of epidemiological links between breast cancer and aging indicates that both processes share some common mechanisms of development. Oxidative stress is associated with both cancer susceptibility and aging. Here we observed that ERBB2-positive breast cancer, which developed in genetically heterogeneous ERBB2-positive transgenic mice generated by a backcross, is more aggressive in chronologically younger than in older mice (differentiated by the median survival of the cohort that was 79 weeks), similar to what occurs in humans. In this cohort, we estimated the oxidative biological age using a mathematical model that integrated several subphenotypes directly or indirectly related to oxidative stress. The model selected the serum levels of HDL-cholesterol and magnesium and total AKT1 and glutathione concentrations in the liver. The grade of aging was calculated as the difference between the predicted biological age and the chronological age. This comparison permitted the identification of biologically younger and older mice compared with their chronological age. Interestingly, biologically older mice developed more aggressive breast cancer than the biologically younger mice. Genomic regions on chromosomes 2 and 15 linked to the grade of oxidative aging were identified. The levels of expression of Zbp1 located on chromosome 2, a gene related to necroptosis and inflammation, positively correlated with the grade of aging and tumour aggressiveness. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression of genes linked to the inflammation and the response to infection pathways was enriched in the livers of biologically old mice. This study shows part of the complex interactions between breast cancer and aging. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A prospective investigation of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, Emer M; Hussey, Juliette; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Healy, Laura A; O’Sullivan, Jacintha N; Bennett, Kathleen; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. The lifetime risk of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 12.5%. For women who carry the deleterious mutation in either of the BRCA genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, the risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer is significantly increased. In recent years there has been increased penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated breast cancer, prompting investigation into the role of modifiable risk factors in this group. Previous investigations into this topic have relied on participants recalling lifetime weight changes and subjective methods of recording physical activity. The influence of obesity-related biomarkers, which may explain the link between obesity, physical activity and breast cancer risk, has not been investigated prospectively in this group. This paper describes the design of a prospective cohort study investigating the role of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers. Participants will be recruited from breast cancer family risk clinics and genetics clinics. Lifestyle risk factors that will be investigated will include body composition, metabolic syndrome and its components, physical activity and dietary intake. PBMC telomere length will be measured as a potential predictor of breast cancer occurrence. Measurements will be completed on entry to the study and repeated at two years and five years. Participants will also be followed annually by questionnaire to track changes in risk factor status and to record cancer occurrence. Data will be analysed using multiple regression models. The study has an accrual target of 352 participants. The results from this study will provide valuable information regarding the role of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer in women with a deleterious mutation in the BRCA gene. Additionally, the study will attempt to identify potential blood biomarkers which may be predictive

  11. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients. A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3–60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%). In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31–1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86–3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS. In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients. PMID:26496339

  12. Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score is Associated With Risk of Recurrence in Bladder Cancer Patients After Radical Cystectomy: A Multicenter Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Capece, Marco; Bruzzese, Dario; Autorino, Riccardo; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Matei, Deliu Victor; Caraglia, Michele; Borghesi, Marco; De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Bove, Pierluigi; Castaldo, Luigi; Hurle, Rodolfo; Musi, Gennaro; Brescia, Antonio; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Altieri, Vincenzo; Damiano, Rocco; Cantiello, Francesco; Serretta, Vincenzo; De Placido, Sabino; Mirone, Vincenzo; Sonpavde, Guru; Terracciano, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    Recently, many studies explored the role of inflammation parameters in the prognosis of urinary cancers, but the results were not consistent. The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), a systemic inflammation marker, is a prognostic marker in various types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of the preoperative mGPS as predictor of recurrence-free (RFS), overall (OS), and cancer-specific (CSS) survivals in a large cohort of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) patients.A total of 1037 patients with UBC were included in this study with a median follow-up of 22 months (range 3-60 months). An mGPS = 0 was observed in 646 patients (62.3%), mGPS = 1 in 297 patients (28.6 %), and mGPS = 2 in 94 patients (9.1%).In our study cohort, subjects with an mGPS equal to 2 had a significantly shorter median RFS compared with subjects with mGPS equal to 1 (16 vs 19 months, hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.31-1.81, P < 0.001) or with subjects with mGPS equal to 0 (16 vs 29 months, HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.86-3.05, P < 0.001). The association between mGPS and RFS was confirmed by weighted multivariate Cox model. Although in univariate analysis higher mGPS was associated with lower OS and CSS, this association disappeared in multivariate analysis where only the presence of lymph node-positive bladder cancer and T4 stage were predictors of worse prognosis for OS and CSS.In conclusion, the mGPS is an easily measured and inexpensive prognostic marker that was significantly associated with RFS in UBC patients.

  13. The modified high-density survival assay is the useful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Mori, Miyuki; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Shimura, Tsutomu; Fukumoto, Manabu; Ohtake, Yosuke; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Mori, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    The high-density survival (HDS) assay was originally elaborated to assess cancer cell responses to therapeutic agents under the influence of intercellular communication. Here, we simplified the original HDS assay and studied its applicability for the detection of cellular radioresistance. We have recently defined clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells, which continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2 gray (Gy) of X-rays for more than 30 days in vitro. We established human CRR cell lines, HepG2-8960-R from HepG2, and SAS-R1 and -R2 from SAS, respectively. In an attempt to apply the HDS assay to detect radioresistance with clinical relevance, we simplified the original HDS assay by scoring the total number of surviving cells after exposure to X-rays. The modified HDS assay successfully detected radioresistance with clinical relevance. The modified HDS assay detected CRR phenotype, which is not always detectable by clonogenic assay. Therefore, we believe that the modified HDS assay presented in this study is a powerful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy against malignant tumors. (author)

  14. Combined effects of 1-methyl cyclopropene (1-MCP) and modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1-MCP-treated fruits delayed two different harvest maturity, persimmon fruits flesh firmness, and combination of 1-MCP with MAPA and MAPB reduced the ethylene production rate during storage. Treatment of 1-MCP improved storability of persimmon fruits more effectively than MAP storage. However, the results indicated ...

  15. Effects of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) rice on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... To detect potential changes in properties of weed communities in fields of ... the hypothesis that the difference between the effect of GMHT rice Bar68-1 ... seed production, to raise purity of parents of hybrid rice, ... 3. 120. 20 × 20 cm. 2007. B. May 18. Jun 5. Aug 29 Aug 5, Sept 4. ..... part of agrobiodiversity.

  16. Research Article Smoking modifies the effect of two independent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sky123.Org

    the effect of NPPA SNPs rs5063 and rs198358 on central obesity might be .... Blood samples were collected in the morning after at least 8 hours of fasting. ... Student's t-test for continuous variables and χ2 tests for categorical variables.

  17. Intellectual Disability Modifies Gender Effects on Disruptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einfeld, Stewart L.; Gray, Kylie M.; Ellis, Louise A.; Taffe, John; Emerson, Eric; Tonge, Bruce J.; Horstead, Sian K.

    2010-01-01

    In typically developing children, boys are more commonly diagnosed than girls with disruptive behavior disorders, namely, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder. For children with intellectual disability (ID), the evidence for this gender effect is less clear. In this report we examine gender…

  18. Effective dark count rate reduction by modified SPAD gating circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef, E-mail: blazej@fjfi.cvut.cz; Kodet, Jan

    2015-07-01

    For our main application of single photon counting avalanche detectors in focus – laser ranging of space objects and laser time transfer – the ultimate requirements are relatively large and homogeneous active area having a diameter of 100 to 200 µm and a sub-picosecond stability of timing. The detector dark count rate and after-pulsing probability are parameters of relatively lower, but not negligible importance. In presented paper we will focused on them. We have developed a new active quenching and gating scheme which can reduce afterpulsing effect and hence also effective dark count rate at lower temperature. In satellite laser ranging system the effective dark count rate was reduced more than 35 times. This improvement will contribute in increasing the data yield and hence to increase precision and productivity. - Highlights: • Signal and quenching path in a control circuit stayed unaffected by gating. • The detector package optimized for laser time transfer systems is considered. • After-pulsing effect is reduced by a modification of the use of gate signal. • The dark count rate is reduced for gate rates of the order of units of kHz.

  19. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12/15...

  20. Modified radical mastectomy sparing one or both pectoral muscles in the treatment of breast cancer: intra and postoperative complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruffo Freitas-Júnior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Modified radical mastectomy is widely utilized in breast cancer treatment. However, no prospective comparison has yet been made between the Madden technique (preservation of the pectoralis minor muscle and the Patey technique (resection of this muscle. The aim of this work was to compare these two modified radical mastectomy techniques, by analyzing their degrees of difficulty and complications. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized trial at the Breast Unit of Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiás; and Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. METHODS: 430 patients with breast cancer with an indication for modified radical mastectomy were included in the program, of whom 426 patients were available for analysis (225 allocated to Patey and 201 to Madden. The chi-squared and Student t tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: The patients’ demographics were well balanced between the two groups. The mean duration of the surgical procedures was 105 (± 29.9 and 102 minutes (± 33, for the Patey and Madden groups, respectively (p = 0.6. Hospitalization duration was 2.3 days for both groups. The mean number of lymph nodes resected was 20.3 (± 7.6 for Patey and 19.8 (± 8.1 for Madden (p = 0.5. There were no differences in terms of vascular or nerve sections, hematomas or infections. The surgeons reported the same degree of difficulty for the two methods. CONCLUSION: The removal of the pectoralis minor muscle did not influence any of the variables studied. Therefore, either technique can be performed, at the surgeon’s discretion.

  1. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  2. Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bladder cancer Types of Sexual Side Effects For women, the most common sexual side effects include: Loss ...

  3. A reusable magnetic graphene oxide-modified biosensor for vascular endothelial growth factor detection in cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Wen; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liao, Shih-sheng; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Sun, Chia-Liang; Wu, Pei-Jung; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Hung-Wei; Ma, Chen-Chi M

    2015-05-15

    Early cancer diagnosis is critical for the prevention of metastasis. However, simple and efficient methods are needed to improve the diagnosis and evaluation of cancer. Here, we propose a reusable biosensor based on a magnetic graphene oxide (MGO)-modified Au electrode to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human plasma for cancer diagnosis. In this biosensor, Avastin is used as the specific biorecognition element, and MGO is used as the carrier for Avastin loading. The use of MGO enables rapid purification due to its magnetic properties, which prevents the loss of bioactivity. Moreover, the biosensor can be constructed quickly, without requiring a drying process, which is convenient for proceeding to detection. Our reusable biosensor provides the appropriate sensitivity for clinical diagnostics and has a wide range of linear detection, from 31.25-2000 pg mL(-1), compared to ELISA analysis. In addition, in experiments with 100% serum from clinical samples, readouts from the sensor and an ELISA for VEGF showed good correlation within the limits of the ELISA kit. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the change in current (ΔC) for reproducibility of the Au biosensor was 2.36% (n=50), indicating that it can be reused with high reproducibility. Furthermore, the advantages of the Avastin-MGO-modified biosensor for VEGF detection are that it provides an efficient detection strategy that not only improves the detection ability but also reduces the cost and decreases the response time by 10-fold, indicating its potential as a diagnosis product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CFD Study on Effective Wake of Conventional and Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    result and the effective wake fractions from integrating CFD velocity fields, 5-15% higher effective wake fractions of tip-modified propellers from the existing estimation method based on the open-water correlation at thrust or torque identity can be related mainly to the effects of Reynolds number...

  5. Evaluation of Modified Categorical Data Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm on the Wisconsin Breast Cancer Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The early diagnosis of breast cancer is an important step in a fight against the disease. Machine learning techniques have shown promise in improving our understanding of the disease. As medical datasets consist of data points which cannot be precisely assigned to a class, fuzzy methods have been useful for studying of these datasets. Sometimes breast cancer datasets are described by categorical features. Many fuzzy clustering algorithms have been developed for categorical datasets. However, in most of these methods Hamming distance is used to define the distance between the two categorical feature values. In this paper, we use a probabilistic distance measure for the distance computation among a pair of categorical feature values. Experiments demonstrate that the distance measure performs better than Hamming distance for Wisconsin breast cancer data.

  6. Effect of Mixing Process on Polypropylene Modified Bituminous Concrete Mix Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Zainab Habib; Ibrahim Kamaruddin; Madzalan Napiah; Isa Mohd Tan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a research conducted to investigate the effect of mixing process on polypropylene (PP) modified bitumen mixed with well graded aggregate to form modified bituminous concrete mix. Two mode of mixing, namely dry and wet with different concentration of polymer polypropylene was used with 80/100 pen bitumen, to evaluate the bituminous concrete mix properties. Three percentages of polymer varying from 1-3% by the weight of bitumen was used in this study. Three mixes namely cont...

  7. Effectiveness of modified hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Rajaeinejad, Mohsen; Keyhani, Manoutchehr; Zokaasadi, Mohammad; Dehghani Firoozabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2018-03-01

    Several chemotherapy regimens have been developed for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but relapse still presents the most common obstacles to attaining long-term survival. The hyper-CVAD (hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisolone)/HD MTX and Ara-C (high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine) chemotherapy regimen was first started in the MD Anderson Cancer Center as an intensive regimen for adult patients with ALL. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified hyper-CVAD protocol. We used hyper-CVAD as consolidation/maintenance after remission induction with daunorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (and cyclophosphamide for T-cell ALL only) rather than standard hyper-CVAD in order to reduce treatment complications. This study was conducted as a retrospective review of medical records of ALL patients at 501 army hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2005 to 2015. Three hundred and one patients underwent modified hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen. Complete remission and overall survival (OS) rates were measured as primary endpoints. Two hundred and forty-six (81.7%) reached complete remission (CR) during the first 6 months of treatment, and 55 patients (18.3%) did not reach CR. The 5-year OS rate was 51.8% (95% CI (confidence interval): 45.1-57.8%). Modified hyper-CVAD regimen is an efficient intensive chemotherapy regimen for consolidation/maintenance of adults with newly diagnosed ALL and has an acceptable 5-year overall that is comparable to standard hyper-CVAD regimen. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Modifiable risk factors and survival in women diagnosed with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Sophie Sell; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the impact of smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, hormone replacement therapy, and physical activity on all-cause mortality among 528 Danish women diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Participants were women enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Prospective...... intake, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and hormone replacement therapy. The study shows that smoking for total mortality [hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.29] and obesity for both total mortality (1.61; 1.12-2.33) and breast cancer-specific mortality (1.82; 1...

  9. Cyclodextrin-Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Sustained Drug Delivery and Proliferation Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Alexandra; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Almeida, Sérgio; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-10-21

    Over the past decade, the potential of polymeric structures has been investigated to overcome many limitations related to nanosized drug carriers by modulating their toxicity, cellular interactions, stability, and drug-release kinetics. In this study, we have developed a successful nanocomposite consisting of undecylenic acid modified thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs) loaded with an anticancer drug, sorafenib, and surface-conjugated with heptakis(6-amino-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HABCD) to show the impact of the surface polymeric functionalization on the physical and biological properties of the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Cytocompatibility studies showed that the UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs were not toxic to breast cancer cells. HABCD also enhanced the suspensibility and both the colloidal and plasma stabilities of the UnTHCPSi NPs. UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs showed a significantly increased interaction with breast cancer cells compared to bare NPs and also sustained the drug release. Furthermore, the sorafenib-loaded UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs efficiently inhibited cell proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

  10. Does modifying personal responsibility moderate the mental contamination effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tinisha S; Simonds, Laura M

    2017-12-01

    Mental contamination is the psychological sense of internal dirtiness that arises in the absence of physical contact with a perceived contaminant. Mental contamination can be evoked through imagining perpetrating a moral transgression. This study experimentally evoked mental contamination by asking men to imagine perpetrating a non-consensual kiss. It explored whether reducing sense of personal responsibility for the kiss moderated the mental contamination effect. Male students (N = 60) imagined giving either a consensual or non-consensual kiss. Personal responsibility for the kiss was manipulated in one of two non-consensual kiss conditions by way of the inclusion of social influence information. Feelings of mental contamination were assessed by self-report and through a behavioural index. Mental contamination was successfully induced in the two non-consensual kiss conditions. There was evidence to support the hypothesis that reducing personal responsibility might moderate specific components of mental contamination (shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse). The effect of responsibility modification was evident in the self-report measures, but not in the behavioural index. The sample comprised male university students which limits generalizability of the findings. The behavioural assessment of mental contamination was limited to a proxy measure. Imagined moral violations are associated with increases in indices of mental contamination. Further research should investigate whether feelings of shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse are particularly responsive to responsibility modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 modification of pyruvate kinase M2 promotes aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation in A549 human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shuxian An,1,* Liangqian Huang,2,3,* Ping Miao,1 Liang Shi,1 Mengqin Shen,1 Xiaoping Zhao,1 Jianjun Liu,1 Gang Huang1,3,4 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Cancer Biology and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine & Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; 4Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Aerobic glycolysis is considered the seventh hallmark of cancer. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 is an important rate-limiting enzyme in glycolytic pathway, and is strongly expressed in several types of cancer. Thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms of regulation of PKM2 is of great value for targeted therapy for lung cancer.Patients and methods: Seventy-three lung adenocarcinoma patients were analyzed in our study. The expression levels of PKM2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissues. The effect of small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO1 on PKM2 expression was investigated using Western blot assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PKM2 SUMO1 modification was determined by in vitro and in vivo SUMOylation assays. 18F-deoxyglucose uptake and lactate production measurements were conducted to research the levels of glycolysis. The level of oxidative phosphorylation in cells was determined by cellular oxygen consumption rate measurements. Cell proliferation assays were carried out to confirm the growth ability of tumor cells.Results: PKM2 was overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma patients based on immunohistochemical staining. Patients with high PKM2 expression had reduced

  12. Subgroup effects of occupational therapy-based intervention for people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro Pilegaard, Marc; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen; la Cour, Karen; Thit Johnsen, Anna; Brandt, Åse

    2018-03-23

    Many people with advanced cancer have decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL). We recently performed a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) assessing the efficacy of an occupational therapy-based program, the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' in people with advanced cancer (N = 242) and found no overall effects on ADL ability. However, heterogeneity of treatment effect may disguise subgroup differences. To investigate whether subgroups of people with advanced cancer gain positive effects from the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' on ADL ability. An exploratory subgroup analysis including 191 participants from a RCT. The outcome was ADL motor ability measured by the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Subgroups were defined by age, gender, years of education, type of primary tumor, functional level, and activity problems. The 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' had no statistically significant effect in the six subgroups. Modifying effects of age (0.30 [95% CI: -0.05 to 0.64]) and gender (0.23 [95% CI: -0.11 to 0.57]) were not found. There were no subgroup effects of the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention'on ADL motor ability. Some indications suggest greater effects for those aged below 69 years; however, this result should be interpreted with caution.

  13. Effect of waste plastic bottles on the stiffness and fatigue properties of modified asphalt mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, Amir; Hamedi, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PET reduced the mix stiffness at both temperatures of 5 and 25 °C. • PET improved the fatigue behavior at both testing temperatures. • At more than 210 microstrain, adding temperature resulted in higher fatigue life. • SBS modified mixes showed better fatigue behavior than PET modified ones. • Overall PET had comparable effects to SBS on the stiffness and fatigue behavior. - Abstract: Nowadays, the use of recycled waste materials as modifier additives in asphalt mixes could have several economic and environmental benefits. The main purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of waste plastic bottles (Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)) on the stiffness and specially fatigue properties of asphalt mixes at two different temperatures of 5 and 20 °C. Likewise, the effect of PET was compared to styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) which is a conventional polymer additive which has been vastly used to modify asphalt mixes. Different PET contents (2–10% by weight of bitumen) were added directly to mixture as the method of dry process. Then the resilient modulus and fatigue tests were performed on cylindrical specimens with indirect tensile loading procedure. Overall, the mix stiffness reduced by increasing the PET content. Although stiffness of asphalt mix initially increased by adding lower amount of PET. Based on the results of resilient modulus test, the stiffness of PET modified mix was acceptable and warranted the proper deformation characteristics of these mixes at heavy loading conditions. At both temperatures, PET improved the fatigue behavior of studied mixes. PET modified mixes revealed comparable stiffness and fatigue behavior to SBS at 20 °C. However, at 5 °C the fatigue life of SBS modified mixes was to some extent higher than that of PET modified ones especially at higher strain levels of 200 microstrain

  14. Radiation therapy and Koebner effect in cancer patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vexler, A.; Ben-Yosef, R.; Soyfer, V.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy (XRT) may initiate skin side effects that occur more often in patients with skin disorders. One of such diseases is psoriasis - a common disorder in the western communities. In the past Grenz rays and superficial XRT were used to treat psoriatic patients and were reported to initiate the Koebner effect, which is an exacerbation of the underlying disease following a skin trauma. Recently, several case reports revealed a similar response in cancer patients receiving megavoltage XRT. Hence, one may assume that irradiation should be re-considered or re-modified in order to spare the involved skin. To report our experience in radiotherapy of cancer patients with psoriasis. Six patients with prostate adenocarcinoma (3), breast cancer (2) and soft tissue sarcoma (1) suffering from psoriasis were referred for radiotherapy as a part of their anti-cancer treatment. In all patients the irradiation fields included the psoriatic lesions. The irradiation was delivered using linear accelerators operated through 6-8 MV photon and 8 MeV electron beams. The total XRT dose varied from 50 to 70 Gy and the daily fraction was 1.8-2.0 Gy. A close monitoring during and after completion of irradiation was carried out and standard skin care was advised. No change in the irradiated psoriatic lesions as well as in the surrounding area was observed in all patients during the irradiation. Subsequent follow up (up to 24 months) revealed no new skin lesions and no worsening of existing plaques. Megavoltage XRT in a conventional daily fraction has no effect on psoriatic skin lesions

  15. Post-translationally modified muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases as circulating biomarkers in experimental cancer cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Roberto; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Bonetto, Andrea; O’Connell, Thomas M; Asher, Scott A; Parry, Traci L; Lockyer, Pamela; McCudden, Christopher R; Couch, Marion E; Willis, Monte S

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a severe wasting syndrome characterized by the progressive loss of lean body mass and systemic inflammation. Up to 80% of cancer patients experience cachexia, with 20-30% of cancer-related deaths directly linked to cachexia. Despite efforts to identify early cachexia and cancer relapse, clinically useful markers are lacking. Recently, we identified the role of muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases Atrogin-1 (MAFbx, FBXO32) and Muscle Ring Finger-1 in the pathogenesis of cardiac atrophy and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that during cachexia, the Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 ubiquitin ligases are released from muscle and migrate to the circulation where they could be detected and serve as a cachexia biomarker. To test this, we induced cachexia in mice using the C26 adenocarcinoma cells or vehicle (control). Body weight, tumor volume, and food consumption were measured from inoculation until ~day 14 to document cachexia. Western blot analysis of serum identified the presence of Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 with unique post-translational modifications consistent with mono- and poly- ubiquitination of Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 found only in cachectic serum. These findings suggest that both increased Atrogin-1 and the presence of unique post-translational modifications may serve as a surrogate marker specific for cachexia. PMID:28979816

  16. Effects of Chemotherapy on the Brain in Women With Newly Diagnosed Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Breast Cancer; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Fatigue; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

  17. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging and addition of calcium hypochlorite on the atmosphere composition, colour and microbial quality of mushrooms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kuyper, L

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of modified atmosphere packaging in combination with the addition of calcium hypochlorite on the atmosphere composition, colour and microbial quality of mushrooms was investigated. A modified atmosphere which slowed down discolouration...

  18. Diets high in corn oil or extra-virgin olive oil differentially modify the gene expression profile of the mammary gland and influence experimental breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Raquel; Escrich, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Vela, Elena; Ruiz de Villa, M Carme; Escrich, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    Nutritional factors, especially dietary lipids, may have a role in the etiology of breast cancer. We aimed to analyze the effects of high-fat diets on the susceptibility of the mammary gland to experimental malignant transformation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a low-fat, high-corn-oil, or high-extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) diet from weaning or from induction. Animals were induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene at 53 days and euthanized at 36, 51, 100 and 246 days. Gene expression profiles of mammary glands were determined by microarrays. Further molecular analyses were performed by real-time PCR, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry. Carcinogenesis parameters were determined at 105 and 246 days. High-corn-oil diet increased body weight and mass when administered from weaning. The EVOO diet did not modify these parameters and increased the hepatic expression of UCP2, suggesting a decrease in intake/expenditure balance. Both diets differentially modified the gene expression profile of the mammary gland, especially after short dietary intervention. Corn oil down-regulated the expression of genes related to immune system and apoptosis, whereas EVOO modified the expression of metabolism genes. Further analysis suggested an increase in proliferation and lower apoptosis in the mammary glands by effect of the high-corn-oil diet, which may be one of the mechanisms of its clear stimulating effect on carcinogenesis. The high-corn-oil diet strongly stimulates mammary tumorigenesis in association with modifications in the expression profile and an increased proliferation/apoptosis balance of the mammary gland.

  19. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  20. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Leclere

    Full Text Available Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3 protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  2. Effects of Diatomite and SBS on Freeze-Thaw Resistance of Crumb Rubber Modified Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Asphalt mixture is susceptible to moisture damage under the effect of freeze-thaw (F-T cycles. In this paper, crumb rubber (CR was used to modify stone mastic asphalt (SMA and the effects of diatomite and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS on antifreezing performances of crumb rubber modified SMA (CRSMA were investigated. Regression analysis and modified grey model (MGM were used to construct the prediction models for properties of modified mixtures. CRSMA, CR and diatomite modified SMA (CRDSMA, and CR and SBS modified SMA (CRSSMA were prepared in laboratory, respectively. Process of F-T cycles was designed. Air void, indirect tensile strength (ITS, and indirect tensile stiffness modulus (ITSM were measured to evaluate the antifreezing performances of CRSMA, CRDSMA, and CRSSMA. Results indicate that air voids increase with the increasing of F-T cycles. ITS and ITSM all decrease with the increasing of F-T cycles. The addition of diatomite and SBS can reduce the air void and improve the ITS and ITSM of CRSMA. CRSSMA presents the lowest air void, highest tensile strength, and largest stiffness modulus, which reveals that CRSSMA has the best F-T resistance among three different kinds of mixtures. Moreover, MGM (1, 2 models present more favorable accuracy in prediction of air void and ITS compared with regression ones.

  3. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  4. Effects of Brassicaceae Isothiocyanates on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Novío

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the major progress made in the field of cancer biology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of mortality, and prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. The effective management of this disease requires developing better anticancer agents with greater efficacy and fewer side effects. Nature is a large source for the development of chemotherapeutic agents, with more than 50% of current anticancer drugs being of natural origin. Isothiocyanates (ITCs are degradation products from glucosinolates that are present in members of the family Brassicaceae. Although they are known for a variety of therapeutic effects, including antioxidant, immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial properties, nowadays, cell line and animal studies have additionally indicated the chemopreventive action without causing toxic side effects of ITCs. In this way, they can induce cell cycle arrest, activate apoptosis pathways, increase the sensitivity of resistant PCa to available chemodrugs, modulate epigenetic changes and downregulate activated signaling pathways, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, progression and invasion-metastasis. The present review summarizes the chemopreventive role of ITCs with a particular emphasis on specific molecular targets and epigenetic alterations in in vitro and in vivo cancer animal models.

  5. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  6. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  7. HIGHLY EFFECTIVE CHEMICAL MODIFIERS FOR PRODUCTION OF CONCRETES WITH PRE-SET PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkach Evgeniya Vladimirovna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the application of industrial by-products and recycled materials. Waterproofing admixtures improve the structure and the properties of the cement stone. Development and preparation of highly effective waterproofing modifiers of durable effect, as well as development of the process procedure parameters, including mixing, activation, heat treatment, etc. are to be implemented. The composition of waterproofing modifiers is to be fine-tuned to synergize the behaviour of various ingredients of cement systems to assure the substantial improvement of their strength, freeze- and corrosion resistance. Multi-functional waterproofing admixtures were used to produce highly effective modified concretes. The key idea of the new method of modifying cement-based building materials is that the waterproofing admixture concentration is to exceed 10% of the weight of the binding agent within the per-unit weight of the cement stone, given that its strength does not deteriorate. GKM-type modifier coupled with organo-mineral waterproofing admixture concentration agent GT-M may be recommended for mass use in the manufacturing of hydraulic concrete and reinforced concrete products. Overview of their practical implementation has proven that waterproofing modifier GKM-S, if coupled with waterproofing admixture concentration agent GT-M, improves the corrosion control inside the cement stone and makes it possible to manufacture durable concrete and reinforced concrete products that demonstrate pre-set physical and processing behaviour. Comprehensive concrete modification by modifier GKM-S and waterproofing admixture concentration agent GT-M may be regarded as one of the most ambitious methods of production of highly effective waterproof concretes.

  8. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  9. Assessing the treatment effects in apraxia of speech : introduction and evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple

  10. Modifying effect of caffeine on lethality and mutability of Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podstavkova, S.; Vlcek, D.; Miadokova, E.

    1983-01-01

    The modifying effect of caffeine was studied using two standard and two UV-sensitive strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardii Dang. Cell survival and mutation frequency was microscopically evaluated on media without caffeine and on media with 1.5 mM of caffeine. The obtained results were indicative of the stimulating effect of caffeine upon survival in all strains. (author)

  11. Milk minerals modify the effect of fat intake on serum lipid profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Astrup, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high content of saturated fat, evidence from observational studies indicates that the consumption of dairy products may have a neutral effect or may be inversely associated with the risk of CVD. We aimed to examine whether milk minerals modify the effect of saturated fat on serum lipid...

  12. Monitoring of environmental cancer initiators through hemoglobin adducts by a modified Edman degradation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernqvist, M.M.; Mowrer, J.; Jensen, S.; Ehrenberg, L.

    1986-01-01

    Tissue doses of cancer initiators/mutagens are suitably monitored through hemoglobin adducts formed in vivo, but the use of this method has been hampered by a lack of sufficiently simple and fast procedures. It was previously observed that when the N-terminal amino acid in hemoglobin, valine, is alkylated it is cleaved off by the Edman sequencing reagent, phenyl isothiocyanate, in the neutral-alkaline coupling medium, as opposed to the acidic medium required by normal amino acids. Based on this principle, conditions for a functioning procedure for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) determination of N-terminal alkylvalines in hemoglobin were worked out. Derivatizing the protein in formamide solution with pentafluorophenyl isothiocyanate, using a 2 H-alkylated protein as internal standard, and applying on-column injection during analysis, permit reproducible determination of hydroxyethylvaline and other adducts down into the dose range where cancer risks may be considered acceptably low

  13. Do psychosocial working conditions modify the effect of depressive symptoms on long-term sickness absence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarsbech, Pernille U.; Christensen, Karl Bang; Andersen, Rikke Voss

    2013-01-01

    , but not psychosocial working conditions, predicted LTSA. Psychosocial working conditions did not statistically significantly modify the effect of depressive symptoms on LTSA. Conclusions: Psychosocial working conditions did not modify the effect of depressive symptoms on LTSA. The results, however, need......Background: The objective of this study was to investigate whether work unit-levels of psychosocial working conditions modify the effect of depressive symptoms on risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA). Methods: A total of 5,416 Danish female eldercare workers from 309 work units were surveyed...... using questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and psychosocial working conditions. LTSA was derived from a national register. We aggregated scores of psychosocial working conditions to the work unit-level and conducted multi-level Poisson regression analyses. Results: Depressive symptoms...

  14. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton's second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton's second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10 -14 m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed

  15. Long-term health effects among testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashibe, Mia; Abdelaziz, Sarah; Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Fraser, Alison; Boucher, Kenneth M; Smith, Ken; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Rowe, Kerry; Rowley, Braden; Daurelle, Micky; Holton, Avery E; VanDerslice, James; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Bishoff, Jay; Lowrance, Will; Stroup, Antoinette

    2016-12-01

    Testicular cancer is diagnosed at a young age and survival rates are high; thus, the long-term effects of cancer treatment need to be assessed. Our objectives are to estimate the incidence rates and determinants of late effects in testicular cancer survivors. We conducted a population-based cohort study of testicular cancer survivors, diagnosed 1991-2007, followed up for a median of 10 years. We identified 785 testicular cancer patients who survived ≥5 years and 3323 men free of cancer for the comparison group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to compare the hazard ratio between the cases and the comparison group and for internal analysis among case patients. Testicular cancer survivors experienced a 24 % increase in risk of long-term health effects >5 years after diagnosis. The overall incidence rate of late effects among testicular cancer survivors was 66.3 per 1000 person years. Higher risks were observed among testicular cancer survivors for hypercholesterolemia, infertility, and orchitis. Chemotherapy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection appeared to increase the risk of late effects. Being obese prior to cancer diagnosis appeared to be the strongest factor associated with late effects. Testicular cancer survivors were more likely to develop chronic health conditions when compared to cancer-free men. While the late effects risk was increased among testicular cancer survivors, the incidence rates of late effects after cancer diagnosis was fairly low.

  16. Could age modify the effect of genetic variants in IL6 and TNF-α genes in multiple myeloma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alessandro; Buda, Gabriele; Maggini, Valentina; Lapi, Francesco; Lupia, Antonella; Di Bello, Domenica; Orciuolo, Enrico; Galimberti, Sara; Barale, Roberto; Petrini, Mario; Rossi, Anna Maria

    2012-05-01

    Cytokines play a central role in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis thus genetic variations within cytokines coding genes could influence MM susceptibility and therapy outcome. We investigated the impact of 8 SNPs in these genes in 202 MM cases and 235 controls also evaluating their impact on therapy outcome in a subset of 91 patients. Despite the overall negative findings, we found a significant age-modified effect of IL6 and TNF-α SNPs, on MM risk and therapy outcome, respectively. Therefore, this observation suggests that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes could be an important mediator of the complex interplay between ageing and cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of a Modified Italian European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Food Frequency Questionnaire for Individuals with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Tomba, Carolina; Elli, Luca; Sieri, Sabina; Grioni, Sara; Bardella, Maria T; Agostoni, Carlo; Doneda, Luisa; Brighenti, Furio; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2016-11-01

    To date, it is unclear whether individuals with celiac disease following a gluten-free (GF) diet for several years have adequate intake of all recommended nutrients. Lack of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for individuals with celiac disease could be partly responsible for this still-debated issue. The aim of the study is to evaluate the performance of a modified European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) FFQ in estimating nutrient and food intake in a celiac population. In a cross-sectional study, the dietary habits of individuals with celiac disease were reported using a modified Italian EPIC FFQ and were compared to a 7-day weighed food record as a reference method. A total of 200 individuals with histologically confirmed celiac disease were enrolled in the study between October 2012 and August 2014 at the Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Celiac Disease (Milan, Italy). Nutrient and food category intake were calculated by 7-day weighed food record using an Italian food database integrated with the nutrient composition of 60 GF foods and the modified EPIC FFQ, in which 24 foods were substituted with GF foods comparable for energy and carbohydrate content. An evaluation of the modified FFQ compared to 7-day weighed food record in assessing the reported intake of nutrient and food groups was conducted using Spearman's correlation coefficients and weighted κ. One hundred individuals completed the study. The Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ and 7-day weighed food record ranged from .13 to .73 for nutrients and from .23 to .75 for food groups. A moderate agreement, which was defined as a weighted κ value of .40 to .60, was obtained for 30% of the analyzed nutrients, and 40% of the nutrients showed values between .30 and .40. The weighted κ exceeded .40 for 60% of the 15 analyzed food groups. The modified EPIC FFQ demonstrated moderate congruence with a weighed food record in ranking individuals by dietary intakes

  18. The effect of different pH modifier on formation of CdS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoxiao, Ren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhao Gaoling [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: glzhao@zju.edu.cn; Hong, Li; Wei, Wu; Gaorong, Han [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-10-06

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method. The effects of pH modifier on the properties of CdS particles were studied. NaOH and NH{sub 4}OH were chosen as the pH modifier. The morphology and optical properties of CdS particles were characterized by transmitted electron microscope (TEM) and optical absorption spectra analysis, respectively. The particle size of the samples whose pH modifier is NaOH was smaller than that of the CdS samples with NH{sub 4}OH at the same pH value. Optical absorption edge of CdS shifted to longer wavelength with increasing pH value. Optical absorption edge of the samples with NH{sub 4}OH as pH modifier shifted to the longer wavelength more significantly than that of those samples with NaOH as pH modifier. When CdS particles were adsorbed to the TiO{sub 2} electrodes, the photoelectrochemical property of CdS-sensitized TiO{sub 2} electrode showed that the samples with NH{sub 4}OH as pH modifier had higher photocurrent than those samples with NaOH.

  19. The effect of different pH modifier on formation of CdS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiaoxiao; Zhao Gaoling; Li Hong; Wu Wei; Han Gaorong

    2008-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method. The effects of pH modifier on the properties of CdS particles were studied. NaOH and NH 4 OH were chosen as the pH modifier. The morphology and optical properties of CdS particles were characterized by transmitted electron microscope (TEM) and optical absorption spectra analysis, respectively. The particle size of the samples whose pH modifier is NaOH was smaller than that of the CdS samples with NH 4 OH at the same pH value. Optical absorption edge of CdS shifted to longer wavelength with increasing pH value. Optical absorption edge of the samples with NH 4 OH as pH modifier shifted to the longer wavelength more significantly than that of those samples with NaOH as pH modifier. When CdS particles were adsorbed to the TiO 2 electrodes, the photoelectrochemical property of CdS-sensitized TiO 2 electrode showed that the samples with NH 4 OH as pH modifier had higher photocurrent than those samples with NaOH

  20. The Effect of Emulsifier and Hydrocolloid on Baking Expansion and Texture of Bread from Modified Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudjihastuti Isti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has a very abundant cassava that can be used instead of wheat. Bread made from cassava is safe for celiac sufferers, in which cannot tolerate a protein called gluten found in wheat flour. However, bread from cassava has the disadvantage that it cannot inflate perfectly. Our research goal is to study the effect of emulsifier and hydrocolloid concentration as modifying agents on baking expansion and bread texture (hardness. The test level hedonic preference for bread products results from modified tapioca is also necessary to know the level of customer satisfaction. This study were conducted by three main stages, modification of cassava, baking process, and analyses. Modification of cassava starch was applied using combination of lactic acid solution and ultra violet (UV irradiation. Emulsifier (DATEM and hydrocolloid (xanthan gum were used in baking process. The addition of emulsifier and hydrocolloid can improve baking expansion. The addition of 7% emulsifiers on modified cassava can increase the volume of bread, taste, and texture so it can give greater satisfaction to consumers. Hydrocolloid can replace the function of gluten so the bread can inflate perfectly. The optimal composition of modified cassava in bread making is 25% of modified cassava and 75% of wheat flour. The low value of texture (hardness on bread made from modified cassava indicated a better performance in comparison with native cassava. Baking expansion and texture of the bread is influenced by the modification process. Furthermore, the comprehensive and optimum studies of modification need to be investigated.

  1. CFD Analysis of Scale Effects on Conventional and Tip-Modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Full-scale propeller performance is traditionally predictedby scaling model-scale test results, but the traditionalscaling methods do not take into account hydrodynamicdistinctions of tip-modified propellers in full-scaleperformance. An open-water CFD analysis is made onscale effects of tip...... the transition model shows that laminar and transitionalflow modeling is crucial in model-scale computations.Grid-independent solutions at model and full scale areachieved by grid verification studies. The CFD analysis of scale effects shows that theefficiency gain of the tip-modified propeller is increasedat...

  2. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  3. Synergistic Cancer Growth-Inhibitory Effect of Emodin and Low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    against human gastric cancer (SNU-5), including their effects on cell cycle phase distribution, apoptosis and cancer ... chemotherapy in cancer. ... is restricted due to harmful side effects such as ..... Our study provides ... Curcumin enhances the effect of cisplatin in suppression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma via.

  4. Synthesis of Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Chitosan 5-Fluorouracil Nanoparticles and Its Inhibition of Liver Cancer Characteristics in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Han

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA, to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS. The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR. By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil, we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  5. A comparative Study of Aptasensor Vs Immunosensor for Label-Free PSA Cancer Detection on GQDs-AuNRs Modified Screen-Printed Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Monika; Nirala, Narsingh R; Srivastava, S K; Prakash, Rajiv

    2018-01-31

    Label-free and sensitive detection of PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) is still a big challenge in the arena of prostate cancer diagnosis in males. We present a comparative study for label-free PSA aptasensor and PSA immunosensor for the PSA-specific monoclonal antibody, based on graphene quantum dots-gold nanorods (GQDs-AuNRs) modified screen-printed electrodes. GQDs-AuNRs composite has been synthesized and used as an electro-active material, which shows fast electron transfer and catalytic property. Aptamer or anti-PSA has immobilized onto the surface of modified screen printed electrodes. Three techniques are used simultaneously, viz. cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedence spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate the analytical performance of both PSA aptasensor and PSA immunosensor with its corresponding PSA antigen. Under optimum conditions, both sensors show comparable results with an almost same limit of detection (LOD) of 0.14 ng mL -1 . The results developed with aptasensor and anti-PSA is also checked through the detection of PSA in real samples with acceptable results. Our study suggests some advantages of aptasensor in terms of better stability, simplicity and cost effectiveness. Further our present work shows enormous potential of our developed sensors for real application using voltammetric and EIS techniques simultaneous to get reliable detection of the disease.

  6. Emotional Numbness Modifies the Effect of End-of-Life Discussions on End-of-Life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    Context Overall, end-of-life (EOL) discussions are unrelated to psychological distress and associated with lower rates of aggressive care near death. Nevertheless, patients who report they feel emotionally numb about their illness might encounter difficulties cognitively processing an EOL discussion. Objectives We hypothesized that emotional numbness would modify the influence of EOL discussions on the receipt of less aggressive EOL care. Methods Data were derived from structured interviews with 290 participants in the federally-funded Coping with Cancer Study, a multisite, prospective cohort study of advanced cancer patients followed through their death. Patients’ reports of EOL discussions with their physician and emotional numbness were assessed a median of 4.6 months before death. Information about aggressive EOL care (i.e., ventilation, resuscitation in the last week of life, death in the Intensive Care Unit) was obtained from postmortem caregiver interviews and medical charts. Main and interactive effects of EOL discussions and emotional numbness on aggressive EOL care, adjusting for potential confounds, were evaluated using multiple logistic regression. Results The likelihood of aggressive EOL care associated with having EOL discussions increased by a factor of nine (adjusted odds ratio=9.02, 95% confidence interval 1.37, 59.6, P=0.022) for every unit increase in a patient’s emotional numbness score. Conclusion Emotional numbness diminishes a patient’s capacity to benefit from EOL discussions. EOL decision making may be more effective if clinical communications with emotionally numb patients are avoided. PMID:22926093

  7. Biological response modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  8. Effect modifiers in intervention research at hospitals in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Jørgen; Edwards, Kasper; Jarebrant, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    paper aims to present assessment of potential effect modifiers in intervention studies at hospital wards in Denmark, Iceland and Sweden. Material and methods: The effect modifiers were assessed by a newly developed method (the EMA method; Edwards & Winkel 2016). It is a type of group interview including...... 3-6 participants representing all occupational groups in the investigated organization. The group is asked to write down significant changes at the workplace during the investigated period. The method also includes a semi-qualitative assessment of the potential Work Environment (WE) impact of each...... Mapping) (6 wards) or the ErgoVSM method (Jarebrant et al, 2010) where additional focus is on ergonomic issues (7 wards). Results: In total 120 interventions were implemented. However, 322 significant modifiers were assessed to have occurred during the intervention period. Of these, 120 were assessed...

  9. Modified GAP index for prediction of acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Haruki; Omori, Shota; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ono, Akira; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Predicting the incidence rate of acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and its prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and IPF is difficult. The aim was to study the incidence of IPF-AE during the clinical course of the disease and its prognosis in patients with both NSCLC and IPF. In this retrospective study, we compared the incidence rate of AE during the clinical course of the disease as well as the 1-year survival rate and overall survival (OS) of patients with NSCLC and IPF using a modified gender, age and physiology (mGAP) staging system based on gender, age and percent predicted forced vital capacity. Of 43 patients with NSCLC and IPF included in the final analysis, 17 patients (40%; 95% CI: 26-54%) experienced AE during the clinical course of the disease. One-year survival and median OS were 41.9% (95% CI: 28-57%) and 9.4 months, respectively. Further analysis showed that the incidence of IPF-AE gradually increased and that the 1-year survival rate and median OS gradually decreased with increasing mGAP index score and stage. Our study suggested that mGAP index score and cancer stage may predict IPF-AE and its prognosis in patients with NSCLC and IPF. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  10. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  11. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the life span study cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, K.; Ozasa, K.; Katayama, H.; Shore, R. E.; Okubo, T.

    2012-01-01

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93 000 atomic bomb survivors and 27.000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35 % per Gy for men and 58 % per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years. (authors)

  12. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; van Os, T. A.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  13. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly...

  14. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, D.G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Thomassen, M.; Gerdes, A.M.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Kaufman, B.; Paluch, S.S.; Borg, A.; Karlsson, P.; Askmalm, M.S.; Bustinza, G.B.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Ausems, M.G.; Aalfs, C.M.; Asperen, C.J. van; Devilee, P.; Gille, H.J.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Adlard, J.; Paterson, J.; Eason, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Remon, M.A.; Moncoutier, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Lasset, C.; Giraud, S.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Sobol, H.; Eisinger, F.; Bressac de Paillerets, B.; Caron, O.; Delnatte, C.; Goldgar, D.; Miron, A.; Ozcelik, H.; Buys, S.; Southey, M.C.; Terry, M.B.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Tea, M.K.; Hansen, T.V.; Johannsson, O.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Basil, J.B.; Blank, S.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Isaacs, C.; Blanco, I.; Gayther, S.A.; Moysich, K.B.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Gadzicki, D.; Fiebig, B.; Caldes, T.; Laframboise, R.; Nevanlinna, H.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; Peterlongo, P.; Manoukian, S.; Bernard, L.; Radice, P.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Mazoyer, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  15. The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklyn, Dwyer; Novak, Eric; Boissy, Adrienne; Bethoux, Francois; Chemali, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive results have been reported with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) in nonfluent aphasia patients with damage to their left-brain speech processes, using the patient's intact ability to sing to promote functional language. This pilot study sought to determine the immediate effects of introducing modified melodic intonation therapy…

  16. The Effectiveness of Parental Communication in Modifying the Relation between Food Advertising and Children's Consumption Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijzen, Moniek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of various types of parental communication in modifying children's responses to television food advertising. In a combined diary-survey study among 234 parents of 4- to 12-year-old children, I investigated how different styles of advertising mediation (active vs. restrictive) and consumer…

  17. Age: An effect modifier of the association between allergic rhinitis and Otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Veling, Maria; Shin, Jennifer J

    2016-07-01

    1) To determine whether there is a significant relationship between allergic rhinitis and otitis media with effusion (OME), Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), or tympanic membrane retraction (TMR) in children in a nationally representative population; and 2) to determine whether age is an effect modifier of any such association because this hypothesis has yet to be tested. Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional national databases with limited potential for referral bias. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2010. Univariate, multivariate, stratified, and subgroup analyses were performed as defined a priori. The primary outcomes were OME, ETD, or TMR; the primary predictor variable was allergic rhinitis, with age evaluated as an effect modifier. Data representing 1,491,045,375 pediatric visits were examined and demonstrated that age was an effect modifier of the assessed association. More specifically, in children 6 years of age or older, the presence of allergic rhinitis significantly increased the odds of OME, ETD, or TMR (odds ratio [OR] 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.17, 8.09; P effect modifier of the association between allergic rhinitis and OME; a significant relationship is observed in children 6 years of age and older, whereas there is no significant association in younger children. 2c. Laryngoscope, 126:1687-1692, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Vitamin D: direct effects of vitamin D metabolites on bone: lessons from genetically modified mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisman, J.A.; Bouillon, R.

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system has clear beneficial effects on bone as demonstrated by prevention of rickets in children and by reducing the risk of osteomalacia or osteoporosis in adults or elderly subjects. Depending on the design of the study of genetically modified animals, however, 1,25(OH)2D

  19. Effect of dietary levels of a modified meat meal on performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of dietary levels of a modified meat meal on performance and small intestinal morphology of broiler chickens. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... in Iran is mixed with 150 g wheat bran, 100 g feather meal and 150 g zeolite per kg.

  20. Effectiveness of the Modified Intensive Toilet Training Method on Teaching Toilet Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Avsar; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effectiveness of a modified version of Azrin and Foxx's (1971) intensive toilet training method on teaching of toilet skills to children with autism. This method consists of administering extra fluids and a time schedule, but does not use overcorrection procedures. Implementation requires a study of six…

  1. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladics, G.S.; Bartholomaeus, A.; Bregitzer, P.; Doerrer, N.G.; Gray, A.; Holzhauzer, T.; Jordan, M.; Keese, P.; Kok, E.J.; Macdonald, P.; Parrott, W.; Privalle, L.; Raybould, A.; Rhee, S.Y.; Rice, E.; Romeis, J.; Vaughn, J.; Wal, J.M.; Glenn, K.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled “Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants” was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75

  2. Effects of cyclodextrin glycosiltransferase modified starch and cyclodextrins on plasma glucose and lipids metabolism in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential functional and nutritional benefits of granular starch treated with cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) and the released cyclodextrins (CDs) were explored in in vivo studies. The metabolic effects of diets in the C57BL/6J mouse containing native and enzymatically modified corn st...

  3. The Effect of a Modified Moore Method on Attitudes and Beliefs in Precalculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brad; Cooper, Thomas E.; Briggs, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a study on the effects of teaching with a Modified Moore Method (MMM), a survey containing 20 items from Schoenfeld's (1989) investigation of attitudes and beliefs about mathematics was administered to students in undergraduate precalculus classes. The study included one section of precalculus taught with an MMM, a student-centered and…

  4. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Dongyuan (Beijing Normal Univ., BJ (China)); Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A. (Research Inst. for the Plastics Industry, Budapest (Hungary))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author).

  5. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongyuan; Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author)

  6. Effectiveness of indometacin to prevent ovulation in modified natural-cycle IVF : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken-Zijlstra, T. M.; Haadsma, M. L.; Hammer, C.; Burgerhof, J. G. M.; Pelinck, M. J.; Simons, A. H. M.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Arts, J. G. E. M.; Land, J. A.; Groen, H.; Hoek, A.

    Modified natural-cycle IVF has a lower pregnancy rate per started cycle as compared with IVF with ovarian stimulation due to, for example, premature ovulation. Indometacin administered before ovulation prevents follicle rupture. Therefore, addition of indometacin may improve the effectiveness of

  7. The effect of effective microorganisms (EM on EBPR in modified contact stabilization system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab M. Rashed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Excessive phosphorus can cause eutrophication in water bodies and needs to be reduced in most wastewaters before discharge to receiving waters. The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR process has been shown to be an economical and environmentally compatible method for reducing phosphorus from wastewaters. The experiment has been performed in order to investigate the effect of using effective microorganisms (EM as an application of Enhanced Biological Phosphorous Removal (EBPR in modified contact stabilization activated sludge system by using contact tank as a phosphorus uptake zone and using thickener tank as a phosphorus release zone. The study involved the construction of a pilot plant which was setup in the Quhafa Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP, Al Fayoum, Egypt. Then the uptake and release of total phosphorus were determined through two batch tests using sludge samples from thickener and stabilization tanks. Results showed the removal efficiencies of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5 and total phosphorus (TP of this pilot plant were 93%, 93% and 90%, respectively. On the other hand the results of batch tests showed that the reason for high ability of phosphorus removal by this pilot plant is related to the high performance of microorganisms for phosphorus accumulation. Finally providing activated EM to the anaerobic zone was to improve fermentation by achieving the enhancement of the performance of phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs and then increase phosphorous release resulting in the decrease of the average effluent phosphorus concentration.

  8. Evaluation of Thermal Oxidative Aging Effect on the Rheological Performance of Modified Asphalt Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng

    Modified asphalt binder, which is combined by base binder and additive modifier, has been implemented in pavement industry for more than 30 years. Recently, the oxidative aging mechanism of asphalt binder has been studied for several decades, and appreciable finding results of asphalt binder aging mechanism were achieved from the chemistry and rheological performance aspects. However, most of these studies were conducted with neat binders, the research of aging mechanism of modified asphalt binder was limited. Nowadays, it is still highly necessary to clarify how the asphalt binder aging happens with the modified asphalt binder, what is the effect of the different modifiers (additives) on the binder aging process, how the rheological performance changes under the thermal oxidative aging conditions and so on. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of isothermal oxidative aging conditions on the rheological performance change of the modified and controlled asphalt binders. There were totally 14 different sorts of asphalt binders had been aged in the PAV pans in the air-force drafted ovens at 50°C, 60°C and 85°C for 0.5 day to 240 days. The Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) were used to perform the experiments. The analysis of rheological indices (Low shear viscosity-LSV, Crossover modulus-G*c, Glover-Rowe Parameter-G-R, DSR function-DSR Fn) as a function of carbonyl area (CA) was conducted. With the SBS modification, both of the hardening susceptibility of the rheological index-LSV and G-R decreases compared with the corresponding base binder. The TR increased the hardening susceptibility of all the rheological indexes. While for the G*c, SBS increases the slope of the most modified asphalt binders except A and B_TR_X series binders. The multiple linear regression statistical analysis results indicate that the oxidative aging conditions play an important role on the CA, and rheological performance

  9. Docetaxel (DTX)-loaded polydopamine-modified TPGS-PLA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dunwan; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Gan; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Linhua; Zeng, Xiaowei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed DTX-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized using D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-poly(lactide) (pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs). To target liver cancer cells, galactosamine was conjugated on the prepared NPs (Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs) to enhance the delivery of DTX via ligand-mediated endocytosis. The size and morphology of pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs changed obviously compared with TPGS-PLA/NPs. In vitro studies showed that TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had similar release profiles of DTX. Both confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometric results showed that coumarin 6-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had the highest cellular uptake efficiency in liver cancer cell line HepG2. Moreover, DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells more potently than TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs, and a clinically available DTX formulation (Taxotere®). The in vivo biodistribution experiments show that the Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs are specifically targeted to the tumor. Furthermore, the in vivo anti-tumor effects study showed that injecting DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs reduced the tumor size most significantly on hepatoma-bearing nude mice. These results suggest that Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs prepared in the study specifically interacted with the hepatocellular carcinoma cells through ligand-receptor recognition and they may be used as a potentially eligible drug delivery system targeting liver cancers. Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed docetaxel (DTX)-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized from D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate

  10. Initial incomplete surgery modifies prognosis in advanced ovarian cancer regardless of subsequent management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Balescu, Irina; Dima, Simona; Herlea, Vlad; David, Leonard; Brasoveanu, Vladislav; Popescu, Irinel

    2015-04-01

    Prognosis in ovarian cancer is determined by completeness of cytoreduction and proper management by specialized oncological gynecologists. Incomplete initial debulking surgery in non-specialized Centers is, however, a reality and there is ongoing discussion about the best subsequent management of such patients. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics--FIGO FIGO stages IIIC-IV) who had biopsy by laparotomy or incomplete cytoreduction followed or not by chemotherapy further referred to our Institution between January 2002 and May 2014 were included. The two groups of incomplete cytoreduction [followed by upfront surgery or followed by chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (IDS)] were compared and also compared against a cohort of 197 patients with similar characteristics who underwent upfront maximal surgery according to the standard at our Iinstitution during the same period. A total of 99 eligible patients were identified. Sixty-seven of them underwent biopsies by laparotomy and 32 underwent incomplete cytoreduction in other institutions. Twenty-eight patients underwent direct re-operation while 71 patients underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by IDS. The mean overall survival duration for patients with upfront reoperation was 31 months and 54 months for patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and IDS, considerably lower than the 72 months obtained for the group of 197 patients with maximal up-front complete cytoreduction at our Institution. Primary biopsy or incomplete cytoreduction reduces survival regardless of the subsequent approach. However, if incomplete cytoreduction has occurred, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by IDS is preferable to up-front reoperation. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. THE EFFECT OF EARLY CERVICAL CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Haller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment effectiveness and clinical outcome of patients with cervical carcinoma FIGO stage IA1 and IA2 are analyzed in three different time period at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Rijeka, Croatia. Method: Retrospective analysis of the hospital chart of all cervical cancer patients between 1991 and 2005 was conducted with five-year follow up. Results: Data on cervical cancer distribution by stage and five-year survival are presented. Separately analyzed age, histology type and treatment modalities in stage FIGO IA1 and IA2 during three consecutive five-year periods are presented. Conclusions: Conservative surgical approach – conization alone in stage IA1 of the squamous cell car- cinoma is reasonable and safe treatment option for reproductive active women. During observed periods conization became the most used surgical technique applied in almost two third of FIGO IA1 cervical cancer patients. Lymph vascular space invasion in stage IA1 lead to adjunct pelvic lymphadenectomy with unclear clinical benefit. In cervical cancer patients stage IA2 simple hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy could be accepted as a standard treatment. In these patients further studies are recommended to evaluate other less radical surgical techniques – simple and radical trachelectomy with or without pelvic lymphadenectomy. Radical hysterectomy in both stages IA1 and IA2, based on personal experience and literature data represents a surgical overtreatment and should be abandoned.

  12. Dependence of radioprotective effect of chemical modifying agents on their intracellular concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidus, L.K.; Korystov, Y.N.; Kublik, L.N.; Vexler, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Regularities of the radioprotective effect of chemical modifying agents cysteamine, caffeine benzoate, thioglycolic acid, and caffeine, all weak electrolytes, have been studied in cultured Chinese hamster cells. Efficiency of protection is shown to be dependent on pH and concentrations of the drug inside the cells and in the medium. Based on the theory of the dissociation of weak electrolytes and their distribution between the cells and the medium a strong correlation between the efficiency of modification of the radiation response and intracellular concentration of a modifying agent is shown. (author)

  13. Does the use of specialist palliative care services modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Nicolson, Donald J; Macleod, Una; Allgar, Victoria; Dalgliesh, Christopher; Johnson, Miriam

    2016-05-01

    Cancer patients in lower socioeconomic groups are significantly less likely to die at home and experience more barriers to access to palliative care. It is unclear whether receiving palliative care may mediate the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. This review examines whether and how use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. A systematic review was conducted. Eligible papers were selected and the quality appraised by two independent reviewers. Data were synthesised using a narrative approach. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched (1997-2013). Bibliographies were scanned and experts contacted. Papers were included if they reported the effect of both socioeconomic status and use of specialist palliative care on place of death for adult cancer patients. Nine studies were included. All study subjects had received specialist palliative care. With regard to place of death, socioeconomic status was found to have (1) no effect in seven studies and (2) an effect in one study. Furthermore, one study found that the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was only significant when patients received standard specialist palliative care. When patients received more intense care adapted to their needs, the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was no longer seen. There is some evidence to suggest that use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Dual-Ligand Modified Polymer-Lipid Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Targeting Delivery to Her2/neu Overexpressed Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Tang, Wenxin; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Hao; Gao, Di; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a dual-ligand polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticle drug delivery vehicle comprised of an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) mimic with a modified HIV-1 Tat (mTAT) was established for the targeted treatment of Her2/neu-overexpressing cells. The resultant dual-ligand hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) consisted of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) core, a near 90% surface coverage of the lipid monolayer, and a 5.7 nm hydrated polyethylene glycol shell. Ligand density optimization study revealed that cellular uptake efficiency of the hybrid NPs could be manipulated by controlling the surface-ligand densities. Furthermore, the cell uptake kinetics and mechanism studies showed that the dual-ligand modifications of hybrid NPs altered the cellular uptake pathway from caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME) to the multiple endocytic pathways, which would significantly enhance the NP internalization. Upon the systemic investigation of the cellular uptake behavior of dual-ligand hybrid NPs, docetaxel (DTX), a hydrophobic anticancer drug, was successfully encapsulated into dual-ligand hybrid NPs with high drug loading for Her2/neu-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell treatment. The DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs showed a decreased burst release and a more gradual sustained drug release property. Because of the synergistic effect of dual-ligand modification, DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs exerted substantially better therapeutic potency against SK-BR-3 cancer cells than other NP formulations and free DTX drugs. These results demonstrate that the dual-ligand hybrid NPs could be a promising vehicle for targeted drug delivery to treat breast cancer.

  15. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f NL in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology

  16. Detection of DNA of genetically modified maize by a silicon nanowire field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Van Binh; Tung Pham, Xuan Thanh; Duong Dang, Ngoc Thuy; Tuyen Le, Thi Thanh; Tran, Phu Duy; Nguyen, Thanh Chien; Nguyen, Van Quoc; Dang, Mau Chien; Tong, Duy Hien; Van Rijn, Cees J M

    2011-01-01

    A silicon nanowire field-effect transistor based sensor (SiNW-FET) has been proved to be the most sensitive and powerful device for bio-detection applications. In this paper, SiNWs were first fabricated by using our recently developed deposition and etching under angle technique (DEA), then used to build up the complete SiNW device based biosensor. The fabricated SiNW biosensor was used to detect DNA of genetically modified maize. As the DNA of the genetically modified maize has particular DNA sequences of 35S promoter, we therefore designed 21 mer DNA oligonucleotides, which are used as a receptor to capture the transferred DNA of maize. In our work, the SiNW biosensor could detect DNA of genetically modified maize with concentrations down to about 200 pM

  17. Effectiveness of Modified Agility and Perturbation Training in Patients with Osteoarthritis Knee: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Choudhary

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To check and compare the effectiveness of modified agility and perturbation training over conventional physical therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Subjects were screened on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria and a total of 50 subjects were recruited for the study. They were randomly divided into Group A and group B with n=25 each. Results: Group receiving conventional knee exercises with modified agility and perturbation training showed statistically significant results. Discussion: It was found that supplementing rehabilitation programs for people with knee OA with a modified agility and perturbation training program assist them in returning to higher levels of physical activity with less pain and instability following rehabilitation.

  18. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  19. Exercise effects on mood in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each symptom can contribute to ... and emotional side-effects experienced by cancer patients include stress, fear of ... the role of psychological factors in cancer survival and emphasises ... Current treatments for anxiety and depression in cancer patients ... evidence that physical activity and exercise have positive effects on.

  20. Effects of Breast Cancer and Mastectomy on Fibrinolytic Activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is good to know if this is also the case in Africans with breast cancer. Africans are known to possess enhanced fibrinolysis. This study was designed to assess the effect of breast cancer on fibrinolytic activity and the effect of mastectomy on fibrinolysis in African women. Sixty histo-patholically proven breast cancer patients ...

  1. A radiobiological approach to cancer treatment. Possible chemical and physical agents modifying radiosensitivity in comparison with high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Biological characteristics of high LET radiations are summarized to be low oxygen enhancement ratio, high RBE, low repair and low cell cycle dependency of radiosensitivity. Various chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity and radiological effect of hyperthermia are classified into these four properties. It is evident that we have now various means to mimic high LET radiations as far as biological response is concerned though some of them are still in experimental stage. Among them, the means to cope with hypoxia and repair which are assumed to be the most important causes of radioresistance of human tumors are discussed in some detail. It is expected that through the present seminar we would have consensus to concentrate our effort of development for new modifying means available and useful in developing countries. (author)

  2. Effect of Training on Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    Effect of Training on Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Human. Papiloma Virus Vaccine ... debut, multiple sexual partners, smoking, history of sexually ... prevent cervical cancer. These include ..... needed to understand and explain the.

  3. Long-Lasting WNT-TCF Response Blocking and Epigenetic Modifying Activities of Withanolide F in Human Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Seth

    Full Text Available The WNT-TCF signaling pathway participates in adult tissue homeostasis and repair, and is hyperactive in a number of human diseases including cancers of the colon. Whereas to date there are no antagonists approved for patient use, a potential problem for their sustained use is the blockade of WNT signaling in healthy tissues, thus provoking potentially serious co-lateral damage. Here we have screened a library of plant and microorganism small molecules for novel WNT signaling antagonists and describe withanolide F as a potent WNT-TCF response blocker. This steroidal lactone inhibits TCF-dependent colon cancer xenograft growth and mimics the effects of genetic blockade of TCF and of ivermectin, a previously reported WNT-TCF blocker. However, withanolide F is unique in that it imposes a long-lasting repression of tumor growth, WNT-TCF targets and cancer stem cell clonogenicity after drug treatment. These findings are paralleled by its modulation of chromatin regulators and its alteration of overall H3K4me1 levels. Our results open up the possibility to permanently repress essential signaling responses in cancer cells through limited treatments with small molecules.

  4. The Effects of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Acute Subcortical Cerebral Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Changshen; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yizhao; Hou, Weijia; Liu, Shoufeng; Gao, Chunlin; Wang, Chen; Mo, Lidong; Wu, Jialing

    2017-01-01

    Background: Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) promotes upper extremity recovery post stroke, however, it is difficult to implement clinically due to its high resource demand and safety of the restraint. Therefore, we propose that modified CIMT (mCIMT) be used to treat individuals with acute subcortical infarction. Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of mCIMT in patients with acute subcortical infarction, and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the effect. ...

  5. Unintended Effects in Genetically Modified Food/Feed Safety: A Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Antonio; Paoletti, Claudia

    2018-04-20

    Identifying and assessing unintended effects in genetically modified food and feed are considered paramount by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), World Health Organization (WHO), and Codex Alimentarius, despite heated debate. This paper addresses outstanding needs: building consensus on the history-of-safe-use concept, harmonizing criteria to select appropriate conventional counterparts, and improving endpoint selection to identify unintended effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Modified 2013 ASCO/CAP Guidelines on HER2 Testing in Breast Cancer. One Year Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Varga

    Full Text Available The latest guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP to test Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 in breast cancer after being revised in 2008 underwent a second modification in October 2013. The modification includes changes in cut-offs: 10% strong membranous staining for score 3+ on immunohistochemistry (IHC (previously 30% and using the ratio of >2 or absolute gene-copy-number (6 or more alone or in combination with each other by in-situ-hybridisation technology (previously >2.2 and average copy-number of 6 or more. Hereby we addressed the question, which impact the modified cut-offs had on overall HER2-positivity in a single institution.We prospectively analysed 617 consecutive diagnostic breast-cancer cases which underwent double HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH, using the modified 2013 ASCO/CAP-guidelines for one year (October 2013-October 2014. Results were compared with HER2-test results on 1,528 consecutive diagnostic breast-cancer cases from two previous years (2011-2012, using the 2008 ASCO/CAP guidelines, also tested with IHC and FISH in each case.Between October 2013 and October 2014, overall HER2-positivity was 15.8% (98 of 617 cases were either IHC 3+ or FISH amplified. 79 of 617 cases (13% were IHC 3+, 96 of 617 cases (15.5% were FISH amplified. Equivocal cases were seen in 25 of 617 cases (4.1%. 22 of 25 equivocal cases (88% in 2013-2014 were IHC 1+ or 2+. In 13 equivocal cases, there was a repeated IHC/FISH testing: 2 of 13 cases (15% became FISH amplified, 1 of 13 cases (7.5% became IHC 3+. In 2011-2012, overall HER2-positivity (IHC/FISH was 13.8% (211 of 1,528 cases. 185 of 1,528 cases (12% were 3+ on IHC, 181 of 1,522 cases (12% were amplified by FISH. Six of 1,528 cases were equivocal by FISH, and interpreted as non-amplified (0.3%.Applying the modified ASCO/CAP guidelines from 2013 resulted in an increase (2

  7. Predominant modifier of extreme liver cancer susceptibility in C57BR/cdJ female mice localized to 6 Mb on chromosome 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peychal, Stephanie E.-M.; Bilger, Andrea; Pitot, Henry C.; Drinkwater, Norman R.

    2009-01-01

    Sex hormones influence the susceptibility of inbred mice to liver cancer. C57BR/cdJ (BR) females are extremely susceptible to spontaneous and chemically induced liver tumors, in part due to a lack of protection against hepatocarcinogenesis normally offered by ovarian hormones. BR males are also moderately susceptible, and the susceptibility of both sexes of BR mice to liver tumors induced with N,N-diethylnitrosamine relative to the resistant C57BL/6J (B6) strain is caused by two loci designated Hcf1 and Hcf2 (hepatocarcinogenesis in females) located on chromosomes 17 and 1, respectively. The Hcf1 locus on chromosome 17 is the predominant modifier of liver cancer in BR mice. To validate the existence of this locus and investigate its potential interaction with Hcf2, congenic mice for each region were generated. Homozygosity for the B6.BR(D17Mit164-D17Mit2) region resulted in a 4-fold increase in liver tumor multiplicity in females and a 4.5-fold increase in males compared with B6 controls. A series of 16 recombinants covering the entire congenic region was developed to further narrow the area containing Hcf1. Susceptible heterozygous recombinants demonstrated a 3- to 7-fold effect in females and a 1.5- to 2-fold effect in males compared with B6 siblings. The effect in susceptible lines completely recapitulated the susceptibility of heterozygous full-length chromosome 17 congenics and furthermore narrowed the location of the Hcf1 locus to a single region of the chromosome from 30.05 to 35.83 Mb. PMID:19255062

  8. Exercise effects on HRV in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, D; Vogt, L; Thiel, C; Schmidt, K; Bernhörster, M; Lungwitz, A; Jäger, E; Banzer, W

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of physical exercise on heart rate variability (HRV) in cancer patients. 3 matched groups of each 15 tumour patients (60.4±8.9 years, 27 male, 18 female) were recruited: Physical exercise group 1 (acute treatment), Physical exercise group 2 (post treatment) and non-intervention group (acute treatment, no exercise). Exercise group patients received counselling for exercise and participated in a Nordic-Walking program. Short-term HRV-recordings, assessments of fatigue and quality of life (QoL) were performed prior to and 16 weeks after the exercise program initiation. MANCOVA revealed group × time differences in total power frequency domain of HRV and QoL (pHRV-parameters and prolonged survival in cancer patients, improvement in autonomic control may be an important goal of exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. EFFECT OF MODIFIED CONSTRAINT INDUCED THERAPY ON UPPERLIMB FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY IN YOUNG STROKE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Prakash Pappala

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of modified constraint induced therapy on upper limb functional recovery in young stroke subjects. Most of the stroke rehabilitation units following conventional rehabilitation methods for treatment of the stroke patients where these methods have been proved to be less useful especially in the young stroke subjects. Hence the purpose of this study is to see the effect of modified constraint induced therapy which is a task specific training method for upperlimb in young stroke subjects. Methods: Total of 40 young stroke subjects who is having minimal motor criterion and met other inclusion criteria were recruited from department of physiotherapy, g.s.l.general hospital. Pre and post intervention measures were taken using Wolf motor function test and Jebsen Taylor hand function test. Results: In this study had shown significant improvements in the modified constraint induced therapy group when compared to the conventional rehabilitation alone. P value between groups was < 0.05. Conclusion: In this study concludes that addition of 15 minutes modified constraint induced movement therapy to conventional physiotherapy is a useful adjunct in functional recovery of upper limb among young stroke subjects

  10. Educational intervention and functional decline among older people: the modifying effects of social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    To analyse if social capital modifies the effect of educational intervention of home visitors on mobility disability. Earlier studies have found that educational intervention of home visitors has a positive effect of older peoples' functional decline, but how social capital might modify this effect is still unknown. We used the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits - a prospective cohort study including 2863 75-year-olds and 1171 80-year-olds in 34 Danish municipalities - to analyse the modifying effect of different aspects of social capital on the effect of educational intervention of home visitors on functional decline. The three measures of social capital (bonding, bridging, and linking) were measured at contextual level. Data was analysed with multivariate linear regression model using generalised estimating equations to account for repeated measurements. We found that 80-year-olds living in municipalities with high bonding (B=0.089, p=0.0279) and high linking (B=0.0929; p=0.0217) had significant better mobility disability in average at 3-year follow up if their municipality had received intervention. With the unique design of the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits and with theory-based measures of social capital that distinguish between three aspects of social capital with focus on older people, this study contributes to the literature about the role of social capital for interventions on mobility disability.

  11. Identifying Treatment Effect Modifiers in the STarT Back Trial: A Secondary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M; Hill, Jonathan C; Campbell, Paul; Afolabi, Ebenezer; George, Steven Z; Dunn, Kate M; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-01-01

    Identification of patient characteristics influencing treatment outcomes is a top low back pain (LBP) research priority. Results from the STarT Back trial support the effectiveness of prognostic stratified care for LBP compared with current best care, however, patient characteristics associated with treatment response have not yet been explored. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to identify treatment effect modifiers within the STarT Back trial at 4-month follow-up (n = 688). Treatment response was dichotomized using back-specific physical disability measured using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (≥7). Candidate modifiers were identified using previous literature and evaluated using logistic regression with statistical interaction terms to provide preliminary evidence of treatment effect modification. Socioeconomic status (SES) was identified as an effect modifier for disability outcomes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71, P = .028). High SES patients receiving prognostic stratified care were 2.5 times less likely to have a poor outcome compared with low SES patients receiving best current care (OR = .40, P = .006). Education level (OR = 1.33, P = .109) and number of pain medications (OR = .64, P = .140) met our criteria for effect modification with weaker evidence (.20 > P ≥ .05). These findings provide preliminary evidence for SES, education, and number of pain medications as treatment effect modifiers of prognostic stratified care delivered in the STarT Back Trial. This analysis provides preliminary exploratory findings about the characteristics of patients who might least likely benefit from targeted treatment using prognostic stratified care for LBP. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  13. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  14. Cost effectiveness of surveillance for GI cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Meester, Reinier G S; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are among the leading causes of death in the world. To reduce the burden of GI diseases, surveillance is recommended for some diseases, including for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, Barrett's oesophagus, precancerous gastric lesions, colorectal adenoma, and pancreatic neoplasms. This review aims to provide an overview of the evidence on cost-effectiveness of surveillance of individuals with GI conditions predisposing them to cancer, specifically focussing on the aforementioned conditions. We searched the literature and reviewed 21 studies. Despite heterogeneity of studies in terms of settings, study populations, surveillance strategies and outcomes, most reviewed studies suggested at least some surveillance of patients with these GI conditions to be cost-effective. For some high-risk conditions frequent surveillance with 3-month intervals was warranted, while for other conditions, surveillance may only be cost-effective every 10 years. Further studies based on more robust effectiveness evidence are needed to inform and optimise surveillance programmes for GI cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer stage, comorbidity, and socioeconomic differences in the effect of cancer on labour market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielen, Karsten; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Andersen, Ingelise

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Socioeconomic inequality in return to work after cancer treatment and rehabilitation have been documented, but less is known about its causes. This paper investigates the role played by breast cancer stage at diagnosis and comorbidity. METHODS: We used the comprehensive Danish Cancer...... employment, and a considerable amount of the educational effect is mediated by comorbidity and pre-cancer labour market participation and income. CONCLUSION: The result of the study is negative in the sense that the stronger effect of breast cancer on employment among low-educated compared to highly educated...

  16. The impact on radiation risk estimates of effect modifiers and confounders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, G.B.; Cologne, J.B.; Pierce, D.A.; Tokuoka, S.

    2003-01-01

    We have conducted studies of the joint effects of radiation with other risk factors for liver, lung, and breast cancer in the cohort of Japanese survivors of the 1945 atomic bombings. Based on follow-up of 45,113 subjects from 1958 through 1994, of whom 592 developed lung cancer, we found the effects of smoking and radiation to be significantly non-multiplicative and consistent with additivity. Adjustment for smoking reduced the female:male ratio of radiation risk estimates for lung cancer in this cohort from 5.8 to 1.6, a ratio more similar to that for all solid cancers. We conducted cross sectional and case control studies within the A-bomb survivor cohort to assess the joint effects of radiation with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and C virus (HCV) infections on the etiology of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our study of 268 pathologist-confirmed cirrhosis cases and 843 subjects without cirrhosis, found no relationship between A-bomb radiation and cirrhosis after adjustment for viral hepatitis. In terms of HCC, our study of 238 pathologist-confirmed cases and 894 controls showed super-multiplicative interaction between radiation and HCV infections. Our results suggest that while chronic radiation exposure acts as a complete carcinogen for HCC, acute irradiation may act in concert with an agent such as HCV that is associated with liver cell proliferation. Studies in progress of the joint effects of radiation with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and total estradiol on the etiology of breast cancer, a particularly radiogenic tumor, will also be discussed

  17. Effect of modified lumbosacral orthoses on treatment of patients with spondylolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bahramizadeh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, the effect of modified lumbo sacral orthoses on lordosis andlumbosacral angle and reliving pain and functional disability was investigated.Materials and Methods: 30 patients (19 females, 11 males with spondylolysis (aged between 22-57 years were sampled in a simple randomized manner. They had a history of low back pain for 30.7(in average months. Modified lumbo sacral orthoses was prescribed for 3 months (23 hours daily.The brace was unique, bridged between xyphoid process to pubic symphysis anteriorly and seventhlumbar vertebrae to gluteal prminency posteriorly.Results: Our results show that 3-months using the modified lumbo sacral orthoses resulted insignificant decrement in pain and improvement in functional ability of patients. Although lordosis andlumbosacral angles decreased to 2.21 and 0.92 degrees, respectively, but these changes were notsignificant. Finally, patients with the lower duration of low back pain showed better results.Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the modified lumbosacral orthoses, as a non-invasiveprocedure, can be used for conservative treatments in spondylolysis patients.

  18. Modified electrical survey for effective leakage detection at concrete hydraulic facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bomi; Oh, Seokhoon

    2018-02-01

    Three original electrode arrays for the effective leakage detection of concrete hydraulic facilities through electrical resistivity surveys are proposed: 'cross-potential', 'direct-potential' and modified tomography-like arrays. The main differences with respect to the commonly used arrays are that the current line-sources are separated from potential pole lines and floated upon the water. The potential pole lines are located directly next to the facility in order to obtain intuitive data and useful interpretations of the internal conditions of the hydraulic facility. This modified configuration of the array clearly displays the horizontal variation of the electrical field around the damaged zones of the concrete hydraulic facility, and any anomalous regions that might be found between potential poles placed across the facilities. In order to facilitate the interpretation of these modified electrical surveys, a new and creative way of presenting the measurements is also proposed and an inversion approach is provided for the modified tomography-like array. A numerical modeling and two field tests were performed to verify these new arrays and interpretation methods. The cross and direct potential array implied an ability to detect small variations of the potential field near the measurement poles. The proposed array showed the overall potential distribution across the hydraulic facility which may be used to assist in the search of trouble zones within the structure, in combination with the traditional electrical resistivity array.

  19. Barriers to overcome for effective cancer control in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Joe B

    2015-08-01

    Cancer control in Africa is complicated due to large differences in cancer incidence between countries caused by differences in exposure to known risk factors. For example, substantial differences are seen when selected cancers in north Africa are compared with those in sub-Saharan Africa. In the future, population growth and demographic shifts are likely to have profound effects on the prevalence of cancer across the continent. Likewise, many factors outside of health care such as language differences, conflict, and poverty can affect cancer control efforts. Although cooperation in cancer control efforts is desirable, differences in cultural and geopolitical factors that characterise African countries and their populations, together with the sheer size of the continent, present unique challenges to effective cancer control. This Series paper discusses factors related to the size, diversity, and conditions within Africa that present barriers to optimal collaboration in cancer control efforts across the continent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of long-term oxidation on the rheological properties of polymer modified asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonghong Ruan; Richard R. Davison; Charles J. Glover [Texas A & M University, College Station, TX (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-10-01

    The effect of long-term aging on rheological properties of polymer modified asphalt binders was studied. Modifiers included diblock poly(styrene-b-butadiene) rubber, triblock poly(styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene), and tire rubber. Asphalt aging was carried out either at 60{sup o}C in a controlled environmental room or at 100{sup o}C in a pressure aging vessel (AASHTO Provisional Standards, 1993). Both dynamic shear properties and extensional properties were investigated. Polymer modification resulted in increased asphalt complex modulus at high temperatures, decreased asphalt complex modulus at low temperatures, broadened relaxation spectra, and improved ductility. Oxidative aging decreased asphalt temperature susceptibility, damaged the polymer network in binders, further broadened the relaxation spectrum, and diminished polymer effectiveness in improving asphalt ductility. 27 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The effect of IPS-modified, an early intervention for people with mood and anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lone; Bech, Per; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    that Individual Placement and Support (IPS) has a positive effect on employment when provided to people with severe mental illness. This modified IPS intervention is aimed at supporting people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in regaining their ability to work and facilitate their return......Anxiety and affective disorders can be disabling and have a major impact on the ability to work. In Denmark, people with a mental disorder, and mainly non-psychotic disorders, represent a substantial and increasing part of those receiving disability pensions. Previous studies have indicated...... to work or education.Aim: To investigate whether an early modified IPS intervention has an effect on employment and education when provided to people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in a Danish context.Methods/design: The trial is a randomised, assessor-blinded, clinical superiority...

  2. The stress response to surgery: release mechanisms and the modifying effect of pain relief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    This short review updates information on the release mechanisms of the systemic response to surgical injury and the modifying effect of pain relief. Initiation of the response is primarily due to afferent nerve impulses combined with release of humoral substances (such as prostaglandins, kinins...... in releasing the classical endocrine catabolic response, while humoral factors are important for the hyperthermic response, changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis immunofunction, and capillary permeability. The modifying effect of pain relief on the surgical stress response is dependent upon the technique...... on the stress response. In summary, pain alleviation itself may not necessarily lead to an important modification of the stress response, and a combined approach with inhibition of the neural and humoral release mechanisms is necessary for a pronounced inhibition or prevention of the response to surgical injury....

  3. Irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging effects on residual nitrite, ascorbic acid, nitrosomyoglobin, and color in sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Joo; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kee-Hyuk; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2003-02-26

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging effects on emulsion-type cooked pork sausage during storage for 4 weeks. CO(2) (100%), N(2) (100%), or 25% CO(2)/75% N(2) packaged sausage were irradiated at 0, 5, and 10 kGy, and residual nitrite, residual ascorbic acid, nitrosomyoglobin (NO-Mb), color values, and their correlation were observed. Irradiation significantly reduced the residual nitrite content and caused partial reduction of NO-Mb during storage. No difference was observed in ascorbic acid content by irradiation. Irradiation decreased the Hunter color a value of sausage. CO(2) or CO(2)/N(2) packaging were more effective for reducing residual nitrite and inhibiting the loss of the red color of sausage compared to N(2) packaging. Results indicated that the proper combination of irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging could reduce the residual nitrite in sausage with minimization of color change.

  4. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on Rheological Properties of some Viscosity Modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G Chandra Sekhara; Ramadevi, K; Sirisha, K

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins are a group of novel excipients, extensively used in the present pharmaceutical industry. Sometimes they show significant interactions with other conventional additives used in the formulation of dosage forms. The effect of β-cyclodextrin on the rheological properties of aqueous solutions of some selected viscosity modifiers was studied in the present work. β-cyclodextrin showed two different types of effects on the rheology of the selected polymers. In case of natural polymers like xanthan gum and guar gum, enhanced apparent viscosity was found and in case of semi-synthetic polymers like sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose, reduction in apparent viscosity was found. β-cyclodextrin was included at 0.5, 1 and 2% w/v concentrations into the polymeric solutions. These findings are useful in the adjustment of concentrations of viscosity modifiers during the formulation of physically stable disperse systems.

  5. Effect of Reprocessing and Accelerated Weathering on Impact-Modified Recycled Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, V.; Mohanty, Smita; Biswal, Manoranjan; Nayak, Sanjay K.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of recycled polycarbonate, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, high-impact polystyrene, and its blends from waste electrical and electronic equipment plastics products properties were enhanced by the addition of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier. The optimized blend formulation was processed through five cycles, at processing temperature, 220-240 °C and accelerated weathering up to 700 h. Moreover, the effect of reprocessing and accelerated weathering in the physical properties of the modified blends was investigated by mechanical, thermal, rheological, and morphological studies. The results show that in each reprocessing cycle, the tensile strength and impact strength decreased significantly and the similar behavior has been observed from accelerated weathering. Subsequently, the viscosity decreases and this decrease becomes the effect of thermal and photo-oxidative degradation. This can be correlated with FTIR analysis.

  6. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  7. The effect of modified trampoline training on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Joohee; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This research was conducted to investigate the effects of modified trampoline training on the balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-four stroke patients participated in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the trampoline group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). [Methods] Both groups participated in conventional physical therapy for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. The trampoline group also ...

  8. Prognostic Significance of Modified Advanced Lung Cancer Inflammation Index (ALI) in Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer_ Comparison with Original ALI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Nambeom; Kim, Young Saing; Seo, Ja-Young; Park, Inkeun; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI, body mass index [BMI] x serum albumin/neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio [NLR]) has been shown to predict overall survival (OS) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). CT enables skeletal muscle to be quantified, whereas BMI cannot accurately reflect body composition. The purpose was to evaluate prognostic value of modified ALI (mALI) using CT-determined L3 muscle index (L3MI, muscle area at L3/height2) beyond original ALI. L3MIs were calculated using the CT images of 186 consecutive patients with SCLC taken at diagnosis, and mALI was defined as L3MI x serum albumin/NLR. Using chi-squared test determined maximum cut-offs for low ALI and low mALI, the prognostic values of low ALI and low mALI were tested using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Finally, deviance statistics was used to test whether the goodness of fit of the prognostic model is improved by adding mALI as an extra variable. Patients with low ALI (cut-off, 31.1, n = 94) had shorter OS than patients with high ALI (median, 6.8 months vs. 15.8 months; p ALI and low mALI (z = 0.000, p = 1.000) and between high ALI and high mALI (z = 0.330, p = 0.740). Multivariable analysis showed that low ALI was an independent prognostic factor for shorter OS (HR, 1.67, p = 0.004), along with advanced age (HR, 1.49, p = 0.045), extensive disease (HR, 2.27, p ALI using BMI. ALI is a simple and useful prognostic indicator in SCLC.

  9. The Emerging Facets of Non-Cancerous Warburg Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.

    2017-10-23

    The Warburg effect (WE), or aerobic glycolysis, is commonly recognized as a hallmark of cancer and has been extensively studied for potential anti-cancer therapeutics development. Beyond cancer, the WE plays an important role in many other cell types involved in immunity, angiogenesis, pluripotency, and infection by pathogens (e.g., malaria). Here, we review the WE in non-cancerous context as a

  10. The effect of anxiety on breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shadiya Mohamed Saleh Baqutayan

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a disease wherein abnormal cells divide without control and are able to attack other tissues. Most of the patients and their families face some degree of depression, anxiety, and fear when cancer becomes a part of their lives. They feel helpless and eager to find ways on how to get rid of it. The study focuses on anxiety among breast cancer patients. It aims at investigating cancer, its symptoms, and effects the disease has on the anxiety level of patients.

  11. The effect of modified trampoline training on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joohee; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This research was conducted to investigate the effects of modified trampoline training on the balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-four stroke patients participated in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the trampoline group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). [Methods] Both groups participated in conventional physical therapy for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. The trampoline group also took part in trampoline training for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. We evaluated balance (Berg balance scale, timed up and go test), gait (dynamic gait index), and falls efficacy (falls efficacy scale-K) to confirm the effects of the intervention. [Results] Both the trampoline and the control group showed significant improvements in balance, gait, and falls efficacy compared to before the intervention, and the improvements were significantly greater in the trampoline group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Modified trampoline training resulted in significantly improved balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients compared to the control group. These results suggest that modified trampoline training is feasible and effective at improving balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy after stroke.

  12. Effects of quantum dots on the ROS amount of liver cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunmeng; Xia, Chunhui; Wang, Baiqi; Chen, Hetao; Wang, Tong; He, Qian; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Yu

    2017-07-01

    Liver cancer (LC) is a serious disease that threatens human lives. LC has a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. LC stem cells (LCSCs) play critical roles in these processes. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to determine cell apoptosis and proliferation. However, studies of the effects of exogenous nanomaterials on LCSC ROS changes are rarely reported. In this work, quantum dots (QDs) were prepared using a hydrothermal method, and QDs were further modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using a chemical approach. The effects of QDs, PEG-modified QDs (PEG@QDs) and BSA-modified QDs (BSA@QDs) on the amounts of ROS in liver cancer PLC/PRF/5 (PLC) cells and liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) were principally investigated. The results showed that when the concentration of QDs, PEG@QDs, and BSA@QDs were 10nM and 90nM, the ROS amount in PLC cells increased by approximately 2- to 5-fold. However, when the concentrations of these nanomaterials were 10nM and 90nM, ROS levels in LCSCs were reduced by approximately 50%. This critical path potentially leads to drug resistance and recurrence of LC. This work provides an important indication for further study of LC drug resistance and recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of yoga on cancer-related fatigue and global side-effect burden in older cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprod, Lisa K; Fernandez, Isabel D; Janelsins, Michelle C; Peppone, Luke J; Atkins, James N; Giguere, Jeffrey; Block, Robert; Mustian, Karen M

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of cancer survivors are 65years of age or older. Cancer and its treatments lead to cancer-related fatigue and many other side effects, in turn, creating substantial global side-effect burden (total burden from all side effects) which, ultimately, compromises functional independence and quality of life. Various modes of exercise, such as yoga, reduce cancer-related fatigue and global side-effect burden in younger cancer survivors, but no studies have specifically examined the effects of yoga on older cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 4-week yoga intervention (Yoga for Cancer Survivors: YOCAS©®) on overall cancer-related fatigue, and due to its multidimensional nature, the subdomains of cancer-related fatigue (general, physical, emotional, and mental) and global side-effect burden in older cancer survivors. We conducted a secondary analysis on data from a multicenter phase III randomized controlled clinical trial with 2 arms (standard care and standard care plus a 4-week YOCAS©® intervention). The sample for this secondary analysis was 97 older cancer survivors (≥60years of age), between 2months and 2years post-treatment, who participated in the original trial. Participants in the YOCAS©® intervention arm reported significantly lower cancer-related fatigue, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, and global side-effect burden than participants in the standard care arm following the 4-week intervention period (peffective standardized yoga intervention for reducing cancer-related fatigue, physical fatigue, mental fatigue, and global side-effect burden among older cancer survivors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The biologic effects of cigarette smoke on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobus, Samantha L; Warren, Graham W

    2014-12-01

    Smoking is one of the largest preventable risk factors for developing cancer, and continued smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased toxicity, recurrence, risk of second primary cancer, and mortality. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains thousands of chemicals, including many known carcinogens. The carcinogenic effects of CS are well established, but relatively little work has been done to evaluate the effects of CS on cancer cells. In this review of the literature, the authors demonstrate that CS induces a more malignant tumor phenotype by increasing proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis and by activating prosurvival cellular pathways. Significant work is needed to understand the biologic effect of CS on cancer biology, including the development of model systems and the identification of critical biologic mediators of CS-induced changes in cancer cell physiology. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  15. Smoking modify the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure on oxidative damage to DNA in coke oven workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhang, Huitao; Wang, Wubin; Liu, Yanli; Fan, Yanfeng

    2017-07-01

    Coke oven emissions containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are predominant toxic constituents of particulate air pollution that have been linked to increased risk of lung cancer. Numerous epidemiological studies have suggested that oxidative DNA damage may play a pivotal role in the carcinogenic mechanism of lung cancer. Little is known about the effect of interaction between PAHs exposure and lifestyle on DNA oxidative damage. The study population is composed by coke oven workers (365) and water treatment workers (144), and their urinary levels of four PAH metabolites and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were determined. Airborne samples of exposed sites (4) and control sites (3) were collected, and eight carcinogenic PAHs were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. The median values of the sum of eight carcinogenic PAHs and BaP in exposed sites were significantly higher than control sites (P < 0.01). The study found that the urinary PAH metabolites were significantly elevated in coke oven workers (P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of high levels of urinary 8-OHdG will increase with increasing age, cigarette consumption, and levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, and P for trend were all <0.05. Smoking can significantly modify the effects of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene on high concentrations urinary 8-OHdG, during co-exposure to both light or heavy smoking and high 1-hydroxypyrene levels (OR 4.28, 95% CI 1.32-13.86 and OR 5.05, 95% CI 1.63-15.67, respectively). Our findings quantitatively demonstrate that workers exposed to coke oven fumes and smoking will cause more serious DNA oxidative damage.

  16. Effect of different gas stunning methods on Manchega suckling lamb meat packed under different modified atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bórnez, R; Linares, M B; Vergara, H

    2010-04-01

    Forty-nine Manchega breed male suckling lambs were used in this experiment. The effect of CO(2) concentration and exposure time at stunning [80% CO(2) for 90 s (G1); 90% CO(2) for 90 s (G2); 90% CO(2) for 60 s (G3); 80% CO(2) for 60 s (G4)] plus an electrically stunned control group (G5) was assessed for pH, colour (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and h(*)), water holding capacity (WHC), drip loss (DL), cooking loss (CL) and shear force (SF) in samples packed under two different types of modified atmospheres (MA: MA A: 70%O(2)+30%CO(2); MA B: 69.3%N(2)+30%CO(2)+0.7%CO) at 7, 14 and 21 d post-packaging. The lowest pH was found in G4 and in G5. The highest WHC and the lowest CL were found in G2 and G3 groups (P<0.05). Modified atmospheres did not affect on pH, WHC, CL and DL, although a significant effect (P<0.001) on colour was found at all the analysis times. Both the type of stunning and the modified atmosphere affected SF values. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of modified Pilates on variability of inter-joint coordination during walking in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sukhoon; Kim, Joo Nyeon; Lim, Hee Sung

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of an 8-week modified Pilates program on the variability of inter-joint coordination in the elderly during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty elderly participants with no recent history of orthopedic abnormalities (age, 67.9 ± 2.7 years; height, 163.7 ± 8.9 cm; weight, 67.1 ± 11.6 kg) were recruited for this study and randomly allocated to a modified Pilates exercise group or a control group. Three-dimensional motion analysis was performed on both groups to evaluate the effects of the Pilates exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the joint variability of the ankle, knee, and hip joints between the groups, both before training and after training. However, there was a significant increase in the hip-knee deviation phase value in the exercise group after the program was completed, and this increase was also significant when compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study has demonstrated that an 8-week modified Pilates exercise program can have a positive impact on the gait of elderly participants, potentially by enhancing neuromuscular adjustment, which may have positive implications for reducing their fall risk.

  18. Effect of penetration modifiers on the dermal and transdermal delivery of drugs and cosmetic active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2008-01-01

    In this study the effect of 2 penetration modifiers, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) on the skin delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC) was investigated. Ten percent DMI and DGME were separately formulated into oil-in-water emulsions containing 1.8% HQ, SA and DIOIC, respectively. Skin delivery and the flux across split-thickness human skin of the active ingredients were determined using Franz diffusion cells. An emulsion with 10% water incorporated instead of the water-soluble penetration modifiers served as a control. The study showed that neither 10% DMI nor 10% DGME significantly enhanced the skin permeation of the various lipophilic active ingredients or the uptake into the skin. It was hypothesized that the addition of the penetration modifiers to the emulsions not only enhanced the solubility of the various active ingredients in the skin but also in the formulation, resulting in a reduced thermodynamic activity and hence a weaker driving force for penetration. Therefore, the effect of DMI and DGME on the solubility of the active ingredients in the skin was counteracted by a simultaneous reduction in the thermodynamic activity in the formulation. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Effect of laser parameters on surface roughness of laser modified tool steel after thermal cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau Sheng, Annie; Ismail, Izwan; Nur Aqida, Syarifah

    2018-03-01

    This study presents the effects of laser parameters on the surface roughness of laser modified tool steel after thermal cyclic loading. Pulse mode Nd:YAG laser was used to perform the laser surface modification process on AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples were then treated with thermal cyclic loading experiments which involved alternate immersion in molten aluminium (800°C) and water (27°C) for 553 cycles. A full factorial design of experiment (DOE) was developed to perform the investigation. Factors for the DOE are the laser parameter namely overlap rate (η), pulse repetition frequency (f PRF) and peak power (Ppeak ) while the response is the surface roughness after thermal cyclic loading. Results indicate the surface roughness of the laser modified surface after thermal cyclic loading is significantly affected by laser parameter settings.

  20. Tumor blood flow modifying effects of electrochemotherapy. A potential vascular targeted mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Miklavcic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine the tumor blood flow modifying, and potential vascular targeted effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin or cisplatin. Materials and methods. Electrochemotherapy was performed by application of short intense electric pulses to the tumors after systemic administration of bleomycin or cisplatin. Evaluated were antitumor effectiveness of electrochemotherapy by tumor measurement, tumor blood flow modifying effect by Patent blue staining technique, and sensitivity of endothelial and tumor cells to the drugs and electrochemotherapy by clonogenicity assay. Results. Electrochemotherapy was effective in treatment of SA-1 tumors in A/J mice resulting in substantial tumor growth delay and also tumor cures. Tumor blood flow reduction following electrochemotherapy correlated well with its antitumor effectiveness. Virtually complete shut down of the tumor blood flow was observed already at 24 h after electrochemotherapy with bleomycin whereas only 50% reduction was observed after electrochemotherapy with cisplatin. Sensitivity of human endothelial HMEC-1 cells to electrochemotherapy suggests a vascular targeted effect for electrochemotherapy in vivo with bleomycin as well as with cisplatin. Conclusion. These results show that, in addition to direct electroporation of tumor cells, other vascular targeted mechanisms are involved in electrochemotherapy with bleomycin or cisplatin, potentially mediated by tumor blood flow reduction, and enhanced tumor cell death as a result of endothelial damage by electrochemotherapy. (author)

  1. Dark energy and modified gravity in the Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusin, Giulia; Lewandowski, Matthew; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    We develop an approach to compute observables beyond the linear regime of dark matter perturbations for general dark energy and modified gravity models. We do so by combining the Effective Field Theory of Dark Energy and Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure approaches. In particular, we parametrize the linear and nonlinear effects of dark energy on dark matter clustering in terms of the Lagrangian terms introduced in a companion paper [1], focusing on Horndeski theories and assuming the quasi-static approximation. The Euler equation for dark matter is sourced, via the Newtonian potential, by new nonlinear vertices due to modified gravity and, as in the pure dark matter case, by the effects of short-scale physics in the form of the divergence of an effective stress tensor. The effective fluid introduces a counterterm in the solution to the matter continuity and Euler equations, which allows a controlled expansion of clustering statistics on mildly nonlinear scales. We use this setup to compute the one-loop dark-matter power spectrum.

  2. The cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotid of E6 mRNA into cervical cancer cells by DOPE-modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Negin Saffarzadeh; Seyed Mehdi Kalantar; Ali Jebali; Seyed Hossein Hekmatimoghaddam; Mohammad Hassan Sheikhha; Ehsan Farashahi

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Although several chemical and physical methods for gene delivery have been introduced, their cytotoxicity, non-specific immune responses and the lack of biodegradability remain the main issues. In this study, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NPs) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanol​amine (DOPE)-modified hydroxyapatite NPs was coated with antisense oligonucleotide of E6 mRNA, and their uptakes into the cervical cancer cell line were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Calcium...

  3. Identification of a New G-Quadruplex Motif in the KRAS Promoter and Design of Pyrene-Modified G4-Decoys with Antiproliferative Activity in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, Susanna; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Filitchev, Vyacheslav Viatcheslav

    2009-01-01

    A new quadruplex motif located in the promoter of the human KRAS gene, within a nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE), has been characterized. Oligonucleotides mimicking this quadruplex are found to compete with a DNA-protein complex between NHE and a nuclear extract from pancreatic cancer cells........ When modified with (R)-1-O-[4-1-(1-pyrenylethynyl) phenylmethyl]glycerol insertions (TINA), the quadruplex oligonucleotides showed a dramatic increase of the Tm (ΔTm from 22 to 32 °C) and a strong antiproliferative effects in Panc-1 cells....

  4. Effects of a Modified German Volume Training Program on Muscular Hypertrophy and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirthalingam, Theban; Mavros, Yorgi; Wilson, Guy C; Clarke, Jillian L; Mitchell, Lachlan; Hackett, Daniel A

    2017-11-01

    Amirthalingam, T, Mavros, Y, Wilson, GC, Clarke, JL, Mitchell, L, and Hackett, DA. Effects of a modified German volume training program on muscular hypertrophy and strength. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3109-3119, 2017-German Volume Training (GVT), or the 10 sets method, has been used for decades by weightlifters to increase muscle mass. To date, no study has directly examined the training adaptations after GVT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a modified GVT intervention on muscular hypertrophy and strength. Nineteen healthy men were randomly assign to 6 weeks of 10 or 5 sets of 10 repetitions for specific compound resistance exercises included in a split routine performed 3 times per week. Total and regional lean body mass, muscle thickness, and muscle strength were measured before and after the training program. Across groups, there were significant increases in lean body mass measures, however, greater increases in trunk (p = 0.043; effect size [ES] = -0.21) and arm (p = 0.083; ES = -0.25) lean body mass favored the 5-SET group. No significant increases were found for leg lean body mass or measures of muscle thickness across groups. Significant increases were found across groups for muscular strength, with greater increases in the 5-SET group for bench press (p = 0.014; ES = -0.43) and lat pull-down (p = 0.003; ES = -0.54). It seems that the modified GVT program is no more effective than performing 5 sets per exercise for increasing muscle hypertrophy and strength. To maximize hypertrophic training effects, it is recommended that 4-6 sets per exercise be performed, as it seems gains will plateau beyond this set range and may even regress due to overtraining.

  5. Direct electric current treatment modifies mitochondrial function and lipid body content in the A549 cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holandino, Carla; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; de Oliveira, Felipe Alves Gomes; Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Siqueira, Camila Monteiro; Messeder, Douglas Jardim; de Aguiar, Fernanda Silva; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Miranda, Kildare; Galina, Antonio; Capella, Marcia Alves Marques; Morales, Marcelo Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical therapy (EChT) entails treatment of solid tumors with direct electric current (DC). This work evaluated the specific effects of anodic flow generated by DC on biochemical and metabolic features of the A549 human lung cancer cell line. Apoptosis was evaluated on the basis of caspase-3 activity and mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation. Cell morphology was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, and lipid droplets were studied through morphometric analysis and X-ray qualitative elemental microanalysis. High-resolution respirometry was used to assess mitochondrial respiratory parameters. Results indicated A549 viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a prominent drop between 18 and 24h after treatment (ppotential. Furthermore, treated cells demonstrated important ultrastructural mitochondria damage and a three-fold increase in the cytoplasmic lipid bodies' number, quantified by morphometrical analyses. Conversely, 24h after treatment, the cells presented a two-fold increase of residual oxygen consumption, accounting for 45.3% of basal oxygen consumption. These results show remarkable alterations promoted by anodic flow on human lung cancer cells which are possibly involved with the antitumoral effects of EChT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical multi-omics strategies for the effective cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Woo, Sang Myung; Myung, Jae Kyung

    2017-08-15

    Cancer is a global health issue as a multi-factorial complex disease, and early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are required for more effective cancer management. With the development of systemic analytical -omics strategies, the therapeutic approach and study of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression have moved from hypothesis-driven targeted investigations to data-driven untargeted investigations focusing on the integrated diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer in individual patients. Predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) is a promising new approach to reduce the burden of cancer and facilitate more accurate prognosis, diagnosis, as well as effective treatment. Here we review the fundamentals of, and new developments in, -omics technologies, together with the key role of a variety of practical -omics strategies in PPPM for cancer treatment and diagnosis. In this review, a comprehensive and critical overview of the systematic strategy for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) for cancer disease was described in a view of cancer prognostic prediction, diagnostics, and prevention as well as cancer therapy and drug responses. We have discussed multi-dimensional data obtained from various resources and integration of multisciplinary -omics strategies with computational method which could contribute the more effective PPPM for cancer. This review has provided the novel insights of the current applications of each and combined -omics technologies, which showed their powerful potential for the establishment of PPPM for cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO; Avaliacao do efeito radiomodificador da propolis em celulas de ovario de hamster chines (CHO-K1) e em celulas tumorais de prostata (PC3), irradiadas com CO-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-07-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 {mu}g/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400{mu}/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 G{gamma}. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the {alpha} coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 {mu}g/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data

  8. Cadmium modifies the cell cycle and apoptotic profiles of human breast cancer cells treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asara, Yolande; Marchal, Juan A; Carrasco, Esther; Boulaiz, Houria; Solinas, Giuliana; Bandiera, Pasquale; Garcia, Maria A; Farace, Cristiano; Montella, Andrea; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-08-12

    Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  9. Cadmium Modifies the Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Profiles of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with 5-Fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Madeddu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd, which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  10. Cadmium Modifies the Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Profiles of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with 5-Fluorouracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asara, Yolande; Marchal, Juan A.; Carrasco, Esther; Boulaiz, Houria; Solinas, Giuliana; Bandiera, Pasquale; Garcia, Maria A.; Farace, Cristiano; Montella, Andrea; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd. PMID:23941782

  11. Half versus full vacuum suction drainage after modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer- a prospective randomized clinical trial[ISRCTN24484328

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh JP

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suction drains are routinely used after modified radical mastectomy and are an important factor contributing to increased hospital stay as the patients are often discharged only after their removal. Amongst various factors that influence the amount of postoperative drainage, the negative suction pressure applied to the drain has been reported to be of great significance. While a high negative suction pressure is expected to drain the collection and reduce the dead space promptly, it may also prevent the leaking lymphatics from closing and lead to increased drainage from the wound. Against this background a prospective randomized clinical study was conducted to compare the amount and duration of drainage between a half negative suction and full vacuum suction drainage in patients following modified radical mastectomy. The associated postoperative morbidity was also compared between the two groups. Methods 85 FNAC (fine needle aspiration cytology proven cases of locally advanced breast cancer were randomized. (Using randomly ordered sealed envelops, which were opened immediately before the closure of the wound in to 50 patients with full vacuum suction (pressure = 700 g/m2 and 35 cases in to half vacuum suction drainage (pressure = 350 g/m2 groups. The two groups were comparable in respect of age, weight, and technique of operation and extent of axillary dissection. Surgery was performed by the same surgical team comprising of five surgeons (two senior and three resident surgeons using a standardized technique with electrocautery. External compression dressing was provided over the axilla for first 48 hrs and following that patients were encouraged to do active and passive shoulder exercises. The outcomes measured were postoperative morbidity and the length of hospital stay. Statistical methods used: Descriptive studies were performed with SPSS version 10 and group characteristics were compared using student t-test. Results

  12. Effects of resveratrol, curcumin, berberine and other nutraceuticals on aging, cancer development, cancer stem cells and microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubrey, James A; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Steelman, Linda S; Abrams, Steve L; Yang, Li V; Murata, Ramiro M; Rosalen, Pedro L; Scalisi, Aurora; Neri, Luca M; Cocco, Lucio; Ratti, Stefano; Martelli, Alberto M; Laidler, Piotr; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Rakus, Dariusz; Gizak, Agnieszka; Lombardi, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Candido, Saverio; Libra, Massimo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre

    2017-06-12

    Natural products or nutraceuticals have been shown to elicit anti-aging, anti-cancer and other health-enhancing effects. A key target of the effects of natural products may be the regulation of microRNA (miR) expression which results in cell death or prevents aging, diabetes, cardiovascular and other diseases. This review will focus on a few natural products, especially on resveratrol (RES), curcumin (CUR) and berberine (BBR). RES is obtained from the skins of grapes and other fruits and berries. RES may extend human lifespan by activating the sirtuins and SIRT1 molecules. CUR is isolated from the root of turmeric ( Curcuma longa ). CUR is currently used in the treatment of many disorders, especially in those involving an inflammatory process. CUR and modified derivatives have been shown to have potent anti-cancer effects, especially on cancer stem cells (CSC). BBR is also isolated from various plants ( e.g., Coptis chinensis ) and has been used for centuries in traditional medicine to treat diseases such as adult- onset diabetes. Understanding the benefits of these and other nutraceuticals may result in approaches to improve human health.

  13. Regorafenib plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: A phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argilés, Guillem; Saunders, Mark P; Rivera, Fernando; Sobrero, Alberto; Benson, Al; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Cascinu, Stefano; Van Cutsem, Eric; Macpherson, Iain R; Strumberg, Dirk; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Zalcberg, John; Wagner, Andrea; Luigi Garosi, Vittorio; Grunert, Julia; Tabernero, Josep; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-05-01

    The oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib improves overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) for which all standard treatments have failed. This study investigated regorafenib plus modified FOLFOX (mFOLFOX6) as first-line treatment of metastatic CRC. In this single-arm, open-label, multicentre, phase II study, patients received mFOLFOX6 on days 1 and 15, and regorafenib 160 mg orally once daily on days 4-10 and 18-24 of each 28-day cycle. The primary end-point was centrally assessed objective response rate (ORR). Secondary end-points included disease control rate (DCR), OS, progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. Median overall treatment duration with any study drug was 9.9 months (range 0.6-19.6); median treatment duration with regorafenib was 7.7 months (range 0.1-19.5); six patients remained on regorafenib for more than 1 year. Fifty-three patients received at least one dose of regorafenib. ORR was 43.9% (all partial responses); DCR was 85.4%; median OS was not reached; median PFS was 8.5months. Treatment-emergent adverse events were experienced by all patients but were manageable with dose modifications. Regorafenib+mFOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic CRC did not improve ORR over historical controls. Regorafenib plus mFOLFOX6 did not appear to be associated with a markedly worse tolerability profile versus mFOLFOX6 alone. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Synoptic weather types and aeroallergens modify the effect of air pollution on hospitalisations for asthma hospitalisations in Canadian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebbern, Christopher; Cakmak, Sabit

    2015-01-01

    Pollution levels and the effect of air pollution on human health can be modified by synoptic weather type and aeroallergens. We investigated the effect modification of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , PM 10 , PM 2.5 and asthma hospitalisation rates in seven synoptic weather types. We developed single air pollutant models, adjusted for the effect of aeroallergens and stratified by synoptic weather type, and pooled relative risk estimates for asthma hospitalisation in ten Canadian cities. Aeroallergens significantly modified the relative risk in 19 pollutant-weather type combinations, reducing the size and variance for each single pollutant model. However, aeroallergens did not significantly modify relative risk for any pollutant in the DT or MT weather types, or for PM 10 in any weather type. Thus, there is a modifying effect of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , PM 2.5 and asthma hospitalisations that differs under specific synoptic weather types. - Highlights: • We model effect modification of aeroallergens on air pollutant–asthma association. • The air pollutant association was modelled in seven synoptic weather types. • Aeroallergens modify CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , and PM 2.5 effect on asthma hospitalisations. • Synoptic weather types modify the air pollutant and asthma association. - We identify a modifying effect of aeroallergens on the relationship between air pollutants and hospitalisation rates for asthma, that differs under specific synoptic weather types

  15. Effect of modified ITO substrate on electrochromic properties of polyaniline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Silva, U.; Nicho, M.E.; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, UAEMor, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Hu, Hailin [Departamento de Materiales Solares, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Av. Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, 62580, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-09-22

    In this work, we report the morphological and electrochromic properties of electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) thin films on bare and modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates. In the last case, the surface of ITO glass was covered by a self-assembled monolayer of N-phenyl-{gamma}-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (PAPTS). Atomic force microscopy images and perfilometry show that smoother and thinner PANI films were grown on PAPTS-modified ITO substrates. PANI-based electrochromic devices (ECDs) were assembled by using a viscous polymeric electrolyte (PE) of LiClO{sub 4} and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) co-dissolved in a mixture of propylene and ethylene carbonate. The architectural design of the devices was glass/ITO/PANI/PE/ITO/glass. A dual ECD was also prepared by collocating a poly(3-methylthiophene) (P3MT) thin film as a complementary electrochromic element. The effect of the PAPTS-modified ITO substrate is reflected in a higher optical transmittance at bleach state and a little less color change at 550 nm of PANI-based ECDs. (author)

  16. Effects of modified cellulose nanocrystals on the barrier and migration properties of PLA nano-biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, E; Peltzer, M; Armentano, I; Torre, L; Jiménez, A; Kenny, J M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the impact of the addition of cellulose nanocrystals on the barrier properties and on the migration behaviour of poly(lactic acid), PLA, based nano-biocomposites prepared by the solvent casting method. Their microstructure, crystallinity, barrier and overall migration properties were investigated. Pristine (CNC) and surfactant-modified cellulose nanocrystals (s-CNC) were used, and the effect of the cellulose modification and content in the nano-biocomposites was investigated. The presence of surfactant on the nanocrystal surface favours the dispersion of CNC in the PLA matrix. Electron microscopy analysis shows the good dispersion of s-CNC in the nanoscale with well-defined single crystals indicating that the surfactant allowed a better interaction between the cellulose structures and the PLA matrix. Reductions of 34% in water permeability were obtained for the cast films containing 1 wt.% of s-CNC while good oxygen barrier properties were detected for nano-biocomposites with both 1 wt.% and 5 wt.% of modified and un-modified cellulose nanocrystals, underlining the improvement provided by cellulose on the PLA films. Moreover, the migration level of the studied nano-biocomposites was below the overall migration limits required by the current normative for food packaging materials in both non-polar and polar simulants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Ultraviolet Aging on Rheology and Chemistry of LDH-Modified Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs are an ultravioletlight (UV-resistant material. In this study, two types of LDHs (Mg-Al-LDHs and Zn-Al-LDHs were applied to modify bitumen by melt-blending. The effect of ultraviolet aging on the rheology and chemistry of LDH-modified bitumen was studied by means of dynamic shear rheometer (DSR, thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection (TLC-FID, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry to reveal the mechanisms of action for LDHs and bitumen. The results showed that within the UV spectra (220–400 nm, the reflectance of Zn-Al-LDHs was larger than that of Mg-Al-LDHs. These two LDHs have different influences on the performance of bitumen. Mg-Al-LDHs had a more obvious influence on the physical and dynamic rheological properties of bitumen than Zn-Al-LDHs. Zn-Al-LDHs improved the UV-aging resistance of bitumen more. The reason can be that the reflectance of the Zn-Al-LDHs to the UV light is larger than that of the Mg-Al-LDHs. The Zn-Al-LDH-modified bitumen had more potential to improve the UV-aging resistance during the service life of asphalt pavement.

  18. Effects of modified β-cyclodextrin on thermal stability and conformation of lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Tadashi; Satoh, Megumi; Tateishi, Takahiro; Nojiri, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Kimura, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of cyclodextrin on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified. ► The CD influences the hydrophobic interaction of lysozyme by the inclusion. ► The CD relatively destabilized the folded state by stabilizing the unfolded state. ► The destabilization depends on the concentration and the substituent of CD. ► The conformation of lysozyme was more spread at unfolded state by inclusion of CD. - Abstract: Effects of cyclic oligosaccharide cyclodextrin (CD) on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified thermodynamically and rheologically by DSC, viscosity, and circular dichroism measurements. The modified β-CD relatively destabilized the folded state of lysozyme by stabilizing the unfolded state due to inclusion of hydrophobic part into the hydrophobic interior of CD. The order of higher destabilization effect was acetyl-β-CD > methyl-β-CD > hydroxypropyl-β-CD. Apparent number of bound CD to unfolded state for methyl-, hydroxypropyl-, and acetyl-β-CD is 6.7 ± 0.7, 4.2 ± 1.1, and 18.6 ± 4.3 and the binding constant is 5.5 ± 0.8, 6.7 ± 2.4, and 4.4 ± 1.2 L mol −1 , respectively. The viscosity for unfolded state was increased with an increase in the each modified β-CD concentration, suggesting that the inclusion of CD on a part of hydrophobic core at unfolded state leads to break the hydrophobic core, then lysozyme would be more spread structure. The substituent of CD can accelerate instability by directly breaking hydrogen bond and/or can restrain instability by increase in hydrophobic interaction. The fact that the each modified CDs has different destabilization effect shows a possibility to control the stability of protein by the substitution of CD.

  19. Microbiome and metabolome modifying effects of several cardiovascular disease interventions in apo-E-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Paul M; London, Lis E E; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Murphy, Kiera; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Shanahan, Fergus; Ross, R Paul; Wishart, David S; Caplice, Noel M; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-03-13

    There is strong evidence indicating that gut microbiota have the potential to modify, or be modified by the drugs and nutritional interventions that we rely upon. This study aims to characterize the compositional and functional effects of several nutritional, neutraceutical, and pharmaceutical cardiovascular disease interventions on the gut microbiome, through metagenomic and metabolomic approaches. Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice were fed for 24 weeks either high-fat/cholesterol diet alone (control, HFC) or high-fat/cholesterol in conjunction with one of three dietary interventions, as follows: plant sterol ester (PSE), oat β-glucan (OBG) and bile salt hydrolase-active Lactobacillus reuteri APC 2587 (BSH), or the drug atorvastatin (STAT). The gut microbiome composition was then investigated, in addition to the host fecal and serum metabolome. We observed major shifts in the composition of the gut microbiome of PSE mice, while OBG and BSH mice displayed more modest fluctuations, and STAT showed relatively few alterations. Interestingly, these compositional effects imparted by PSE were coupled with an increase in acetate and reduction in isovalerate (p metabolome, including alterations in several acylcarnitines previously associated with a state of metabolic dysfunction (p < 0.05). We observed functional alterations in microbial and host-derived metabolites, which may have important implications for systemic metabolic health, suggesting that cardiovascular disease interventions may have a significant impact on the microbiome composition and functionality. This study indicates that the gut microbiome-modifying effects of novel therapeutics should be considered, in addition to the direct host effects.

  20. Immediate effects of modified landing pattern on a probabilistic tibial stress fracture model in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T L; An, W W; Chan, Z Y S; Au, I P H; Zhang, Z H; Cheung, R T H

    2016-03-01

    Tibial stress fracture is a common injury in runners. This condition has been associated with increased impact loading. Since vertical loading rates are related to the landing pattern, many heelstrike runners attempt to modify their footfalls for a lower risk of tibial stress fracture. Such effect of modified landing pattern remains unknown. This study examined the immediate effects of landing pattern modification on the probability of tibial stress fracture. Fourteen experienced heelstrike runners ran on an instrumented treadmill and they were given augmented feedback for landing pattern switch. We measured their running kinematics and kinetics during different landing patterns. Ankle joint contact force and peak tibial strains were estimated using computational models. We used an established mathematical model to determine the effect of landing pattern on stress fracture probability. Heelstrike runners experienced greater impact loading immediately after landing pattern switch (Ptibial strains and the risk of tibial stress fracture in runners with different landing patterns (P>0.986). Immediate transitioning of the landing pattern in heelstrike runners may not offer timely protection against tibial stress fracture, despite a reduction of impact loading. Long-term effects of landing pattern switch remains unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A method for Effect Modifier Assessment in ergonomic intervention research – The EMA method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Winkel, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ergonomic intervention research includes studies in which researchers arrange (or follow) changes in working conditions to determine the effects in risk factors and/or health. Often this research takes place at workplaces and not in a controlled environment of a laboratory. The effe......Introduction: Ergonomic intervention research includes studies in which researchers arrange (or follow) changes in working conditions to determine the effects in risk factors and/or health. Often this research takes place at workplaces and not in a controlled environment of a laboratory...... of the literature revealed lack of or poor consideration of effect modifiers in ergonomic intervention research. We present a method that has been developed over the course of several years parallel to intervention studies in healthcare. Material and methods: The EMA method is a type of group interview including 3...... sources. Conclusion: The EMA method seems to offer a feasible procedure to obtain significant knowledge on potential effect modifiers in ergonomic intervention research. However, further development and validation is suggested....

  2. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Polymer Modified White Sand Cement Mortar Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the substitution effect of standard sand of conventional cement mortar made from ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and standard sand (SS) OPC/SS 1:3; by different ratios of white sand (WS) powder to prepare three types of white sand cement mortar designated as 1OPC:2SS:1WS, 1OPC:1SS:2WS and 1OPC:0SS:3WS. The prepared samples were first cured under tap water for different time intervals namely 3, 7, 28 and 90 days. The effect of addition of 10% styrene-acrylic ester (SAE) as well as the effect of different doses of gamma rays (10, 20, 30 and 50 kGy) on the physicomechanical properties of polymer modified white sand cement mortar specimens also discussed. Compression strength test, total porosity and water absorption percentages were measured according to standard specifications. The obtained data indicated that, the cement mortar samples containing different ratios of white sand have lower values of compressive strength as compared to the conventional cement mortar while, the percentages of total porosity and water absorption increased. On the other hand, the polymer modified mortar specimens showed a noticeably enhancement in the physico-mechanical properties under the effect of gamma-radiation than those of untreated samples. These results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) studies

  3. Modified vs. standard D2 lymphadenectomy in distal subtotal gastrectomy for locally advanced gastric cancer patients under 70 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Dong; Zong, Liang; Ning, Fei-Long; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prognosis and survival of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer who underwent distal subtotal gastrectomy with modified D2 (D1+) and D2 lymphadenectomy, under 70 years of age. The five-year overall survival rates of 390 patients were compared between those receiving D1+ and D2 lymphadenectomy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify factors that correlated with prognosis and lymph node metastasis. Tumor size (P=0.039), pT stage (P=0.011), pN stage (PD2 lymphadenectomy removes sufficient lymph nodes to improve staging accuracy and survival. Therefore, D2 lymphanectomy is recommended in distal subtotal gastrectomy for locally advanced gastric cancer, especially for cancers of larger size and higher pT stage.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Modified Advanced Lung Cancer Inflammation Index (ALI in Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer_ Comparison with Original ALI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Young Kim

    Full Text Available Advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI, body mass index [BMI] x serum albumin/neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio [NLR] has been shown to predict overall survival (OS in small cell lung cancer (SCLC. CT enables skeletal muscle to be quantified, whereas BMI cannot accurately reflect body composition. The purpose was to evaluate prognostic value of modified ALI (mALI using CT-determined L3 muscle index (L3MI, muscle area at L3/height2 beyond original ALI.L3MIs were calculated using the CT images of 186 consecutive patients with SCLC taken at diagnosis, and mALI was defined as L3MI x serum albumin/NLR. Using chi-squared test determined maximum cut-offs for low ALI and low mALI, the prognostic values of low ALI and low mALI were tested using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Finally, deviance statistics was used to test whether the goodness of fit of the prognostic model is improved by adding mALI as an extra variable.Patients with low ALI (cut-off, 31.1, n = 94 had shorter OS than patients with high ALI (median, 6.8 months vs. 15.8 months; p < 0.001, and patients with low mALI (cut-off 67.7, n = 94 had shorter OS than patients with high mALI (median, 6.8 months vs. 16.5 months; p < 0.001. There was no significant difference in estimates of median survival time between low ALI and low mALI (z = 0.000, p = 1.000 and between high ALI and high mALI (z = 0.330, p = 0.740. Multivariable analysis showed that low ALI was an independent prognostic factor for shorter OS (HR, 1.67, p = 0.004, along with advanced age (HR, 1.49, p = 0.045, extensive disease (HR, 2.27, p < 0.001, supportive care only (HR, 7.86, p < 0.001, and elevated LDH (HR, 1.45, p = 0.037. Furthermore, goodness of fit of this prognostic model was not significantly increased by adding mALI as an extra variable (LR difference = 2.220, p = 0.136.The present study confirms mALI using CT-determined L3MI has no additional prognostic value beyond original ALI using BMI. ALI

  5. Effects of modified Clay on the morphology and thermal stability of PMMA/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chuang, Yi-Chen; Chou, Po-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The potential to improve the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites prepared with clay containing an organic modifier was investigated. Pristine sodium montmorillonite clay was modified using cocoamphodipropionate, which absorbs UVB in the 280–320 nm range, via ion exchange to enhance the compatibility between the clay platelets and the methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Three types of clay with various cation-exchange capacities (CEC) were used as inorganic layered materials in these organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites: CL42, CL120, and CL88 with CEC values of 116, 168, and 200 meq/100 g of clay, respectively. We characterized the effects of the organoclay dispersion on UV resistance, effectiveness as an O 2 gas barrier, thermal stability, and mechanical properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites. Gas permeability analysis demonstrated the excellent gas barrier properties of the nanocomposites, consistent with the intercalated or exfoliated morphologies observed. The optical properties were assessed using UV–Visible spectroscopy, which revealed that these materials have good optical clarity, UV resistance, and scratch resistance. The effect of the dispersion capability of organoclay on the thermal properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry; these analyses revealed excellent thermal stability of some of the modified clay nanocomposites. - Highlights: ► We control the dispersion morphology by protonation of K2 into the clay. ► The CL120 and CL88, with the higher CEC, are more random intercalated by K2. ► We report these materials have good optical clarity, and UV resistance

  6. Effects of Cancer Treatment on Fertility (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Effects of Cancer Treatment on Fertility KidsHealth / For Parents / Effects of Cancer Treatment on ...

  7. Environmental novelty and illumination modify ethanol-induced open-field behavioral effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushiro, Daniela F; Benetti, Liliane F; Josino, Fabiana S; Oliveira, Gabriela P; Fernandes, Maiara deM; Saito, Luis P; Uehara, Regina A; Wuo-Silva, Raphael; Oliveira, Camila S; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Both spontaneous and drug-induced animal behaviors can be modified by exposure to novel stimuli or different levels of environmental illumination. However, research into how these factors specifically impact ethanol (ETH)-induced behavioral effects is currently lacking. We aimed to investigate the effects of these two factors, considered separately or in conjunction, on ETH-induced acute hyperlocomotor effect and its sensitization in adult male Swiss mice. Mice were placed in a novel or familiar open-field under normal light (200 lx) or low light (9 lx) immediately after receiving an ip injection of either 1.8 g/kg ETH or saline (SAL). After 7 days, all animals received an ip challenge injection of 1.8 g/kg ETH, and were placed in the open-field under the same light conditions described above. Novelty increased central locomotion and decreased grooming, while low light increased grooming. Acute ETH administration increased both total and peripheral locomotion and these effects were potentiated by low light. Both low light and novelty were able to facilitate ETH-induced locomotor sensitization, which was detected by the central locomotion parameter. However, there was no synergism between the effects of these two modulating factors on ETH-induced behavioral sensitization. We conclude that both the acute behavioral effects of ETH and behavioral sensitization induced by previous administration of this drug can be critically modified by environmental factors. In addition, our study stresses the importance of using different behavioral parameters to evaluate the interaction between environmental factors and ETH effects. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  9. A Modified Spontaneously Closed Defunctioning Tube Ileostomy After Anterior Resection of the Rectum for Rectal Cancer with a Low Colorectal Anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qin-Song; Hua, Han-Ju; Cheng, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei-Bing; Chen, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jia-He; Lin, Jian-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique of modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection of the rectum for rectal cancer with a low colorectal anastomosis. Patients with rectal cancer who underwent anterior resection of rectum with a low colorectal anastomosis and chose a modified defunctioning tube ileostomy between March 2012 and August 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data on the success of the operation procedures, post-operative hospital stay, and post-operative tube ileostomy-related complications were analyzed. One hundred fifty-two patients (87 males and 65 females; 57.1 ± 17.4 years) undergoing the modified defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection for rectal cancer were included. The post-operative hospital stay was 11.9 ± 3.2 days. The tube was removed on days 22.6 ± 4.1 after operation and the ileostomy wound closed spontaneously within 13.1 ± 1.9 days. Twenty-five patients felt tube-associated pain or discomfort, which was relieved after a period of adaptation and appropriate tube adjustment. Nine patients suffered from tube blockage and were treated successfully with saline irrigation. Two patients had intestinal obstruction, which was resolved with conservative treatment. Three patients developed leakage of the distal anastomosis: two were successfully treated with conservative measures and the other completely recovered after reoperation. The modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy appears efficacious and safe. This technique may be used to protect the distal anastomosis and simultaneously decrease the ileostomy complications, and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with stoma takedown.

  10. The effectiveness of parental communication in modifying the relation between food advertising and children's consumption behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijzen, Moniek

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of various types of parental communication in modifying children's responses to television food advertising. In a combined diary-survey study among 234 parents of 4- to 12-year-old children, I investigated how different styles of advertising mediation (active vs. restrictive) and consumer communication (concept-oriented vs. socio-oriented) moderated the relation between children's advertising exposure and their consumption of advertised energy-dense food products. Interaction analysis in regression showed that active advertising mediation (i.e. explaining the purpose and nature of advertising), and socio-oriented consumer communication (i.e. emphasizing control and restrictions) significantly reduced the impact of advertising on children's food consumption. Parental restrictions of advertising exposure were only effective among younger children (<8). These results suggest that critical discussion about advertising and rule making about consumption are most effective in countering the impact of food advertising.

  11. Early Life and Environmental Risk Factors Modify the Effect of Acculturation on Hispanic Children's Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Payan, Paola; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Acculturation tends to erode Hispanic immigrants' initial health advantage. Using a more nuanced conceptualization of acculturation than previous studies, we explore the associations between acculturation and Hispanic children's asthma. Data came from an observational mail survey of caretakers of Hispanic schoolchildren in El Paso, Texas (N = 1,513). Results from generalized linear models (GzLMs) demonstrate that acculturation was a significant positive predictor of asthma. The addition of interaction terms revealed that prenatal smoking, low birth weight, breastfeeding, and pest exposure significantly modified the effect of acculturation on asthma. Results suggest that although higher levels of acculturation were detrimental overall, the effects were not equally damaging for all Hispanic children. Findings foster an understanding of how the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's asthma is intensified or attenuated by distinct individual-level risk factors.

  12. Flexoelectric Effect on Vibration of Piezoelectric Microbeams Based on a Modified Couple Stress Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjia Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel electric Gibbs function was proposed for the piezoelectric microbeams (PMBs by employing a modified couple stress theory. Based on the new Gibbs function and the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the governing equations which incorporate the effects of couple stress, flexoelectricity, and piezoelectricity were derived for the mechanics of PMBs. The analysis of the effective bending rigidity shows the effects of size and flexoelectricity can greaten the stiffness of PMBs so that the natural frequency increases significantly compared with the Euler-Bernoulli beam, and then the mechanical and electrical properties of PMBs are enhanced compared to the classical beam. This study can guide the design of microscale piezoelectric/flexoelectric structures which may find potential applications in the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS.

  13. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and a modified atmospheric packaging on the physicochemical characteristics of sausage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, H-.J.; Kim, J.-H.; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, J.-W.; Yook, H.-S.; Kim, H.-Y.; Byun, M.-W.

    2004-01-01

    This study is to investigate the combined effects of irradiation and a modified atmospheric packaging (MAP) on the color, nitrosoheme pigments (NO-Mb), residual nitrite and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in sausage during storage. Sausage with air, vacuum, CO 2 , N 2 , or CO 2 /N 2 packaging was irradiated at 5 kGy. Irradiation reduced the red color of sausage, and a vacuum or MAP was effective in minimizing the loss of redness. The reduction of NO-Mb was observed by irradiation, while the MAP was more effective in maintaining the NO-Mb than the aerobic ones. Residual nitrite was reduced by irradiation, and the contents were lower under vacuum or MAP than aerobic ones. NDMA was significantly reduced by irradiation

  14. Combined effects of gamma irradiation and a modified atmospheric packaging on the physicochemical characteristics of sausage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, H- J; Kim, J -H; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, J -W; Yook, H -S; Kim, H -Y; Byun, M -W

    2004-10-01

    This study is to investigate the combined effects of irradiation and a modified atmospheric packaging (MAP) on the color, nitrosoheme pigments (NO-Mb), residual nitrite and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in sausage during storage. Sausage with air, vacuum, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, or CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} packaging was irradiated at 5 kGy. Irradiation reduced the red color of sausage, and a vacuum or MAP was effective in minimizing the loss of redness. The reduction of NO-Mb was observed by irradiation, while the MAP was more effective in maintaining the NO-Mb than the aerobic ones. Residual nitrite was reduced by irradiation, and the contents were lower under vacuum or MAP than aerobic ones. NDMA was significantly reduced by irradiation.

  15. Effects of various surfactants on the dispersion stability and electrical conductivity of surface modified graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, Md. Elias [WCU Program, Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kuila, Tapas [Surface Engineering and Tribology, CSIR – Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 721 302 (India); Nayak, Ganesh Chandra [Department of Applied Chemistry, ISM Dhanbad, Dhanbad 826 004, Jharkhand (India); Kim, Nam Hoon [Department of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Bon-Cheol [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Dunsan-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 864-9 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Hee, E-mail: jhl@chonbuk.ac.kr [WCU Program, Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Water dispersible graphene has been prepared using ionic and non-ionic surfactants. ► XPS and FTIR spectra analysis confirm surface modification and reduction of GO. ► The highest water dispersibility is observed in the graphene modified with of SDBS. ► The best properties of modified graphene is achieved with GO/surfactant ratio of two. -- Abstract: Ionic and non-ionic surfactant functionalized, water dispersible graphene were prepared to investigate the effects on the dispersion stability and electrical conductivity of graphene. In this study, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), sodium dodecyl sulfate and 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl) phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) were used as ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The effects of surfactant concentrations on the dispersibility and electrical conductivity of the surface modified graphene were investigated. The dispersion stability of SDBS functionalized graphene (SDBS-G) was found to be best in water at 1.5 mg ml{sup −1}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicate that the presence of surfactants does not prevent the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). These measurements also demonstrated that the surfactants were present on the surface of graphene, resulting in the formation of functionalized graphene. The thickness of different functionalized graphene was measured by Atomic force microscopy and varied significantly with different surfactants. The thermal properties of the functionalized graphene were also found to be dependent on the nature of the surfactants. The electrical conductivity of SDBS-G (108 S m{sup −1}) was comparatively higher than SDS and Triton X-100 functionalized graphene.

  16. Inhibition effect of B7-H1 gene-modified regulatory dendritic cells on thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Xin Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To construct adenovirus vector expressing mice B7-H1 gene, transfect dendritic cells(DCs, and to study the therapeutic effect of modified DC on thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy(TAOin mice.METHODS: We designed and constructed B7-H1 gene adenovirus expression vector, and transfected DCs from mouse bone marrow, tested the phenotype and function of modified DCs, identificated its negative regulation to immune responses. The modified DCs were infected the sicked mice. And then the immunotherapeutic effect of modified DCs to TAO were tested. RESULTS: B7-H1 gene adenovirus vector was constructed and transfected DCs from bone marrow. The titer of the recombinant adenovirus was 1.8×109PFU/mL. B7-H1 gene modified DCs characteristics of regulatory DCs, could inhibit positive immune responses. The inhibition proceeding of TAO into mice infected modified DCs, was obviously prior to the control mice. The gene modified DCs, maybe become the new immunotherapy biological agent to thy TAO.CONCLUSION: We constructed the expression of mouse B7-H1 gene adenovirus expressed vector successfully, transfected DCs,by vector have properties of regulatory DCs, inhibiting positive immune response and the occurrence and development of thyroid eye disease. Gene modified DCs, reveal potent to the treatment of thyroid eye disease.

  17. Co-delivery of siRNA and hypericin into cancer cells by hyaluronic acid modified PLGA-PEI nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Buhai; Shen, Yan; Ouahab, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors cause more death because of the resistance of the hypoxic cancer cell toward radiotherapy. Targeting for hypoxic cancer area and gene silencing to overcome the hypoxia are two kinds of important therapeutic strategies for treating tumors. In order to explore the combined effects of gene therapy and hypericin (Hy) on tumor cells, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) was transfected into the hypoxic human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (CNE2) cells using Hy-encapsulated nanocomplexes (Hy-HPP NPs) as a carrier which would achieve dual targeting to the tumor necrosis area. NPs were prepared by emulsion-diffusion-evaporation method. Formulations were evaluated by conducting in vitro physicochemical studies, electrophoresis, in vivo study, and biochemical studies. Hy-loaded nanoparticles with a mean size of around 160 nm was able to enhance the accumulation in the tumors by enhanced permeability and retention effect. The electrophoresis confirmed the good stability of siRNA/Hy-HPP NPs in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4), competitive heparin, and RNase. The results of transfection showed that the uptake of siRNA was significantly increased up to 50% in CNE2 cells. The level of the HIF-1α with Hy-encapsulated nanocomplexes was significantly reduced to 30% in the transfected CNE2 cells. In vivo studies, the carrier exhibited higher intensity at the tumor tissue cells and higher affinity toward the necrotic tumor tissue. Results demonstrated that Hy-HPP NPs could significantly enhance the tranfection efficiency of siRNA, suggesting Hy-encapsulated nanoparticle as an efficient gene carrier. The co-delivery of HIF-1α siRNA (siHIF-1α) and Hy could efficiently decrease the level of HIF-1α and increase the affinity toward necrotic tissues. Hence, this is a promising strategy for further application in radiotherapy.

  18. Two Opposing Effects (Yin and Yang) Determine Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujun; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Xu, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we introduce a new vision of cancer describing opposing effects that control progression. Cancer is a paradigm of opposing of "Yin" and "Yang," with Yin being the effect to promote cancer and Yang that to maintain the normal state. This Yin Yang hypothesis has been used to select Yin and Yang genes to develop multigene signatures for determining prognosis in lung and breast cancer. Most of the Yin genes are involved in cell survival, growth, and proliferation, whereas most Yang genes are involved in cell apoptosis. Furthermore, Yin and Yang pathways have been identified in breast cancer and compounds that can inhibit the Yin pathways or activate the Yang pathways have been examined, suggesting a new promising targeting therapy for cancer. We are building a Yin Yang model to represent the dynamic change of Yin and Yang genes and pathways.

  19. Effects of hydrogen peroxide, modified atmosphere and their combination on quality of minimally processed cluster beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghmare, Roji B; Annapure, Uday S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on quality of fresh-cut cluster beans. Fresh-cut cluster beans were dipped in a solution of 2% H 2 O 2 for 2 min, packed in an atmosphere of (5% O 2 , 10% CO 2 , 85% N 2 ) and stored in polypropylene bags at 5 °C for 35 days. Passive MAP was created by consuming O 2 and producing CO 2 by fresh-cut cluster beans. The combined effect of H 2 O 2 and MAP on physico-chemical analysis (Headspace gas, weight loss, chlorophyll, hardness and color), microbial quality (mesophilic aerobics and yeasts and molds) and sensory analysis were studied. Chemical treatment and MAP both are equally effective in extending the shelf life at 5 °C for 28 days. Hence, MAP can be an alternative for chemical treatment to achieve a shelf life of 28 days for fresh-cut cluster beans. Control samples, without chemical treatment and modified atmosphere, stored at 5 °C were spoiled after 14 days. Chemical treatment followed by MAP underwent minimum changes in weight, chlorophyll, hardness and color of fresh-cut cluster beans. Combination treatment gives a storage life of 35 days.

  20. Cost-effective disposable thiourea film modified copper electrode for capacitive immunosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbut, Warakorn; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Limsakul, Chusak

    2010-01-01

    Cost-effective disposable electrodes were fabricated from copper clad laminate, usually used for printed circuit board (PCB) in electronic industries, by using dry film photoresist. Electro-oxidation (anodisation) was employed to obtain a good formation of thiourea film on the electrode surface. The affinity binding pair of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) was used as a model system. Anti-CEA was immobilized on thiourea film via covalent coupling. This modified electrode was incorporated with a capacitive system for CEA analysis. This capacitive immunosensor provided a linear range between 0.01 and 10 ng ml -1 with a detection limit of 10 pg ml -1 . When applied to analyze CEA in serum samples, the results agreed well with the enzyme linked fluorescent assay (ELFA) technique (P > 0.05). The proposed strategy for the preparation of disposable modified copper electrode is very cost effective and simple. Moreover, it provides good reproducibility. This technique can easily be applied to immobilize other biological sensing elements for biosensors development.

  1. A Cost-Effective Tracking Algorithm for Hypersonic Glide Vehicle Maneuver Based on Modified Aerodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to defend the hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV, a cost-effective single-model tracking algorithm using Cubature Kalman filter (CKF is proposed in this paper based on modified aerodynamic model (MAM as process equation and radar measurement model as measurement equation. In the existing aerodynamic model, the two control variables attack angle and bank angle cannot be measured by the existing radar equipment and their control laws cannot be known by defenders. To establish the process equation, the MAM for HGV tracking is proposed by using additive white noise to model the rates of change of the two control variables. For the ease of comparison several multiple model algorithms based on CKF are presented, including interacting multiple model (IMM algorithm, adaptive grid interacting multiple model (AGIMM algorithm and hybrid grid multiple model (HGMM algorithm. The performances of these algorithms are compared and analyzed according to the simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the proposed tracking algorithm based on modified aerodynamic model has the best tracking performance with the best accuracy and least computational cost among all tracking algorithms in this paper. The proposed algorithm is cost-effective for HGV tracking.

  2. Effectiveness of a Community-Based Health Education Intervention in Cervical Cancer Prevention in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chania

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women’s beliefs are one of the main reasons for not undergoing Pap-test for cervical cancer prevention. Health education programs could help change these beliefs and motivate women to adopt a preventive health behavior.Objectives: This study aims to assess the modification in women’s beliefs and behavior about cervical cancer prevention after the implementation of a health education intervention.Methodology: A health education intervention for cervical cancer prevention was implemented to 300 women in two prefectures of southern Greece. The experimental group received a 120-minute health education intervention, based on the Health Beliefs Model (HBM including a lecture, discussion and leaflets. The hypotheses were a will this brief intervention change women’s beliefs (perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer, benefits and barriers ofundergoing the Pap-test? b will this change in beliefs sustain in six months follow-up period? and c will women undergo pap-test in six months period? The women filled in an anonymous questionnaire, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM, before, immediately after and six months after the program.Results: The health education intervention significantly modified women’s beliefs and behaviors towards pap-test. The greater changes in women’s beliefs were observed in their sense of susceptibility towards the disease and the benefits of prevention which were sustained or improved after six months. Perceived barriers to undergo the Paptest, pain, embarrassment, and worry for the results decreased immediately after the program but started relapsingin the six month follow up period. Moreover, 88.1% of the women answered that they had underwent a Pap-test during the following six months.Conclusions: This health education intervention modified women’s beliefs and behavior about cervical cancer prevention. Short, low cost, health education interventions for breast cancer prevention to women can be

  3. [Effect of modified Badenoch operation on the treatment of posterior urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping-xian; Zhang, Gen-pu; Huang, Chi-bing; Fan, Ming-qi; Feng, Jia-yu; Xiao, Ya

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of modified pull-through operation (Badenoch operation) on the treatment of posterior urethral stricture. From September 2001 to December 2010 traditional pull-through operation was Modified for two times in our center. A total of 129 patients with posttraumatic posterior urethral stricture resulting from pelvic fracture injury underwent the modified urethral pull-through operation. Stricture length was 1.5 to 5.3 cm (mean 2.9 cm). Of the patients 43 had undergone at least 1 previous failed management for stricture. In phase 1 (from September 2001 to January 2008), the improving items include: (1) The distal urethral end was stitched and tied to the catheter. (2) As catheter was inserted into bladder and 20 ml water was injected into catheter balloon, the distal urethral end was fixed in the proximal urethra and an overlaying of 1.5 cm was formed between the two ends. (3) Three weeks later, it was tried to insert the catheter to bladder. After the urethral stump necrosis and the catheter separating from the urethra, the catheter was removed. In phase 2 (from February 2008 to December 2010), based on the above, irrigating catheter was used. After the surgery, urethra was irrigated with 0.02% furacillin solution through the catheter 3 times a day. All patients were followed up for at least 6 months. If patients had no conscious dysuria and maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) > 15 ml/s, the treatment was considered successful. All complications were recorded. In phase 1, the 96 patients (101 times) underwent the procedure. The treatment was successful in 88 patients (success rate 92%). Within 1 to 13 days after removal of the catheter, urethral stricture was recurred in 8 patients. They had to undergo cystostomy once more for 3 to 11 months before reoperation (the 3 patients' reoperation was in phase 2). The 8 cases were treated successfully. In phase 2, 33 patients (total 36 times) underwent the procedure. One patient was failed (success rate 97

  4. Dithiolethione modified valproate and diclofenac increase E-cadherin expression and decrease proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W; Switzer, Christopher; Santana-Flores, Wilmarie; Ridnour, Lisa A; Berna, Marc; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, Robert T; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Yeh, Grace C; Roberts, David D; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Wink, David A

    2010-05-01

    The effects of dithiolethione modified valproate, diclofenac and sulindac on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were investigated. Sulfur(S)-valproate and S-diclofenac at 1 microg/ml concentrations significantly reduced prostaglandin (PG)E(2) levels in NSCLC cell lines A549 and NCI-H1299 as did the COX-2 inhibitor DuP-697. In vitro, S-valproate, S-diclofenac and S-sulindac half-maximally inhibited the clonal growth of NCI-H1299 cells at 6, 6 and 15 microg/ml, respectively. Using the MTT assay, 10 microg/ml S-valproate, NO-aspirin and Cay10404, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, but not SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor, inhibited the growth of A549 cells. In vivo, 18mg/kg i.p. of S-valproate and S-diclofenac, but not S-sulindac, significantly inhibited A549 or NCI-H1299 xenograft proliferation in nude mice, but had no effect on the nude mouse body weight. The mechanism by which S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibited the growth of NSCLC cells was investigated. Nitric oxide-aspirin but not S-valproate caused apoptosis of NSCLC cells. By Western blot, S-valproate and S-diclofenac increased E-cadherin but reduced vimentin and ZEB1 (a transcriptional suppressor of E-cadherin) protein expression in NSCLC cells. Because S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibit the growth of NSCLC cells and reduce PGE(2) levels, they may prove beneficial in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of NSCLC. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively...... of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest...

  6. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    diagnosis over age 35. We took forward 96 SNPs for replication in another 5,986 BRCA1 carriers (2,974 individuals with breast cancer and 3,012 unaffected individuals). Five SNPs on 19p13 were associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.3 × 10¿¿ to P(trend) = 3.9 × 10¿7), two of which showed independent......Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer...... associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR...

  7. Modified SEAGULL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, M. D.; Kuehn, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Original version of program incorporated into program SRGULL (LEW-15093) for use on National Aero-Space Plane project, its duty being to model forebody, inlet, and nozzle portions of vehicle. However, real-gas chemistry effects in hypersonic flow fields limited accuracy of that version, because it assumed perfect-gas properties. As a result, SEAGULL modified according to real-gas equilibrium-chemistry methodology. This program analyzes two-dimensional, hypersonic flows of real gases. Modified version of SEAGULL maintains as much of original program as possible, and retains ability to execute original perfect-gas version.

  8. The cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotid of E6 mRNA into cervical cancer cells by DOPE-modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Saffarzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Although several chemical and physical methods for gene delivery have been introduced, their cytotoxicity, non-specific immune responses and the lack of biodegradability remain the main issues. In this study, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (NPs and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanol​amine (DOPE-modified hydroxyapatite NPs was coated with antisense oligonucleotide of E6 mRNA, and their uptakes into the cervical cancer cell line were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Calcium nitrate and diammonium phosphate were used for the synthesis of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticle. Thus, they were coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG, DOPE and antisense oligonucleotide of E6 mRNA using a cross-linker. Then, hydroxyapatite NPs and DOPE-modified hydroxyapatite NPs were incubated 48 hours with cervical cancer cells and their uptakes were evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. Results: The hydroxyapatite NPs had different shapes and some agglomeration with average size of 100 nm. The results showed DOPE-modified hydroxyapatite NPs had higher uptake than hydroxyapatite NPs (P

  9. Effect of optically modified polyethylene terephthalate fiber socks on chronic foot pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ian L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing experimental and clinical evidence suggests that illumination of the skin with relatively low intensity light may lead to therapeutic results such as reduced pain or improved wound healing. The goal of this study was to evaluate prospectively whether socks made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET incorporating optically active particles (Celliant™ ameliorates chronic foot pain resulting from diabetic neuropathy or other disorders. Such optically modified fiber is thought to modify the illumination of the skin in the visible and infrared portions of the spectrum, and consequently reduce pain. Methods A double-blind, randomized trial with 55 subjects (38 men, 17 women enrolled (average age 59.7 ± 11.9 years, 26 with diabetic neuropathy and 29 with other pain etiologies. Subjects twice completed the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and SF-36 a week apart (W1+2 before receiving either control or Celliant™ socks. The same questionnaires were answered again one and two weeks (W3+4 later. The questionnaires provided nine scores for analyzing pain reduction: one VAS score, two BPI scores, five MPQ scores, and the bodily pain score on the SF-36. Mean W1+2 and W3+4 scores were compared to measure pain reduction. Results More pain reduction was reported by Celliant™ subjects for 8 of the 9 pain questions employed, with a significant (p = 0.043 difference between controls and Celliant™ for McGill question III. In neuropathic subjects, Celliant™ caused more pain reduction in 6 of the 9 questions, but not significantly. In non-neuropathic subjects 8 of 9 questions showed more pain reduction with the Celliant™ socks. Conclusion Socks with optically modified PET (Celliant™ appear to have a beneficial impact on chronic foot pain. The mechanism could be related to the effects seen with illumination of tissues with visible and infrared light. Trial Registration

  10. Effective Electrochemistry of Human Sulfite Oxidase Immobilized on Quantum-Dots-Modified Indium Tin Oxide Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ting; Leimkühler, Silke; Koetz, Joachim; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2015-09-30

    The bioelectrocatalytic sulfite oxidation by human sulfite oxidase (hSO) on indium tin oxide (ITO) is reported, which is facilitated by functionalizing of the electrode surface with polyethylenimine (PEI)-entrapped CdS nanoparticles and enzyme. hSO was assembled onto the electrode with a high surface loading of electroactive enzyme. In the presence of sulfite but without additional mediators, a high bioelectrocatalytic current was generated. Reference experiments with only PEI showed direct electron transfer and catalytic activity of hSO, but these were less pronounced. The application of the polyelectrolyte-entrapped quantum dots (QDs) on ITO electrodes provides a compatible surface for enzyme binding with promotion of electron transfer. Variations of the buffer solution conditions, e.g., ionic strength, pH, viscosity, and the effect of oxygen, were studied in order to understand intramolecular and heterogeneous electron transfer from hSO to the electrode. The results are consistent with a model derived for the enzyme by using flash photolysis in solution and spectroelectrochemistry and molecular dynamic simulations of hSO on monolayer-modified gold electrodes. Moreover, for the first time a photoelectrochemical electrode involving immobilized hSO is demonstrated where photoexcitation of the CdS/hSO-modified electrode lead to an enhanced generation of bioelectrocatalytic currents upon sulfite addition. Oxidation starts already at the redox potential of the electron transfer domain of hSO and is greatly increased by application of a small overpotential to the CdS/hSO-modified ITO.

  11. Implementation of a Psychoeducational Program for Cancer Survivors and Family Caregivers at a Cancer Support Community Affiliate: A Pilot Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockham, Bonnie; Schafenacker, Ann; Yoon, Hyojin; Ronis, David L; Kershaw, Trace; Titler, Marita; Northouse, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Psychoeducational interventions, tested for efficacy in randomized clinical trials, are seldom implemented in clinical practice where cancer survivors and their family caregivers can benefit from them. This study examined the effectiveness of the FOCUS Program on cancer survivors' and their family caregivers' outcomes when implemented at a Cancer Support Community (CSC) affiliate by agency social workers. Study aims were to (1) test effects of the program on survivor and caregiver outcomes as a unit and (2) determine program feasibility in terms of enrollment, retention, intervention fidelity, and satisfaction. A preintervention and postintervention pilot effectiveness study was conducted with 34 cancer survivor-caregiver dyads (ie, pairs). The FOCUS Program, originally delivered by nurses in dyads' homes, was modified to a small-group format and delivered by CSC social workers. The primary outcome was quality of life (QOL). Intermediary outcomes were benefits of illness/caregiving, communication, support, and self-efficacy. Analyses included repeated-measures analysis of variance. Dyads had significant improvements in total QOL; physical, emotional, and functional QOL; benefits of illness; and self-efficacy. Effect sizes were similar to prior randomized clinical trial findings. Although dyads were difficult to recruit (enrollment, 60%), both retention (92%) and intervention fidelity (94%) were high. It was possible to implement the FOCUS Program at a CSC affiliate by agency staff, obtain positive intervention effects, and maintain intervention fidelity. Researchers and clinicians need to collaborate to implement more evidence-based interventions in practice settings for cancer survivors and their family caregivers.

  12. Lipid-modifying effects of nutraceuticals: An evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Cicero, Arrigo F; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The present review provides an up-to-date summary of the findings on the lipid-lowering effects of the most important nutraceuticals and functional foods. Based on current knowledge, nutraceuticals might exert significant lipid-lowering, and their use has several advantages: A number of important questions remain to be addressed, including whether longer durations of therapy would result in a better response and the exact safety profile of nutraceuticals, especially at doses higher than those consumed in an average diet. Additionally, data regarding the effects of nutraceutical supplementation on the incidence of cardiovascular outcomes are lacking, and it is not clear whether additional lipid lowering by nutraceuticals can modify the residual cardiovascular risk that remains after statin therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J, E-mail: arnhildj@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: fabian.koehler@chem.ethz.ch [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  14. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus; Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J

    2010-01-01

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  15. Health effects of feeding genetically modified (GM) crops to livestock animals: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Clazien J; Swanenburg, Manon

    2017-08-31

    A large share of genetically modified (GM) crops grown worldwide is processed into livestock feed. Feed safety of GM crops is primarily based on compositional equivalence with near-isogenic cultivars and experimental trials in rodents. However, feeding studies in target animals add to the evaluation of GM crops with respect to animal health. This review aimed to evaluate the possible health effects of feeding GM crops to livestock by reviewing scientific publications on experimental studies in ruminants, pigs, and poultry in which at least one of the following health parameters was investigated: body condition score, organ weight, haematology, serum biochemistry, histopathology, clinical examination, immune response, or gastrointestinal microbiota. In most experiments, either Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) maize, Roundup Ready (RR) soybean, or both were fed to livestock animals. Significant differences (PGM crops has adverse effects on animal health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy modified for inpatients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew C; Hooke, Geoff R

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness among inpatients with depression of a modified cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program was examined. A group of 300 inpatient admissions with a primary diagnosis of depression attending a private psychiatric clinic were assessed at the beginning and end of a two-week CBT program. The effectiveness of the treatment was demonstrated by improvements on the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the health of the nation outcome scales, locus of control of behaviour scale, and the global assessment of function. The changes on the BDI for patients with depression were benchmarked against estimates generated from published studies. The degree of change in a two-week period for inpatients with depression was similar to that observed in efficacy studies of CBT that typically run over a more extended time. Implications for integrating CBT with inpatient services are discussed.

  17. Effects of information on young consumers' willingness to pay for genetically modified food: experimental auction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajale, Dilip B; Becker, T C

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of information on consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for genetically modified food (GMF). We used Vickrey second price experimental auction method for elicitation of consumer WTP for GM potato chips and GM soya-chocolate bar. The sample used in this study was university students from Delhi, India. Four information formats (positive, negative, no information, and combined information about GM technology) were used for the examination. The results show that, when students received the combine information they were willing to pay around 17%-20% premium for GMF and when received the negative information they demanded around 22% discount for GMF. While the positive- and the no-information formats alone have no considerable effect on consumers' WTP for GMF. Overall, our findings suggest that while doing marketing of GMF in India, the best strategy is to provide combined information about GM technology.

  18. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health.

  19. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy

  20. Late endocrine effects of cancer and cancer therapies in survivors of childhood malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Pedro; Van Huellen, Hans; Fitzpatrick, Ailbhe; Druce, Maralyn

    2016-03-01

    The development of several cancer treatment modalities including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy has improved the survival rates of childhood cancers over recent decades, leading to an increase in the population of childhood cancer survivors. Detailed epidemiological studies have demonstrated that childhood cancer survivors frequently develop medical complications months or years after cancer treatment. Endocrine complications are common in survivors, particularly those exposed to radiotherapy, total body irradiation and alkylating agents, and may involve dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, gonads, thyroid gland, bone and body composition as well as metabolic abnormalities. Early identification and proper management of these disorders can significantly improve the quality of life and reduce the morbidity and potentially mortality in this population. Multidisciplinary teams, expert physicians and the development of healthcare structures are key elements for improving the screening, surveillance, cost effectiveness and overall management of endocrine late effects of cancer therapies in childhood cancer survivors. The aim of the present review was to discuss the most important and common late endocrine effects of childhood cancer treatment.

  1. The effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation: RePCa-a randomised study among primary prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieperink, K B; Johansen, C; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2013-01-01

    Background:The objective of this study is the effectiveness of multidisciplinary rehabilitation on treatment-related adverse effects after completed radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer (PCa).Methods:In a single-centre oncology unit in Odense, Denmark, 161 PCa patients treated...... with radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy were randomly assigned to either a programme of two nursing counselling sessions and two instructive sessions with a physical therapist (n=79) or to usual care (n=82). Primary outcome was Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) urinary irritative sum......-score.Before radiotherapy, pre-intervention 4 weeks after radiotherapy, and after a 20-week intervention, measurements included self-reported disease-specific quality of life (QoL; EPIC-26, including urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal symptoms), general QoL (Short-form-12, SF-12), pelvic floor muscle strength (Modified...

  2. Modified whole effluent toxicity test to assess and decouple wastewater effects from environmental gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Sauco

    Full Text Available Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd and salinity controls (SC: without canal water. CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses.

  3. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  4. Effects of iron on intermetallic compound formation in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@mail.kmutt.ac.th [Production Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Iron reduces the modification effects of scandium in Al–Si–Mg alloys. • Morphologies of Sc-rich intermetallic phases vary with Fe and Sc contents and the cooling rates. • Sc neutralizes effects of Fe by changing Fe-rich intermetallic phases from platelets to more cubic. - Abstract: In general, iron has a strong tendency to dissolve in molten aluminum. Iron has very low solid solubility in aluminum–silicon casting alloys, so it will form intermetallic compounds that cause detrimental effects on mechanical properties. In this work, the effects of iron on intermetallic compound formations in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg alloys were studied. There were two levels of iron addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%) and two levels of scandium addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%). We found that the effects of scandium modification decreased with increasing iron addition. The morphologies of the complex intermetallic compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that scandium changes the morphology of Fe-rich intermetallic compounds from β-phase (plate-like) to α-phase, which reduces the harmful effects of β-phase.

  5. Prophylactic effects of triptolide on colon cancer development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of triptolide on colon cancer cell growth and its capacity to prevent tumor development in an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of colon cancer. Methods: HCT116 cell viability and migration potential were assessed. Control and AOM/DSS-treated mice (with and ...

  6. Students with Cancer: Presenting Issues and Effective Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Melissa M.; Bray, Melissa A.; Maykel, Cheryl; Cross, Karen; Shankar, Nilani L.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners working with children diagnosed with cancer in the school environment must consider several facets in order to effectively work with the child and family. The remission rate for children with cancer is relatively high, so one must consider whether the child is anticipating treatment, actively in treatment, or posttreatment when one…

  7. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  8. Effects of sintering atmosphere on the physical and mechanical properties of modified BOF slag glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wen-bin; Li, Yu; Cang, Da-qiang; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Fan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This study proposes an efficient way to utilize all the chemical components of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag to prepare high value-added glass-ceramics. A molten modified BOF slag was converted from the melting BOF slag by reducing it and separating out iron component in it, and the modified BOF slag was then quenched in water to form glasses with different basicities. The glasses were subsequently sintered in the temperature range of 600-1000°C in air or nitrogen atmosphere for 1 h. The effects of different atmospheres on the physical and mechanical properties of sintered samples were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by conducting experiment on evaluating the sintering shrinkage, water absorption and bulk density. It is found that the kinetics of the sintering process is significantly affected by sintering atmosphere. In particular, compared with sintering in air atmosphere, sintering in N2 atmosphere promotes the synergistic growth of pyroxene and melilite crystalline phases, which can contribute to better mechanical properties and denser microstructure.

  9. Effectiveness of Brief Abstinence for Modifying Problematic Internet Gaming Cognitions and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel L; Kaptsis, Dean; Delfabbro, Paul H; Gradisar, Michael

    2017-12-01

    This pilot study tested the efficacy of a voluntary 84-hour abstinence protocol for modifying problematic Internet gaming cognitions and behaviors METHOD: Twenty-four adults from online gaming communities, including 9 individuals who screened positively for Internet gaming disorder (IGD), abstained from Internet games for 84 hours. Surveys were collected at baseline, at daily intervals during abstinence, and at 7-day and 28-day follow-up RESULTS: Brief voluntary abstinence was successful in reducing hours of gaming, maladaptive gaming cognitions, and IGD symptoms. Abstinence was highly acceptable to participants with total compliance and no study attrition. Clinically significant improvement in IGD symptoms occurred in 75% of the IGD group at 28-day follow-up. Reliable improvement in maladaptive gaming cognitions occurred in 63% of the IGD group, whose cognition score reduced by 50% and was comparable to the non-IGD group at 28-day follow-up CONCLUSIONS: Despite limitations of sample size, this study provides promising support for brief abstinence as a simple, practical, and cost-effective treatment technique for modifying unhelpful gaming cognitions and reducing Internet gaming problems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging on microbiological properties of cold-smoked trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đorđević, J.; Pavlićević, N.; Bošković, M.; Janjić, J.; Glišić, M.; Starčević, M.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the importance of different packaging methods for the extension of fish shelf life, as a highly perishable food, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging on the total Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria counts of cold-smoked Salmon trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) stored at 3°C during six weeks. Trout fillets were vacuumed packaged (VP) or packaged in one of two different modified atmospheres, with gas ratio of 50%CO2/50%N2 (MAP1) and 90%CO2/10%N2 (MAP2) and analysed on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Both the total Enterobacteriaceae and total lactic acid bacteria counts increased in the trout fillets in all packaging types during storage. A significantly lower total Enterobacteriaceae count was determined in the MAP fish compared to the VP fish, with the weakest growth rate and lowest numbers attained in MAP2 fillets. The lactic acid bacteria count was higher in trout packaged in MAP compared to VP, with the highest number in the MAP with 90% CO2 (MAP2).

  11. A study on effect of ATH on Euphorbia coagulum modified polyester banana fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sanju; Rai, Bhuvneshwar; Kumar, Gulshan

    2018-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are used for building and structural applications due to their high strength. In conventional composites both the binder and the reinforcing fibers are synthetic or either one of the material is natural. In the present study coagulum of Euphorbia royleana has been used for replacing polyester resinas binder in polyester banana composite. Euphorbia coagulum (driedlatex) is rich in resinous mass (60-80%), which are terpenes and polyisoprene (10-20%). Effect of varying percentage of coagulum content on various physico-mechanical properties of polyester-banana composites has been studied. Since banana fiber is sensitive to water due to presence of polar group, banana composite undergoes delamination and deterioration under humid condition. Alkali treated banana fiber along with coagulum content has improved overall mechanical properties and reduction in water absorption. The best physico-mechanical properties have been achieved on replacing 40% of polyester resin by coagulum. An increase of 50% in bending strength, 30% bending modulus and 45% impact strength as well as 68% decrease in water absorption was observed. Incorporation of 20% ATH as flame retardant in coagulum modified banana polyester composite enhanced limiting oxygen index from 20.6 to 26.8% and smoke density reduced up to 40%. This study presents the possibility of utilization of renewable materials for environmental friendly composite development as well as to find out alternative feedstock for petroleum products. Developed Euphorbia latex modified banana polyester composites can have potential utility in hardboard, partition panel, plywood and automotive etc.

  12. Effect of prior cold work on creep properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior cold worked (PCW) titanium-modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used as a core-structural material in fast breeder reactor because of its superior creep strength and resistance to void swelling. In this study, the influence of PCW in the range of 16–24% on creep properties of IFAC-1 SS, a titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic SS, at 923 K and 973 K has been investigated. It was found that PCW has no appreciable effect on the creep deformation rate of the steel at both the test temperatures; creep rupture life increased with PCW at 923 K and remained rather unaffected at 973 K. The dislocation structure along with precipitation in the PCW steel was found to change appreciably depending on creep testing conditions. A well-defined dislocation substructure was observed on creep testing at 923 K; a well-annealed microstructure with evidences of recrystallization was observed on creep testing at 973 K

  13. Effects of modified multistage field test on performance and physiological responses in wheelchair basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissland, Thierry; Faupin, Arnaud; Borel, Benoit; Berthoin, Serge; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A bioenergetical analysis of manoeuvrability and agility performance for wheelchair players is inexistent. It was aimed at comparing the physiological responses and performance obtained from the octagon multistage field test (MFT) and the modified condition in "8 form" (MFT-8). Sixteen trained wheelchair basketball players performed both tests in randomized condition. The levels performed (end-test score), peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2peak), minute ventilation (VEpeak), heart rate (HRpeak), peak and relative blood lactate (Δ[Lact(-)] = peak--rest values), and the perceived rating exertion (RPE) were measured. MFT-8 induced higher VO2peak and VEpeak values compared to MFT (VO2peak: 2.5 ± 0.6 versus 2.3 ± 0.6 L · min(-1) and VEpeak: 96.3 ± 29.1 versus 86.6 ± 23.4 L · min(-1); P < 0.05) with no difference in other parameters. Significant relations between VEpeak and end-test score were correlated for both field tests (P < 0.05). At exhaustion, MFT attained incompletely VO2peak and VEpeak. Among experienced wheelchair players, MFT-8 had no effect on test performance but generates higher physiological responses than MFT. It could be explained by demands of wheelchair skills occurring in 8 form during the modified condition.

  14. Enhancing siRNA-based cancer therapy using a new pH-responsive activatable cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang B

    2017-03-01

    -like kinase 1, and augmented cell apoptosis. In addition, favorable siRNA avoidance of the endosome/lysosome was observed in both MCF-7 and A549 cells, followed by effective cytoplasmic release. In view of its acid sensitivity and therapeutic potency, this newly developed pH-responsive and ACPP-mediated liposome system represents a potential platform for siRNA-based cancer treatment. Keywords: siRNA, ACPP, hydrazone, liposome, endosomal/lysosomal escape

  15. Comparative Effects of MMT Clay Modified with Two Different Cationic Surfactants on the Thermal and Rheological Properties of Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshal Al-Samhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene montmorillonite (MMT nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending using two different organoclays modified with imidazolium and alkylammonium surfactants. The imidazolium and ammonium modified organoclays were characterized by the FTIR and SEM analysis. The effect of organic clay (MMT on the physical properties of polypropylene was evaluated, thermal and rheological properties with different filler weight percentage. Differential scanning calorimetric results showed that imidazolium modified clay (IMMT exhibits low melting temperature compared to the ammonium modified clay (AMMT. The crystallinity analysis showed that crystallization improved in all nanocomposites irrespective of surface modification; the thermogravimetric analysis showed that the imidazolium modified polymer composites are more thermally stable than conventional ammonium modified composites. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM analyses indicated that the PP-IMMT composites displayed exfoliated morphologies compared with the intercalated structure in PP-AMMT, and the rheological analysis at 180°C showed an enhancement in the viscoelastic properties as the clay concentration increases. The melt viscosity, crossover modulus, and relaxation times were comparable for both the surface modified composites with two different cations. The imidazolium based surfactant was found to be an effective organic modification for MMT to prepare thermally stable PP/MMT nanocomposites.

  16. The Effect of Breast Cancer Fatalism on Breast Cancer Awareness Among Turkish Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Hulya Kulakci; Ayyildiz, Tulay Kuzlu; Veren, Funda; Topan, Aysel Kose

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of breast cancer fatalism and other factors on breast cancer awareness among Turkish women. This cross-sectional and comparative descriptive study was conducted with 894 women. Data were collected by Personal Information Form, Powe Fatalism Inventory and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale. Seriousness, health motivation, BSE benefits and BSE self-efficacy perceptions of the women were moderate, and susceptibility and BSE barriers perceptions were low. It was determined that awareness of breast cancer of the women was affected by breast cancer fatalism, age, education level, employment status, marital status, family type, economic status, social assurance, menopause status, family history of cancer, family history of breast cancer, knowledge on BSE, source of information on BSE, performing of BSE, frequency of BSE performing, having a problem with breast, having a breast examination in hospital, feeling during breast examination by healthcare professional, sex of healthcare professional for breast examination and their health beliefs (p breast cancer of the women was affected by breast cancer fatalism. In providing breast cancer early diagnosis behaviors, it is recommended to evaluate fatalism perceptions and health beliefs of the women and to arrange educational programs for this purpose.

  17. Quantity and economic value of unused oral anti-cancer and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs among outpatient pharmacy patients who discontinue therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, C L; Melis, E J; Egberts, A C G; Bouvy, M L; Gardarsdottir, H; van den Bemt, B J F

    2018-03-24

    Patients sometimes discontinue the use of expensive oral anti-cancer drug (OACD) or biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapies early, leading to medication waste if the patient has not used all dispensed medication. To determine the proportion of patients who have unused OACDs or bDMARDs after therapy discontinuation, and the quantity and economic value of these unused medications. Furthermore, patients' reasons for therapy discontinuation and their disposal method for unused medications were determined. In a retrospective follow-up study using a Dutch outpatient pharmacy database, patients (≥18 years) who did not refill an OACD or bDMARD prescription, dispensed between November 2015 and February 2016, within two weeks of the prescription end date were contacted by phone and asked about their unused medication and reasons thereof. The economic value was calculated using Dutch medication prices. Data were descriptively analyzed in STATA13. The database included 1173 patients, of whom 159 likely had discontinued therapy and were contacted. Of these, 88 patients were excluded (39 refilled, 47 missing, and 2 other). Of the 71 patients who had discontinued therapy, 39 (54.9%) had unused medications, comprising 22 OACD users (mean age 63.0 (SD ± 15.9) years, 50.0% female) and 17 bDMARD users (mean age 50.7 (SD ± 13.5) years, 47.1% female). A total of 59 packages were unused, with a total value of €60,341. Unused OACD packages and bDMARD packages had median values of €179 (IQR €24-2487) and €992 (IQR €681-1093), respectively. Patients primarily discontinued therapy due to adverse or insufficient effects. This study illustrates that more than half of patients discontinuing OACD or bDMARD therapies have unused medication. This emphasizes the need for waste-reducing interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effectiveness of different approaches to media literacy in modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes

    2013-01-01

    Fearing the negative effect that alcohol advertising might have on adolescents' receptiveness to the consumption of alcohol, health educators have used media literacy as an effective strategy to mitigate the effect of these messages in the media. The present study applied parental mediation to the design and evaluations of a media literacy curriculum that targets alcohol decision-making processes illustrated in the message interpretation process model. The authors conducted a pretest-posttest quasi-experiment of 171 adolescents to examine the effect of a negative evaluative approach and a balanced evaluative approach (a combination of negative and positive evaluative strategies) to media literacy on modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol messages. Results showed that different media literacy approaches had varying degrees of effectiveness on adolescent boys and girls. After receiving a negative media literacy lesson, adolescent boys regarded television characters as less realistic and believed that drinking alcohol had negative consequences. In contrast, adolescent girls benefited more from a balanced evaluative approach as their media skepticism attitude was enhanced. Results suggest that health educators should choose tailored pedagogical approaches that are based on gender to improve decision making regarding alcohol consumption.

  19. A modified differential evolution approach for dynamic economic dispatch with valve-point effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xiaohui; Wang Liang; Yuan Yanbin; Zhang Yongchuan; Cao Bo; Yang Bo

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic economic dispatch (DED) plays an important role in power system operation, which is a complicated non-linear constrained optimization problem. It has nonsmooth and nonconvex characteristic when generation unit valve-point effects are taken into account. This paper proposes a modified differential evolution approach (MDE) to solve DED problem with valve-point effects. In the proposed MDE method, feasibility-based selection comparison techniques and heuristic search rules are devised to handle constraints effectively. In contrast to the penalty function method, the constraints-handling method does not require penalty factors or any extra parameters and can guide the population to the feasible region quickly. Especially, it can be satisfied equality constraints of DED problem precisely. Moreover, the effects of two crucial parameters on the performance of the MDE for DED problem are studied as well. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated for application example and the test results are compared with those of other methods reported in literature. It is shown that the proposed method is capable of yielding higher quality solutions

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Susceptibility Loci That Modify Radiation-Related Risk for Breast Cancer After Childhood Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lindsay M; Sampson, Joshua N; Armstrong, Gregory T; Chen, Ting-Huei; Hudson, Melissa M; Karlins, Eric; Dagnall, Casey L; Li, Shengchao Alfred; Wilson, Carmen L; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Liu, Wei; Kang, Guolian; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Henderson, Tara O; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Gibson, Todd M; Merino, Diana M; Wong, Jeannette R; Hammond, Sue; Neglia, Joseph P; Turcotte, Lucie M; Miller, Jeremy; Bowen, Laura; Wheeler, William A; Leisenring, Wendy M; Whitton, John A; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles; Hicks, Belynda D; Jones, Kristine; Machiela, Mitchell J; Vogt, Aurelie; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Neale, Geoffrey; Lear, Matthew; Strong, Louise C; Yasui, Yutaka; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E; Smith, Susan A; Howell, Rebecca; Davies, Stella M; Radloff, Gretchen A; Onel, Kenan; Berrington de González, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Rajaraman, Preetha; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Bhatia, Smita; Chanock, Stephen J; Tucker, Margaret A; Robison, Leslie L

    2017-11-01

    Childhood cancer survivors treated with chest-directed radiotherapy have substantially elevated risk for developing breast cancer. Although genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in the general population is well studied, large-scale evaluation of breast cancer susceptibility after chest-directed radiotherapy for childhood cancer is lacking. We conducted a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in female survivors of childhood cancer, pooling two cohorts with detailed treatment data and systematic, long-term follow-up: the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and St. Jude Lifetime Cohort. The study population comprised 207 survivors who developed breast cancer and 2774 who had not developed any subsequent neoplasm as of last follow-up. Genotyping and subsequent imputation yielded 16 958 466 high-quality variants for analysis. We tested associations in the overall population and in subgroups stratified by receipt of lower than 10 and 10 or higher gray breast radiation exposure. We report P values and pooled per-allele risk estimates from Cox proportional hazards regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among survivors who received 10 or higher gray breast radiation exposure, a locus on 1q41 was associated with subsequent breast cancer risk (rs4342822, nearest gene PROX1 , risk allele frequency in control subjects [RAF controls ] = 0.46, hazard ratio = 1.92, 95% confidence interval = 1.49 to 2.44, P = 7.09 × 10 -9 ). Two rare variants also showed potentially promising associations (breast radiation ≥10 gray: rs74949440, 11q23, TAGLN , RAF controls = 0.02, P = 5.84 × 10 -8 ; breast cancer risk after childhood cancer. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P. L.; Andrulis, I. L.; Thomassen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA...

  2. Cancer and treatment effects on job task performance for gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, Nancy M; Shanley, Ryan; Ghebre, Rahel G

    2013-01-01

    Over 91,000 new cases of gynecological cancers are expected to be diagnosed in 2013 in the US alone. As cancer detection technology and treatment options improve, the number of working-age cancer survivors continues to grow. To describe US gynecological cancer survivors' perceptions of the effects of cancer and treatment on their job tasks. 104 adult gynecological cancer survivors who were working at the time of their cancer diagnosis, treated at a University-based women's health clinic, diagnosed in the previous 24 months, and spoke English. Women completed written surveys to describe their work experiences following diagnosis. Clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were performed to describe characteristics and associations. Fifteen percent of women had chemotherapy and radiation treatment; 48% had only chemotherapy, 9% only radiation therapy, and 28% had neither. Survivors described the frequency of performing seven job tasks, such as 'intense concentration', 'analyzing data', and 'lifting heavy loads.' Women who had undergone radiation treatment were more likely to indicate limitations for physical tasks; women undergoing chemotherapy were more likely to report limitations in more analytic tasks. Only 29% of women noted an employer-based policy facilitated their return-to-work process. Cancer and treatment have important effects on job performance and may vary by type of treatment. Employer-based policies focusing on improved communication and work accommodations may improve the return to work process.

  3. Mesomeric Effects of Graphene Modified with Diazonium Salts: Substituent Type and Position Influence its Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouša, Daniel; Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Luxa, Jan; Šturala, Jiří; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, graphene and graphene derivatives have become some of the most intensively studied materials. Tuning of the electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene is of paramount importance. In this study, six diazonium-modified graphenes containing different functional groups according to the diazonium salt precursor were investigated. These diazonium moieties have a strong mesomeric (resonance) effect and act as either electron-donating or -withdrawing species. Different graphene precursors, such as thermally and chemically reduced graphenes were studied. All the products were characterized in detail by elemental combustion analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry. Resistivity and zeta potential measurements were consistent with theoretical (DFT) calculations. The results show that chemical modification of graphene by diazotation strongly influences its properties, creating a huge application potential in microelectronics, energy storage and conversion devices, and electrocatalysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effects of Δ baryon in hyperon stars in a modified quark meson coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, H.S.; Mishra, R.N.; Panda, P.K.; Barik, N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on the appearance of the Δ (1232) isobars in neutron stars has ignited much debate on the possibility of its existence in neutron stars satisfying the observational limit of 2 M_⊙. Given the fact that the presence of the Δ tends to soften the equation of state (EoS) and reduce the maximum mass, theoretical and observational contradictions have given rise to the so called Δ puzzle, similar to the hyperon puzzle. In the present work we develop the EoS for dense matter with the inclusion of the nucleons, hyperons and the Delta isobars and study the effects of such inclusion on stellar properties using a Modified Quark-Meson coupling model (MQMC)

  5. Effect of the Modified Pitched Blade Turbines on the Flow Pattern in Stirred Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Driss, Zied; Chtourou; Wajdi; Abid, Mohamed Salah

    2009-01-01

    The hydrodynamic and turbulence model have been simulated by our computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code in a mechanically stirred tank equipped by axial turbine. The effect of the modified attack angle of the blade on the flow prediction is studied. The Reynolds-averaged continuity and Navier-Stokes equations were solved. For the closure of the above equations, a turbulence model κ-ε has been employed. The numerical solution of these equations was achieved by a finite-volume method. The CFD predicted flow fields at different locations in the tank as well as the power number show reasonably good agreement with the measured data and with those calculated from published experimental correlations

  6. Modified Cross Feedback Control for a Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Rotor with Significant Gyroscopic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For magnetically suspended rigid rotors (MSRs with significant gyroscopic effects, phase lag of the control channel is the main factor influencing the system nutation stability and decoupling performance. At first, this paper proves that the phase lag of the cross channel instead of the decentralized channel is often the main factor influencing the system nutation stability at high speeds. Then a modified cross feedback control strategy based on the phase compensation of cross channel is proposed to improve the stability and decoupling performances. The common issues associated with the traditional control methods have been successfully resolved by this method. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed control method.

  7. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between the three groups of RMGIC. There is a decrease in the compressive strength value along with the duration of storage time.

  8. A procedure for estimating the dose modifying effect of chemotherapy on radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.; Keane, T.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure based on a logistic regression model was used to estimate the dose-modifying effect of chemotherapy on the response of normal tissues to radiation. The DEF in the proposed procedure is expressed as a function of logistic regression coefficients, response levels and values of covariates in the model. The proposed procedure is advantageous as it allows consideration of both the response levels and the values of covariates in calculating the DEF. A plot of the DEF against the response or a covariate describes how the DEF varies with the response levels or the covariate values. Confidence intervals of the DEF were obtained based on the normal approximation of the distribution of the estimated DEF and on a non-parametric Bootstrap method. An example is given to illustrate the proposed procedure. (Author)

  9. Photovoltaic effect in transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas; Chrisey, Douglas B; Pradhan, Dhiren Kumar; Katiyar, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Pankaj; Scott, J F; Katiyar, Ram S; Coondoo, Indrani; Panwar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    We report photovoltaic (PV) effect in multiferroic Bi 0.9 Sm 0.1 Fe 0.95 Co 0.05 O 3 (BSFCO) thin films. Transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO 3 (BFO) thin films have been deposited on Pt/TiO 2 /SiO 2 /Si substrate successfully through pulsed laser deposition (PLD). PV response is observed under illumination both in sandwich and lateral electrode configurations. The open-circuit voltage (V oc ) and the short-circuit current density (J sc ) of the films in sandwich electrode configuration under illumination are measured to be 0.9 V and −0.051 µA cm −2 . Additionally, we report piezoresponse for BSFCO films, which confirms ferroelectric piezoelectric behaviour. (paper)

  10. Does the modified Stroop effect exist in PTSD? Evidence from dissertation abstracts and the peer reviewed literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kimble, Matthew O.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Marks, Libby

    2009-01-01

    The modified Stroop effect (MSE), in which participants show delayed color naming to trauma specific words is one of the most widely cited findings in the literature pertaining to cognitive bias in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study used a novel approach (Dissertation Abstract Review; DAR) to review the presence of the MSE in dissertation abstracts. A review of dissertations that used the modified Stroop task in a PTSD sample revealed that only 8% of the studies found del...

  11. Effects of scheduled exercise on cancer-related fatigue in women with early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde; Dyrstad, Sindre Mikal; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Søreide, Jon Arne; Bru, Lars Edvin

    2014-01-01

    The article was originally published in The Scientific World Journal; by Hindawi Publishing Corporation under the Creative Commons Attribution License; see http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/27182. While physical activity during cancer treatment is found beneficial for breast cancer patients, evidence indicates ambiguous findings concerning effects of scheduled exercise programs on treatment-related symptoms. This study investigated effects of a scheduled home-based exercise intervention i...

  12. [Effectivity and Safety of a Modified Tip Design in Torsional Phacoemulsification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Hubich, Sophie; Vetter, Jan Markus; Wirbelauer, Christopher

    2018-02-16

    Torsional mode phacoemulsification results in more effective fragmentation of the nucleus due to a different movement of the phacotip. In this clinical study, we investigated the influence of a modified tip design and active fluidics on the efficacy of phacoemulsification and safety for the corneal endothelium. We conducted a prospective randomized 2 : 1 study in which 40 patients were operated on with the mini-flared Kelman Tip using the Infiniti ® System (group 1), and 20 patients were operated on with the Intrepid ® Balanced Tip and the Centurion ® System. We analyzed the intraoperative cumulative dissipated energy and also the density of the corneal endothelium measured with an endothelial microscope (CEM 530, Nidek) pre- and postoperatively. Both groups did not differ preoperatively in age, sex, axial length of the globe or corneal endothelium cell density nor cataract density (LOCS3). All surgeries were uneventful. The cumulative dissipated energy in group 1 (mini-flared Kelman tip, Infiniti System) was 38% higher than in group 2 (balanced tip, Centurion System; p  0.05). The cell size (polymegathism) increased in both groups significantly with + 37 µm in group 1 (p  0.05). The number of hexagonal cells (pleomorphism) and corneal thickness did not differ in both groups either pre- nor postoperatively. Compared to torsional phacoemulsification with a mini-flared Kelman Tip and gravity fluidics, torsional phacoemulsification with a modified tip design and active fluidics is 38% more effective regarding the cumulative dissipated energy. Endothelial cell loss occurs to a similar extend using both systems. The postoperative changes in cell size (polymegathism), number of hexagonal cells (pleomorphism) and corneal thickness (pachymetry) were similar among both systems. We conclude, that the intraoperative stress on the endothelium is equivalent with both systems used. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Analytical approach for evaluating temperature field of thermal modified asphalt pavement and urban heat island effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongzhou

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Derive an analytical approach to predict temperature fields of multi-layered asphalt pavement based on Green’s function. • Analyze the effects of thermal modifications on heat output from pavement to near-surface environment. • Evaluate pavement solutions for reducing urban heat island (UHI) effect. - Abstract: This paper aims to present an analytical approach to predict temperature fields in asphalt pavement and evaluate the effects of thermal modification on near-surface environment for urban heat island (UHI) effect. The analytical solution of temperature fields in the multi-layered pavement structure was derived with the Green’s function method, using climatic factors including solar radiation, wind velocity, and air temperature as input parameters. The temperature solutions were validated with an outdoor field experiment. By using the proposed analytical solution, temperature fields in the pavement with different pavement surface albedo, thermal conductivity, and layer combinations were analyzed. Heat output from pavement surface to the near-surface environment was studied as an indicator of pavement contribution to UHI effect. The analysis results show that increasing pavement surface albedo could decrease pavement temperature at various depths, and increase heat output intensity in the daytime but decrease heat output intensity in the nighttime. Using reflective pavement to mitigate UHI may be effective for an open street but become ineffective for the street surrounded by high buildings. On the other hand, high-conductivity pavement could alleviate the UHI effect in the daytime for both the open street and the street surrounded by high buildings. Among different combinations of thermal-modified asphalt mixtures, the layer combination of high-conductivity surface course and base course could reduce the maximum heat output intensity and alleviate the UHI effect most.

  14. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  15. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarito, Tommaso; Lugini, Luana; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Canese, Rossella; Gugliotta, Alessio; Fidanza, Stefano; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver®) (BP) on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05). The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers.

  16. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Azzarito

    Full Text Available Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver® (BP on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05. The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers.

  17. Testing an Adapted Modified Delphi Method: Synthesizing Multiple Stakeholder Ratings of Health Care Service Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaron, Anne L; Chang Weir, Rosy; Stanton, Petra; Vangala, Sitaram; Grogan, Tristan R; Clarke, Robin M

    2016-03-01

    The Affordable Care Act incentivizes health systems for better meeting patient needs, but often guidance about patient preferences for particular health services is limited. All too often vulnerable patient populations are excluded from these decision-making settings. A community-based participatory approach harnesses the in-depth knowledge of those experiencing barriers to health care. We made three modifications to the RAND-UCLA appropriateness method, a modified Delphi approach, involving patients, adding an advisory council group to characterize existing knowledge in this little studied area, and using effectiveness rather than "appropriateness" as the basis for rating. As a proof of concept, we tested this method by examining the broadly delivered but understudied nonmedical services that community health centers provide. This method created discrete, new knowledge about these services by defining 6 categories and 112 unique services and by prioritizing among these services based on effectiveness using a 9-point scale. Consistent with the appropriateness method, we found statistical convergence of ratings among the panelists. Challenges include time commitment and adherence to a clear definition of effectiveness of services. This diverse stakeholder engagement method efficiently addresses gaps in knowledge about the effectiveness of health care services to inform population health management. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. The effects on student health of interventions modifying the school environment: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, C; Wells, H; Harden, A; Jamal, F; Fletcher, A; Thomas, J; Campbell, R; Petticrew, M; Whitehead, M; Murphy, S; Moore, L

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the limited effectiveness of traditional health education curricula in schools, there is increasing interest in interventions aiming to promote young people's health by modifying the school environment. Existing systematic reviews cannot determine whether environmental intervention is effective because they examine interventions combining environmental modifications and traditional health education. This gap is significant because school-environment interventions are complex to implement and may be sidelined in underfunded and attainment-focused school systems without evidence to support such an approach. This systematic review examined the effectiveness of school-environment interventions without health-education components on student health and inequalities. This was a systematic review of experimental/quasi-experimental studies of school-environment interventions. Sixteen databases were searched, eliciting 62 329 references which were screened, with included studies quality assessed, data extracted and narratively synthesised. Sixteen reports of 10 studies were included, all from the USA and the UK. Five evaluations of interventions aiming to develop a stronger sense of community and/or improve relationships between staff and students suggested potential benefits particularly regarding violence and aggression. Two trials of interventions enabling students to advocate for changes in school catering and physical activity reported benefits for physical activity but not diet. Three evaluations of improvements to school playgrounds offered weak evidence of effects on physical activity. School environment interventions show the potential to improve young people's health particularly regarding violence, aggression and physical activity. Further trials are required to provide a stronger and more generalisable evidence base.

  19. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has "non-cholinergic" effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  20. Huperzine A: Is it an Effective Disease-Modifying Drug for Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA) is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta). It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has “non-cholinergic” effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death. PMID:25191267

  1. Huperzine A: is it an effective disease-modifying drug for Alzheimer’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Ming eQian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. Huperzine A (HupA is a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE derived from the Chinese folk medicine Huperzia serrata (Qian Ceng Ta. It is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and is available as a nutraceutical in the US. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that HupA has multifaceted pharmacological effects. In addition to the symptomatic, cognitive-enhancing effect via inhibition of AChE, a number of recent studies have reported that this drug has non-cholinergic effects on AD. Most important among these is the protective effect of HupA on neurons against amyloid beta-induced oxidative injury and mitochondrial dysfunction as well as via the up-regulation of nerve growth factor and antagonizing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The most recent discovery that HupA may reduce brain iron accumulation lends further support to the argument that HupA could serve as a potential disease-modifying agent for AD and also other neurodegenerative disorders by significantly slowing down the course of neuronal death.

  2. Modifying effects of vitamin E on chlorpyrifos toxicity in atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål A Olsvik

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate how vitamin E (alpha tocopherol may ameliorate the toxicity of the pesticide chlorpyrifos in Atlantic salmon. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed to vitamin E, chlorpyrifos or a combination of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos (all 100 μM. Transcriptomics (RNA-seq and metabolomics were used to screen for effects of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos. By introducing vitamin E, the number of upregulated transcripts induced by chlorpyrifos exposure was reduced from 941 to 626, while the number of downregulated transcripts was reduced from 901 to 742 compared to the control. Adding only vitamin E had no effect on the transcriptome. Jak-STAT signaling was the most significantly affected pathway by chlorpyrifos treatment according to the transcriptomics data. The metabolomics data showed that accumulation of multiple long chain fatty acids and dipeptides and amino acids in chlorpyrifos treated cells was partially alleviated by vitamin E treatment. Significant interaction effects between chlorpyrifos and vitamin E were seen for 15 metabolites, including 12 dipeptides. The antioxidant had relatively modest effects on chlorpyrifos-induced oxidative stress. By combining the two data sets, the study suggests that vitamin E supplementation prevents uptake and accumulation of fatty acids, and counteracts inhibited carbohydrate metabolism. Overall, this study shows that vitamin E only to a moderate degree modifies chlorpyrifos toxicity in Atlantic salmon liver cells.

  3. Modified Dynamical Supergravity Breaking and Off-Diagonal Super-Higgs Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Gheorghiu, Tamara; Vacaru, Sergiu

    2015-01-01

    We argue that generic off-diagonal vacuum and nonvacuum solutions for Einstein manifolds mimic physical effects in modified gravity theories (MGTs) and encode certain models of $f(R,T,...)$, Ho\\vrava type with dynamical Lorentz symmetry breaking, induced effective mass for graviton etc. Our main goal is to investigate the dynamical breaking of local supersymmetry determined by off--diagonal solutions in MGTs encoded as effective Einstein spaces. This includes the Deser-Zumino super--Higgs effect, for instance, for an one--loop potential in a (simple but representative) model of $\\mathcal{N}=1, D=4$ supergravity. We develop and apply a new geometric techniques which allows us to decouple the gravitational field equations and integrate them in very general forms with metrics and vierbein fields depending on all spacetime coordinates via various generating and integration functions and parameters. We study how solutions in MGTs may be related to dynamical generation of a gravitino mass and supergravity breaking.

  4. Negotiated media effects. Peer feedback modifies effects of media's thin-body ideal on adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    The present study introduces a theoretical framework on negotiated media effects. Specifically, we argue that feedback of peers on thin-body ideal media images and individual dispositions guide effects on adolescent girls' psychosocial responses to media exposure. Therefore, we examined the

  5. Effect of emulsifiers on complexation and retrogradation characteristics of native and chemically modified White sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Tahira Mohsin; Hasnain, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sorghum starches were chemically modified. ► Starch–lipid complexes were studied in the presence of emulsifiers. ► Type II complexes were also detected in native and oxidized starches on adding GMS. ► Starch–lipid complexes sharply reduced retrogradation in modified starches. - Abstract: The effect of emulsifiers on complexation and retrogradation characteristics of native and chemically modified white sorghum starches was studied. Complex forming tendency of white sorghum starch with commercially available emulsifiers GMS and DATEM improved after acetylation. Presence of emulsifiers reduced λ max (wavelength of maximum absorbance) both for native and modified sorghum starches suggesting lower availability of amylose chains to complex with iodine. In native white sorghum starch (NWSS) and oxidized white sorghum starch (OWSS), both Type I and Type II starch–lipid complexes were observed on addition of 1.0% GMS prior to gelatinization. Acetylated-oxidized white sorghum starch (AOWSS) formed weakest complexes among all the modified starches. The results revealed that antistaling characteristics of modified sorghum starches were enhanced when used in combination with emulsifiers. The most prominent decline in reassociative capability among modified starches was observed for acetylated starches.

  6. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State. ... Therefore, the management of University of Port Harcourt teaching hospital ...

  7. Cost-effectiveness and radiation risk of breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Base cost effectiveness risk associated with radiological screening for tuberculosis and lung tumor the Government of Netherlands advised against mass screening. However, mass screening remains an important method in the case of breast cancer

  8. The Effects of Brief Psychotherapy of Coping with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCaul, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    .... Our novel approach tested the effects of brief psychotherapy provided by phone. The final sample included 61 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who were randomly assigned to either the phone treatment or a "standard treatment" condition...

  9. Effects of an expressive writing intervention on cancer-related distress in Danish breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund; Christensen, Søren; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of an expressive writing intervention (EWI) on cancer-related distress, depressive symptoms, and mood in women treated for early stage breast cancer. Methods: A nationwide sample of 507 Danish women who had recently completed treatment for primary breast cancer...... were randomly assigned to three 20-min home-based writing exercises, one week apart, focusing on either emotional disclosure (EWI group) or a non-emotional topic (control group). Cancer-related distress [Impact of Event Scale (IES)], depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory—Short Form......), and negative (37-item Profile of Moods State) and positive mood (Passive Positive Mood Scale) were assessed at baseline and at 3 and 9 months post-intervention. Choice of writing topic (cancer versus other), alexithymia (20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale), and social constraints (Social Constraints Scale) were...

  10. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  11. Snake Venom As An Effective Tool Against Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzair, Bushra; Atlas, Nagina; Malik, Sidra Batool; Jamil, Nazia; Salaam, Temitope Ojuolape; Rehman, Mujaddad Ur; Khan, Barkat Ali

    2018-06-13

    Cancer is considered one of the most predominant causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world and colorectal cancer is the most common fatal cancers, triggering the second cancer related death. Despite progress in understanding carcinogenesis and development in chemotherapeutics, there is an essential need to search for improved treatment. More than the half a century, cytotoxic and cytostatic agents have been examined as a potential treatment of cancer, among these agents; remarkable progresses have been reported by the use of the snake venom. Snake venoms are secreting materials of lethal snakes are store in venomous glands. Venoms are composite combinations of various protein, peptides, enzymes, toxins and non proteinaceous secretions. Snake venom possesses immense valuable mixtures of proteins and enzymes. Venoms have potential to combat with the cancerous cells and produce positive effect. Besides the toxicological effects of venoms, several proteins of snake venom e.g. disintegrins, phospholipases A2, metalloproteinases, and L-amino acid oxidases and peptides e.g. bradykinin potentiators, natriuretic, and analgesic peptides have shown potential as pharmaceutical agents, including areas of diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this review we have discussed recent remarkable research that has involved the dynamic snake venoms compounds, having anticancer bustle especially in case of colorectal cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Molecular Pathways: Fumarate Hydratase-Deficient Kidney Cancer: Targeting the Warburg Effect in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk for development of cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type II papillary kidney cancer. HLRCC is characterized by germline mutation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH). FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by impaired oxidative phosphorylation and a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis, a form of metabolic reprogramming referred to as the Warburg effect. Increased glycolysis generates ATP needed for increased cell proliferation. In FH-deficient kidney cancer levels of AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, are decreased; resulting in diminished p53 levels, decreased expression of the iron importer, DMT1, leading to low cellular iron levels, and to enhanced fatty acid synthesis by diminishing phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate limiting step for fatty acid synthesis. Increased fumarate and decreased iron levels in FH-deficient kidney cancer cells inactivate prolyl hydroxylases, leading to stabilization of HIF1α, and increased expression of genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and GLUT1 to provide fuel needed for rapid growth demands. Several therapeutic approaches for targeting the metabolic basis of FH-deficient kidney cancer are under development or are being evaluated in clinical trials, including the use of agents such as metformin, which would reverse the inactivation of AMPK, approaches to inhibit glucose transport, LDH-A, the anti-oxidant response pathway, the heme oxygenase pathway and approaches to target the tumor vasculature and glucose transport with agents such as bevacizumab and erlotinib. These same types of metabolic shifts, to aerobic glycolysis with decreased oxidative phosphorylation, have been found in a wide variety of other cancer types. Targeting the metabolic basis of a rare cancer such as fumarate hydratase

  13. Ultraviolet radiation: effects on risks of prostate cancer and other internal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Samuel J. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Fryer, Anthony A. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Strange, Richard C. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paa00@keele.ac.uk

    2005-04-01

    Governmental and research agencies worldwide have strongly advocated sun avoidance strategies in an attempt to counter marked increases in skin cancer incidence. Concurrently, there are reports describing widespread Vitamin D{sub 3} deficiency. Because 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, through interaction with the Vitamin D receptor, exerts pleiotrophic effects, such deficiency might be expected to have clinical consequences. Indeed, various reports indicate that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exerts a protective effect on development of some common diseases including internal cancers and multiple sclerosis. We describe studies indicating that modest exposure reduces risk of prostate cancer. The effect of UVR is mediated by skin type; at lower levels of exposure a relative inability to effect skin pigmentation is protective presumably because it allows more efficient Vitamin D{sub 3} synthesis. Polymorphic variants in genes associated with pigmentation including melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor and tyrosinase are also associated with prostate cancer risk. Overall, though preliminary and requiring cautious interpretation, these data indicate that moderate UVR exposure together with characteristics linked with less effective tanning confer reduced prostate cancer risk. Clearly, it is important to define safe levels of UVR that do not result in increased risk of skin cancers such as malignant melanoma.

  14. Ultraviolet radiation: effects on risks of prostate cancer and other internal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Samuel J.; Fryer, Anthony A.; Strange, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    Governmental and research agencies worldwide have strongly advocated sun avoidance strategies in an attempt to counter marked increases in skin cancer incidence. Concurrently, there are reports describing widespread Vitamin D 3 deficiency. Because 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , through interaction with the Vitamin D receptor, exerts pleiotrophic effects, such deficiency might be expected to have clinical consequences. Indeed, various reports indicate that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exerts a protective effect on development of some common diseases including internal cancers and multiple sclerosis. We describe studies indicating that modest exposure reduces risk of prostate cancer. The effect of UVR is mediated by skin type; at lower levels of exposure a relative inability to effect skin pigmentation is protective presumably because it allows more efficient Vitamin D 3 synthesis. Polymorphic variants in genes associated with pigmentation including melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor and tyrosinase are also associated with prostate cancer risk. Overall, though preliminary and requiring cautious interpretation, these data indicate that moderate UVR exposure together with characteristics linked with less effective tanning confer reduced prostate cancer risk. Clearly, it is important to define safe levels of UVR that do not result in increased risk of skin cancers such as malignant melanoma

  15. Adverse glycaemic effects of cancer therapy: indications for a rational approach to cancer patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Marco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Felicetti, Francesco; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Trimarchi, Francesco; Arvat, Emanuela; Vigneri, Riccardo; Colao, Annamaria

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are common, chronic, and potentially fatal diseases that frequently co-exist. Observational studies have reported an increased risk of cancer in patients with diabetes. Furthermore, many patients with cancer already have diabetes, or develop hyperglycaemia as a consequence of the tumor or of cancer therapies, and coexisting diabetes confers a greater risk of mortality for many malignancies. Managing oncologic patients with diabetes is often complicated, since the co-existence of diabetes and cancer poses several complex clinical questions: what level of glycaemic control to achieve, which therapy to use, how to deal with glucocorticoid therapies and artificial nutrition, how diabetes complications can affect cancer management, which drug-drug interactions should be taken into account, or even how to manage diabetes at the end of life. In the clinical setting, both at hospital and at home, there are little agreed, evidence-based guidelines on the best management and criteria upon which clinical decisions should be based. A practical solution lies in the implementation of care networks based on communication and ongoing collaboration between Oncologists, Endocrinologists, and the nursing staff, with the patient at the centre of the care process. This manuscript aims to review the current evidence on the effect of cancer therapies on glucose metabolism and to address some of the more common challenges of diabetes treatment in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modified denatured lysozyme effectively solubilizes fullerene c60 nanoparticles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepi, Marialuisa; Politi, Jane; Dardano, Principia; Amoresano, Angela; De Stefano, Luca; Monti, Daria Maria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Fullerenes, allotropic forms of carbon, have very interesting pharmacological effects and engineering applications. However, a very low solubility both in organic solvents and water hinders their use. Fullerene C60, the most studied among fullerenes, can be dissolved in water only in the form of nanoparticles of variable dimensions and limited stability. Here the effect on the production of C60 nanoparticles by a native and denatured hen egg white lysozyme, a highly basic protein, has been systematically studied. In order to obtain a denatured, yet soluble, lysozyme derivative, the four disulfides of the native protein were reduced and exposed cysteines were alkylated by 3-bromopropylamine, thus introducing eight additional positive charges. The C60 solubilizing properties of the modified denatured lysozyme proved to be superior to those of the native protein, allowing the preparation of biocompatible highly homogeneous and stable C60 nanoparticles using lower amounts of protein, as demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies. This lysozyme derivative could represent an effective tool for the solubilization of other carbon allotropes.

  17. The Effect of Modified Collaborative Strategic Reading on EFL Learners' Reading Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Abbasnezhad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of reading instructional approach called MCSR- Modified Collaborative Strategic Reading on reducing intermediate EFL learner's reading anxiety. Based on a pretest-posttest design, MCSR was implemented with 64 EFL learners at intermediate level. They received EFL reading instruction according to MCSR over two and a half months. A questionnaire called English as a Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Inventory EFLRAI was group-administered atthepretest and the posttest. Quantitative results indicated that participating students demonstrated significant gains in reducing reading anxiety. This study highlighted our understanding by considering the effectiveness of MCSR program and also it elaborated the effects of using strategies like MCSR in overcoming the big problem of reading anxiety among EFL learners as non-native students. And teachers changed the focus of attention from using traditional methods for teaching the essential skill of reading to modern programs like MCSR in order to remove their students' anxiety and stress in reading.

  18. A multi-scale modeling of surface effect via the modified boundary Cauchy-Born model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoei, A.R., E-mail: arkhoei@sharif.edu; Aramoon, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new multi-scale approach is presented based on the modified boundary Cauchy-Born (MBCB) technique to model the surface effects of nano-structures. The salient point of the MBCB model is the definition of radial quadrature used in the surface elements which is an indicator of material behavior. The characteristics of quadrature are derived by interpolating data from atoms laid in a circular support around the quadrature, in a least-square scene. The total-Lagrangian formulation is derived for the equivalent continua by employing the Cauchy-Born hypothesis for calculating the strain energy density function of the continua. The numerical results of the proposed method are compared with direct atomistic and finite element simulation results to indicate that the proposed technique provides promising results for modeling surface effects of nano-structures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multi-scale approach is presented to model the surface effects in nano-structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total-Lagrangian formulation is derived by employing the Cauchy-Born hypothesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radial quadrature is used to model the material behavior in surface elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quadrature characteristics are derived using the data at the atomistic level.

  19. Sense of coherence modifies the effect of overtime work on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Masanori; Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamato, Hiroshi; Kumashiro, Masaharu; Sugimura, Hisamichi

    2015-01-01

    In the occupational health field, it is important to know how workload influences mental health. Overtime work and job strain appear to affect the mental health status of workers. Sense of coherence (SOC) may mediate the relationship between work stress and mental health. Since SOC represents a personal ability to manage psychological stressors, we hypothesized that a strong SOC would modify the adverse effect of an objective measure of overtime work on mental health. A total of 1,558 Japanese workers employed in an information technology company were asked to complete a 3-item SOC Questionnaire and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) to assess mental health status. Workload was assessed by the actual amount of overtime work hours recorded by the company. Multiple regression analysis revealed a main effect of overtime work (β=0.08, p=0.0003) and SOC scores (β=0.41, p work and SOC scores (β=0.05, p=0.051). Simple slope analysis supported this association (-1 SD below the mean, simple slope=0.04, SE=0.01, p health impacts of workload as measured by an objective index of overtime work, and should be considered when assessing the effects of workload on mental health.

  20. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3 on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health.

  1. The effects of mother-child mediated learning strategies on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability of boys with learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, David; Shomron, Vered

    2018-06-01

    The theoretical framework of the current study is based on mediated learning experience (MLE) theory, which is similar to the scaffolding concept. The main question of the current study was to what extent mother-child MLE strategies affect psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability of boys with learning disability (LD). Secondary questions were to what extent the home environment, severity of boy's LD, and mother's attitude towards her child's LD affect her MLE strategies and consequently the child's psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability. The main objectives of this study were the following: (a) to investigate the effects of mother-child MLE strategies on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability among 7- to 10-year-old boys with LD, (b) to study the causal effects of distal factors (i.e., socio-economic status [SES], home environment, severity of child's LD, mother's attitude towards LD) and proximal factors (i.e., MLE strategies) on psychological resilience and cognitive modifiability. A sample of mother-child dyads (n = 100) were videotaped during a short teaching interaction. All children were boys diagnosed as children with LD. The interaction was analysed for MLE strategies by the Observation of Mediation Interaction scale. Children were administered psychological resilience tests and their cognitive modifiability was measured by dynamic assessment using the Analogies subtest from the Cognitive Modifiability Battery. Home environment was rated by the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME), and mothers answered a questionnaire of attitudes towards child's LD. The findings showed that mother-child MLE strategies, HOME, and socio-economic level contributed significantly to prediction of psychological resilience (78%) and cognitive modifiability (51%). Psychological resilience was positively correlated with cognitive modifiability (Rc = 0.67). Structural equation modelling analysis supported, in general

  2. Magnetoelectric coupling effect in transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivas Puli, Venkata, E-mail: pvsri123@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Department of Physics and Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936 (United States); Kumar Pradhan, Dhiren [Department of Physics and Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936 (United States); Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309-4401 (United States); Coondoo, Indrani [Department of Materials and Ceramic and CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Panwar, Neeraj [Department of Physics, Central University of Rajasthan, Bandar Sindri, Kishangarh 305801, Rajasthan (India); Adireddy, Shiva; Chrisey, Douglas B. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Katiyar, Ram S. [Department of Physics and Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00936 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Rare-earth (Sm) and transition metal (Co) modified polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films have been deposited on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate successfully through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Piezoelectric, leakage current and temperature dependent dielectric and magnetic behaviour were investigated for the films. Typical “butterfly-shaped” loop were observed in BSFCO films with an effective piezoelectric constant (d{sub 33}) ∼94 pm/V at 0.6 MV/cm. High dielectric constant ∼900 and low dielectric loss ∼0.25 were observed at room temperature. M–H loops have shown relatively high saturation magnetization ∼35 emu/cm{sup 3} at a maximum field of H ∼20 kOe. Enhanced magnetoelectric coupling response is observed under applied magnetic field. The multiferroic, piezoelectric, leakage current behaviours were explored. Such studies should be helpful in designing multiferroic materials based on BSFCO films. - Highlights: • Transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3} thin films prepared using PLD. • High ME-coupling response was observed in co-substituted BiFeO{sub 3} thin films. • High magnetization ∼35 emu/cm{sup 3} at a maximum field of H ∼20 kOe. • Low leakage current might be due to co-substitution in BiFeO{sub 3} thin films. • A notable piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} ∼94 pm/V was found in BiFeO{sub 3} thin films.

  3. Magnetoelectric coupling effect in transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas Puli, Venkata; Kumar Pradhan, Dhiren; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Coondoo, Indrani; Panwar, Neeraj; Adireddy, Shiva; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2014-01-01

    Rare-earth (Sm) and transition metal (Co) modified polycrystalline BiFeO 3 (BFO) thin films have been deposited on Pt/TiO 2 /SiO 2 /Si substrate successfully through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Piezoelectric, leakage current and temperature dependent dielectric and magnetic behaviour were investigated for the films. Typical “butterfly-shaped” loop were observed in BSFCO films with an effective piezoelectric constant (d 33 ) ∼94 pm/V at 0.6 MV/cm. High dielectric constant ∼900 and low dielectric loss ∼0.25 were observed at room temperature. M–H loops have shown relatively high saturation magnetization ∼35 emu/cm 3 at a maximum field of H ∼20 kOe. Enhanced magnetoelectric coupling response is observed under applied magnetic field. The multiferroic, piezoelectric, leakage current behaviours were explored. Such studies should be helpful in designing multiferroic materials based on BSFCO films. - Highlights: • Transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO 3 thin films prepared using PLD. • High ME-coupling response was observed in co-substituted BiFeO 3 thin films. • High magnetization ∼35 emu/cm 3 at a maximum field of H ∼20 kOe. • Low leakage current might be due to co-substitution in BiFeO 3 thin films. • A notable piezoelectric constant d 33 ∼94 pm/V was found in BiFeO 3 thin films

  4. The effect of modified atmosphere packaging with carbon monoxide on the storage quality of master-packaged fresh pork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, B.H.P.; Janz, J.A.M.; Morel, P.C.H.; Purchas, R.W.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging with carbon dioxide is effective for prolonging shelf-life of fresh meat. Addition of carbon monoxide to the system provides the advantage of enhancing meat colour. The study objective was to determine the effect of CO2-MAP + 0.4% CO, vs. 100% CO2-MAP, on the

  5. Modified natural cycle versus controlled ovarian hyperstimulation IVF: a cost-effectiveness evaluation of three simulated treatment scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Henk; Tonch, Nino; Simons, Arnold H. M.; van der Veen, Fulco; Hoek, Annemieke; Land, Jolande A.

    2013-01-01

    Can modified natural cycle IVF or ICSI (MNC) be a cost-effective alternative for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation IVF or ICSI (COH)? The comparison of simulated scenarios indicates that a strategy of three to six cycles of MNC with minimized medication is a cost-effective alternative for one

  6. Physical activity modifies the FTO effect on BMI change in Japanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Keiko; Okuda, Masayuki; Okayama, Naoko; Kunitsugu, Ichiro

    2018-04-14

    Evidence of the effects of fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variation and long-term effects of physical activity (PA) on adiposity in adolescents is largely scarce. This study aimed to investigate whether physical activity modulates the effects of the FTO gene on body mass index (BMI) changes in Japanese adolescents between the ages of 13 and 18 years. Data of 343 subjects (156 boys; 187 girls) who were enrolled in 2006 and 2007 from schools on Shunan City, Japan, were collected. Genotyping (rs1558902) was conducted, and anthropometric measurements and blood test results were recorded for subjects in the eighth grade. A second survey involving self-reporting of anthropometric measurements was conducted when the subjects were in the twelfth grade. PA was estimated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire in this survey. BMI and the standard deviation score for BMI (BMI-SDS) were calculated. BMI changes and BMI-SDS changes were compared among FTO genotypes using a multivariate model. The effect of the interaction between PA and the FTO genotype on BMI changes was significant among boys but not girls. Among boys, PA had a significant negative influence on BMI-SDS changes in those with the AA genotype and a significant positive influence on BMI and BMI-SDS changes in those with the TT genotype. These data suggest that the influence of PA on BMI changes and BMI-SDS changes varied on the basis of genotype. PA modified the effect of the FTO gene on BMI changes in Japanese boys. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Intraspecific priority effects modify compensatory responses to changes in hatching phenology in an amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Rincón, Andrea P; Kolter, Nora A; Laurila, Anssi; Orizaola, Germán

    2017-01-01

    In seasonal environments, modifications in the phenology of life-history events can alter the strength of time constraints experienced by organisms. Offspring can compensate for a change in timing of hatching by modifying their growth and development trajectories. However, intra- and interspecific interactions may affect these compensatory responses, in particular if differences in phenology between cohorts lead to significant priority effects (i.e. the competitive advantage that early-hatching individuals have over late-hatching ones). Here, we conducted a factorial experiment to determine whether intraspecific priority effects can alter compensatory phenotypic responses to hatching delay in a synchronic breeder by rearing moor frog (Rana arvalis) tadpoles in different combinations of phenological delay and food abundance. Tadpoles compensated for the hatching delay by speeding up their development, but only when reared in groups of individuals with identical hatching phenology. In mixed phenology groups, strong competitive effects by non-delayed tadpoles prevented the compensatory responses and delayed larvae metamorphosed later than in single phenology treatments. Non-delayed individuals gained advantage from developing with delayed larvae by increasing their developmental and growth rates as compared to single phenology groups. Food shortage prolonged larval period and reduced mass at metamorphosis in all treatments, but it did not prevent compensatory developmental responses in larvae reared in single phenology groups. This study demonstrates that strong intraspecific priority effects can constrain the compensatory growth and developmental responses to phenological change, and that priority effects can be an important factor explaining the maintenance of synchronic life histories (i.e. explosive breeding) in seasonal environments. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  8. Nutlin-3a and Cytokine Co-loaded Spermine-Modified Acetalated Dextran Nanoparticles for Cancer Chemo-Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauleth-Ramos, Tomás; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Liu, Dongfei

    2017-01-01

    The combination of chemo- and immunotherapy represents one promising strategy to overcome the existent challenges in the present-day anticancer therapy. Here, spermine-modified acetalated dextran nanoparticles (Sp-AcDEX NPs), co-loaded with the non-genotoxic molecule Nutlin-3a (Nut3a), and the cy......The combination of chemo- and immunotherapy represents one promising strategy to overcome the existent challenges in the present-day anticancer therapy. Here, spermine-modified acetalated dextran nanoparticles (Sp-AcDEX NPs), co-loaded with the non-genotoxic molecule Nutlin-3a (Nut3a...

  9. Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica Sinensis on Women’s Reproductive Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hong Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Danggui, the root of Angelica Sinensis, has traditionally been used for the treatment of women’s reproductive disorders in China for thousands of years. This study was to determine whether Danggui have potential anti-cancer effect on women’s cancer and its potential mechanism. Methods: Danggui was extracted by ethanol. The Cell Titer 96® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay was used to compare the effects of Danggui on human breast (MCF-7 and 7368 and cervical (CaSki and SiHa cancer cells with its effects on normal fibroblasts (HTB-125. A revised Ames test was used to test for antimutagenicity. The standard strains of Salmonella typhimarium (TA 100 and 102 were used in the test. Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS and UV light were used as positive mutagen controls and ethanol and double distilled water (DDW as controls. The SAS statistical software was used to analyze the data. Results: Danggui was found to be much more toxic to all cancer cell lines tested than to normal fibroblasts. There was a significant negative dose-effect relationship between Danggui and cancer cell viability. Average viability of MCF-7 was 69.5%, 18.4%, 5.7%, 5.7%, and 5.0% of control for Danggui doses 0.07, 0.14, 0.21, 0.32, and 0.64 ug/ul, respectively, with a Ptrend < 0.0001. Half maximal inhibitory dose (ID50 of Danggui for cancer cell lines MCF-7, CaSki, SiHa and CRL-7368 was 0.10, 0.09, 0.10 and 0.07 ug/ul, Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(6:242-250respectively. For the normal fibroblasts, ID50 was 0.58 ug/ul. At a dose of 0.32 ug/ul, Danggui killed over 90% of the cells in each cancer cell line, but at the same dose, only 12.3 % of the normal HTB-125 cells were killed. Revertants per plate of TA 100 decreased with the introduction of increasing doses of Danggui extracts with a Ptrend < 0.0001 when UV light was used as a mutagen. There was no difference in revertants per plate between ethanol and DDW control groups. Conclusions

  10. Studies of rhodamine-123: effect on rat prostate cancer and human prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, J A; Narayan, K S; Techy, G; Ng, C P; Saroufeem, R M; Jones, L W

    1995-06-01

    The effect of the lipophilic, cationic dye, Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123), on prostate cancer in rats, and on three tumor cell lines in vitro is reported here. The general toxicity of Rh-123 in mice has been found to be minimal. Lobund-Wistar (L-W) rats with the autochthonous prostate cancer of Pollard were treated for six doses with Rh-123 at a dose of 15 mg/kg subcutaneously every other day. Microscopic examination of the tumors revealed cellular and acinar destruction. The effectiveness of Rh-123 as a cytotoxic agent was tested by clonogenic and viability assays in vitro with three human prostate cancer cell lines. Severe (60-95%) growth inhibition was observed following Rh-123 exposure for 2-5 days at doses as low as 1.6 micrograms/ml in all three prostate cancer cell lines.

  11. Decreased expression of connective tissue growth factor in non-small cell lung cancer is associated with clinicopathological variables and can be restored by epigenetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecka, Hanna; Gałęcki, Bartłomiej; Jarmołowska-Jurczyszyn, Donata; Kluk, Andrzej; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies indicated undisputed contribution of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the development of many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the functional role and regulation of CTGF expression during tumorigenesis remain elusive. Our goal was to determine CTGF transcript and protein levels in tumoral and matched control tissues from 98 NSCLC patients, to correlate the results with clinicopathological features and to investigate whether the CTGF expression can be epigenetically regulated in NSCLC. We used quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry to evaluate CTGF expression in lung cancerous and histopathologically unchanged tissues. We tested the impact of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC) and trichostatin A (TSA) on CTGF transcript and protein levels in NSCLC cells (A549, Calu-1). DNA methylation status of the CTGF regulatory region was evaluated by bisulfite sequencing. The influence of 5-dAzaC and TSA on NSCLC cells viability and proliferation was monitored by the trypan blue assay. We found significantly decreased levels of CTGF mRNA and protein (both p cancerous tissues of NSCLC patients. Down-regulation of CTGF occurred regardless of gender in all histological subtypes of NSCLC. Moreover, we showed that 5-dAzaC and TSA were able to restore CTGF mRNA and protein contents in NSCLC cells. However, no methylation within CTGF regulatory region was detected. Both compounds significantly reduced NSCLC cells proliferation. Decreased expression of CTGF is a common feature in NSCLC; however, it can be restored by the chromatin-modifying agents such as 5-dAzaC or TSA and consequently restrain cancer development.

  12. Does the modified Stroop effect exist in PTSD? Evidence from dissertation abstracts and the peer reviewed literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Matthew O; Frueh, B Christopher; Marks, Libby

    2009-06-01

    The modified Stroop effect (MSE), in which participants show delayed colour naming to trauma-specific words, is one of the most widely cited findings in the literature pertaining to cognitive bias in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study used a novel approach (Dissertation Abstract Review; DAR) to review the presence of the MSE in dissertation abstracts. A review of dissertations that used the modified Stroop task in