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Sample records for cancer drug target

  1. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  2. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Jin-Ku Bao; Jin-Ming Yang; Yan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process,has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases,such as cancer.Notably,autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer.To date,substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators,such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs),PI3K,mTOR,p53,and Beclin-1,may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression.Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer,it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics.With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy,we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy.

  3. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  4. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  5. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  6. Chromatin targeting drugs in cancer and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinjha, Rab; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Recent advances in the enzymology of transcription and chromatin regulation have led to the discovery of proteins that play a prominent role in cell differentiation and the maintenance of specialized cell functions. Knowledge about post-synthetic DNA and histone modifications as well as information about the rules that guide the formation of multimolecular chromatin-bound complexes have helped to delineate gene-regulating pathways and describe how these pathways are altered in various pathological conditions. The present review focuses on the emerging area of therapeutic interference with chromatin function for the purpose of cancer treatment and immunomodulation.

  7. Folate receptor targeted liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Among all available lipid based nanoparticulate systems, the success of liposomal drug delivery system is evident by the number of liposomal products available in the market or under advanced stages of preclinical and clinical trials. Liposome has the ability to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the targeted tissues or even inside the cancerous cells by enhanced intracellular penetration or improved tumour targeting. In the last decade, folate receptor mediated tumour targeting has emerged as an attractive alternative method of active targeting of cancer cells through liposomes due to its numerous advantages over other targeting methods. Folate receptors, also known as folate binding proteins, allow the binding and internalization of folate or folic acid into the cells by a method called folate receptor mediated endocytosis. They have restricted presence in normal cells and are mostly expressed during malignant transformation. In this review article, folate receptor targeting capability of liposomes has been described. This review article has focussed on the different cancer drugs which have been encapsulated in folate receptor targeted liposomes and their in vitro as well as in vivo efficacies in several tumour models.

  8. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  9. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  10. Targeting DDX3 in cancer: personalized drug development and delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer begins when a cell in an organ of our body starts to grow uncontrollably. Only recently has it become clear that targeting the cancer cells’ dependency on specific proteins, rather than their origin, has greater therapeutic potential. The vast majority of potential targets for cancer therapy

  11. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  12. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  13. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models on liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Chen, Ningbo; Wang, Yunbing; Wang, Ke

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocarcinoma animal models, such as the induced tumor model, transplanted tumor model, gene animal model, are significant experimental tools for the evaluation of targeting drug delivery system as well as the pre-clinical studies of liver cancer. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models not only furnishes similar biological characteristics to human liver cancer but also offers guarantee of pharmacokinetic indicators of the liver-targeting preparations. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of antitumor drug-targeting models of hepatoma and speculated that the research on this field would be capable of attaining a deeper level and expecting a superior achievement in the future.

  14. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  15. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhenzhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1 they themselves have target effects; (2 they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3 they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  16. A New Era for Cancer Target Therapies: Applying Systems Biology and Computer-Aided Drug Design to Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Chiu, Chia-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Ting-Shou; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jeremy; Chen, Bor-Sen

    In recent years, many systems biology approaches have been used with various cancers. The materials described here can be used to build bases to discover novel cancer therapy targets in connection with computer-aided drug design (CADD). A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cancer will provide more choices and correct strategies in the development of multiple target drug therapies, which is quite different from the traditional cancer single target therapy. Targeted therapy is one of the most powerful strategies against cancer and can also be applied to other diseases. Due to the large amount of progress in computer hardware and the theories of computational chemistry and physics, CADD has been the main strategy for developing novel drugs for cancer therapy. In contrast to traditional single target therapies, in this review we will emphasize the future direction of the field, i.e., multiple target therapies. Structure-based and ligand-based drug designs are the two main topics of CADD. The former needs both 3D protein structures and ligand structures, while the latter only needs ligand structures. Ordinarily it is estimated to take more than 14 years and 800 million dollars to develop a new drug. Many new CADD software programs and techniques have been developed in recent decades. We conclude with an example where we combined and applied systems biology and CADD to the core networks of four cancers and successfully developed a novel cocktail for drug therapy that treats multiple targets.

  17. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  18. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food and Drug Administration approved a drug called vismodegib (Erivedge™) for treating advanced cases of basal cell ... the trial that led to the approval of vismodegib appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine ...

  19. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

  20. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  1. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P; Wang, Zihua; Kinney, Justin B; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations to the 5' exons of candidate genes, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We also show that the magnitude of negative selection can be used to infer the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting.

  2. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    -templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...... ligand and saporin (ribosome inactivating protein) as the warhead to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of saporin to transferrin receptor overexpressed cancer cell line. The transferrin-saporin conjugate complex are formed by linking the site-selective DNA-transferrin conjugates with mono...... to cancer cells. The DNA duplex in the conjugates could be used for doxorubicin intercalation since it contains CGA repeats. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results showed a receptor-mediated targeting manner to EGFR+ cancer cell lines (KB and MDA-MB-231), and resulted in enhanced cell killing...

  3. Drug delivery using nanoparticles for cancer stem-like cell targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing eLu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The theory of cancer stem-like cell (or cancer stem cell, CSC has been established to explain how tumor heterogeneity arises and contributes to tumor progression in diverse cancer types. CSCs are believed to drive tumor growth and elicit resistance to conventional therapeutics. Therefore, CSCs are becoming novel target in both medical researches and clinical studies. Emerging evidences showed that nanoparticles effectively inhibit many types of CSCs by targeting various specific markers (aldehyde dehydrogenases, CD44, CD90, and CD133 and signaling pathways (Notch, Hedgehog, and TGF-β, which are critically involved in CSC function and maintenance. In this review, we briefly summarize the current status of CSC research and review a number of state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches targeting CSC. In addition, we discuss emerging therapeutic strategies using epigenetic drugs to eliminate CSCs and inhibit cancer cell reprogramming.

  4. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which 60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and 10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, 90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and 70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy.

  5. Smart Cancer Cell Targeting Imaging and Drug Delivery System by Systematically Engineering Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nan; Tian, Ying; Tian, Wei; Huang, Peng; Liu, Ying; Tang, Yuxia; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Shouju; Su, Yunyan; Zhang, Yunlei; Pan, Jing; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-02-10

    The integration of diagnosis and therapy into one nanoplatform, known as theranostics, has attracted increasing attention in the biomedical areas. Herein, we first present a cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery system based on engineered thioether-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMOs). The PMOs are stably and selectively conjugated with near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye Cyanine 5.5 (Cy5.5) and anti-Her2 affibody on the outer surfaces to endow them with excellent NIRF imaging and cancer targeting properties. Also, taking the advantage of the thioether-group-incorporated mesopores, the release of chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in the PMOs is responsive to the tumor-related molecule glutathione (GSH). The drug release percentage reaches 84.8% in 10 mM of GSH solution within 24 h, which is more than 2-fold higher than that without GSH. In addition, the drug release also exhibits pH-responsive, which reaches 53.6% at pH 5 and 31.7% at pH 7.4 within 24 h. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis demonstrate that the PMOs-based theranostic platforms can efficiently target to and enter Her2 positive tumor cells. Thus, the smart imaging and drug delivery nanoplatforms induce high tumor cell growth inhibition. Meanwhile, the Cy5.5 conjugated PMOs perform great NIRF imaging ability, which could monitor the intracellular distribution, delivery and release of the chemotherapy drug. In addition, cell viability and histological assessments show the engineered PMOs have good biocompatibility, further encouraging the following biomedical applications. Over all, the systemically engineered PMOs can serve as a novel cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery platform with NIRF imaging, GSH and pH dual-responsive drug release, and high tumor cell targeting ability.

  6. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  7. Targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan; Neal Rosen; Carlos Arteaga

    2011-01-01

    With unprecedented understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer in this genomic era, a large number of drugs specifically targeting hypothesized oncogenic drivers to which tumors are potentially addicted to have been developed and continue to be developed. These targeted cancer therapies are being actively tested in clinical trials with mixed successes. This editorial provides an overview on successful targeted cancer drugs on the market and those drugs that are in late clinical development stages. Importantly, the article lays out main challenges in developing molecular targeted therapies and potential path forward to overcome these challenges, as well as opportunities for China in this new era of targeted agents. The editorial serves as an introduction to the Targeted Cancer Therapies serias that will review in depth of major pathways and drugs targeting these pathways to be published in the coming issues of the Chinese Journal of Cancer.

  8. Network-based approaches for drug response prediction and targeted therapy development in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, Mathurin; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei; Kuperstein, Inna

    2015-08-21

    Signaling pathways implicated in cancer create a complex network with numerous regulatory loops and redundant pathways. This complexity explains frequent failure of one-drug-one-target paradigm of treatment, resulting in drug resistance in patients. To overcome the robustness of cell signaling network, cancer treatment should be extended to a combination therapy approach. Integrating and analyzing patient high-throughput data together with the information about biological signaling machinery may help deciphering molecular patterns specific to each patient and finding the best combinations of candidates for therapeutic targeting. We review state of the art in the field of targeted cancer medicine from the computational systems biology perspective. We summarize major signaling network resources and describe their characteristics with respect to applicability for drug response prediction and intervention targets suggestion. Thus discuss methods for prediction of drug sensitivity and intervention combinations using signaling networks together with high-throughput data. Gradual integration of these approaches into clinical routine will improve prediction of response to standard treatments and adjustment of intervention schemes.

  9. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  10. A green approach to dual-drug nanoformulations with targeting and synergistic effects for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Lu, Yue; Fan, Zhongxiong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Yuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2017-11-01

    Exploration of efficient dual-drug nanohybrids, particularly those with high drug loading, specific targeting property, and long-termed stability, is of highly importance in cancer therapy. A pH-driven coprecipitation was performed in the aqueous phase to obtain a dual-drug nanoformulation, composed of 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) nanoneedles integrated with an exterior thin layer of the methotrexate (MTX)-chitosan conjugate. The high stability of nanohybrids in water and the targeting property provided by the MTX ingredient function synergistically to the prolonged and sustained drug release property in tumor tissues and the increased cellular uptake. The cytotoxicity test illustrates that dual-drug nanoneedles possess the remarkable killing ability to HeLa cells with the combination index at 0.33 ± 0.07. After cellular internalization, the release of both drug ingredients results in an excellent anticancer activity in vivo with the minimized adverse side effects. Design of a green approach to the carrier-free, dual-drug nanoformulations enables to develop emerging drug delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

  12. A method for predicting target drug efficiency in cancer based on the analysis of signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, Artem; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Michael; Lezhnina, Ksenia; Jellen, Leslie; Zhukov, Nikolay; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Borisov, Nicolas; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-06

    A new generation of anticancer therapeutics called target drugs has quickly developed in the 21st century. These drugs are tailored to inhibit cancer cell growth, proliferation, and viability by specific interactions with one or a few target proteins. However, despite formally known molecular targets for every "target" drug, patient response to treatment remains largely individual and unpredictable. Choosing the most effective personalized treatment remains a major challenge in oncology and is still largely trial and error. Here we present a novel approach for predicting target drug efficacy based on the gene expression signature of the individual tumor sample(s). The enclosed bioinformatic algorithm detects activation of intracellular regulatory pathways in the tumor in comparison to the corresponding normal tissues. According to the nature of the molecular targets of a drug, it predicts whether the drug can prevent cancer growth and survival in each individual case by blocking the abnormally activated tumor-promoting pathways or by reinforcing internal tumor suppressor cascades. To validate the method, we compared the distribution of predicted drug efficacy scores for five drugs (Sorafenib, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Sorafenib, Imatinib, Sunitinib) and seven cancer types (Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colon cancer, Lung adenocarcinoma, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Thyroid cancer and Sarcoma) with the available clinical trials data for the respective cancer types and drugs. The percent of responders to a drug treatment correlated significantly (Pearson's correlation 0.77 p = 0.023) with the percent of tumors showing high drug scores calculated with the current algorithm.

  13. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology.

  14. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed.

  15. Targeted therapeutic nanotubes influence the viscoelasticity of cancer cells to overcome drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Chikkaveeraiah, Bhaskara V; Srivatsan, Avinash; Niu, Gang; Jin, Albert J; Kapoor, Ankur; Wang, Zhe; Patel, Sachin; Patel, Vyomesh; Gorbach, Alexander M; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hight Walker, Angela R; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-05-27

    Resistance to chemotherapy is the primary cause of treatment failure in over 90% of cancer patients in the clinic. Research in nanotechnology-based therapeutic alternatives has helped provide innovative and promising strategies to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). By targeting CD44-overexpressing MDR cancer cells, we have developed in a single-step a self-assembled, self-targetable, therapeutic semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sSWCNT) drug delivery system that can deliver chemotherapeutic agents to both drug-sensitive OVCAR8 and resistant OVCAR8/ADR cancer cells. The novel nanoformula with a cholanic acid-derivatized hyaluronic acid (CAHA) biopolymer wrapped around a sSWCNT and loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX, is much more effective in killing drug-resistant cancer cells compared to the free DOX and phospholipid PEG (PL-PEG)-modified sSWCNT formula, PEG-sSWCNT-DOX. The CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX affects the viscoelastic property more than free DOX and PL-PEG-sSWCNT-DOX, which in turn allows more drug molecules to be internalized. Intravenous injection of CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX (12 mg/kg DOX equivalent) followed by 808 nm laser irradiation (1 W/cm(2), 90 s) led to complete tumor eradication in a subcutaneous OVCAR8/ADR drug-resistant xenograft model, while free DOX alone failed to delay tumor growth. Our newly developed CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX nanoformula, which delivers therapeutics and acts as a sensitizer to influence drug uptake and induce apoptosis with minimal resistance factor, provides a novel effective means of counteracting the phenomenon of multidrug resistance.

  16. Controllability in cancer metabolic networks according to drug targets as driver nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Yazdan; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Networks are employed to represent many nonlinear complex systems in the real world. The topological aspects and relationships between the structure and function of biological networks have been widely studied in the past few decades. However dynamic and control features of complex networks have not been widely researched, in comparison to topological network features. In this study, we explore the relationship between network controllability, topological parameters, and network medicine (metabolic drug targets). Considering the assumption that targets of approved anticancer metabolic drugs are driver nodes (which control cancer metabolic networks), we have applied topological analysis to genome-scale metabolic models of 15 normal and corresponding cancer cell types. The results show that besides primary network parameters, more complex network metrics such as motifs and clusters may also be appropriate for controlling the systems providing the controllability relationship between topological parameters and drug targets. Consequently, this study reveals the possibilities of following a set of driver nodes in network clusters instead of considering them individually according to their centralities. This outcome suggests considering distributed control systems instead of nodal control for cancer metabolic networks, leading to a new strategy in the field of network medicine.

  17. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  18. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  19. Bacterial exopolysaccharide based magnetic nanoparticles: a versatile nanotool for cancer cell imaging, targeted drug delivery and synergistic effect of drug and hyperthermia mediated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Balasubramanian; Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Sreejith, Raveendran; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Iwai, Seiki; Suzuki, Masashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, Dasappan Nair

    2014-06-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are highly heterogeneous polymers produced by fungi and bacteria that have garnered considerable attention and have remarkable potential in various fields, including biomedical research. The necessity of biocompatible materials to coat and stabilize nanoparticles is highly recommended for successful application of the same in biomedical regime. In our study we have coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with two bacterial EPS-mauran (MR) and gellan gum (GG). The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs was enhanced and we have made it multifunctional by attaching targeting moiety, folate and with encapsulation of a potent anticancerous drug, 5FU. We have conjugated an imaging moiety along with nanocomposite to study the effective uptake of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the dye labeled folate targeted nanoparticles could effectively enter into cancer cells and the fate of nanoparticles was tracked with Lysotracker. The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs and synergistic effect of magnetic hyperthermia and drug for enhanced antiproliferation of cancer cells was also evaluated. More than 80% of cancer cells was killed within a period of 60 min when magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) was applied along with drug loaded EPS coated MNPs, thus signifying the combined effect of drug loaded MNPs and MHT. Our results suggests that MR and GG coated MNPs exhibited excellent biocompatibility with low cell cytotoxicity, high therapeutic potential, and superparamagnetic behavior that can be employed as prospective candidates for bacterial EPS based targeted drug delivery, cancer cell imaging and for MHT for killing cancer cells within short period of time.

  20. Repositioning metformin in cancer: genetics, drug targets, and new ways of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Mihaela; Craciun, Lucian; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Kacso, Gabriel; Florian, Ioan Stefan; Crivii, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    After sitting many years on the shelves of drug stores as a harmless antidiabetic drug, metformin comes back in the spotlight of the scientific community as a surprisingly effective antineoplastic drug. Metformin targets multiple pathways that play pivotal roles in cancer progression, impacting various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell death, metabolism, and even the cancer stemness features. The biomolecular characteristics of tumors, such as appropriate expression of organic cation transporters or genetic alterations including p53, K-ras, LKB1, and PI3K may impact metformin's anticancer efficiency. This could indicate a need for tumor genetic profiling in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from metformin treatment. Considering that the majority of experimental models suggest that higher, supra-clinical doses of metformin should be used in order to obtain an antineoplastic effect, new ways of drug delivery could be developed, such as metformin-loaded nanoparticles or incorporation of metformin into microparticles used in transarterial chemoembolization, with the aim of obtaining higher intratumoral drug concentrations and a targeted therapy which will ultimately maximize metformin's efficacy.

  1. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  2. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  3. Targeted pancreatic cancer therapy with the small molecule drug conjugate SW IV-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Spitzer, Dirk; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Hornick, Mary C; Garg, Gunjal; Hornick, John R; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to conventional therapeutics and has been shown to evade apoptosis by deregulation of the X-linked and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (XIAP and cIAP). Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) induces and amplifies cell death by reversing the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. Thus, Smac-derived peptide analogues (peptidomimetics) have been developed and shown to represent promising cancer therapeutics. Sigma-2 receptors are overexpressed in many proliferating tumor cells including pancreatic cancer. Selected ligands to this receptor are rapidly internalized by cancer cells. These characteristics have made the sigma-2 receptor an attractive target for drug delivery because selective delivery to cancer cells has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. Here, we describe the initial characterization of SW IV-134, a chemically linked drug conjugate between the sigma-2 ligand SW43 and the Smac mimetic SW IV-52 as a novel treatment option for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor killing characteristics of our dual-domain therapeutic SW IV-134 was far greater than either component in isolation or in an equimolar mix and suggests enhanced cellular delivery when chemically linked to the sigma-2 ligand. One of the key findings was that SW IV-134 retained target selectivity of the Smac cargo with the involvement of the NF-κB/TNFα signaling pathway. Importantly, SW IV-134 slowed tumor growth and improved survival in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Our data support further study of this novel therapeutic and this drug delivery strategy because it may eventually benefit patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Development Drugs Against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia eVasconcelos-dos-Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc, and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac, donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs.

  5. Drug embedded PVP coated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted killing of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, P Arsula; Praseetha, P K; Bhagat, Madhulika; Alexander, Princy; Abdeen, Sunitha; Chavali, Murthy

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in loco-regional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by co-precipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). Characterization was performed using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. Magnetite (Fe3O4) remained as the core of the carrier. The amount of PVP bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles was estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVP to the iron oxide nanoparticles confirmed by FTIR analysis. The loading efficiency of Epirubicin hydrochloride onto the PVP coated and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles was measured at intervals such as 1 hr and 24 hrs by UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The binding of Epirubicin hydrochloride to the PVP coated and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings showed that Epirubicin hydrochloride loaded PVP coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. The drug displayed increased cell cytotoxicity at lower concentrations when conjugated with the nanoparticles than being administered conventionally as individual drugs.

  6. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  7. Multifunctional aptamer-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to circumvent cancer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yuanyu; Deng, Hua; Kumar, Anil; Wang, Chenxuan; Liang, Zicai; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-06-01

    By its unique advantages over traditional medicine, nanomedicine has offered new strategies for cancer treatment. In particular, the development of drug delivery strategies has focused on nanoscale particles to improve bioavailability. However, many of these nanoparticles are unable to overcome tumor resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, new opportunities for drug delivery have been provided by oligonucleotides that can self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures. In this work, we have designed and developed functional DNA nanostructures to deliver the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (Dox) to resistant cancer cells. These nanostructures have two components. The first component is a DNA aptamer, which forms a dimeric G-quadruplex nanostructure to target cancer cells by binding with nucleolin. The second component is double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is rich in -GC- base pairs that can be applied for Dox delivery. We demonstrated that Dox was able to efficiently intercalate into dsDNA and this intercalation did not affect the aptamer's three-dimensional structure. In addition, the Aptamer-dsDNA (ApS) nanoparticle showed good stability and protected the dsDNA from degradation in bovine serum. More importantly, the ApS&Dox nanoparticle efficiently reversed the resistance of human breast cancer cells to Dox. The mechanism circumventing doxorubicin resistance by ApS&Dox nanoparticles may be predominantly by cell cycle arrest in S phase, effectively increased cell uptake and decreased cell efflux of doxorubicin. Furthermore, the ApS&Dox nanoparticles could effectively inhibit tumor growth, while less cardiotoxicity was observed. Overall, this functional DNA nanostructure provides new insights into the design of nanocarriers to overcome multidrug resistance through targeted drug delivery.

  8. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  9. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  10. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy.

  11. Mapping Novel Metabolic Nodes Targeted by Anti-Cancer Drugs that Impair Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsay S; Yan, Peter; Bateman, Leslie A; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-08

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 receptor-negative subtypes of breast cancers that show the worst prognoses and lack targeted therapies. Here, we have coupled the screening of ∼400 anticancer agents that are under development or in the clinic with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to identify novel metabolic mechanisms for agents that impair TNBC pathogenicity. We identify 20 anticancer compounds that significantly impaired cell survival across multiple types of TNBC cells. Among these 20 leads, the phytoestrogenic natural product licochalcone A was of interest, since TNBCs are unresponsive to estrogenic therapies, indicating that licochalcone A was likely acting through another target. Using chemoproteomic profiling approaches, we reveal that licochalcone A impairs TNBC pathogenicity, not through modulating estrogen receptor activity but rather through inhibiting prostaglandin reductase 1, a metabolic enzyme involved in leukotriene B4 inactivation. We also more broadly performed metabolomic profiling to map additional metabolic mechanisms of compounds that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Overlaying lipidomic profiling with drug responses, we find that deubiquitinase inhibitors cause dramatic elevations in acyl carnitine levels, which impair mitochondrial respiration and contribute to TNBC pathogenic impairments. We thus put forth two unique metabolic nodes that are targeted by drugs or drug candidates that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Our results also showcase the utility of coupling drug screens with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to uncover unique metabolic drivers of TNBC pathogenicity.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4): a targetable regulator of drug resistance in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, R C; Longley, D B; Allen, W L; Stevenson, L; McLaughlin, K; Dunne, P D; Blayney, J K; Salto-Tellez, M; Van Schaeybroeck, S; Johnston, P G

    2014-02-06

    The discovery of underlying mechanisms of drug resistance, and the development of novel agents to target these pathways, is a priority for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously undertook a systems biology approach to design a functional genomic screen and identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as a potential mediator of drug resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FGFR4 in drug resistance using RNAi and the small-molecule inhibitor BGJ398 (Novartis). We found that FGFR4 is highly expressed at the RNA and protein levels in colon cancer tumour tissue compared with normal colonic mucosa and other tumours. Silencing of FGFR4 reduced cell viability in a panel of colon cancer cell lines and increased caspase-dependent apoptosis. A synergistic interaction was also observed between FGFR4 silencing and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colon cancer cell lines. Mechanistically, FGFR4 silencing decreased activity of the pro-survival STAT3 transcription factor and expression of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP. Furthermore, silencing of STAT3 resulted in downregulation of c-FLIP protein expression, suggesting that FGFR4 may regulate c-FLIP expression via STAT3. A similar phenotype and downstream pathway changes were observed following FGFR4 silencing in cell lines resistant to 5-FU, oxaliplatin and SN38 and upon exposure of parental cells to the FGFR small-molecule inhibitor BGJ398. Our results indicate that FGFR4 is a targetable regulator of chemo-resistance in CRC, and hence inhibiting FGFR4 in combination with 5-FU and oxaliplatin is a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  13. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-03-18

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets.

  14. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  15. Non-small-cell lung cancer: molecular targeted therapy and personalized medicine – drug resistance, mechanisms, and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechler M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Marybeth Sechler,1,2 Amber D Cizmic,3 Sreedevi Avasarala,1 Michelle Van Scoyk,1 Christine Brzezinski,1 Nicole Kelley,1 Rama Kamesh Bikkavilli,1 Robert A Winn1–3 1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care, 2Program in Cancer Biology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Targeted therapies for cancer bring the hope of specific treatment, providing high efficacy and in some cases lower toxicity than conventional treatment. Although targeted therapeutics have helped immensely in the treatment of several cancers, like chronic myelogenous leukemia, colon cancer, and breast cancer, the benefit of these agents in the treatment of lung cancer remains limited, in part due to the development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug resistance and the current strategies used to treat lung cancer. A better understanding of these drug-resistance mechanisms could potentially benefit from the development of a more robust personalized medicine approach for the treatment of lung cancer. Keywords: lung cancer, drug targets, personalized medicine, NSCLC

  16. Green synthesis of pullulan stabilized gold nanoparticles for cancer targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Raja, Modhugoor Devendiran; Subamekala, Muthaiya Kannappan; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles using liver specific biopolymer and to develop a liver cancer targeted drug delivery system with enhanced efficacy and minimal side effects. Pullulan stabilized gold nanoparticles (PAuNPs) were coupled with 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) and folic acid (Fa) which could be used as a tool for targeted drug delivery and imaging of cancer. The toxicity of 5-Fu, 5-Fu adsorbed gold nanoparticles (5-Fu@AuNPs), Fa-coupled 5-Fu adsorbed gold nanoparticles (5-Fu@AuNPs-Fa), was studied using zebrafish embryo as an in vivo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free 5-Fu, 5-Fu@AuNPs, 5-Fu@AuNPs-Fa against HepG2 cells was studied and found that the amount of 5-Fu required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (Ic50) was much lower in 5-Fu@AuNP-Fa than in free 5-Fu, 5-Fu@AuNPs. The in vivo biodistribution of PAuNPs showed that higher amount of gold had been accumulated in liver (54.42±5.96 μg) than in other organs.

  17. Treating triple negative breast cancer cells with erlotinib plus a select antioxidant overcomes drug resistance by targeting cancer cell heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Mitrea, Cristina; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Marchetti, Luca; Girsch, Emily; Farr, Rebecca L.; Boerner, Julie L; Mohammad, Ramzi; Dyson, Greg; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia

    2017-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients, those diagnosed with the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype have the worst prog-nosis. TNBC does not express estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, or the HER2 oncogene; therefore, TNBC lacks targets for molecularly-guided therapies. The concept that EGFR oncogene inhibitor drugs could be used as targeted treatment against TNBC has been put forth based on estimates that 30–60% of TNBC express high levels of EGFR. However, results from clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, did not improve patient outcomes. Results herein offer an explanation as to why EGFR inhibitors failed TNBC patients and support how combining a select antioxidant and an EGFR-specific small molecule kinase inhibitor (SMKI) could be an effective, novel therapeutic strategy. Treatment with CAT-SKL—a re-engineered protein form of the antioxidant enzyme catalase—inhibited cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and treatment with the EGFR-specific SMKI erlotinib inhibited non-CSCs. Thus, combining the antioxidant CAT-SKL with erlotinib targeted both CSCs and bulk cancer cells in cultures of EGFR-expressing TNBC-derived cells. We also report evidence that the mechanism for CAT-SKL inhibition of CSCs may depend on antioxidant-induced downregulation of a short alternative mRNA splicing variant of the methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene, isoform MBD2c. PMID:28281569

  18. Treating triple negative breast cancer cells with erlotinib plus a select antioxidant overcomes drug resistance by targeting cancer cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Mitrea, Cristina; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Marchetti, Luca; Girsch, Emily; Farr, Rebecca L; Boerner, Julie L; Mohammad, Ramzi; Dyson, Greg; Terlecky, Stanley R; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia

    2017-03-10

    Among breast cancer patients, those diagnosed with the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype have the worst prog-nosis. TNBC does not express estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, or the HER2 oncogene; therefore, TNBC lacks targets for molecularly-guided therapies. The concept that EGFR oncogene inhibitor drugs could be used as targeted treatment against TNBC has been put forth based on estimates that 30-60% of TNBC express high levels of EGFR. However, results from clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, did not improve patient outcomes. Results herein offer an explanation as to why EGFR inhibitors failed TNBC patients and support how combining a select antioxidant and an EGFR-specific small molecule kinase inhibitor (SMKI) could be an effective, novel therapeutic strategy. Treatment with CAT-SKL-a re-engineered protein form of the antioxidant enzyme catalase-inhibited cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and treatment with the EGFR-specific SMKI erlotinib inhibited non-CSCs. Thus, combining the antioxidant CAT-SKL with erlotinib targeted both CSCs and bulk cancer cells in cultures of EGFR-expressing TNBC-derived cells. We also report evidence that the mechanism for CAT-SKL inhibition of CSCs may depend on antioxidant-induced downregulation of a short alternative mRNA splicing variant of the methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene, isoform MBD2c.

  19. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harati, Sahar; Cooper, Lee A D; Moran, Josue D; Giuste, Felipe O; Du, Yuhong; Ivanov, Andrei A; Johns, Margaret A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Moreno, Carlos S

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology. Here we introduce a computational method (MEDICI) to predict PPI essentiality by combining gene knockdown studies with network models of protein interaction pathways in an analytic framework. Our method uses network topology to model how gene silencing can disrupt PPIs, relating the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs to experimentally observed protein essentialities. This model is then deconvolved to recover the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs. We demonstrate the validity of our approach via prediction of sensitivities to compounds based on PPI essentiality and differences in essentiality based on genetic mutations. We further show that lung cancer patients have improved overall survival when specific PPIs are no longer present, suggesting that these PPIs may be potentially new targets for therapeutic development. Software is freely available at https://github.com/cooperlab/MEDICI. Datasets are available at https://ctd2.nci.nih.gov/dataPortal.

  20. Inulin-based polymer coated SPIONs as potential drug delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialabba, C; Licciardi, M; Mauro, N; Rocco, F; Ceruti, M; Giammona, G

    2014-11-01

    This paper deal with the synthesis and characterization of PEGylated squalene-grafted-inulin amphiphile capable of self-assembling and self-organizing into nanocarriers once placed in aqueous media. It was exploited as coating agent for obtaining doxorubicin loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) endowed with stealth like behavior and excellent physicochemical stability. Inulin was firstly modified in the side chain with primary amine groups, followed in turn by conjugation with squalenoyl derivatives through common amidic coupling agents and PEGylation by imine linkage. Polymer coated SPIONs were so obtained by spontaneous self-assembling of inulin copolymer onto magnetite surface involving hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions between the metallic core and the squalene moieties. The system was characterized in terms of hydrodynamic radius, zeta potential, shape and drug loading capacity. On the whole, the stealth-like shell stabilized the suspension in aqueous media, though allowing the release of the doxorubicin loaded in therapeutic range. The cytotoxicity profile on cancer (HCT116) cell line and in vitro drug uptake were evaluated both with and without an external magnetic field used as targeting agent and uptake promoter, displaying that magnetic targeting implies advantageous therapeutic effects, that is amplified drug uptake and increased anticancer activity throughout the tumor mass.

  1. Using Gold Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine Phosphate to Treat Hematological Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Steven; Hao, Yuzhi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging paradigm for creating functional nanoscale materials for various biomedical applications. In this study, a new nanotechnology-based drug delivery method was developed using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a delivery vehicle to reduce adverse drug side effects. Fludarabine Phosphate is a commercial chemotherapy drug used in cancer treatment, and has ability to kill various cancer cells. KG-1 cell, a type of acute cancer leukemia cell, was selected as a proof-of-concept target in this study. Due to the small size of GNPs, they can help Fludarabine Phosphate enter cancer cells more efficiently and better interfere with DNA synthesis in the cancer cells. To enhance targeting ability, folic acid molecules were also covalently linked to GNPs, resulting in GNP-Fludarabine-folic acid (GNP-F/f). Compared to treatments with GNP-F or drugs on its own (Fludarabine Phosphate), the GNP-F/f achieves much improved cell-killing effects. The UV-Vis spectra results also revealed that the drugs had successfully bonded covalently to the GNPs. The higher cell-killing efficiency of GNP-F/f compared with GNP-Fludarabine (GNP-F) or drugs on their own further validates the effectiveness of both the vectors (GNPs) and folic acid in enhancing the drug delivery to the cancer cells. The MTT viability tests showed that the GNPs had no cytotoxicity.

  2. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors meditate targeted delivery of anticancer drug with encapsulated nanoparticles to breast cancer cells with high selectivity and its potential for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Shen, Zheyu; Ma, Xuehua; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Gong, An; Xia, Tian; Guo, Junming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-03-11

    By enabling nanoparticle-based drug delivery system to actively target cancer cells with high selectivity, active targeted molecules have attracted great attention in the application of nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery. However, the clinical application of most active targeted molecules in breast cancer therapy is limited, due to the low expression of their receptors in breast tumors or coexpression in the normal and tumor breast tissues. Here, a neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors ligand PNBL-NPY, as a novel targeted molecule, is conjugated with anticancer drug doxorubicin encapsulating albumin nanoparticles to investigate the effect of Y1 receptors on the delivery of drug-loaded nanoparticles to breast cancer cells and its potential for breast cancer therapy. The PNBL-NPY can actively recognize and bind to the Y1 receptors that are significantly overexpressed on the surface of the breast cancer cells, and the drug-loaded nanoparticles are delivered directly into the cancer cells through internalization. This system is highly selective and able to distinguish the breast cancer cells from the normal cells, due to normal breast cells that express Y2 receptors only. It is anticipated that this study may provide a guidance in the development of Y1 receptor-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system for a safer and more efficient breast cancer therapy.

  3. Chaperone-Targeting Cytotoxin and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Inducing Drug Synergize to Kill Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Backer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA of a novel bacterial AB5 toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  4. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  5. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Doan Do, Hai; Thong Phan, Quoc; Nguyet Tran Thi, Minh; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan; Nhung Hoang Thi, My; Huong Le, Mai; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Quang Bui, Thuc; Hieu Phan, Van

    2016-03-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50-100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment.

  6. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  7. A Synthetic Aptamer-Drug Adduct for Targeted Liver Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thu Le; Zhu, Guizhi; Xiao, Xilin; Puszyk, William; Sefah, Kwame; Wu, Qunfeng; Tan, Weihong; Liu, Chen

    2015-01-01

    AS1411 (previously known as AGRO100) is a 26 nucleotide guanine-rich DNA aptamer which forms a guanine quadruplex structure. AS1411 has shown promising utility as a treatment for cancers in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials without causing major side-effects. AS1411 inhibits tumor cell growth by binding to nucleolin which is aberrantly expressed on the cell membrane of many tumors. In this study, we utilized a simple technique to conjugate a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (Dox), to AS1411 to form a synthetic Drug-DNA Adduct (DDA), termed as AS1411-Dox. We demonstrate the utility of AS1411-Dox in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by evaluating the targeted delivery of Dox to Huh7 cells in vitro and in a murine xenograft model of HCC.

  8. A Synthetic Aptamer-Drug Adduct for Targeted Liver Cancer Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thu Le Trinh

    Full Text Available AS1411 (previously known as AGRO100 is a 26 nucleotide guanine-rich DNA aptamer which forms a guanine quadruplex structure. AS1411 has shown promising utility as a treatment for cancers in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials without causing major side-effects. AS1411 inhibits tumor cell growth by binding to nucleolin which is aberrantly expressed on the cell membrane of many tumors. In this study, we utilized a simple technique to conjugate a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (Dox, to AS1411 to form a synthetic Drug-DNA Adduct (DDA, termed as AS1411-Dox. We demonstrate the utility of AS1411-Dox in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by evaluating the targeted delivery of Dox to Huh7 cells in vitro and in a murine xenograft model of HCC.

  9. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Systems for Targeted Inhibition of Notch Signaling in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Notch signaling, a key regulator of stem cells, is frequently overactivated in cancer. It is often linked to aggressive forms of cancer, evading standard treatment highlighting Notch as an exciting therapeutic target. Notch is in principle “druggable” by γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), inhibitory peptides and antibodies, but clinical use of Notch inhibitors is restricted by severe side effects and there is a demand for alternative cancer-targeted therapy. Here, we present a novel approach, usi...

  10. The Metaboloepigenetic Dimension of Cancer Stem Cells: Evaluating the Market Potential for New Metabostemness-Targeting Oncology Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The current global portfolio of oncology drugs is unlikely to produce durable disease remission for millions of cancer patients worldwide. This is due, in part, to the existence of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), a particularly aggressive type of malignant cell that is capable of indefinite self-replication, is refractory to conventional treatments, and is skilled at spreading and colonizing distant organs. To date, no drugs from big-league Pharma companies are capable of killing CSCs. Why? Quite simply, a classic drug development approach based on mutated genes and pathological protein products cannot efficiently target the plastic, epigenetic proclivity of cancer tissues to generate CSCs. Recent studies have proposed that certain elite metabolites (oncometabolites) and other common metabolites can significantly influence the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures of stemness and cancer. Consequently, cellular metabolism and the core epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, can be better viewed as an integrated metaboloepigenetic dimension of CSCs, which we have recently termed cancer metabostemness. By targeting weaknesses in the bridge connecting metabolism and epigenetics, a new generation of metabostemnessspecific drugs can be generated for potent and long-lasting elimination of life-threatening CSCs. Here I evaluate the market potential of re-modeling the oncology drug pipeline by discovering and developing new metabolic approaches able to target the apparently undruggable epigenetic programs that dynamically regulate the plasticity of non-CSC and CSC cellular states.

  11. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang, E-mail: mcfzeng@scut.edu.cn; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu, E-mail: shzhwu@scut.edu.cn [South China University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (China)

    2013-09-15

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of {approx}100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  12. Targeting the chromatin remodeling enzyme BRG1 increases the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Sharma, Soni; Cui, Hang; LeBlanc, Scott E.; Zhang, Hong; Muthuswami, Rohini; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Brahma related gene product 1 (BRG1) is an ATPase that drives the catalytic activity of a subset of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes. BRG1 is overexpressed in most human breast cancer tumors without evidence of mutation and is required for breast cancer cell proliferation. We demonstrate that knockdown of BRG1 sensitized triple negative breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat breast cancer. An inhibitor of the BRG1 bromodomain had no effect on breast cancer cell viability, but an inhibitory molecule that targets the BRG1 ATPase activity recapitulated the increased drug efficacy observed in the presence of BRG1 knockdown. We further demonstrate that inhibition of BRG1 ATPase activity blocks the induction of ABC transporter genes by these chemotherapeutic drugs and that BRG1 binds to ABC transporter gene promoters. This inhibition increased intracellular concentrations of the drugs, providing a likely mechanism for the increased chemosensitivity. Since ABC transporters and their induction by chemotherapy drugs are a major cause of chemoresistance and treatment failure, these results support the idea that targeting the enzymatic activity of BRG1 would be an effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. PMID:27029062

  13. Efficient pH Dependent Drug Delivery to Target Cancer Cells by Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alle Madhusudhan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX was immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs capped with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC for effective delivery to cancer cells. The carboxylic group of carboxymethyl chitosan interacts with the amino group of the doxorubicin (DOX forming stable, non-covalent interactions on the surface of AuNPs. The carboxylic group ionizes at acidic pH, thereby releasing the drug effectively at acidic pH suitable to target cancer cells. The DOX loaded gold nanoparticles were effectively absorbed by cervical cancer cells compared to free DOX and their uptake was further increased at acidic conditions induced by nigericin, an ionophore that causes intracellular acidification. These results suggest that DOX loaded AuNPs with pH-triggered drug releasing properties is a novel nanotheraputic approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  14. PTPN11 Is a Central Node in Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahallad, Anirudh; Heynen, Guus J J E; Germano, Giovanni; Willems, Stefan M; Evers, Bastiaan; Vecchione, Loredana; Gambino, Valentina; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto; Bernards, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Most BRAF (V600E) mutant melanomas are sensitive to selective BRAF inhibitors, but BRAF mutant colon cancers are intrinsically resistant to these drugs because of feedback activation of EGFR. We performed an RNA-interference-based genetic screen in BRAF mutant colon cancer cells to search for phosph

  15. Half-Antibody Functionalized Lipid-Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Presenting Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Aryal, Santosh; Sartor, Marta; Esener, Sadik; Bouvet, Michael; Zhang, Liangfang

    2010-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens against pancreatic cancer are met with little success as poor tumor vascularization significantly limits the delivery of oncological drugs. High-dose targeted drug delivery, through which a drug delivery vehicle releases a large payload upon tumor localization, is thus a promising alternative strategy against this lethal disease. Herein, we synthesize anti-CEA half-antibody conjugated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and characterize their ligand conjugation yields, physicochemical properties, and targeting ability against pancreatic cancer cells. Under the same drug loading, the half-antibody targeted nanoparticles show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted nanoparticles. PMID:20394436

  16. Quantum-dot-conjugated graphene as a probe for simultaneous cancer-targeted fluorescent imaging, tracking, and monitoring drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; He, Ye-Ju; Chen, Xu-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-03-20

    We report a novel quantum-dot-conjugated graphene, i.e., hybrid SiO2-coated quantum dots (HQDs)-conjugated graphene, for targeted cancer fluorescent imaging, tracking, and monitoring drug delivery, as well as cancer therapy. The hybrid SiO2 shells on the surface of QDs not only mitigate its toxicity, but also protect its fluorescence from being quenched by graphene. By functionalizing the surface of HQDs-conjugated graphene (graphene-HQDs) with transferrin (Trf), we developed a targeted imaging system capable of differential uptake and imaging of cancer cells that express the Trf receptor. The widely used fluorescent antineoplastic anthracycline drug, doxorubicin (DOX), is adsorbed on the surface of graphene and results in a large loading capacity of 1.4 mg mg(-1). It is advantageous that the new delivery system exhibits different fluorescence color in between graphene-HQDs and DOX in the aqueous core upon excitation at a same wavelength for the purpose of tracking and monitoring drug delivery. This simple multifunctional nanoparticle system can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and enable us to localize the graphene-HQDs and monitor intracellular DOX release. The specificity and safety of the nanoparticle conjugate for cancer imaging, monitoring, and therapy has been demonstrated in vitro.

  17. Research Progress in the Use of Drugs for Breast Cancer Targeted Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun'e Yang; Bing Zhao

    2008-01-01

    In recent years,many significant advances have been made on molecular target therapy to aim directly at epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancers.Clinical studies of such agents as trastuzumab,lapatinib,erlotinib and bevacituzumab have been widely conducted.This paper will review the recent research progress related to targeted therapy.

  18. Integrating Enzymatic Self-Assembly and Mitochondria Targeting for Selectively Killing Cancer Cells without Acquired Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wang, Youzhi; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Bing

    2016-12-14

    Targeting organelles by modulating the redox potential of mitochondria is a promising approach to kill cancer cells that minimizes acquired drug resistance. However, it lacks selectivity because mitochondria perform essential functions for (almost) all cells. We show that enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), a bioinspired molecular process, selectively generates the assemblies of redox modulators (e.g., triphenyl phosphinium (TPP)) in the pericellular space of cancer cells for uptake, which allows selectively targeting the mitochondria of cancer cells. The attachment of TPP to a pair of enantiomeric, phosphorylated tetrapeptides produces the precursors (L-1P or D-1P) that form oligomers. Upon dephosphorylation catalyzed by ectophosphatases (e.g., alkaline phosphatase (ALP)) overexpressed on cancer cells (e.g., Saos2), the oligomers self-assemble to form nanoscale assemblies only on the surface of the cancer cells. The cancer cells thus uptake these assemblies of TPP via endocytosis, mainly via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. Inside the cells, the assemblies of TPP-peptide conjugates escape from the lysosome, induce dysfunction of mitochondria to release cytochrome c, and result in cell death, while the controls (i.e., omitting TPP motif, inhibiting ALP, or removing phosphate trigger) hardly kill the Saos2 cells. Most importantly, the repeated stimulation of the cancers by the precursors, unexpectedly, sensitizes the cancer cells to the precursors. As the first example of the integration of subcellular targeting with cell targeting, this study validates the spatial control of the assemblies of nonspecific cytotoxic agents by EISA as a promising molecular process for selectively killing cancer cells without inducing acquired drug resistance.

  19. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles In Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Surface Receptors Using Targeted Contrast Agents Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology 5 (6): 485-494, 2004. 3. Cohen B, Dafni H, Meir G , Harmelin A... ProteinA Antibody DNA Fusion tag Biotin Protein Streptavidin Linker (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) ( g ) (h) (i) (j) N H 2 N H 2 Figure 7: Schematic diagram of...breast cancer research have resulted from the development of contrast agents (CAs) that generate receptor - targeted or molecular targeted contrast

  20. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P.; Wang, Zhihua; Kinney, Justin B.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-induced mutations to the 5’ exons of candidate genes 1–5 , but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher propor...

  1. Construction of a cancer-perturbed protein-protein interaction network for discovery of apoptosis drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is caused by genetic abnormalities, such as mutations of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, which alter downstream signal transduction pathways and protein-protein interactions. Comparisons of the interactions of proteins in cancerous and normal cells can shed light on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Results We constructed initial networks of protein-protein interactions involved in the apoptosis of cancerous and normal cells by use of two human yeast two-hybrid data sets and four online databases. Next, we applied a nonlinear stochastic model, maximum likelihood parameter estimation, and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC to eliminate false-positive protein-protein interactions in our initial protein interaction networks by use of microarray data. Comparisons of the networks of apoptosis in HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cells and in normal primary lung fibroblasts provided insight into the mechanism of apoptosis and allowed identification of potential drug targets. The potential targets include BCL2, caspase-3 and TP53. Our comparison of cancerous and normal cells also allowed derivation of several party hubs and date hubs in the human protein-protein interaction networks involved in caspase activation. Conclusion Our method allows identification of cancer-perturbed protein-protein interactions involved in apoptosis and identification of potential molecular targets for development of anti-cancer drugs.

  2. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Pfefferle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways.

  3. Targeting Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0412 TITLE: "Targeting Prostate Cancer Metastasis " PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yong Teng CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: REPORT...ng Prost a t e Cancer Metastasi s Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH- 14- 1- 0 41 2 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER YongTeng Se...r egulator in contr olling metastasis of p r ost a t e cancer and i nhi b i t i ng i t prevent s met ast asis . There are no drugs available to tar

  4. Novel candidate metastasis genes as putative drug targets for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosmalen, Wilhelmina Paulina Elisabeth van

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive studies to unravel molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis, still 3500 women die of the results of this disease in the Netherlands each year. Improving our understanding of metastasis formation remains a challenge for further drug development. The scope of this the

  5. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scooter Willis

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets.

  6. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification.

  7. Emory University: MEDICI (Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions) for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has developed a computational methodology to combine high-throughput knockdown data with known protein network topologies to infer the importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for the survival of cancer cells.  Applying these data to the Achilles shRNA results, the CCLE cell line characterizations, and known and newly identified PPIs provides novel insights for potential new drug targets for cancer therapies and identifies important PPI hubs.

  8. Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-04-01

    The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy.

  9. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  10. Targeted therapy of SMMC-7721 liver cancer in vitro and in vivo with carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zongfei; Lin, Gaofeng; Lu, Qinghua; Meng, Lingjie; Shen, Xizhong; Dong, Ling; Fu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Xiaoke

    2012-01-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) involved chitosan (CHI) modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable loading/release of anti-cancer doxorubicin (DOX) was constructed. CHI was non-covalently wrapped around SWNTs, imparting water-solubility and biocompatibility to the nanotubes. Folic acid (FA) was also bounded to the outer CHI layer to realize selective killing of tumor cells. The targeting DDS could effectively kill the HCC SMMC-7721 cell lines and depress the growth of liver cancer in nude mice, showing superior pharmaceutical efficiency to free DOX. The results of the blood routine and serum biochemical parameters, combined with the histological examinations of vital organs, demonstrating that the targeting DDS had negligible in vivo toxicity. Thus, this DDS is promising for high treatment efficacy and low side effects for future cancer therapy.

  11. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  12. Nanoencapsulated anti-CK2 small molecule drug or siRNA specifically targets malignant cancer but not benign cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembley, Janeen H; Unger, Gretchen M; Korman, Vicci L; Tobolt, Diane K; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Kren, Betsy T; Ahmed, Khalil

    2012-02-01

    CK2, a pleiotropic Ser/Thr kinase, is an important target for cancer therapy. We tested our novel tenfibgen-based nanocapsule for delivery of the inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) and an siRNA directed against both CK2α and α' catalytic subunits to prostate cancer cells. We present data on the TBG nanocapsule itself and on CK2 inhibition or downregulation in treated cells, including effects on Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65. By direct comparison of two CK2-directed cargos, our data provide proof that the TBG encapsulation design for delivery of drugs specifically to cancer cells has strong potential for small molecule- and nucleic acid-based cancer therapy.

  13. The greedy nature of mutant RAS: a boon for drug discovery targeting cancer metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jing; Wang, Jieqiong; Chang, Siyu; Liu, Mingyao; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    RAS oncogene mutations are frequently detected in human cancers. Among RAS-mediated tumorigenesis, KRAS-driven cancers are the most frequently diagnosed and resistant to current therapies. Despite more than three decades of intensive efforts, there are still no specific therapies for mutant RAS proteins. While trying to block those well-established downstream pathways, such as the RAF-MAPK pathway and the PI3K-AKT pathway, attentions have been paid to potential effects of RAS on metabolic pathways and the feasibility for targeting these pathways. Recent studies have proved that RAS not only promotes aerobic glycolysis and glutamine metabolism reprograming to provide energy, but it also facilitates branched metabolism pathways, autophagy, and macropinocytosis. These alterations generate building blocks for tumor growth and strengthen antioxidant defense in tumor cells. All of these metabolic changes meet different demands of RAS-driven cancers, making them distinct from normal cells. Indeed, some achievements have been made to inhibit tumor growth through targeting specific metabolism rewiring in preclinical models. Although there is still a long way to elucidate the landscape of altered metabolism, we believe that specific metabolic enzymes or pathways could be therapeutically targeted for selective inhibition of RAS-driven cancers.

  14. Iodinated hyaluronic acid oligomer-based nanoassemblies for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-04-01

    Nano-sized self-assemblies based on amphiphilic iodinated hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) was conjugated to an HA oligomer as a computed tomography (CT) imaging modality and a hydrophobic residue. Nanoassembly based on HA-TIBA was fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). Cellular uptake of DOX from nanoassembly, compared to a DOX solution group, was enhanced via an HA-CD44 receptor interaction, and subsequently, the in vitro antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanoassembly was improved in SCC7 (CD44 receptor positive squamous cell carcinoma) cells. Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye, was attached to the HA-TIBA conjugate and the in vivo tumor targetability of HA-TIBA nanoassembly, which is based on the interaction between HA and CD44 receptor, was demonstrated in a NIRF imaging study using an SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor targeting and cancer diagnosis with HA-TIBA nanoassembly were verified in a CT imaging study using the SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to efficient cancer diagnosis using NIRF and CT imaging modalities, improved antitumor efficacies were shown. HA and TIBA can be used to produce HA-TIBA nanoassembly that may be a promising theranostic nanosystem for cancers that express the CD44 receptor.

  15. FOXD1 promotes breast cancer proliferation and chemotherapeutic drug resistance by targeting p27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhao, Jing-Yu; Yue, Hong [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the General Hospital of CPLA, Beijing 100048 (China); Hu, Ke-Shi; Shen, Hao [Department of Anesthesiology, The General Hospital of CPLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Guo, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: gsgzg304@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the General Hospital of CPLA, Beijing 100048 (China); Su, Xiao-Jun, E-mail: lucusebibi@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the General Hospital of CPLA, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD1 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance by inducing G1 to S transition. • FOXD1 transcriptionally suppresses p27 expression. - Abstract: Forkhead transcription factors are essential for diverse processes in early embryonic development and organogenesis. As a member of the forkhead family, FOXD1 is required during kidney development and its inactivation results in failure of nephron progenitor cells. However, the role of FOXD1 in carcinogenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we reported that FOXD1 is a potential oncogene in breast cancer. We found that FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Depletion of FOXD1 expression decreases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas overexpression of FOXD1 increases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we observed that FOXD1 induces G1 to S phase transition by targeting p27 expression. Our results suggest that FOXD1 may be a potential therapy target for patients with breast cancer.

  16. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  17. Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso) for Identifying Anti-Cancer Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heewon; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering driver genes is crucial for understanding heterogeneity in cancer. L1-type regularization approaches have been widely used for uncovering cancer driver genes based on genome-scale data. Although the existing methods have been widely applied in the field of bioinformatics, they possess several drawbacks: subset size limitations, erroneous estimation results, multicollinearity, and heavy time consumption. We introduce a novel statistical strategy, called a Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso), for high dimensional genomic data analysis and investigation of driver genes. For time-effective analysis, we consider a recursive bootstrap procedure in line with the random lasso. Furthermore, we introduce a parametric statistical test for driver gene selection based on bootstrap regression modeling results. The proposed RRLasso is not only rapid but performs well for high dimensional genomic data analysis. Monte Carlo simulations and analysis of the "Sanger Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer dataset from the Cancer Genome Project" show that the proposed RRLasso is an effective tool for high dimensional genomic data analysis. The proposed methods provide reliable and biologically relevant results for cancer driver gene selection.

  18. Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso for Identifying Anti-Cancer Drug Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Park

    Full Text Available Uncovering driver genes is crucial for understanding heterogeneity in cancer. L1-type regularization approaches have been widely used for uncovering cancer driver genes based on genome-scale data. Although the existing methods have been widely applied in the field of bioinformatics, they possess several drawbacks: subset size limitations, erroneous estimation results, multicollinearity, and heavy time consumption. We introduce a novel statistical strategy, called a Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso, for high dimensional genomic data analysis and investigation of driver genes. For time-effective analysis, we consider a recursive bootstrap procedure in line with the random lasso. Furthermore, we introduce a parametric statistical test for driver gene selection based on bootstrap regression modeling results. The proposed RRLasso is not only rapid but performs well for high dimensional genomic data analysis. Monte Carlo simulations and analysis of the "Sanger Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer dataset from the Cancer Genome Project" show that the proposed RRLasso is an effective tool for high dimensional genomic data analysis. The proposed methods provide reliable and biologically relevant results for cancer driver gene selection.

  19. Human Progesterone A-Form as a Target for New Drug Discovery in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Voltz et al’(ii 3 altered recycling, and impaired regulation of the PDGFR TR4 chloride transporter by hormones. Most recent studies suggest that CFTR ...growth transporters, and other proteins localized at or near the factor receptor and ion transporters such as CFTR , plasma membrane. Consistent with this...overexpression in human breast cancers cytoskeleton. This review will focus on the signaling and mutations in NHERF targets, such as CFTR and paradigms

  20. Targets and mechanisms of berberine, a natural drug with potential to treat cancer with special focus on breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh Kaboli, Parham; Rahmat, Asmah; Ismail, Patimah; Ling, King-Hwa

    2014-10-05

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide and novel therapeutic agents are needed to treat this disease. The plant-based alkaloid berberine has potential therapeutic applications for breast cancer, although a better understanding of the genes and cellular pathways regulated by this compound is needed to define the mechanism of its action in cancer treatment. In this review, the molecular targets of berberine in various cancers, particularly breast cancer, are discussed. Berberine was shown to be effective in inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis in various cancerous cells. Some signaling pathways affected by berberine, including the MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, are critical for reducing cellular migration and sensitivity to various growth factors. This review will discuss recent studies and consider the application of new prospective approaches based on microRNAs and other crucial regulators for use in future studies to define the action of berberine in cancer. The effects of berberine on cancer cell survival and proliferation are also outlined.

  1. EpCAM aptamer-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for efficient colon cancer cell-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaodong; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Huijuan; Lu, Yusheng; Lian, Shu; Lin, Hang; Gao, Yu; Jia, Lee

    2016-02-15

    Targeted delivery of anticancer agents by functional nanoparticles is an attractive strategy to increase their therapeutic efficacy while reducing toxicity. In this work, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were modified with aptamer (Ap) against the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery of DOX to colon cancer cells. These nanoparticles (Ap-MSN-DOX) were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, aptamer conjugation efficiency, drug encapsulation efficiency, and drug release properties. The in vitro cell recognition, cellular uptake, EpCAM protein inhibition efficiency, and cytotoxicity of Ap-MSN-DOX were also studied. Results demonstrated that EpCAM conjugation increased binding of Ap-MSN-DOX to EpCAM over-expressing SW620 colon cancer cells but not EpCAM-negative Ramos cells, resulting in enhanced cellular uptake and increased cytotoxicity of the DOX in SW620 cells when compared to non-Ap-modified nanoparticles (MSN-DOX). Additionally, Ap-MSN-DOX exhibited significant inhibition effects on the expression of EpCAM on SW620 cells. These results suggested that Ap-MSN-DOX has the potential for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into EpCAM positive colon cancer cells to improve therapeutic index while reducing side effects.

  2. Global connectivity of hub residues in Oncoprotein structures encodes genetic factors dictating personalized drug response to targeted Cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Venky; Aravamudan, Murali

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy and mechanisms of therapeutic action are largely described by atomic bonds and interactions local to drug binding sites. Here we introduce global connectivity analysis as a high-throughput computational assay of therapeutic action - inspired by the Google page rank algorithm that unearths most ``globally connected'' websites from the information-dense world wide web (WWW). We execute short timescale (30 ps) molecular dynamics simulations with high sampling frequency (0.01 ps), to identify amino acid residue hubs whose global connectivity dynamics are characteristic of the ligand or mutation associated with the target protein. We find that unexpected allosteric hubs - up to 20Å from the ATP binding site, but within 5Å of the phosphorylation site - encode the Gibbs free energy of inhibition (ΔGinhibition) for select protein kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics. We further find that clinically relevant somatic cancer mutations implicated in both drug resistance and personalized drug sensitivity can be predicted in a high-throughput fashion. Our results establish global connectivity analysis as a potent assay of protein functional modulation. This sets the stage for unearthing disease-causal exome mutations and motivates forecast of clinical drug response on a patient-by-patient basis. We suggest incorporation of structure-guided genetic inference assays into pharmaceutical and healthcare Oncology workflows.

  3. Bcl-2 Targeted Structural Based Computer Aided Drug Design (CAAD For Therapeutic Assessment of Ricin in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghraj Singh Baghel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is referred as uncontrolled growth of abnormal cell mass. Out of the several types of cancer, prostate cancer (PC has become a major public health problem in men worldwide. Bcl-2 and p27 proteins are important regulatory molecules of cell cycle. Failure of cell cycle regulation leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation and causes cancer. For designing an effective structural based targeted drug, the assessment of protein-protein and protein-ligand interaction is indispensable. Therefore for treatment of PC, we selected a ribosome inactivating protein, Ricin, for assessment of its therapeutic nature. In the present work through CLUSTAL-W phylogenetic analysis, we found that Bcl-2 protein was found more conserved than p27. Further Bcl-2 was selected as target molecule for docking study with Ricin protein and other chemically synthetic inhibitor molecules i.e. 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO and Sarcosine, as lead molecule. Through HEX5.1 docking software docking was performed between targeted receptor and lead molecules. Energy maximum (Emax= -93.12 and energy minimum (Emin= -163.07 was observed for docking complex of optimised and energy minimised structure of Bcl-2 receptor with Ricin, which in turn shows that it is highly stable interaction. On the other hand, for synthetic inhibitors, we found energy maximum (DFMO; Emax= -77.17, Emin= -117.83 and Sarcosine; Emax= -72.23, Emin= -103.00 and energy minimum, which are significant more as compared to Ricin docking complex. Due to ricin docking complex having less energies shows stable interaction with Bcl-2. We also observed that Ricin is less toxic (lesser log P value as compared to other molecules by toxicity analysis by ADME/TOX server. These evidences show this Ricin could be better drug for PC. Further results are needed to validate by in vitro and in vivo study to make proper elucidation of drug for better PC treatment.

  4. Are predictions of cancer response to targeted drugs, based on effects in unrelated tissues, the 'Black Swan' events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Beatrica; Golem, Ante Zvonimir; Kurbel, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Adverse effects of targeted drugs on normal tissues can predict the cancer response. Rash correlates with efficacy of erlotinib, cetuximab and gefitinib and onset of arterial hypertension with response to bevacizumab, sunitinib, axitinib and sorafenib, possible examples of 'Black Swan' events, unexpected scientific observations, as described by Karl Popper in 1935. The proposition is that our patients have individual intrinsic variants of cell growth control, important for tumor response and adverse effects on tumor-unrelated tissue. This means that the lack of predictive side effects in healthy tissue is linked with poor results of tumor therapy when tumor resistance is caused by mechanisms that protect all cells of that patient from the targeted drug effects.

  5. Dual-targeted hybrid nanoparticles of synergistic drugs for treating lung metastases of triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Prasad, Preethy; Cai, Ping; He, Chunsheng; Shan, Dan; Rauth, Andrew Michael; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2017-02-20

    Lung metastasis is the major cause of death in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with no effective therapy at present. It has been proposed that dual-targeted therapy, ie, targeting chemotherapeutic agents to both tumor vasculature and cancer cells, may offer some advantages. The present work was aimed to develop a dual-targeted synergistic drug combination nanomedicine for the treatment of lung metastases of TNBC. Thus, Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD)-conjugated, doxorubicin (DOX) and mitomycin C (MMC) co-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (RGD-DMPLN) were prepared and characterized. The synergism between DOX and MMC and the effect of RGD-DMPLN on cell morphology and cell viability were evaluated in human MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. The optimal RGD density on nanoparticles (NPs) was identified based on the biodistribution and tumor accumulation of the NPs in a murine lung metastatic model of MDA-MB-231 cells. The microscopic distribution of RGD-conjugated NPs in lung metastases was examined using confocal microscopy. The anticancer efficacy of RGD-DMPLN was investigated in the lung metastatic model. A synergistic ratio of DOX and MMC was found in the MDA-MB-231 human TNBC cells. RGD-DMPLN induced morphological changes and enhanced cytotoxicity in vitro. NPs with a median RGD density showed the highest accumulation in lung metastases by targeting both tumor vasculature and cancer cells. Compared to free drugs, RGD-DMPLN exhibited significantly low toxicity to the host, liver and heart. Compared to non-targeted DMPLN or free drugs, administration of RGD-DMPLN (10 mg/kg, iv) resulted in a 4.7-fold and 31-fold reduction in the burden of lung metastases measured by bioluminescence imaging, a 2.4-fold and 4.0-fold reduction in the lung metastasis area index, and a 35% and 57% longer median survival time, respectively. Dual-targeted RGD-DMPLN, with optimal RGD density, significantly inhibited the progression of

  6. A lysosome-targeted drug delivery system based on sorbitol backbone towards efficient cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniganda, Santhi; Sankar, Vandana; Nair, Jyothi B; Raghu, K G; Maiti, Kaustabh K

    2014-09-14

    A straightforward synthetic approach was adopted for the construction of a lysosome-targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) using sorbitol scaffold (Sor) linked to octa-guanidine and tetrapeptide GLPG, a peptide substrate of lysosomal cysteine protease, cathepsin B. The main objective was to efficiently deliver the potential anticancer drug, doxorubicin to the target sites, thereby minimizing dose-limiting toxicity. Three TDDS vectors were synthesized viz., DDS1: Sor-GLPG-Fl, DDS2: Sor-Fl (control) and DDS3: Sor-GLPGC-SMCC-Dox. Dox release from DDS3 in the presence of cathepsin B was studied by kinetics measurement based on the fluorescent property of Dox. The cytotoxicity of DDS1 was assessed and found to be non-toxic. Cellular internalization and colocalization studies of all the 3 systems were carried out by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy utilizing cathepsin B-expressing HeLa cells. DDS1 and DDS3 revealed significant localization within the lysosomes, in contrast to DDS2 (control). The doxorubicin-conjugated carrier, DDS3, demonstrated significant cytotoxic effect when compared to free Dox by MTT assay and also by flow cytometric analysis. The targeted approach with DDS3 is expected to be promising, because it is indicated to be advantageous over free Dox, which possesses dose-limiting toxicity, posing risk of injury to normal tissues.

  7. Mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic drugs as novel targets for pancreatic cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Anna; Piro, Geny; Carbone, Carmine; Tortora, Giampaolo; Melisi, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal and poorly understood human malignancies and will continue to be a major unsolved health problem in the 21st century. Despite efforts over the past three decades to improve diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis for patients with pancreatic cancer is extremely poor with or without treatment, and incidence rates are virtually identical to mortality rates. Although advances have been made through the identification of relevant molecular pathways in pancreatic cancer, there is still a critical, unmet need for the translation of these findings into effective therapeutic strategies that could reduce the intrinsic drug resistance of this disease and for the integration of these molecularly targeted agents into established combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in order to improve patients’ survival. Tumors are heterogeneous cellular entities whose growth and progression depend on reciprocal interactions between genetically altered neoplastic cells and a non-neoplastic microenvironment. To date, most of the mechanisms of resistance studied have been related to tumor cell-autonomous signaling pathways. However, recent data suggest a putative important role of tumor microenvironment in the development and maintenance of resistance to classic chemotherapeutic and targeted therapies. This present review is meant to describe and discuss some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment-related molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of pancreatic cancer to the proapoptotic activity of the classic chemotherapeutic agents and to the most novel anti-angiogenic drugs. We present some of the emerging therapeutic targets for the modulation of this resistant phenotype. PMID:23641216

  8. Medical treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis: from bisphosphonates to targeted drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Bulent; Cicin, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer bone metastasis causing severe morbidity is commonly encountered in daily clinical practice. It causes pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord and other nerve compression syndromes and life threatening hypercalcemia. Breast cancer metastasizes to bone through complicated steps in which numerous molecules play roles. Metastatic cells disrupt normal bone turnover and create a vicious cycle to which treatment efforts should be directed. Bisphosphonates have been used safely for more than two decades. As a group they delay time to first skeletal related event and reduce pain, but do not prevent development of bone metastasis in patients with no bone metastasis, and also do not prolong survival. The receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand inhibitor denosumab delays time to first skeletal related event and reduces the skeletal morbidity rate. Radionuclides are another treatment option for bone pain. New targeted therapies and radionuclides are still under investigation. In this review we will focus on mechanisms of bone metastasis and its medical treatment in breast cancer patients.

  9. Integrin-targeting thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for combined cancer imaging and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Kyung; Park, Jinho; Jon, Sangyong [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Chemdangwagi-ro, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong Yeon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Jeonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, 160 Ilsim-ri, Hwasun-eup, Jeonnam 519-809 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: syjon@gist.ac.kr [Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    We report multifunctional nanoparticles that are capable of cancer targeting and simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy. The nanoparticles are composed of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide ligand bioconjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) that enable loading of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox). The cyclic RGD-conjugated TCL-SPION (cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION) had a mean hydrodynamic size of 34 {+-} 8 nm with approximately 0.39 wt% of cyclic RGD attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. The cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION exhibited preferential binding towards target cancer cells (U87MG, integrin {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} +) when analyzed by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. When Dox was loaded onto the polymeric coating layers of cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION via ionic interaction, the resulting Dox-loaded cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION (Dox-cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION) showed much higher cytotoxicity in U87MG cells than Dox-TCL-SPION lacking cRGD (IC{sub 50} value of 0.02 {mu}M versus 0.12 {mu}M). These results suggest that Dox-cRGD{sub T}CL-SPION has potential for use as an integrin-targeted, combined imaging and therapeutic agent.

  10. New generation of β-cyclodextrin-chitosan nanoparticles encapsulated quantum dots loaded with anticancer drug for tumor-target drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Guo, Jin; Ding, Li; Zhong, Wenying

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to report the drug delivery system that can integrate the functional building blocks for optical pH-sensing, cancer cell imaging and controlled drug release into a single nanoparticle. The CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were prepared by in-situ immobilization of ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in β-cyclodextrin (CD) and chitosan (CS) polymer loaded with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Synthetic CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were approximately 100 nm in size and with blue fluorescence. The drug encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles was 22.36 % and the encapsulated drug was released via a controlled release mechanism after a 9 h plateau was reached. The efficiency of the drug release in tumor microenvironments (pH 5.3 buffer solutions) was higher than that in physiological pH 7.4. In vitro cytotoxicity assay results showed that the blank nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and therefore can be used as the fluorescence tracer, and the SAHA-encapsulated nanoparticles expressed an anticancer effect. Confocal microscopy and in vivo imaging studies showed that the developed nanoparticles had cytotoxicity in resistant cancer cells and preferentially accumulated in tumors. CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles with excellent long-term optical properties have great prospects for the development of targeting tracers and anti-tumor biomedical research.

  11. Tumour-selective targeting of drug metabolizing enzymes to treat metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierdl, Monika; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Hatfield, M Jason; Potter, Philip M

    2016-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for the detoxification of ester-containing xenobiotics. This hydrolysis reaction results in the formation of the corresponding carboxylic acid and alcohol. Due to their highly plastic active site, CEs can hydrolyze structurally very distinct and complex molecules. Because ester groups significantly increase the water solubility of compounds, they are frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry to make relatively insoluble compounds more bioavailable. By default, this results in CEs playing a major role in the distribution and metabolism of these esterified drugs. However, this can be exploited to selectively improve compound hydrolysis, and using specific in vivo targeting techniques can be employed to generate enhanced drug activity. Here, we seek to detail the human CEs involved in esterified molecule hydrolysis, compare and contrast these with CEs present in small mammals and describe novel methods to improve drug therapy by specific delivery of CEs to cells in vivo. Finally, we will discuss the development of such approaches for their potential application towards malignant disease.

  12. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common side effects seen with this drug include fatigue, rash, diarrhea, increases in blood pressure, and redness, pain, swelling, ... other targets that help cancer cells grow. This drug is taken as a ... effects are nausea, diarrhea, changes in skin or hair color, mouth sores, ...

  13. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of ...

  14. Molecular targeted drug therapy of cervical cancer%宫颈癌的分子靶向药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周春霞; 周雪

    2016-01-01

    Advanced and recurrent cervical cancer has a poor prognosis and few effective therapeutic option.With the development of molecular biology,the targeted drugs for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer continuously appear,such as inhibiting human papillomavirus,targeting angiogenesis,epidermal growth factor receptor,mammalian target of rapamycin,cyclooxygenase-2,sarcoma gene,proteasome inhibitor,DNA methylation,etc.With the development of new molecular targeted therapy,more effective or even treatment measures of cervical cancer might be found,which can provid a new approach for the individualized treatment of cervical cancer.%晚期及复发性宫颈癌预后差,缺乏有效的治疗手段。随着分子生物学的发展,在局部晚期宫颈癌患者的治疗中靶向治疗药物不断涌现,包括抑制人乳头瘤病毒、靶向抑制肿瘤血管生成、表皮生长因子、哺乳动物雷帕霉素靶蛋白、环氧合酶-2、鸡肉瘤病毒基因、蛋白酶体抑制剂、DNA 甲基化等。随着新型分子靶向治疗的不断发展,可能会发现更有效的宫颈癌疗法,为宫颈癌的个体化治疗开辟新的途径。

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Antibody-Drug Conjugate for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Knutson

    Full Text Available Antibodies are widely available and cost-effective research tools in life science, and antibody conjugates are now extensively used for targeted therapy, immunohistochemical staining, or in vivo diagnostic imaging of cancer. Significant advances in site-specific antibody labeling technologies have enabled the production of highly characterized and homogenous conjugates for biomedical purposes, and some recent studies have utilized site-specific labeling to synthesize bifunctional antibody conjugates with both imaging and drug delivery properties. While these advances are important for the clinical safety and efficacy of such biologics, these techniques can also be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. Furthermore, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs used for tumor treatment generally remain distinct from conjugates used for diagnosis. Thus, there exists a need to develop simple dual-labeling methods for efficient therapeutic and diagnostic evaluation of antibody conjugates in pre-clinical model systems. Here, we present a rapid and simple method utilizing commercially available reagents for synthesizing a dual-labeled fluorescent ADC. Further, we demonstrate the fluorescent ADC's utility for simultaneous targeted therapy and molecular imaging of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Employing non-site-specific, amine-reactive chemistry, our novel biopharmaceutical theranostic is a monoclonal antibody specific for a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA biomarker conjugated to both paclitaxel and a near-infrared (NIR, polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated fluorophore (DyLight™ 680-4xPEG. Using in vitro systems, we demonstrate that this fluorescent ADC selectively binds a CEA-positive pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3 in immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry, exhibits efficient internalization kinetics, and is cytotoxic. Model studies using a xenograft of BxPC-3 cells in athymic mice also show the fluorescent ADC's efficacy in detecting tumors in

  16. Differential effects of drugs targeting cancer stem cell (CSC and non-CSC populations on lung primary tumors and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Larzabal

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after chemotherapy. Targeting CSCs and non-CSCs with specific compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung cancer growth and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salinomycin, a selective inhibitor of CSCs, with or without combination with paclitaxel, in a metastatic model. To evaluate the effect of these drugs in metastasis and tumor microenvironment we took advantage of the immunocompetent and highly metastatic LLC mouse model. Aldefluor assays were used to analyze the ALDH+/- populations in murine LLC and human H460 and H1299 lung cancer cells. Salinomycin reduced the proportion of ALDH+ CSCs in LLC cells, whereas paclitaxel increased such population. The same effect was observed for the H460 and H1299 cell lines. Salinomycin reduced the tumorsphere formation capacity of LLC by more than 7-fold, but paclitaxel showed no effect. In in vivo experiments, paclitaxel reduced primary tumor volume but increased the number of metastatic nodules (p<0.05, whereas salinomycin had no effect on primary tumors but reduced lung metastasis (p<0.05. Combination of both drugs did not improve the effect of single therapies. ALDH1A1, SOX2, CXCR4 and SDF-1 mRNA levels were higher in metastatic lesions than in primary tumors, and were significantly elevated in both locations by paclitaxel treatment. On the contrary, such levels were reduced (or in some cases did not change when mice were administered with salinomycin. The number of F4/80+ and CD11b+ cells was also reduced upon administration of both drugs, but particularly in metastasis. These results show that salinomycin targets ALDH+ lung CSCs, which has important therapeutic effects in vivo by reducing metastatic lesions. In contrast, paclitaxel (although reducing primary tumor growth promotes the selection of ALDH+ cells that likely modify the lung microenvironment to foster

  17. Hyaluronic Acid Conjugates as Vectors for the Active Targeting of Drugs, Genes and Nanocomposites in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arpicco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a naturally-occurring glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 are found on the surface of epithelial, hematopoietic, and neuronal cells; it is overexpressed in many cancer cells, and in particular in tumor-initiating cells. HA has recently attracted considerable interest in the field of developing drug delivery systems, having been used, as such or encapsulated in different types of nanoassembly, as ligand to prepare nano-platforms for actively targeting drugs, genes, and diagnostic agents. This review describes recent progress made with the several chemical strategies adopted to synthesize conjugates and prepare novel delivery systems with improved behaviors.

  18. Acid-triggered core cross-linked nanomicelles for targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging in liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Xian Li,1,* Hao Li,2,4,* Wei Yi,3 Jianyu Chen,1 Biling Liang1 1Radiology Department, The Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Center of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 3Radiotherapy Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 4School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To research the acid-triggered core cross-linked folate-poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly[N-(N',N'-diisopropylaminoethyl glutamine] (folated-PEG-P[GA-DIP] amphiphilic block copolymer for targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in liver cancer cells. Methods: As an appropriate receptor of protons, the N,N-diisopropyl tertiary amine group (DIP was chosen to conjugate with the side carboxyl groups of poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly (L-glutamic acid to obtain PEG-P(GA-DIP amphiphilic block copolymers. By ultrasonic emulsification, PEG-P(GA-DIP could be self-assembled to form nanosized micelles loading doxorubicin (DOX and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs in aqueous solution. When PEG-P(GA-DIP nanomicelles were combined with folic acid, the targeted effect of folated-PEG-P(GA-DIP nanomicelles was evident in the fluorescence and MRI results. Results: To further increase the loading efficiency and the cell-uptake of encapsulated drugs (DOX and SPIONs, DIP (pKa≈6.3 groups were linked with ~50% of the side carboxyl groups of poly(L-glutamic acid (PGA, to generate the core cross-linking under neutral or weakly acidic conditions. Under the acidic condition (eg, endosome/lysosome, the carboxyl groups were neutralized to facilitate disassembly of the P(GA-DIP blocks' cross-linking, for duly accelerating the encapsulated drug release. Combined

  19. Notch 1 signaling pathway is the potential target of novel anticancer drugs for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Fang Guan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of Notch signaling pathway in cancer stem cells plays a crucial role in the regulation of self–renewal and maintenance of side population cells. In the present study, we have identified cancer stem like 2.7% side population cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma samples whose prevalence was signifi-cantly reduced to 0.3% upon verapamil treatment. The protein level of Notch1 and Hes-1 are highly up-regulated in fluorescence-activated cell sorting purified side population cells and thus leads to the elevated expression of stem cell surface proteins (Oct-4, Sox2 and Nanog, which are essential for side population cells self-renewal. In addition, these nasopharyngeal carcinoma side population cells are CD133 and CD44 positive and they possess enhanced cell proliferation rate, highly tumorgenic and invasive. Our findings suggest that Notch1 signaling is a potential target of novel anticancer drugs, which could efficiently target and eradicate the cancer stem cells.

  20. Target-specific near-IR induced drug release and photothermal therapy with accumulated Au/Ag hollow nanoshells on pulmonary cancer cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Mi Suk; Lee, Somin; Kang, Homan; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Hyunmi; Hwang, Doyk; Lee, Jong Woo; Jeong, Sinyoung; Jang, Yoonjeong; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Jeong, Dae Hong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-03-01

    Au/Ag hollow nanoshells (AuHNSs) were developed as multifunctional therapeutic agents for effective, targeted, photothermally induced drug delivery under near-infrared (NIR) light. AuHNSs were synthesized by galvanic replacement reaction. We further conjugated antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the PEGylated AuHNS, followed by loading with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (AuHNS-EGFR-DOX) for lung cancer treatment. AuHNSs showed similar photothermal efficiency to gold nanorods under optimized NIR laser power. The targeting of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX was confirmed by light-scattering images of A549 cells, and doxorubicin release from the AuHNSs was evaluated under low pH and NIR-irradiated conditions. Multifunctional AuHNS-EGFR-DOX induced photothermal ablation of the targeted lung cancer cells and rapid doxorubicin release following irradiation with NIR laser. Furthermore, we evaluated the effectiveness of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX drug delivery by comparing two drug delivery methods: receptor-mediated endocytosis and cell-surface targeting. Accumulation of the AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on the cell surfaces by targeting EGFR turned out to be more effective for lung cancer treatments than uptake of AuHNS-EGFR-DOX. Taken together, our data suggest a new and optimal method of NIR-induced drug release via the accumulation of targeted AuHNS-EGFR-DOX on cancer cell membranes.

  1. Properties of protein drug target classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C Bull

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of drug targets is a crucial part of any drug development program. We mined the human proteome to discover properties of proteins that may be important in determining their suitability for pharmaceutical modulation. Data was gathered concerning each protein's sequence, post-translational modifications, secondary structure, germline variants, expression profile and drug target status. The data was then analysed to determine features for which the target and non-target proteins had significantly different values. This analysis was repeated for subsets of the proteome consisting of all G-protein coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases and proteases, as well as proteins that are implicated in cancer. Machine learning was used to quantify the proteins in each dataset in terms of their potential to serve as a drug target. This was accomplished by first inducing a random forest that could distinguish between its targets and non-targets, and then using the random forest to quantify the drug target likeness of the non-targets. The properties that can best differentiate targets from non-targets were primarily those that are directly related to a protein's sequence (e.g. secondary structure. Germline variants, expression levels and interactions between proteins had minimal discriminative power. Overall, the best indicators of drug target likeness were found to be the proteins' hydrophobicities, in vivo half-lives, propensity for being membrane bound and the fraction of non-polar amino acids in their sequences. In terms of predicting potential targets, datasets of proteases, ion channels and cancer proteins were able to induce random forests that were highly capable of distinguishing between targets and non-targets. The non-target proteins predicted to be targets by these random forests comprise the set of the most suitable potential future drug targets, and should therefore be prioritised when building a drug development programme.

  2. Targeted therapy: tailoring cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yan; Quentin Qiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies include small-molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,have made treatment more tumor-specific and less toxic,and have opened new possibilities for tailoring cancer treatment.Nevertheless,there remain several challenges to targeted therapies,including molecular identification,drug resistance,and exploring reliable biomarkers.Here,we present several selected signaling pathways and molecular targets involved in human cancers including Aurora kinases,PI3K/mTOR signaling,FOXO-FOXM1 axis,and MDM2/MDM4-p53 interaction.Understanding the molecular mechanisms for tumorigenesis and development of drug resistance will provide new insights into drug discovery and design of therapeutic strategies for targeted therapies.

  3. Dual Targeting of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor and Collateral Pathways in Cancer: Combating Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Joseph A., E-mail: jaludwig@mdanderson.org; Lamhamedi-Cherradi, Salah-Eddine [Departments of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lee, Ho-Young [Departments of Thoracic Head & Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Naing, Aung [Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Benjamin, Robert [Departments of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2011-07-26

    The insulin-like growth factor pathway, regulated by a complex interplay of growth factors, cognate receptors, and binding proteins, is critically important for many of the hallmarks of cancer such as oncogenesis, cell division, growth, and antineoplastic resistance. Naturally, a number of clinical trials have sought to directly abrogate insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) function and/or indirectly mitigate its downstream mediators such as mTOR, PI3K, MAPK, and others under the assumption that such therapeutic interventions would provide clinical benefit, demonstrable by impaired tumor growth as well as prolonged progression-free and overall survival for patients. Though a small subset of patients enrolled within phase I or II clinical trials revealed dramatic clinical response to IGF-1R targeted therapies (most using monoclonal antibodies to IGF-1R), in toto, the anticancer effect has been underwhelming and unsustained, as even those with marked clinical responses seem to rapidly acquire resistance to IGF-1R targeted agents when used alone through yet to be identified mechanisms. As the IGF-1R receptor is just one of many that converge upon common intracellular signaling cascades, it is likely that effective IGF-1R targeting must occur in parallel with blockade of redundant signaling paths. Herein, we present the rationale for dual targeting of IGF-1R and other signaling molecules as an effective strategy to combat acquired drug resistance by carcinomas and sarcomas.

  4. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Drugs 2013, 18, 97– 107. 67. Cui, M.; Naczynski, D. J.; Zevon, M.; Griffith, C. K.; Sheihet, L.; Poventud-Fuentes, I.; Chen, S.; Roth , C. M.; Moghe, P...in vivo. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2013:65:71-9. 42. Waite CL, Roth CM. Nanoscale drug delivery systems for enhanced drug penetration into solid tumors...instrument and a laser lamp (Edinburgh Instruments, Scotland ). Transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) imaging was performed using an FEI Tecnai F20 U-TWIN

  5. Bioinspired fluorescent dipeptide nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and real-time monitoring of drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-04-01

    Peptide nanostructures are biodegradable and are suitable for many biomedical applications. However, to be useful imaging probes, the limited intrinsic optical properties of peptides must be overcome. Here we show the formation of tryptophan-phenylalanine dipeptide nanoparticles (DNPs) that can shift the peptide's intrinsic fluorescent signal from the ultraviolet to the visible range. The visible emission signal allows the DNPs to act as imaging and sensing probes. The peptide design is inspired by the red shift seen in the yellow fluorescent protein that results from π-π stacking and by the enhanced fluorescence intensity seen in the green fluorescent protein mutant, BFPms1, which results from the structure rigidification by Zn(II). We show that DNPs are photostable, biocompatible and have a narrow emission bandwidth and visible fluorescence properties. DNPs functionalized with the MUC1 aptamer and doxorubicin can target cancer cells and can be used to image and monitor drug release in real time.

  6. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of drugs in organization. So, the development of QD nano-carriers for drugs has become a hotspot in the fields of nano-drug research in recent years. In this paper, we review the advantages and applications of the QD nano-carriers for drugs in biological fields.

  7. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of drugs in organization. So, the development of QD nano-carriers for drugs has become a hotspot in the fields of nano-drug research in recent years. In this paper, we review the advantages and applications of the QD nano-carriers for drugs in biological fields.

  8. Evaluation of activity and combination strategies with the microtubule-targeting drug sagopilone in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eEschenbrenner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular heterogeneity of cancer calls for individualized therapies to become the standard of care. The development of new therapeutic agents needs to include integrative translational research as early as possible. Target-specific compounds require specific diagnostic biomarker support. Tailored treatment approaches, such as specific schedules or combinations, can improve the therapeutic outcome of drugs with more general mode of action, i.e. the classical chemotherapy. Results from translational research will allow to define the optimal patient population, to tailor individual treatment and to choose treatment combinations on a rational basis.Sagopilone, a fully synthetic epothilone, is a microtubule-stabilizing agent optimized for high in vitro and in vivo activity against a broad range of tumor models, including those resistant to paclitaxel and other systemic treatments. Sagopilone development was accompanied by translational research studies to evaluate the molecular mode of action, to recognize mechanisms leading to resistance, to identify predictive response biomarkers and to establish a rationale for combination with different therapies.Here, we present an RNAi drug modifier screen interrogating 300 genes in four cancer cell lines. Defects of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC were identified to cause resistance against sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Potential biomarkers for resistance are SAC-defects like mutations in the SAC-kinase BUB1B and chromosomal heterogeneity and polyploidy since they imply an increased tolerance for aberrant mitosis. The RNAi drug modifier screen identified the enhancement of sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest by inhibition of the mitotic kinesin KIF2C (MCAK as potential combination strategy.These new findings are correlated with results from previous studies. We discuss successes and failures of our integrative preclinical development program and provide recommendations for future

  9. Targeting Signal Pathways active in Cancer Stem Cells to Overcome Drug Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miaorong SHE; Xilin CHEN

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Over the last several decades, although there have been advances in the treatment of diseases such as children leuke-mia, Hodgkin's disease, and testicular cancer, however, the survival of patients with the most common malignancies such as lung, breast, liver, and colon cancers has not changed signifi-cantly[1-4].

  10. Curcumin–Piperine/Curcumin–Quercetin/Curcumin–Silibinin dual Drug-loaded Nanoparticulate Combination Therapy: A Novel Approach to Target and Treat Multidrug-resistant Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moorthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a functional food, which provides a wide range of health benefits including anti-cancer activity and considered as a suitable alternative for chemotherapeutic agents. However, cancer cells exhibit resistance to most chemotherapeutic agents including curcumin due to overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins in the cancer cell membrane, which decrease the intracellular concentration of chemotherapeutic agents. Similarly, most chemotherapeutic agents including curcumin experience lack of cancer cell targeting, lack of aqueous solubility, rapid systemic clearance, intestinal metabolism and hepatic metabolism. These limitations hinder the clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancers. In this article, we propose curcumin–piperine, or curcumin–quercetin or curcumin–silibinin dual drug-loaded nanoparticulate combination therapy to target and treat multidrug-resistant cancers. The proposed dual drug-loaded nanoparticulate combination is expected to reverse the multidrug resistance, prevent the rapid systemic clearance, prevent the intestinal and the hepatic metabolism, increase the aqueous solubility, enhance the bioavailability, target the cancer cells, produce a synergistic anti-cancer effect and enhance the efficacy of curcumin in the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancers.

  11. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyamohan P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prashanti Jeyamohan, Takashi Hasumura, Yutaka Nagaoka, Yasuhiko Yoshida, Toru Maekawa, D Sakthi Kumar Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Japan Abstract: The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4 and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0, which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. Keywords: cancer, nanotherapy, SWCNTs, targeted drug delivery

  12. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  13. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-07-18

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent inhibition of the Met

  14. Aptamer-Functionalized and Backbone Redox-Responsive Hyperbranched Polymer for Targeted Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Hongping; Su, Yue; He, Lin; Wang, Ruibin; Tong, Gangsheng; He, Dannong; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-06-13

    A novel type of backbone redox-responsive hyperbranched poly(2-((2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl)disulfanyl)ethyl 4-cyano-4-(((propylthio)carbonothioyl)-thio)-pentanoate-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (HPAEG) has been designed and prepared successfully via the combination of reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and self-condensing vinyl polymerization (SCVP). Owing to the existence of surface vinyl groups, HPAEG could be efficiently functionalized by DNA aptamer AS1411 via Michael addition reaction to obtain an active tumor targeting drug delivery carrier (HPAEG-AS1411). The amphiphilic HPAEG-AS1411 could form nanoparticles by macromolecular self-assembly strategy. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay illustrated that HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles had low cytotoxicity to normal cell line. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results demonstrated that HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles could be internalized into tumor cells via aptamer-mediated endocytosis. Compared with pure HPAEG nanoparticles, HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles displayed enhanced tumor cell uptake. When the HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) were internalized into tumor cells, the disulfide bonds in the backbone of HPAEG-AS1411 were cleaved by glutathione (GSH) in the cytoplasm, so that DOX was released rapidly. Therefore, DOX-loaded HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles exhibited a high tumor cellular proliferation inhibition rate and low cytotoxicity to normal cells. This aptamer-functionalized and backbone redox-responsive hyperbranched polymer provides a promising platform for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  15. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... targeted therapies are directed against HER-2, including trastuzumab (Herceptin®), which is approved to treat certain breast and ... traditional chemotherapy drugs. For example, the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin®) has been used in combination with docetaxel , ...

  4. Targeted and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery using liposomes co-modified with cancer cell-targeting aptamers and a thermosensitive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Takahiro; Kawabata, Shinya; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeted and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery using liposomes co-modified with single stranded DNA aptamers that recognized platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) as targeting ligands for breast cancer cells and poly(NIPMAM-co-NIPAM) as the thermosensitive polymer (TSP) to sensitize these liposomes to high temperature. TSP-modified liposomes (TSP liposomes) released encapsulated calcein under 1 MHz ultrasound irradiation for 30 s at 0.5 W/cm(2) as well as the case under incubation for 5 min at 42 °C. Ultrasound-triggered calcein release from TSP liposomes was due to an increased local temperature, resulting from cavitation bubble collapse induced by ultrasound, and not due to an increase in the bulk medium temperature. Liposomes modified with PDGFR aptamers (APT liposomes) bound to MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells through PDGFR aptamers; however, they did not bind to primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). The binding of APT liposomes was greatest for MDA-MB-231 cells, followed by MCF-7, WiDr, and HepG2 cancer cells. In a cell injury assay using doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded APT/TSP liposomes and ultrasound irradiation, cell viability of MDA-MB-231 at 24h after ultrasound irradiation (1 MHz for 30 s at 0.5 W/cm(2)) with DOX-loaded APT/TSP liposomes was 60%, which was lower than that with ultrasound irradiation and DOX-loaded TSP liposomes or with DOX-loaded APT/TSP liposomes alone.

  5. Possibility of sandwiched liver surgery with molecular targeting drugs, cetuximab and bevacizumab on colon cancer liver metastases: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer with concomitant simultaneous multiple liver metastases had received FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil and irinotecan) and FOLFOX6 (leucovorin, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) after an ordinary sigmoidectomy. However, his serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level increased rapidly during the fifteen months after the operation while he was on FOLFOX6. Abdominal computed tomography revealed expanding multiple liver tumors. As the third line chemotherapy, a combination therapy of cetuximab with irinotecan was given, which markedly reduced his levels of serum CEA, and the size and number of liver tumors. He underwent lateral segmentectomy of the liver and microwave coagulation of the liver metastases in the remnant liver. Thereafter, a good quality of life with tumor dormancy was obtained for 6 months. However, his serum CEA started to rise again in the absence of liver tumors. Therefore, FOLFOX6 with bevacizumab was chosen as the fourth line chemotherapy, and the serum CEA was reduced with tumor dormancy. A good quality of life was obtained again at 3 years after the first surgery. This report indicates the effectiveness of sandwiched liver surgery with the molecular targeting drugs cetuximab and bevacizumab on multiple liver metastases of colon cancer, and suggests the possibility of a regimen consisting of bevacizumab following cetuximab. PMID:22747970

  6. Possibility of sandwiched liver surgery with molecular targeting drugs, cetuximab and bevacizumab on colon cancer liver metastases: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyama Yoichi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 31-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer with concomitant simultaneous multiple liver metastases had received FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil and irinotecan and FOLFOX6 (leucovorin, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin after an ordinary sigmoidectomy. However, his serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level increased rapidly during the fifteen months after the operation while he was on FOLFOX6. Abdominal computed tomography revealed expanding multiple liver tumors. As the third line chemotherapy, a combination therapy of cetuximab with irinotecan was given, which markedly reduced his levels of serum CEA, and the size and number of liver tumors. He underwent lateral segmentectomy of the liver and microwave coagulation of the liver metastases in the remnant liver. Thereafter, a good quality of life with tumor dormancy was obtained for 6 months. However, his serum CEA started to rise again in the absence of liver tumors. Therefore, FOLFOX6 with bevacizumab was chosen as the fourth line chemotherapy, and the serum CEA was reduced with tumor dormancy. A good quality of life was obtained again at 3 years after the first surgery. This report indicates the effectiveness of sandwiched liver surgery with the molecular targeting drugs cetuximab and bevacizumab on multiple liver metastases of colon cancer, and suggests the possibility of a regimen consisting of bevacizumab following cetuximab.

  7. Manufacturing Techniques and Surface Engineering of Polymer Based Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of polymer based nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier via pharmaceutical nano/microencapsulation has greatly promoted the development of nano- and micro-medicine in the past few decades. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA and chitosan, which are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers, have been approved by both the Food & Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicine Agency (EMA, making them ideal biomaterials that can be advanced from laboratory development to clinical oral and parental administrations. PLGA and chitosan encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs have successfully been developed as new oral drug delivery systems with demonstrated high efficacy. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the fabrication of PLGA and chitosan particulate systems using nano/microencapsulation methods, the current progress and the future outlooks of the nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Especially, we focus on the formulations and nano/micro-encapsulation techniques using top-down techniques. It also addresses how the different phases including the organic and aqueous ones in the emulsion system interact with each other and subsequently influence the properties of the drug delivery system. Besides, surface modification strategies which can effectively engineer intrinsic physicochemical properties are summarised. Finally, future perspectives and potential directions of PLGA and chitosan nano/microencapsulated drug systems are outlined.

  8. Improved Targeting of Cancers with Nanotherapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Christian; Watson, Andre; Kaplinsky, Joseph John;

    2017-01-01

    Targeted cancer nanotherapeutics offers numerous opportunities for the selective uptake of toxic chemotherapies within tumors and cancer cells. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as their small size, large surface-to-volume ratios, and the ability to achieve multivalency of targeting...... ligands on their surface, provide superior advantages for nanoparticle-based drug delivery to a variety of cancers. This review highlights various key concepts in the design of targeted nanotherapeutics for cancer therapy, and discusses physicochemical parameters affecting nanoparticle targeting, along...... with recent developments for cancer-targeted nanomedicines....

  9. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles In Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    treatment of cancer. Chemical Society Reviews 42(19): 7816-7833, 2013. 3. Gulaka PK, Yu JX, Liu L, Mason RP, Kodibagkar VD. Novel S-Gal analogs as 1H...L. Sheihet, I. P. Fuentes, S. Chen, C. M. Roth , P. V. Moghe, Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2013, 2, 1236. [15]C. Xu, Y. Niu, A. Popat, S. Jambhrunkar, S

  10. Identification and Characterization of Novel Drug Targets for Personalized Breast Cancer Nanomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Block, Ines; Müller, Carolin; Sdogati, Daniel;

    Personalized cancer nanomedicine aims at the design of novel nanodrugs that would match the molecular fingerprint of an individual patient`s tumor. Expression profiling and next generation-sequencing data represent rich resources for discovering new starting points for such approaches. Here, we...

  11. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Sridhar R, Wang PC: Bioluminescent animal models of human breast cancer for tumor biomass evaluation and metastasis detection. Ethn Dis 2008;18(2 Suppl...this study, near infrared fl uorescent imaging was used to confi rm the tumor tar - geting effectiveness of the immunotoxin in LNCaP tumors. Optical

  12. Gold Nanoplates as Cancer-Targeted Photothermal Actuators for Drug Delivery and Triggered Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Brann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The selective exposure of cancerous tissue to systemically delivered chemotherapeutic agents remains a major challenge facing cancer therapy. To address this question, a near infrared responsive oligonucleotide-coated (AS1411, hairpin, or both gold nanoplate loaded with doxorubicin is demonstrated to be nontoxic to cells without triggered release, while being acutely toxic to cells after 5 minutes of laser exposure to trigger DOX release. Conjugation of oligonucleotides to the nanoplates is confirmed by an average increase in hydrodynamic diameter of 30.6 nm, an average blue shift of the plasmon resonance peak by 36 nm, and an average −10 mV shift in zeta potential of the particles. DOX loading through intercalation into the hairpin DNA structure is confirmed through fluorescence measurements. For both GNP-Hairpin and GNP-Hairpin-AS1411, ~60% of loaded DOX is released after the first 5 minutes of laser exposure (λ=817 nm, with complete release after two more 5-minute exposures. Preliminary proof of concept is demonstrated in vitro using A549 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines as models for breast and lung cancer, respectively. Exposure of cells to untriggered DOX-loaded conjugate with no laser exposure results in little to no toxicity, while laser-triggered release of DOX causes significant cell death.

  13. MicroRNA-130b targets PTEN to mediate drug resistance and proliferation of breast cancer cells via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuan; Zheng, Wei; Li, Nana; Su, Zhen; Zhao, Lifen; Zhou, Huimin; Jia, Li

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) correlates with treatment failure and poor prognosis among breast cancer patients. This study was aimed to investigate the possible mechanism by which microRNA-130b-3p (miR-130b) mediates the chemoresistance and proliferation of breast cancer. MiR-130b was found to be up-regulated in tumor tissues versus adjacent tissues of breast cancer, as well as in adriamycin (ADR) resistant breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/ADR) versus its parental line (MCF-7) and the non-malignant breast epithelial cell line (MCF-10A), demonstrating its crucial relevance for breast cancer biology. We identified that PTEN was a direct target of miR-130b and inversely correlated with miR-130b expression in breast cancer. Moreover, over-expression of miR-130b promoted drug resistance, proliferation and decreased apoptosis of MCF-7 cells, while suppression of miR-130b enhanced drug cytotoxicity and apoptosis, as well as reduced proliferation of MCF-7/ADR cells in vitro and in vivo. Particularly, miR-130b mediated the activity of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway as well as the chemoresistance and proliferation of breast cancer cell lines, which was partially blocked following knockdown of PTEN. Altogether, miR-130b targets PTEN to induce MDR, proliferation, and apoptosis via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This provides a novel promising candidate for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28165066

  14. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il;

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...... take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective...... delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs....

  15. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  16. In vitro development of chemotherapy and targeted therapy drug-resistant cancer cell lines: A practical guide with case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eMcDermott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3-18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval and optimising the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between 2-8 fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299, H460 and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144 cell lines. Continuous selection produced lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954. Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical drug

  17. Evaluation of Three Small Molecular Drugs for Targeted Therapy to Treat Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ni; Li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To guide the optimal selection among first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in clinical practice.This review attempted to provide a thorough comparison among three first-generation EGFR-TKIs, namely icotinib,erlotinib, and gefitinib, with regard to their molecular structure, pharmacokinetic parameters, clinical data, adverse reactions, and contraindications.Data Sources: An electronic literature search of the PubMed database and Google Scholar for all the available articles regarding gefitinib,icotinib, and erlotinib in the English language from January 2005 to December 2014 was used.Study Selection: The search terms or keywords included but not limited to "lung cancer", "nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC)","epidemiology", "EGFR", "TKIs", and "optimal selection".Results: As suggested by this review, even though the three first-generation EGFR-TKIs share the quinazoline structure, erlotinib had the strongest apoptosis induction activity because of its use of a different side-chain.The pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that both erlotinib and icotinib are affected by food.The therapeutic window of erlotinib is narrow, and the recommended dosage is close to the maximum tolerable dosage.Icotinib enjoys a wider therapeutic window, and its concentration in the blood is within a safe dosage range even if it is administered with food.Based on multiple large-scale clinical trials, erlotinib is universally applied as the first-line treatment.In marked contrast, icotinib is available only in China as the second-or third-line therapeutic approach for treating advanced lung cancer.In addition, it exhibits a similar efficacy but better safety profile than gefitinib.Conclusions: Although there is a paucity of literature regarding whether icotinib is superior to erlotinib, its superior toxicity profile, noninferior efficacy, and lower cost indicate that it is a better alternative for Chinese patients living with

  18. Bladder Cancer and Urothelial Impairment: The Role of TRPV1 as Potential Drug Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mistretta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urothelium, in addition to its primary function of barrier, is now understood to act as a complex system of cell communication that exhibits specialized sensory properties in the regulation of physiological or pathological stimuli. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that bladder inflammation and neoplastic cell growth, the two most representative pathological conditions of the lower urinary tract, may arise from a primary defective urothelial lining. Transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1 (TRPV1, a receptor widely distributed in lower urinary tract structures and involved in the physiological micturition reflex, was described to have a pathophysiological role in inflammatory conditions and in the genesis and development of urothelial cancer. In our opinion new compounds, such as curcumin, the major component of turmeric Curcuma longa, reported to potentiate the effects of the chemotherapeutic agents used in the management of recurrent urothelial cancer in vitro and also identified as one of several compounds to own the vanillyl structure required to work like a TRPV1 agonist, could be thought as complementary in the clinical management of both the recurrences and the inflammatory effects caused by the endoscopic resection or intravesical chemotherapy administration or could be combined with adjuvant agents to potentiate their antitumoral effect.

  19. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) ...

  1. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery.

  2. Cancer-drug associations: a complex system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Dalkic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Network analysis has been performed on large-scale medical data, capturing the global topology of drugs, targets, and disease relationships. A smaller-scale network is amenable to a more detailed and focused analysis of the individual members and their interactions in a network, which can complement the global topological descriptions of a network system. Analysis of these smaller networks can help address questions, i.e., what governs the pairing of the different cancers and drugs, is it driven by molecular findings or other factors, such as death statistics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We defined global and local lethality values representing death rates relative to other cancers vs. within a cancer. We generated two cancer networks, one of cancer types that share Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs (FDA cancer network, and another of cancer types that share clinical trials of FDA approved drugs (clinical trial cancer network. Breast cancer is the only cancer type with significant weighted degree values in both cancer networks. Lung cancer is significantly connected in the FDA cancer network, whereas ovarian cancer and lymphoma are significantly connected in the clinical trial cancer network. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that global lethality impacts the drug approval and trial numbers, whereas, local lethality impacts the amount of drug sharing in trials and approvals. However, this effect does not apply to pancreatic, liver, and esophagus cancers as the sharing of drugs for these cancers is very low. We also collected mutation target information to generate cancer type associations which were compared with the cancer type associations derived from the drug target information. The analysis showed a weak overlap between the mutation and drug target based networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical and FDA cancer networks are differentially connected, with only breast cancer significantly

  3. Cancer immunotherapy targeting neoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    Neoantigens are antigens encoded by tumor-specific mutated genes. Studies in the past few years have suggested a key role for neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy. Here we review the discoveries of neoantigens in the past two decades and the current advances in neoantigen identification. We also discuss the potential benefits and obstacles to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies targeting neoantigens.

  4. Targeted Therapies in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Dogan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common genital cancer in developed world. It is generally diagnosed in early stage and it has a favorable prognosis. However, advanced staged disease and recurrences are difficult to manage. There are some common genetic alterations related to endometrial carcinogenesis in similar fashion to other cancers. Personalized medicine, which means selection of best suited treatment for an individual, has gain attention in clinical care of patients in recent years. Targeted therapies were developed as a part of personalized or %u201Ctailored%u201D medicine and specifically acts on a target or biologic pathway. There are quite a number of molecular alteration points in endometrial cancer such as PTEN tumor suppressor genes, DNA mismatch repair genes, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and p53 oncogene which all might be potential candidates for tailored targeted therapy. In recent years targeted therapies has clinical application in ovarian cancer patients and in near future with the advent of new agents these %u201Ctailored%u201D drugs will be in market for routine clinical practice in endometrial cancer patients, in primary disease and recurrences as well.

  5. Quantum dots conjugated with Fe3O4-filled carbon nanotubes for cancer-targeted imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; He, Ye-Ju; Chen, Xu-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2012-11-27

    A novel and specific nanoplatform for in vitro simultaneous cancer-targeted optical imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery is developed by conjugating CdTe quantum dots with Fe(3)O(4)-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the first time. Fe(3)O(4) is filled into the interior of the CNTs, which facilitates magnetically guided delivery and improves the synergetic targeting efficiency. In comparison with that immobilized on the external surface of CNTs, the magnetite nanocrystals inside the CNTs protect it from agglomeration, enhance its chemical stability, and improve the drug loading capacity. It also avoids magnetic nanocrystals-induced quenching of fluorescence of the quantum dots. The SiO(2)-coated quantum dots (HQDs) attached on the surface of CNTs exhibit favorable fluorescence as the hybrid SiO(2) shells on the QDs surface prevent its fluorescence quenching caused by the CNTs. In addition, the hybrid SiO(2) shells also mitigate the toxicity of the CdTe QDs. By coating transferrin on the surface of the herein modified CNTs, it provides a dual-targeted drug delivery system to transport the doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) into Hela cells by means of an external magnetic field. The nanocarrier based on the multifunctional nanoplatform exhibits an excellent drug loading capability of ca. 110%, in addition to cancer-targeted optical imaging as well as magnetically guided drug delivery.

  6. Novel Drugs Targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Its Downstream Pathways in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartej Merla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy among men and women in the United States, and the 5-year survival rate remains poor despite recent advances in chemotherapy and targeted agents. The mainstay of therapy for advanced disease remains the cytotoxic chemotherapy including 5-FU, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin. The USFDA approval and introduction of targeted therapies, including cetuximab and panitumumab (monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and bevacizumab (monoclonal antibody targeting the vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF, has improved the median survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to around 24 months. Clearly, better and more efficacious drugs are needed, and target-specific agents remain the future of cancer treatment. On this front, rapid advances are being made, which are likely to change the future of the management of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, absence of specific biomarkers for the use of targeted agents, in the subset of population who will benefit from the treatment, remains a major drawback. In this paper, we review agents that are in phases 1 and 2 clinical development, specifically targeting the EGFR and its subsequent downstream pathways.

  7. Folate Receptor-Targeted Polymeric Micellar Nanocarriers for Delivery of Orlistat as a Repurposed Drug against Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Bhethanabotla, Rohith; Mishra, Kaushik; Devulapally, Rammohan; Foygel, Kira; Sekar, Thillai V; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Massoud, Tarik F; Joy, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a recalcitrant malignancy with no available targeted therapy. Off-target effects and poor bioavailability of the FDA-approved antiobesity drug orlistat hinder its clinical translation as a repurposed new drug against TNBC. Here, we demonstrate a newly engineered drug formulation for packaging orlistat tailored to TNBC treatment. We synthesized TNBC-specific folate receptor-targeted micellar nanoparticles (NP) carrying orlistat, which improved the solubility (70-80 μg/mL) of this water-insoluble drug. The targeted NPs also improved the delivery and bioavailability of orlistat to MDA-MB-231 cells in culture and to tumor xenografts in a nude mouse model. We prepared HEA-EHA copolymer micellar NPs by copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethylacrylate (HEA) and 2-ethylhexylacrylate (EHA), and functionalized them with folic acid and an imaging dye. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of TNBC cells indicated a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic populations in cells treated with free orlistat, orlistat NPs, and folate-receptor-targeted Fol-HEA-EHA-orlistat NPs in which Fol-HEA-EHA-orlistat NPs showed significantly higher cytotoxicity than free orlistat. In vitro analysis data demonstrated significant apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations in cells activated through caspase-3 and PARP inhibition. In vivo analysis demonstrated significant antitumor effects in living mice after targeted treatment of tumors, and confirmed by fluorescence imaging. Moreover, folate receptor-targeted Fol-DyLight747-orlistat NP-treated mice exhibited significantly higher reduction in tumor volume compared to control group. Taken together, these results indicate that orlistat packaged in HEA-b-EHA micellar NPs is a highly promising new drug formulation for TNBC therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 221-31. ©2015 AACR.

  8. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  9. Aquaporins as potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang WANG; Xue-chao FENG; Yong-ming LI; Hong YANG; Tong-hui MA

    2006-01-01

    The aquaporins (AQP) are a family of integral membrane proteins that selectively transport water and,in some cases,small neutral solutes such as glycerol and urea.Thirteen mammalian AQP have been molecularly identified and localized to various epithelial,endothelial and other tissues.Phenotype studies of transgenic mouse models of AQP knockout,mutation,and in some cases humans with AQP mutations have demonstrated essential roles for AQP in mammalian physiology and pathophysiology,including urinary concentrating function,exocrine glandular fluid secretion,brain edema formation,regulation of intracranial and intraocular pressure,skin hydration,fat metabolism,tumor angiogenesis and cell migration.These studies suggest that AQP may be potential drug targets for not only new diuretic reagents for various forms of pathological water retention,but also targets for novel therapy of brain edema,inflammatory disease,glaucoma,obesity,and cancer.However,potent AQP modulators for in vivo application remain to be discovered.

  10. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances that have taken place in the past decade, including the development of novel molecular targeted agents, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of cancer treatment. In breast cancer, anthracyclines and taxanes are the two main chemotherapeutic options used on a routine...... basis. Although effective, their usefulness is limited by the inevitable development of resistance, a lack of response to drug-induced cancer cell death. A large body of research has resulted in the characterization of a plethora of mechanisms involved in resistance; ATP-binding cassette transporter...

  11. Smart ligand: aptamer-mediated targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and siRNA for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Qinghe; Qiu, Liyan

    2013-10-28

    Aptamers are a class of oligonucleotides that can specifically bind to different targets with high affinity. Since their discovery in 1980s, aptamers have attracted considerable interests in medical applications. So far, initial research using aptamers as delivery systems has produced exciting results. In this review, we summarize recent progress in aptamer-mediated chemotherapeutic drug and siRNA delivery systems in tumor treatment. With regard to chemotherapeutic drugs, the 2 main methods for targeted delivery using aptamers are as follows: aptamer-drug systems (in which aptamers directly deliver the drug both as a carrier and as a ligand) and aptamer-nanoparticles systems (in which nanoparticles function together with aptamers for targeted delivery of drugs). For delivery of siRNA, aptamers can be utilized by the following ways to facilitate targeting: (1) linked by a connector; (2) form a chimera; and (3) combined with nanoparticles. In co-delivery system, the advantages associated with the use of aptamers are beginning to become apparent also. Here, the challenges and new perspectives in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery have been discussed.

  12. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  13. Network systems biology for targeted cancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The era of targeted cancer therapies has arrived.However,due to the complexity of biological systems,the current progress is far from enough.From biological network modeling to structural/dynamic network analysis,network systems biology provides unique insight into the potential mechanisms underlying the growth and progression of cancer cells.It has also introduced great changes into the research paradigm of cancer-associated drug discovery and drug resistance.

  14. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly change it. The solubilization of both drugs by the mixed micelles was more efficient than by micelles made of PEG-PE alone. Solubilization of camptothecin in micelles prevented also the hydrolysis of active lactone form of the drug to inactive carboxylate form. Drug loaded mixed micelles and mAb 2C5-immunomicelles demonstrated significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity than free drug against various cancer cell lines. PMID:18583114

  15. AS1411 aptamer and folic acid functionalized pH-responsive ATRP fabricated pPEGMA-PCL-pPEGMA polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lale, Shantanu V; R G, Aswathy; Aravind, Athulya; Kumar, D Sakthi; Koul, Veena

    2014-05-12

    Nonspecificity and cardiotoxicity are the primary limitations of current doxorubicin chemotherapy. To minimize side effects and to enhance bioavailability of doxorubicin to cancer cells, a dual-targeted pH-sensitive biocompatible polymeric nanosystem was designed and developed. An ATRP-based biodegradable triblock copolymer, poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-poly(caprolactone)-poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (pPEGMA-PCL-pPEGMA), conjugated with doxorubicin via an acid-labile hydrazone bond was synthesized and characterized. Dual targeting was achieved by attaching folic acid and the AS1411 aptamer through EDC-NHS coupling. Nanoparticles of the functionalized triblock copolymer were prepared using the nanoprecipitation method, resulting in an average particle size of ∼140 nm. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was evaluated using MTT cytotoxicity assays, blood compatibility studies, and protein adsorption studies. In vitro drug release studies showed a higher cumulative doxorubicin release at pH 5.0 (∼70%) compared to pH 7.4 (∼25%) owing to the presence of the acid-sensitive hydrazone linkage. Dual targeting with folate and the AS1411 aptamer increased the cancer-targeting efficiency of the nanoparticles, resulting in enhanced cellular uptake (10- and 100-fold increase in uptake compared to single-targeted NPs and non-targeted NPs, respectively) and a higher payload of doxorubicin in epithelial cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and PANC-1), with subsequent higher apoptosis, whereas a normal (noncancerous) cell line (L929) was spared from the adverse effects of doxorubicin. The results indicate that the dual-targeted pH-sensitive biocompatible polymeric nanosystem can act as a potential drug delivery vehicle against various epithelial cancers such as those of the breast, ovary, pancreas, lung, and others.

  16. Clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of CDH1 in breast cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruixue Huang,* Ping Ding,* Fei Yang*Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China*All authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: CDH1, as a tumor suppressor gene, contributes sporadic breast cancer (BC progression. However, the association between CDH1 hypermethylation and BC, and its clinicopathological significance remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between the CDH1 methylation profile and the major clinicopathological features. A detailed literature was searched through the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science™, and EMBASE™ for related research publications. The data were extracted and assessed by two reviewers independently. Odds ratios (ORs with corresponding confidence intervals (CIs were calculated and summarized respectively. The frequency of CDH1 methylation was significantly higher in invasive ductal carcinoma than in normal breast tissues (OR =5.83, 95% CI 3.76–9.03, P<0.00001. CDH1 hypermethylation was significantly higher in estrogen receptor (ER-negative BC than in ER-positive BC (OR =0.62, 95% CI 0.43–0.87, P=0.007. In addition, we found that the CDH1 was significantly methylated in HER2-negative BC than in HER2-positive BC (OR =0.26, 95% CI 0.15–0.44, P<0.00001. However, CDH1 methylation frequency was not associated with progesterone receptor (PR status, or with grades, stages, or lymph node metastasis of BC patients. Our results indicate that CDH1 hypermethylation is a potential novel drug target for developing personalized therapy. CDH1 hypermethylation is strongly associated with ER-negative and HER2-negative BC, respectively, suggesting CDH1 methylation status could contribute to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ER-negative or HER2-negative BC with aggressive tumor biology.Keywords: methylation, estrogen receptor, HER2

  17. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    Full Text Available The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC. S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  18. Augmentation of a Novel Enzyme/Pro-Drug Gene Therapy "Distant Bystander Effect" to Target Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    fluorocytosine (5FC), which is converted by CD to 5- fluoro-uridine ( 5FU ). The fusion gene has been shown to be more effective in GDEPT than CD alone...as the UPRT converts 5FU directly to additional anti- metabolites, 5FdUMP and 5FUTP (Tiraby et al., 1998) and sensitises cancer cells to low doses...of 5FU (Kanai et al., 1998). The drugs generated by CDUPRT can kill both dividing and non-dividing cells. This is important in prostate cancer, where

  19. Polymer-Based Prodrugs: Improving Tumor Targeting and the Solubility of Small Molecule Drugs in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojevic, Sonja; Ryu, Jung Su; Raucher, Drazen

    2015-12-04

    The majority of anticancer drugs have poor aqueous solubility, produce adverse effects in healthy tissue, and thus impose major limitations on both clinical efficacy and therapeutic safety of cancer chemotherapy. To help circumvent problems associated with solubility, most cancer drugs are now formulated with co-solubilizers. However, these agents often also introduce severe side effects, thereby restricting effective treatment and patient quality of life. A promising approach to addressing problems in anticancer drug solubility and selectivity is their conjugation with polymeric carriers to form polymer-based prodrugs. These polymer-based prodrugs are macromolecular carriers, designed to increase the aqueous solubility of antitumor drugs, can enhance bioavailability. Additionally, polymer-based prodrugs approach exploits unique features of tumor physiology to passively facilitate intratumoral accumulation, and so improve chemodrug pharmacokinetics and pharmacological properties. This review introduces basic concepts of polymer-based prodrugs, provides an overview of currently emerging synthetic, natural, and genetically engineered polymers that now deliver anticancer drugs in preclinical or clinical trials, and highlights their major anticipated applications in anticancer therapies.

  20. Polymer-Based Prodrugs: Improving Tumor Targeting and the Solubility of Small Molecule Drugs in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Dragojevic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of anticancer drugs have poor aqueous solubility, produce adverse effects in healthy tissue, and thus impose major limitations on both clinical efficacy and therapeutic safety of cancer chemotherapy. To help circumvent problems associated with solubility, most cancer drugs are now formulated with co-solubilizers. However, these agents often also introduce severe side effects, thereby restricting effective treatment and patient quality of life. A promising approach to addressing problems in anticancer drug solubility and selectivity is their conjugation with polymeric carriers to form polymer-based prodrugs. These polymer-based prodrugs are macromolecular carriers, designed to increase the aqueous solubility of antitumor drugs, can enhance bioavailability. Additionally, polymer-based prodrugs approach exploits unique features of tumor physiology to passively facilitate intratumoral accumulation, and so improve chemodrug pharmacokinetics and pharmacological properties. This review introduces basic concepts of polymer-based prodrugs, provides an overview of currently emerging synthetic, natural, and genetically engineered polymers that now deliver anticancer drugs in preclinical or clinical trials, and highlights their major anticipated applications in anticancer therapies.

  1. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  2. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  4. NIOSOMES- A NOVEL DRUG CARRIER FOR DRUG TARGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.KRISHNA SAILAJA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are vesicular drug delivery systems made of cholesterol and non ionic surfactants. Various novel drug delivery systems available for targeting of drugs include liposomes, nanoparticles, and resealed erythrocytes. Because of the instability and higher cost liposomes are less preferred over niosomes. The application of vesicular systems in cosmetics and for therapeutic purpose may offer several advantages for niosomes. They improve the therapeutic performance of the drug molecules by delayed clearance from the circulation, protecting the drug from biological environment and restricting effects to target cells. Niosomes have great drug delivery potential for targeted delivery of anti-cancer, anti-infective agents. Drug delivery potential of niosome can enhance by using novel concepts like proniosomes and aspasome. Niosomes also serve better aid in diagnostic imaging and as a vaccine adjuvant. Thus these areas need further exploration and research so as to bring out commercially available niosomal preparation. This article mainly focuses on the significance, advantages over other drug delivery systems, manufacturing methods, characterization methods, current research in niosomal drug delivery and their limitations.

  5. Sugar-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for the poorly soluble drug celastrol enables targeted induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Erik; Desai, Diti; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Eriksson, John E; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2015-10-01

    Cancerous cells have a rapid metabolism by which they take up sugars, such as glucose, at significantly higher rates than normal cells. Celastrol is a traditional herbal medicine known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The poor aqueous solubility and lack of target selectivity of celastrol result in low therapeutic concentration of the drug reaching subcellular compartments of the target tissue, making it an interesting candidate for nanoparticulate delivery. The goal of this study was to utilize glucose as an affinity ligand decorated on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), with the aim of delivering these celastrol-loaded MSNs with high specificity to cancer cells and inducing minimal off-target effects in healthy cells. MSNs were thus functionalized with sugar moieties by two different routes, either by conjugation directly to the MSN surface or mediated by a hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine), PEI layer; the latter to increase the cellular uptake by providing an overall positive surface charge as well as to increase the reaction sites for sugar conjugation. The effect of surface functionalization on the target-specific efficacy of the particles was assessed by analyzing the uptake in HeLa and A549 cells as cancer cell models, as compared to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) as a representative for normal cells. To this end a comprehensive analysis strategy was employed, including flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and spectrophotometry. When the apoptotic effect of celastrol was evaluated, the anti-cancer activity of celastrol was shown to be significantly enhanced when it was loaded into the specifically designed MSNs. The particles themselves did not induce any toxicity, and normal cells displayed minimal off-target effects. In summary, we show that glucose-functionalized MSNs can be used as efficient carriers for targeted celastrol delivery to achieve specific induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

  6. Target Oriented Drugs against Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-31

    the leishmanial source. Leishmanial strains L32 Leishmania tropica LRC L32 L137 Leishmania tropica LRC L137 L52 Leishmania donovani LRC L52 These...RESOLUTION TEST CHAR] 0REPORT NUMBER I TARGET ORIENTED DRUGS AGAINST LEISHMANIA (First Annual Summary Report) 0URI ZEHAVI, PhD and JOSEPH EL-ON, PhD...GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RE PIENT.S CATALOG NUMBER A....*( - ) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED TARGET ORIENTED DRUGS AGAINST LEISHMANIA 6 FIRST

  7. Smart bomb AS1411 aptamer-functionalized/PAMAM dendrimer nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Behrooz, Amir; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Adiban, Jamal; Shafiee Ardestani, Mehdi; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sohanaki, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy, a conventional method assessed in recent oncology studies, poses numerous problems in the clinical environment. To overcome the problems inherent in chemotherapy, an intelligent drug delivery system has come to the forefront of cancer therapeutics. In this study, we designed a dendrimer-based pharmaceutical system together with a single-stranded AS1411 aptamer (APT(AS)(1411) ) as a therapeutic strategy. The polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) complex was then conjugated with the AS1411 aptamer and confirmed by atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) .In this study, we show that the conjugated PAMAM-PEG-APT(AS)(1411) complex dramatically increased PAMAM-PEG-5-FU uptake by MKN45 gastric cancer cells. We also demonstrated both the stability of the nanoparticle-5-FU-APT(AS)(1411) complex, by thin layer chromatography (TLC), and an increase in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) accumulation in the vicinity of cancerous tumors. This smart drug delivery system is capable of effectively transferring 5-FU to MKN45 gastric cancer cells in consistent and without toxic effects.

  8. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  9. Cancer-targeted MDR-1 siRNA delivery using self-cross-linked glycol chitosan nanoparticles to overcome drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, Ji Young; Song, Seungyong; Lee, So Jin; Park, Sung-Gurl; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Myung Goo; Son, Sejin; Koo, Heebeom; Kwon, Ick Chan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jeong, Seo Young; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2015-01-28

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of failure in chemotherapy. In this study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) for Pgp down-regulation was delivered to tumors to overcome MDR in cancer. To achieve an efficient siRNA delivery in vivo, self-polymerized 5'-end thiol-modified siRNA (poly-siRNA) was incorporated in tumor targeting glycol chitosan nanoparticles. Pgp-targeted poly-siRNA (psi-Pgp) and thiolated glycol chitosan polymers (tGC) formed stable nanoparticles (psi-Pgp-tGC NPs), and the resulting nanoparticles protected siRNA molecules from enzymatic degradation. The psi-Pgp-tGC NPs could release functional siRNA molecules after cellular delivery, and they were able to facilitate siRNA delivery to Adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). After intravenous administration, the psi-Pgp-tGC NPs accumulated in MCF-7/ADR tumors and down-regulated P-gp expression to sensitize cancer cells. Consequently, chemo-siRNA combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth without systemic toxicity. These psi-Pgp-tGC NPs showed great potential as a supplementary therapeutic agent for drug-resistant cancer.

  10. Scaffold Repurposing of Old Drugs Towards New Cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Wu, Jianlei; Gao, Yu; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    As commented by the Nobelist James Black that "The most fruitful basis of the discovery of a new drug is to start with an old drug", drug repurposing represents an attractive drug discovery strategy. Despite the success of several repurposed drugs on the market, the ultimate therapeutic potential of a large number of non-cancer drugs is hindered during their repositioning due to various issues including the limited efficacy and intellectual property. With the increasing knowledge about the pharmacological properties and newly identified targets, the scaffolds of the old drugs emerge as a great treasure-trove towards new cancer drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of novel small molecules for cancer therapy by scaffold repurposing with highlighted examples. The relevant strategies, advantages, challenges and future research directions associated with this approach are also discussed.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Multifunctional Sericin Nanoparticles for Tumor Targeting and pH-Responsive Subcellular Delivery of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Tao, Kaixiong; Liu, Jia; Qi, Chao; Xu, Luming; Chang, Panpan; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    The severe cytotoxicity of cancer chemotherapy drugs limits their clinical applications. Various protein-based nanoparticles with good biocompatibility have been developed for chemotherapy drug delivery in hope of reducing drugs' side effects. Sericin, a natural protein from silk, has no immunogenicity and possesses diverse bioactivities that have prompted sericin's application studies. However, the potential of sericin as a multifunctional nanoscale vehicle for cancer therapy have not been fully explored. Here we report the successful fabrication and characterization of folate-conjugated sericin nanoparticles with cancer-targeting capability for pH-responsive release of doxorubicin (these nanoparticles are termed "FA-SND"). DOX is covalently linked to sericin through pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds that render a pH-triggered release property. The hydrophobicity of DOX and the hydrophilicity of sericin promote the self-assembly of sericin-DOX (SND) nanoconjugates. Folate (FA) is then covalently grafted to SND nanoconjugates as a binding unit for actively targeting cancer cells that overexpress folate receptors. Our characterization study shows that FA-SND nanoparticles exhibit negative surface charges that would reduce nonspecific clearance by circulation. These nanoparticles possess good cytotoxicity and hemocompatibiliy. Acidic environment (pH 5.0) triggers effective DOX release from FA-SND, 5-fold higher than does a neutral condition (pH 7.4). Further, FA-SND nanoparticles specifically target folate-receptor-rich KB cells, and endocytosed into lysosomes, an acidic organelle. The acidic microenvironment of lysosomes promotes a rapid release of DOX to nuclei, producing cancer specific chemo-cytotoxicity. Thus, FA-mediated cancer targeting and lysosomal-acidity promoting DOX release, two sequentially-occurring cellular events triggered by the designed components of FA-SND, form the basis for FA-SND to achieve its localized and intracellular chemo

  12. Evaluation of Nanocarrier Targeted Drug Delivery of Capecitabine-PAMAM Dendrimer Complex in a Mice Colorectal Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nabavizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine, an effective anticancer drug in colorectal cancer chemotherapy, may create adverse side effects on healthy tissues. In the present study, we first induced colon adenocarcinoma with azoxymethane, a carcinogen agent, and then investigated the potentiality of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer to improve capecitabine therapeutic index and decrease its adverse side effects on healthy tissues like liver and bone marrow. Other variables such as nanoparticle concentrations have also been investigated. Drug loading concentration (DLC and encapsulation efficiency (EE were calculated for capecitabine/dendrimer complex. Experimental results showed an increase in DLC percentage resulted from elevated capecitabine/dendrimer ratio. Capecitabine/dendrimer complex could reduce tumor size and adverse side effects in comparison with free capecitabine form.

  13. EGFR-targeted drugs for colorectal cancer: current status and future challenges%EGFR靶向药物在结直肠癌中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 余英豪

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common gastrointestinal malignancy. The effects of traditional chemotherapy and radiation therapy against colorectal cancer are not satisfactory. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway plays an important role in tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in colorectal cancer. EGFR-targeted drugs have been developed and applied to the treatment of colorectal cancer. This paper provides a literature review on the current status and future challenges of EGFR-targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.%结直肠癌是常见的消化系恶性肿瘤,传统的化疗和放疗效果均不甚理想.表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)q%号转导通路在结直肠癌细胞的增殖、血管生成、侵袭、转移等方面有重要作用.因此,针对EGFR的靶向药物已陆续开发,并应用于结直肠癌治疗的临床实践.本文就EGFR靶向药物在结直肠癌中的研究现状及其相关问题进行综述.

  14. Cancer metabolism: strategic diversion from targeting cancer drivers to targeting cancer suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Youl

    2015-03-01

    Drug development groups are close to discovering another pot of gold-a therapeutic target-similar to the success of imatinib (Gleevec) in the field of cancer biology. Modern molecular biology has improved cancer therapy through the identification of more pharmaceutically viable targets, and yet major problems and risks associated with late-phase cancer therapy remain. Presently, a growing number of reports have initiated a discussion about the benefits of metabolic regulation in cancers. The Warburg effect, a great discovery approximately 70 years ago, addresses the "universality" of cancer characteristics. For instance, most cancer cells prefer aerobic glycolysis instead of mitochondrial respiration. Recently, cancer metabolism has been explained not only by metabolites but also through modern molecular and chemical biological techniques. Scientists are seeking context-dependent universality among cancer types according to metabolic and enzymatic pathway signatures. This review presents current cancer metabolism studies and discusses future directions in cancer therapy targeting bio-energetics, bio-anabolism, and autophagy, emphasizing the important contribution of cancer metabolism in cancer therapy.

  15. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of these cancers: Leukemia and lymphoma Breast cancer Colon cancer Skin cancer Lung cancer Prostate Other cancers ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 44. Review Date 9/13/2015 Updated by: Todd Gersten, ...

  16. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prostate cancer. The list includes generic ...

  17. Biotin-targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles delivering niclosamide: A repositioning strategy to treat drug-resistant lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Annapina; Pellosi, Diogo Silva; Pagliara, Valentina; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru; Budillon, Alfredo; Ungaro, Francesca; Russo, Giulia; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2016-09-10

    With the aim to develop alternative therapeutic tools for the treatment of resistant cancers, here we propose targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles (PMM) delivering niclosamide (NCL) as a repositioning strategy to treat multidrug resistant non-small lung cancer cell lines. To build multifunctional PMM for targeting and imaging, Pluronic(®) F127 was conjugated with biotin, while Pluronic(®) P123 was fluorescently tagged with rhodamine B, in both cases at one of the two hydroxyl end groups. This design intended to avoid any interference of rhodamine B on biotin exposition on PMM surface, which is a key fundamental for cell trafficking studies. Biotin-decorated PMM were internalized more efficiently than non-targeted PMM in A549 lung cancer cells, while very low internalization was found in NHI3T3 normal fibroblasts. Biotin-decorated PMM entrapped NCL with good efficiency, displayed sustained drug release in protein-rich media and improved cytotoxicity in A549 cells as compared to free NCL (P<0.01). To go in depth into the actual therapeutic potential of NCL-loaded PMM, a cisplatin-resistant A549 lung cancer cell line (CPr-A549) was developed and its multidrug resistance tested against common chemotherapeutics. Free NCL was able to overcome chemoresistance showing cytotoxic effects in this cell line ascribable to nucleolar stress, which was associated to a significant increase of the ribosomal protein rpL3 and consequent up-regulation of p21. It is noteworthy that biotin-decorated PMM carrying NCL at low doses demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity than free NCL in CPr-A549. These results point at NCL-based regimen with targeted PMM as a possible second-line chemotherapy for lung cancer showing cisplatin or multidrug resistance.

  18. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F; Dresch, Roger R; Carraro, João L F; Mothes, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Junior, Mário L C da Frota; Henriques, Amélia T

    2015-08-25

    Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z)-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3, 6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R)-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy.

  19. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Biegelmeyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3, 6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87 and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy.

  20. Nucleolin overexpression in breast cancer cell sub-populations with different stem-like phenotype enables targeted intracellular delivery of synergistic drug combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nuno A; Rodrigues, Ana S; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Gregório, Ana C; Valério-Fernandes, Ângela; Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Rosa, Manuel Santos; Moura, Vera; Ramalho-Santos, João; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) are thought responsible for tumor growth and relapse, metastization and active evasion to standard chemotherapy. The recognition that CSC may originate from non-stem cancer cells (non-SCC) through plastic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition turned these into relevant cell targets. Of crucial importance for successful therapeutic intervention is the identification of surface receptors overexpressed in both CSC and non-SCC. Cell surface nucleolin has been described as overexpressed in cancer cells as well as a tumor angiogenic marker. Herein we have addressed the questions on whether nucleolin was a common receptor among breast CSC and non-SCC and whether it could be exploited for targeting purposes. Liposomes functionalized with the nucleolin-binding F3 peptide, targeted simultaneously, nucleolin-overexpressing putative breast CSC and non-SCC, which was paralleled by OCT4 and NANOG mRNA levels in cells from triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) origin. In murine embryonic stem cells, both nucleolin mRNA levels and F3 peptide-targeted liposomes cellular association were dependent on the stemness status. An in vivo tumorigenic assay suggested that surface nucleolin overexpression per se, could be associated with the identification of highly tumorigenic TNBC cells. This proposed link between nucleolin expression and the stem-like phenotype in TNBC, enabled 100% cell death mediated by F3 peptide-targeted synergistic drug combination, suggesting the potential to abrogate the plasticity and adaptability associated with CSC and non-SCC. Ultimately, nucleolin-specific therapeutic tools capable of simultaneous debulk multiple cellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment may pave the way towards a specific treatment for TNBC patient care.

  1. FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS IDENTIFIES TIS21-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PUTATIVE CANCER DRUG TARGETS UNDERLYING MEDULLOBLASTOMA SHH-TYPE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Gentile

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have recently generated a novel medulloblastoma (MB mouse model with activation of the Shh pathway and lacking the MB suppressor Tis21 (Patched1+-Tis21KO.ts main phenotype is a defect of migration of the cerebellar granule precursor cells (GCPs. By genomic analysis of GCPs in vivo, we identified as drug target and major responsible of this defect the down-regulation of the promigratory chemokine Cxcl3. Consequently, the GCPs remain longer in the cerebellum proliferative area, and the MB frequency is enhanced. Here, we further analyzed the genes deregulated in a Tis21-dependent manner (Patched1+-is21 wild-type versus Ptch1+-Tis21 knockout, among which are a number of down-regulated tumor inhibitors and up-regulated tumor facilitators, focusing on pathways potentially involved in the tumorigenesis and on putative new drug targets.The data analysis using bioinformatic tools revealed: i a link between the Shh signaling and the Tis21-dependent impairment of the GCPs migration, through a Shh-dependent deregulation of the clathrin-mediated chemotaxis operating in the primary cilium through the Cxcl3-Cxcr2 axis; ii a possible lineage shift of Shh-type GCPs toward retinal precursor phenotype the neural cell type involved in group 3 MB; iii the identification of a subset of putative drug targets for MB, involved, among the others, in the regulation of Hippo signaling and centrosome assembly. Finally, our findings define also the role of Tis21 in the regulation of gene expression, through epigenetic and RNA processing mechanisms, influencing the fate of the GCPs.

  2. Size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers for targeted and controlled cancer drug delivery using salting out cation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madasamy Hari Balakrishanan; Mariappan Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Research for synthesis of size-controlled carriers is currently challenging one. In this research paper, a method for size-controlled synthesis of biodegradable nanocarriers is proposed and described. Salting out method is suitable for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for the encapsulation on carriers. This synthetic method is based on polylactic acid (PLA) and non-ionic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) composed by CaCl2 as salting out agent. This method permits size-controlled synthesis of particles between 50 and 400 nm simply by varying the concentration of salting out agents. We have prepared cisplatin (CDDP)-loaded PLA-CMC nanocarriers by salting out method, with varying salting out agent (CaCl2) concentrations as 0.05, 0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 M. The nanocarriers were characterized for their size, surface charge and morphology by atomic force microscope, zeta potential analyser and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency and in-vitro drug-releasing behaviour of the nanocarriers were investigated. The cytotoxicity effect of nanocarriers and drug-loaded nanocarriers was tested against MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

  3. Photodynamic therapy of a 2-methoxyestradiol tumor-targeting drug delivery system mediated by Asn-Gly-Arg in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jinjin Shi, Zhenzhen Wang, Lei Wang, Honghong Wang, Lulu Li, Xiaoyuan Yu, Jing Zhang, Rou Ma, Zhenzhong ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Fullerene (C60 has shown great potential in drug delivery. In this study we exploited modified fullerene (diadduct malonic acid-fullerene-Asn-Gly-Arg peptide [DMA-C60-NGR] as an antitumor drug carrier in order to build a new tumor-targeting drug delivery system. We also investigated the synergistic enhancement of cancer therapy using photodynamic therapy (PDT induced by DMA-C60-NGR and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that DMA-C60-NGR had no obvious toxicity, while our drug delivery system (DMA-C60-2ME-NGR had a high inhibition effect on MCF-7 cells compared to free 2ME. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system could efficiently cross cell membranes, and illumination induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. Furthermore, DMA-C60-2ME-NGR with irradiation had the highest inhibition effect on MCF-7 cells compared to the other groups. DMA-C60-NGR combined with 2ME showed a good synergistic photosensitization effect for inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells, demonstrating that DMA-C60-2ME-NGR may be promising for high treatment efficacy with minimal side effects in future therapy.Keywords: fullerene, drug delivery system, photodynamic therapy, tumor targeting

  4. Evaluation and validation of drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    Drug target is one of the key factors for discovering and developing new drugs. To find and validate drug targets is a crucial technique required in drug discovery by the strategy of high throughput screening. Based on the knowledge of molecular biology, human genomics and proteomics, it has been predicted that 5000 to 10000 drug targets exist in human. So, it is important orocedure to evaluate and validate the drug targets.

  5. Orexin receptors: multi-functional therapeutic targets for sleeping disorders, eating disorders, drug addiction, cancers and other physiological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Rui; Yang, Yang; Ward, Richard; Gao, Linghuan; Liu, Ying

    2013-12-01

    The orexin peptides (orexin A, orexin B) and their receptors (orexin receptor type 1, orexin receptor type 2) are involved in multiple physiological processes such as the regulation of sleep/wakefulness state, energy homeostasis and reward seeking. A result of this has been the development of small-molecule orexin receptor antagonists as novel therapies for the treatment of insomnia and drug addiction. Increased levels of signaling via the orexin peptide/receptor system may protect against obesity, while somewhat unexpectedly, orexins acting at orexin receptors induce dramatic apoptosis resulting in the significant reduction of cell growth in various cancer cell lines. Meanwhile, the orexin peptide/receptor system is also involved in cardiovascular modulation, neuroendocrine and reproduction regulation. This review summarizes the latest developments in deciphering the biology of orexin signaling as well as efforts to manipulate orexin signaling pharmacologically.

  6. Prodrug applications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Irene; Boland, Erin L; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-09-01

    Prodrugs are widely used in the targeted delivery of cytotoxic compounds to cancer cells. To date, targeted prodrugs for cancer therapy have achieved great diversity in terms of target selection, activation chemistry, as well as size and physicochemical nature of the prodrug. Macromolecular prodrugs such as antibody-drug conjugates, targeted polymer-drug conjugates and other conjugates that self-assemble to form liposomal and micellar nanoparticles currently represent a major trend in prodrug development for cancer therapy. In this review, we explore a unified view of cancer-targeted prodrugs and highlight several examples from recombinant technology that exemplify the prodrug concept but are not identified as such. Recombinant "prodrugs" such as engineered anthrax toxin show promise in biological specificity through the conditionally targeting of multiple cellular markers. Conditional targeting is achieved by structural complementation, the spontaneous assembly of engineered inactive subunits or fragments to reconstitute functional activity. These complementing systems can be readily adapted to achieve conditionally bispecific targeting of enzymes that are used to activate low-molecular weight prodrugs. By leveraging strengths from medicinal chemistry, polymer science, and recombinant technology, prodrugs are poised to remain a core component of highly focused and tailored strategies aimed at conditionally attacking complex molecular phenotypes in clinically relevant cancer.

  7. New drugs in gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, A; Munster, P; Munster, P; Spriggs, D R

    2001-04-01

    The implementation of new drug treatments has improved the prognosis for advanced cancers of the cervix, uterus, and ovary. Platinum analogs are the most effective drugs in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Other drugs, such as oxaliplatin, have been proposed as a rational treatment of platinum refractory ovarian cancer. Epothilones are also being studied in clinical trials, as are histone deacetylase inhibitors. Several promising agents may soon receive Food and Drug Administration approval.

  8. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  9. Profound activity of the anti-cancer drug bortezomib against Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes identifies the proteasome as a novel drug target for cestodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stadelmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A library of 426 FDA-approved drugs was screened for in vitro activity against E. multilocularis metacestodes employing the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI assay. Initial screening at 20 µM revealed that 7 drugs induced considerable metacestode damage, and further dose-response studies revealed that bortezomib (BTZ, a proteasome inhibitor developed for the chemotherapy of myeloma, displayed high anti-metacestodal activity with an EC50 of 0.6 µM. BTZ treatment of E. multilocularis metacestodes led to an accumulation of ubiquinated proteins and unequivocally parasite death. In-gel zymography assays using E. multilocularis extracts demonstrated BTZ-mediated inhibition of protease activity in a band of approximately 23 kDa, the same size at which the proteasome subunit beta 5 of E. multilocularis could be detected by Western blot. Balb/c mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes were used to assess BTZ treatment, starting at 6 weeks post-infection by intraperitoneal injection of BTZ. This treatment led to reduced parasite weight, but to a degree that was not statistically significant, and it induced adverse effects such as diarrhea and neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the proteasome was identified as a drug target in E. multilocularis metacestodes that can be efficiently inhibited by BTZ in vitro. However, translation of these findings into in vivo efficacy requires further adjustments of treatment regimens using BTZ, or possibly other proteasome inhibitors.

  10. Profound activity of the anti-cancer drug bortezomib against Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes identifies the proteasome as a novel drug target for cestodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Aeschbacher, Denise; Huber, Cristina; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    A library of 426 FDA-approved drugs was screened for in vitro activity against E. multilocularis metacestodes employing the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) assay. Initial screening at 20 µM revealed that 7 drugs induced considerable metacestode damage, and further dose-response studies revealed that bortezomib (BTZ), a proteasome inhibitor developed for the chemotherapy of myeloma, displayed high anti-metacestodal activity with an EC50 of 0.6 µM. BTZ treatment of E. multilocularis metacestodes led to an accumulation of ubiquinated proteins and unequivocally parasite death. In-gel zymography assays using E. multilocularis extracts demonstrated BTZ-mediated inhibition of protease activity in a band of approximately 23 kDa, the same size at which the proteasome subunit beta 5 of E. multilocularis could be detected by Western blot. Balb/c mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes were used to assess BTZ treatment, starting at 6 weeks post-infection by intraperitoneal injection of BTZ. This treatment led to reduced parasite weight, but to a degree that was not statistically significant, and it induced adverse effects such as diarrhea and neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the proteasome was identified as a drug target in E. multilocularis metacestodes that can be efficiently inhibited by BTZ in vitro. However, translation of these findings into in vivo efficacy requires further adjustments of treatment regimens using BTZ, or possibly other proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goeun; Piao, Huiyan; Alothman, Zeid A; Vinu, Ajayan; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection.

  12. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. NEW DRUG TARGETING TREATMENT - GLIVEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xue-mei(孙雪梅); BRADY Ben

    2003-01-01

    This review evaluates the role of Glivec in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and other malignant tumors. Preclinical and clinical evidence showed that Glivec demonstrated a potent and specific inhibition on BCR-ABL positive leukemias and other malignant tumors in which overexpression of c-kit and PDGFR-β played a major role in their pathogenesis. Glivec has induced complete hematologic responses in up to 98% of patients evaluated in clinical trials. It's a very successful drug that supported the idea of targeted therapy through inhibition of tyrosine kinases. Although it's still in the early stages of clinical development and the resistance to Glivec remains to be a problem needed further study, a great deal has been learned from these research and observation. And with the increasing data, molecular targeting therapy will play much more important role in the treatment of malignant tumors. With the better understanding of the pathogenesis of malignant tumors, well-designed drugs targeting the specific molecular abnormalities with higher efficacy and lower side effect will benefit numerous patients with malignant tumors.

  14. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goeun Choi,1 Huiyan Piao,1 Zeid A Alothman,2 Ajayan Vinu,3 Chae-Ok Yun,4 Jin-Ho Choy1 1Center for Intelligent Nano-Bio Materials, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea; 2Advanced Materials Research Chair, Chemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA, Australia; 4Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Methotrexate (MTX, an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection. Keywords: anionic clay, biodistribution, cervical cancer, colloidal stability, layered double hydroxide, methotrexate 

  15. Targeted inhibition of cancer-inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes Coimbra, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The new paradigm in cancer treatment that aims to inhibit the smoldering inflammatory response in tumors is explored to develop new anticancer treatments. It appears that targeted drug delivery is essential in this concept as high local levels of anti-inflammatory agents are needed to observe the be

  16. TIMP-1 overexpression does not affect sensitivity to HER2-targeting drugs in the HER2-gene-amplified SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohong; Fogh, Louise; Lademann, Ulrik; Jensen, Vibeke; Stenvang, Jan; Yang, Huanming; Brünner, Nils; Schrohl, Anne-Sofie

    2013-04-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested as a marker of prognosis and response to treatment in breast cancer. In vitro, TIMP-1 can regulate shedding of the extracellular domain of HER2 and signalling via the Akt pathway, and we hypothesize that TIMP-1 therefore can affect sensitivity to the HER2-targeting drugs trastuzumab and lapatinib. SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells were stably transfected with TIMP-1, characterized with regard to TIMP-1 protein expression, proliferation, and functionality of the secreted TIMP-1, and the sensitivity to trastuzumab and lapatinib was studied in five selected single-cell subclones expressing TIMP-1 protein at various levels plus the parental SK-BR-3 cell line. Both trastuzumab and lapatinib reduced cell viability, as determined by MTT assay, but the sensitivity to the drugs was not associated with the expression level of TIMP-1 protein. Western blotting showed that the activation of Akt, PTEN, and HER2 as well as ADAM10 was similar in all clones. In conclusion, in this model, TIMP-1 overexpression does not affect HER2 cleavage by ADAM10 or signalling via the Akt pathway, and TIMP-1 does not influence sensitivity to trastuzumab and lapatinib.

  17. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine Drugs Approved to Treat Cervical Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Blenoxane (Bleomycin) Bleomycin Hycamtin (Topotecan ...

  18. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, I; Macedo, D; Alho, I; Dionísio, M R; Costa, L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom.

  19. General route to multifunctional uniform yolk/mesoporous silica shell nanocapsules: a platform for simultaneous cancer-targeted imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingyu; Wang, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Liu, Cong; Wang, Chungang; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Y Andrew; Su, Zhongmin

    2012-09-24

    Hollow mesoporous SiO(2) (mSiO(2)) nanostructures with movable nanoparticles (NPs) as cores, so-called yolk-shell nanocapsules (NCs), have attracted great research interest. However, a highly efficient, simple and general way to produce yolk-mSiO(2) shell NCs with tunable functional cores and shell compositions is still a great challenge. A facile, general and reproducible strategy has been developed for fabricating discrete, monodisperse and highly uniform yolk-shell NCs under mild conditions, composed of mSiO(2) shells and diverse functional NP cores with different compositions and shapes. These NPs can be Fe(3)O(4) NPs, gold nanorods (GNRs), and rare-earth upconversion NRs, endowing the yolk-mSiO(2) shell NCs with magnetic, plasmonic, and upconversion fluorescent properties. In addition, multifunctional yolk-shell NCs with tunable interior hollow spaces and mSiO(2) shell thickness can be precisely controlled. More importantly, fluorescent-magnetic-biotargeting multifunctional polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified fluorescent Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) yolk-shell nanobioprobes as an example for simultaneous targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery to liver cancer cells is also demonstrated. This synthetic approach can be easily extended to the fabrication of multifunctional yolk@mSiO(2) shell nanostructures that encapsulate various functional movable NP cores, which construct a potential platform for the simultaneous targeted delivery of drug/gene/DNA/siRNA and bio-imaging.

  20. Clitocine targets Mcl-1 to induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth inhibition in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Li, Hua; Li, Xia; Zeng, Xueli; Wu, Ping; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Liu, Fei-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance is a major reason for therapy failure in cancer. Clitocine is a natural amino nucleoside isolated from mushroom and has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we observed that clitocine can effectively induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and inhibit tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Clitocine treatment inhibited drug-resistant human cancer cell growth in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Biochemical analysis revealed that clitocine-induced tumor growth inhibition is associated with activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, PARP cleavage, cytochrome c release and Bax, Bak activation, suggesting that clitocine inhibits drug-resistant cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis regulatory genes indicated that Mcl-1 level was dramatically decreased after clitocine treatment. Over-expression of Mcl-1 reversed the activation of Bax and attenuated clitocine-induced apoptosis, suggesting that clitocine-induced apoptosis was at least partially by inducing Mcl-1 degradation to release Bax and Bak. Consistent with induction of apoptosis in vitro, clitocine significantly suppressed the drug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in vivo by inducing apoptosis as well as inhibiting cell proliferation. Taken together, our data demonstrated that clitocine is a potent Mcl-1 inhibitor that can effectively induce apoptosis to suppress drug-resistant human cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, and thus holds great promise for further development as potentially a novel therapeutic agent to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy.

  1. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  2. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  3. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  4. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  5. MicroRNA-133b targets glutathione S-transferase π expression to increase ovarian cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Chen,1 Jin-Wen Jiao,2 Kai-Xuan Sun,1 Zhi-Hong Zong,3 Yang Zhao1 1Department of Gynecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Gynecology, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Background: Accumulating studies reveal that aberrant microRNA (miRNA expression can affect the development of chemotherapy drug resistance by modulating the expression of relevant target proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-133b in the development of drug resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Methods: We examined the levels of miR-133b expression in ovarian carcinoma tissues and the human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (A2780, A2780/DDP and A2780/Taxol, respectively. We determined the cell viability of these cell lines treated with cisplatin or paclitaxel in the presence or absence of miR-133b or anti-miR-133b transfection using the MTT assay. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to assess the mRNA and protein expression levels of two drug-resistance-related genes: glutathione S-transferase (GST-π and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1. The dual-luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the promoter activity of GST-π in the presence and absence of miR-133b. Results: The expression of miR-133b was significantly lower in primary resistant ovarian carcinomas than in the chemotherapy-sensitive carcinomas (P<0.05, and the same results were found in primary resistant ovarian cell lines (A2780/Taxol and A2780/DDP compared to the chemotherapy-sensitive cell line (A2780; P<0.05. Following miR-133b transfection, four cell lines showed increased sensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin, while anti-miR-133b transfection

  6. Targeting in Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Mangues

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug developers recruit and combine principles, procedures and strategies from chemistry, pharmacology, nanotechnology and biotechnology, focusing on the generation of functional vehicles as nano-carriers of drugs for improved stability and enhanced intracellular delivery.[...

  7. Targeted biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lufang; Xu, Ningning; Sun, Yan; Liu, Xiaoguang Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Cancer is a complex invasive genetic disease that causes significant mortality rate worldwide. Protein-based biopharmaceuticals have significantly extended the lives of millions of cancer patients. This article reviews the biological function and application of targeted anticancer biopharmaceuticals. We first discuss the specific antigens and core pathways that are used in the development of targeted cancer therapy. The innovative monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins, and small molecules targeting these antigens or pathways are then reviewed. Finally, the current challenges in anticancer biopharmaceuticals development and the potential solutions to address these challenges are discussed.

  8. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  9. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel Doxorubicin Hydrochloride 5-FU (Fluorouracil ...

  10. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression.

  11. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning, Freja A.; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-)clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression. PMID:26539408

  12. Emerging drugs for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, Lloyd R

    2005-05-01

    Because most patients presenting with advanced ovarian cancer are not curable by surgery alone, chemotherapy represents an essential component of treatment. The disease may be considered as chemosensitive, as in around three-quarters of patients major (complete) responses are seen to initial treatment with the platinum-containing drugs cisplatin and carboplatin either used alone or in combination with the taxane, paclitaxel. However, only 15-20% of patients experience long-term remission as tumours often become resistant. The probability of achieving a second response depends on the duration of remission after first-line therapy: if this is 6, and especially if > 12 months (platinum sensitive), responses may be seen in about a quarter of patients, to the same drugs as used first line or to drugs such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, topotecan and hexamethylmelamine (all three are approved in this setting by the FDA). Gemcitabine, oral etoposide, docetaxel and oxaliplatin also show some activity either in sequential addition to existing approved of first-line therapy (as with gemcitabine) or as second-line therapy. However, there is an urgent unmet clinical need for new drugs capable of prolonging survival either by increasing long-term remission rates and/or duration as first-line treatment or to improve on outcomes of second-line treatment. Strategies currently being exploited in clinical trials include attempts to deliver more killing selectively to tumours (e.g., intraperitoneal administration of cisplatin or radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies), agents designed to target drug resistance mechanisms (e.g., TLK-286 activated by glutathione transferase), agents targeting proteins/receptors shown to be selectively expressed in the disease (e.g., monoclonal antibodies recognising CA-125 or HER1; small molecules targeting HER1 such as gefitinib) and disrupting established tumour vasculature (e.g., 5,6-dimethyl xanthenone 4-acetic acid). At the pre-clinical level

  13. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  14. Strategically targeting MYC in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    MYC is a major driver of cancer cell growth and mediates a transcriptional program spanning cell growth, the cell cycle, metabolism, and cell survival. Many efforts have been made to deliberately target MYC for cancer therapy. A variety of compounds have been generated to inhibit MYC function or stability, either directly or indirectly. The most direct inhibitors target the interaction between MYC and MAX, which is required for DNA binding. Unfortunately, these compounds do not have the desired pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for in vivo application. Recent studies report the indirect inhibition of MYC through the development of two compounds, JQ1 and THZ1, which target factors involved in unique stages of transcription. These compounds appear to have significant therapeutic value for cancers with high levels of MYC, although some effects are MYC-independent. These approaches serve as a foundation for developing novel compounds to pharmacologically target MYC-driven cancers. PMID:27081479

  15. Targeting the Mevalonate Pathway to Reduce Mortality from Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0221 TITLE: Targeting the Mevalonate Pathway to Reduce Mortality from Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kala...AND SUBTITLE: Targeting the Meval onate Pathway to Reduce Mortality from Ovarian Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0221 5b. GRANT NUMBER...cost. 15. SUBJECT TERMS: cancer mortality, cholesterol-lowering drugs, disease progression, epithelial ovarian cancer , lovastatin, Mevalonate Pathway

  16. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  17. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-10

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  18. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various me...

  19. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  20. A conceptual framework for the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, T T; Borup, R; Willer, A

    2010-01-01

    regulation, and (ii) the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets for therapeutic interventions. Significantly, our study provides a conceptual framework that can be applied to any subtype of AML and cancer in general to uncover novel information from published microarray data sets at low cost...

  1. Bioinert Anodic Alumina Nanotubes for Targeting of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagic Signaling: A Combinatorial Nanotube-Based Drug Delivery System for Enhancing Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Kaur, Gagandeep; Chen, Yuting; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-12-16

    Although nanoparticle-based targeted delivery systems have gained promising achievements for cancer therapy, the development of sophisticated strategies with effective combinatorial therapies remains an enduring challenge. Herein, we report the fabrication of a novel nanomaterial, so-called anodic alumina nanotubes (AANTs) for proof-of-concept cancer therapy by targeting cell signaling networks. This strategy is to target autophagic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling by using thapsigargin (TG)-loaded AANTs cotreated with an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). We first show that AANTs are nontoxic and can activate autophagy in different cell types including human fibroblast cells (HFF), human monocyte cells (THP-1), and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231-TXSA). Treatment with 3-MA at a nontoxic dose reduced the level of autophagy induced by AANTs, and consequently sensitized breast cancer cells to AANTs-induced cellular stresses. To target autophagic and ER stress signaling networking, breast cancer cells were treated with 3-MA together with AANTs loaded with the prototype ER stress inducer TG. We demonstrated that 3-MA enhanced the cancer cell killing effect of AANTs loaded with TG. This effect was associated with enhanced ER stress signaling due to the combination effect of TG and 3-MA. These findings not only demonstrate the excellent biocompatibility of AANTs as novel biomaterials but also provide new opportunities for developing ER- and autophagy-targeted delivery systems for future clinical cancer therapy.

  2. Targeted drug-carrying bacteriophages as antibacterial nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoby, Iftach; Bar, Hagit; Benhar, Itai

    2007-06-01

    While the resistance of bacteria to traditional antibiotics is a major public health concern, the use of extremely potent antibacterial agents is limited by their lack of selectivity. As in cancer therapy, antibacterial targeted therapy could provide an opportunity to reintroduce toxic substances to the antibacterial arsenal. A desirable targeted antibacterial agent should combine binding specificity, a large drug payload per binding event, and a programmed drug release mechanism. Recently, we presented a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages as targeted drug carriers that could partially inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. This partial success was due to limitations of drug-loading capacity that resulted from the hydrophobicity of the drug. Here we present a novel drug conjugation chemistry which is based on connecting hydrophobic drugs to the phage via aminoglycoside antibiotics that serve as solubility-enhancing branched linkers. This new formulation allowed a significantly larger drug-carrying capacity of the phages, resulting in a drastic improvement in their performance as targeted drug-carrying nanoparticles. As an example for a potential systemic use for potent agents that are limited for topical use, we present antibody-targeted phage nanoparticles that carry a large payload of the hemolytic antibiotic chloramphenicol connected through the aminoglycoside neomycin. We demonstrate complete growth inhibition toward the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli with an improvement in potency by a factor of approximately 20,000 compared to the free drug.

  3. A Novel Theranostic Platform for Targeted Cancer Therapy and Treatment Monitoring | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Cancer treatment currently relies heavily upon administration of cytotoxic drugs that attack both cancerous and healthy cells due to limited selectivity of drugs. Therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity can be improved by employing a multifunctional drug delivery system that allows targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and therapeutic effect monitoring. The integration of therapeutic and diagnostic treatments has created a new genre in patient care and personalized medicine termed theranostics. |

  4. Targeting Membrane Lipid a Potential Cancer Cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Wai-Leng; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer mortality and morbidity is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Current chemotherapeutic strategies have significant limitations, and there is great interest in seeking novel therapies which are capable of specifically targeting cancer cells. Given that fundamental differences exist between the cellular membranes of healthy cells and tumor cells, novel therapies based on targeting membrane lipids in cancer cells is a promising approach that deserves attention in the field of anticancer drug development. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a lipid membrane component which exists only in the inner leaflet of cell membrane under normal circumstances, has increased surface representation on the outer membrane of tumor cells with disrupted membrane asymmetry. PE thus represents a potential chemotherapeutic target as the higher exposure of PE on the membrane surface of cancer cells. This feature as well as a high degree of expression of PE on endothelial cells in tumor vasculature, makes PE an attractive molecular target for future cancer interventions. There have already been several small molecules and membrane-active peptides identified which bind specifically to the PE molecules on the cancer cell membrane, subsequently inducing membrane disruption leading to cell lysis. This approach opens up a new front in the battle against cancer, and is of particular interest as it may be a strategy that may be prove effective against tumors that respond poorly to current chemotherapeutic agents. We aim to highlight the evidence suggesting that PE is a strong candidate to be explored as a potential molecular target for membrane targeted novel anticancer therapy. PMID:28167913

  5. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  6. A Second WNT for Old Drugs: Drug Repositioning against WNT-Dependent Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal Ahmed; Shaw, Holly V.; Alexey Koval; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant WNT signaling underlies cancerous transformation and growth in many tissues, such as the colon, breast, liver, and others. Downregulation of the WNT pathway is a desired mode of development of targeted therapies against these cancers. Despite the urgent need, no WNT signaling-directed drugs currently exist, and only very few candidates have reached early phase clinical trials. Among different strategies to develop WNT-targeting anti-cancer therapies, repositioning of existing drugs p...

  7. Amifostine-conjugated pH-sensitive calcium phosphate-covered magnetic-amphiphilic gelatin nanoparticles for controlled intracellular dual drug release for dual-targeting in HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Huang, Wei-Chen; Su, Chia-Wei; Chiang, Min-Yu; Chen, Jian-Yi; Chen, San-Yuan

    2015-12-28

    We developed a surfactant-free method utilizing amifostine to stably link a targeting ligand (Herceptin) to amphiphilic gelatin (AG)-iron oxide@calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles with hydrophobic curcumin (CUR) and hydrophilic doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in the AG core and CaP shell (AGIO@CaP-CD), respectively. This multi-functional nanoparticle system has a pH-sensitive CaP shell and degradable amphiphilic gelatin (AG) core, which enables controllable sequential release of the two drugs. The dual-targeting system of AGIO@CaP-CD (HER-AGIO@CaP-CD) with a bioligand and magnetic targeting resulted in significantly elevated cellular uptake in HER2-overexpressing SKBr3 cells and more efficacious therapy than delivery of targeting ligand alone due to the synergistic cell multi-drug resistance/apoptosis-inducing effect of the CUR and DOX combination. This nanoparticle combined with Herceptin and iron oxide nanoparticles not only provided a dual-targeting functionality, but also encapsulated CUR and DOX as a dual-drug delivery system for the combination therapy. This study further demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacy of this dual-targeting co-delivery system can be improved by modifying the application duration of magnetic targeting, which makes this combination therapy system a powerful new tool for in vitro/in vivo cancer therapy, especially for HER2-positive cancers.

  8. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells: A Moving Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Chandler, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Even though the number of anti-cancer drugs entering clinical trials and approved by the FDA has increased in recent years, many cancer patients still experience poor survival outcome. The main explanation for such a dismal prognosis is that current therapies might leave behind a population of cancer cells with the capacity for long-term self-renewal, so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), from which most tumors are believed to be derived and fueled. CSCs might favor local and distant recurrence even many years after initial treatment, thus representing a potential target for therapies aimed at improving clinical outcome. In this review, we will address the CSC hypothesis with a particular emphasis on its current paradigms and debates, and discuss several mechanisms of CSC resistance to conventional therapies.

  10. Drug loading, dispersion stability, and therapeutic efficacy in targeted drug delivery with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Heister, E; Neves, V.; Lamprecht, C.; Silva, SRP; Coley, HM; Mcfadden, J.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a drug delivery system for the anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin and mitoxantrone based on carbon nanotubes, which is stable under biological conditions, allows for sustained release, and promotes selectivity through an active targeting scheme. Carbon nanotubes are particularly promising for this area of application due to their high surface area, allowing for high drug loading, and their unique interaction with cellular membranes. We have taken a systematic approach to PEG conju...

  11. Cancer Immunotherapy of Targeting Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianmeiHou; LingTian; YuquanWei

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy may be a useful approach to cancer therapy. This review discussed tumor angiogenesis and immunotherapy of targeting tumor angiogenesis from two main aspects: (1) active vaccination to induce effective anti-angiogenesis immunity; (2) passive immunotherapy with anti-pro-angiogenic molecules relevant antibody. Evidence from the recent years suggested that anti-angiogenic therapy should be one of the most promising approaches to cancer therapy.

  12. Nonestrogenic drugs and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, D A; Jick, H; Hunter, J R; Stergachis, A; Madsen, S

    1982-08-01

    The relation between breast cancer and selected nonestrogenic drugs was evaluated in the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington, a prepaid health care organization with computerized information on diagnoses and outpatient drug use. No important positive associations with breast cancer were found in a follow-up study of 302 women aged 35-74 years. These women were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 1977-1980 and were studied in relation to exposure in the six months prior to diagnosis to one or more of the following drugs: diazepam, digitalis glycosides, medroxyprogesterone acetate, methyldopa, metronidazole, phenothiazines, tricyclic antidepressants, thiazides, thyroid/levothyroxine sodium, or spironolactone. A modest association between recent reserpine use and breast cancer was present (risk ratio = 1.7, 90% confidence interval 0.9-3.3).

  13. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  14. Enhanced cellular transport and drug targeting using dendritic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2003-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorable, peripheral' functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug delivery. The large density of end groups can also be tailored to create enhanced affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, drug/ligand conjugation, in vitro cellular and in vivo drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Results on PAMAM dendrimers and polyol hyperbranched polymers suggest that: (1) These materials complex/encapsulate a large number of drug molecules and release them at tailorable rates; (2) The drug-dendrimer complex is transported very rapidly through a A549 lung epithelial cancel cell line, compared to free drug, perhaps by endocytosis. The ability of the drug-dendrimer-ligand complexes to target specific asthma and cancer cells is currently being explored using in vitro and in vivo animal models.

  15. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  16. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Lung Cancer Oncogenotype-Selective Drug Target Discovery (Natural Products Focus) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use small molecules and RNAi to functionally define subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a panel of cell lines prepared and molecularly annotated by Drs. John Minna and Adi Gazdar. Experimental Approaches Lung Cancer Natural Products Screening/Chemical Library Screening

  17. Targeted therapies in gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stefan; Schuler, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Gastroesophageal cancers comprising gastric cancer (GC), and cancers of the distal oesophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) are a global health threat. In Western populations the incidence of GC is declining which has been attributed to effective strategies of eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection. To the contrary, GEJ cancers are on the rise, with obesity and reflux disease being viewed as major risk factors. During the past decade perioperative chemotherapy, pre- or postoperative radio-chemotherapy, and, in Asian populations, adjuvant chemotherapy have been shown to improve the outcome of patients with advanced GC and GEJ cancers suited for surgery. Less progress has been made in the treatment of metastatic disease. The introduction of trastuzumab in combination with platinum/fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy for patients with HER2-positive disease has marked a turning point. Recently, several novel agents targeting growth factor receptors, angiogenic pathways, adhesion molecules and mediators of intracellular signal transduction have been clinically explored. Here we summarise the current status and future developments of molecularly targeted therapies in GC and GEJ cancer.

  18. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  19. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  20. Discovering drug targets through the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, David S

    2007-03-01

    Traditionally, drug-target discovery is a "wet-bench" experimental process, depending on carefully designed genetic screens, biochemical tests and cellular assays to identify proteins and genes that are associated with a particular disease or condition. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing, transcript profiling, protein identification and protein quantification are leading to a flood of genomic and proteomic data that is, or potentially could be, linked to disease data. The quantity of data generated by these high throughput methods is forcing scientists to re-think the way they do traditional drug-target discovery. In particular it is leading them more and more towards identifying potential drug targets using computers. In fact, drug-target identification is now being done as much on the desk-top as on the bench-top. This review focuses on describing how drug-target discovery can be done in silico (i.e. via computer) using a variety of bioinformatic resources that are freely available on the web. Specifically, it highlights a number of web-accessible sequence databases, automated genome annotation tools, text mining tools; and integrated drug/sequence databases that can be used to identify drug targets for both endogenous (genetic and epigenetic) diseases as well as exogenous (infectious) diseases.

  1. Drug Repurposing: Far Beyond New Targets for Old Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Mestres, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach is of ...... relevance to the disease in question and the intellectual property landscape. These activities go far beyond the identification of new targets for old drugs.......Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach...... is of interest primarily because we continue to face significant gaps in the drug–target interactions matrix and to accumulate safety and efficacy data during clinical studies. Collecting and making publicly available as much data as possible on the target profile of drugs offer opportunities for drug...

  2. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  3. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  4. Advances in target therapy in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Sculier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have reviewed and analysed recent literature, published in 2013 and early 2014, in the context of pre-existing data. Considered target therapies were tyrosine kinase inhibitors of active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (e.g. erlotinib, gefinitib and afatinib, anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements (e.g. crizotinib or angiogenesis (drugs under development, or monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (e.g. bevacizumab or epidermal growth factor receptors (e.g. cetuximab. The therapeutic project has to consider tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the case of nonsmall cell lung cancer with active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement. However, these drugs should not be used in the absence of the targeted genetic abnormalities.

  5. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN.

  6. New drugs in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Yoo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms.

  7. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  8. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang HW

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Wei Yang,1,2 Mu-Yi Hua,1 Hao-Li Liu,3 Chiung-Yin Huang,2 Kuo-Chen Wei21Molecular Medicine Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, TaiwanAbstract: Nanoparticles (NPs play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some

  9. p21-activated kinase family: promising new drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nhi Huynh, Hong He Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The p21-activated kinase (PAK family of serine/threonine protein kinases are downstream effectors of the Rho family of GTPases. PAKs are frequently upregulated in human diseases, including various cancers, and their overexpression correlates with disease progression. Current research findings have validated important roles for PAKs in cell proliferation, survival, gene transcription, transformation, and cytoskeletal remodeling. PAKs are shown to act as a converging node for many signaling pathways that regulate these cellular processes. Therefore, PAKs have emerged as attractive targets for treatment of disease. This review discusses the physiological and pathological roles of PAKs, validation of PAKs as new promising drug targets, and current challenges and advances in the development of PAK-targeted anticancer therapy, with a focus on PAKs and human cancers. Keywords: p21-activated kinase, cancer, inhibitor

  10. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  11. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  12. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  13. Improved nanoparticles preparation and drug release for liver targeted delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Weili

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nTargeted delivery of drugs and proteins to liver can be achieved via asialoglycoprotein receptor, which can recognize and combine the galactose- and N-acetygalatosamine-terminated glycoproteins. Glycosyl is usually conjugated with drugs directly to fabricate prodrugs or with nanoparticles encapsulated drugs via forming covalent bonds, while the covalent bonds may lead to some shortages for drug release. Therefore, we have a hypothesis that we can prepare nanoparticles for efficient targeting by glycosylation using galactosylated poly (L-glutamic acid (Gal-PLGA as a carrier to entrap the model drugs in nanoparticles core physically rather than forming covalent drug conjugation. The means of incorporation of drug in nanoparticles may improve drug release to maintain its activity, raise its therapeutic index and diminish the adverse effect. Based on previous researches, it is achievable to obtain nanoparticles that we hypothesize to prepare. Due to their nanometer-size and galactosyl, the nanoparticles may be a potential delivery system for passive and active targeting to liver parenchymal cells for therapy of hepatitis and liver cancer.

  14. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  15. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Li Yong [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Tsui, Wendy [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Zhang, David [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Song, Emma [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Qu, C F [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Kearsley, John [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Thompson, John [Sydney Melanoma Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown 2050 NSW (Australia)

    2004-08-21

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The {sup 213}Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 {mu

  16. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  17. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  18. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP.

  19. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  20. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin Hai; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy.

  1. Targeted Cancer Therapy Using Engineered Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin Hai

    2016-01-01

    Obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Salmonella, or Escherichia coli specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumor tissues and inhibit tumor growth. Among them, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) has been widely studied in animal cancer models and Phase I clinical trials in human patients. S. typhimurium genes are easily manipulated; thus diverse attenuated strains of S. typhimurium have been designed and engineered as tumor-targeting therapeutics or drug delivery vehicles that show both an excellent safety profile and therapeutic efficacy in mouse models. An attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, VNP20009, successfully targeted human metastatic melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in Phase I clinical trials; however, the efficacy requires further refinement. Along with the characteristics of self-targeting, proliferation, and deep tissue penetration, the ease of genetic manipulation allows for the production of more attenuated strains with greater safety profiles and vector systems that deliver designable cargo molecules for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy. Here, we discuss recent progress in the field of Salmonellae-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:27689027

  2. Targeting the hedgehog pathway for gallbladder cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Balraj; Yadav, Saurabh

    2016-02-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a fatal malignancy of hepatobiliary tract that is generally diagnosed at advanced stages of cancer because of its asymptomatic nature. Advanced GBC tumors are unresectable with poor prognosis. Improvement in GBC patient care requires better understanding of the biological signaling pathways and application of newly discovered drugs for cancer therapy. Herein, we discuss the possibilities and challenges in targeting the hedgehog pathway in gallbladder cancer therapy based on recent developments in the area.

  3. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  4. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  5. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of methotrexate conjugated fluorescent carbon nanoparticles as drug delivery system for human lung cancer targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Yunus, Uzma; Matin, Abdul; Haq, Noaman Ul

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology based cancer therapeutics have rapidly advanced towards the solution of many limitations associated with other drug delivery agents such as nonspecific distribution within the body, low water solubility and non-biocompatibility. Carbon nanoparticles have demonstrated unique properties that are useful to combat with these issues, including their properties dependent on size, high stability in different solvents, compatible size for drug delivery and ease of surface modifications. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with good water solubility were obtained from a carbohydrate source by acid assisted ultrasonic treatment at 35kHz for 4h. This simple and economical method can be used for large scale production. Electron microscopic, spectroscopic and thermo gravimetric analysis techniques were used to characterize these carbon nanoparticles. Functionalized CNPs were further conjugated with anticancer drug-methotrexate and used as fluorescent nano-carriers. In this research work, we determined the in vitro bioactivity of CNPs-methotrexate conjugates by lactate dehydrogenase assay, cell adhesion assay and sulforhodamine B assay in human lung carcinoma cell line (H157). The CNPs showed promising biocompatibility and CNPs-MTX conjugates demonstrated potent cytotoxic effects and high anticancer activities in human lung cancer cell line.

  7. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  8. Teratogens as anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2005-11-01

    Most anticancer drugs are teratogens, merely because they target vital cellular functions. Conversely, some plants produce agents that intentionally target embryonic signaling pathways, precisely to cause birth defects if pregnant animals eat such plants. Cyclopamine, a teratogen produced by a flowering plant, inhibits the Hh/Gli pathway, causing developmental defects such as cyclopia (one eye in the middle of the face). In theory, selective teratogens may suppress cancer cells that reactivate embryonic pathways, while sparing most normal cells. I discuss the potential (and limits) of teratogens in cancer therapy, linking diverse topics from morning sickness of pregnancy, embryonic pathways and poisonous plants to the mechanism of action of anticancer teratogens and their combinations with less selective cytotoxic agents.

  9. Nanoscale Quantifying the Effects of Targeted Drug on Chemotherapy in Lymphoma Treatment Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-10-01

    The applications of targeted drugs in treating cancers have significantly improved the survival rates of patients. However, in the clinical practice, targeted drugs are commonly combined with chemotherapy drugs, causing that the exact contribution of targeted drugs to the clinical outcome is difficult to evaluate. Quantitatively investigating the effects of targeted drugs on chemotherapy drugs on cancer cells is useful for us to understand drug actions and design better drugs. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for probing the nanoscale physiological activities of single live cells. In this paper, the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties were quantified on single lymphoma cells during the actions of rituximab (a monoclonal antibody targeted drug) and two chemotherapy drugs (cisplatin and cytarabine) by AFM. AFM imaging revealed the distinct changes of cellular ultramicrostructures induced by the drugs. The changes of cellular mechanical properties after the drug stimulations were measured by AFM indenting. The statistical histograms of cellular surface roughness and mechanical properties quantitatively showed that rituximab could remarkably strengthen the killing effects of chemotherapy drugs. The study offers a new way to quantify the synergistic interactions between targeted drugs and chemotherapy drugs at the nanoscale, which will have potential impacts on predicting the efficacies of drug combinations before clinical treatments.

  10. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eNatoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases. Humans differentially express twenty different sialyltransferases in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyze the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (2-3; 2-6 or 2-8 to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of sialyltransferases contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural-isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha 1-3-fucosyltransferases, 2-3-sialyltransferases, 1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl--glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these sialyltransferases have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular sialyltransferases, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include sialyltransferase inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of sialyltransferase inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical

  11. Targeting SR-BI for cancer diagnostics, imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha Amrita Rajora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI plays an important role in trafficking cholesteryl esters between the core of high density lipoprotein and the liver. Interestingly, this integral membrane protein receptor is also implicated in the metabolism of cholesterol by cancer cells, whereby overexpression of SR-BI has been observed in a number of tumours and cancer cell lines, including breast and prostate cancers. Consequently, SR-BI has recently gained attention as a cancer biomarker and exciting target for the direct cytosolic delivery of therapeutic agents. This brief review highlights these key developments in SR-BI-targeted cancer therapies and imaging probes. Special attention is given to the exploration of high density lipoprotein nanomimetic platforms that take advantage of upregulated SR-BI expression to facilitate targeted drug-delivery and cancer diagnostics, and promising future directions in the development of these agents.

  12. Target inhibition networks: predicting selective combinations of druggable targets to block cancer survival pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available A recent trend in drug development is to identify drug combinations or multi-target agents that effectively modify multiple nodes of disease-associated networks. Such polypharmacological effects may reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance by means of attacking the disease networks through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. However, due to the exponentially increasing number of potential drug and target combinations, systematic approaches are needed for prioritizing the most potent multi-target alternatives on a global network level. We took a functional systems pharmacology approach toward the identification of selective target combinations for specific cancer cells by combining large-scale screening data on drug treatment efficacies and drug-target binding affinities. Our model-based prediction approach, named TIMMA, takes advantage of the polypharmacological effects of drugs and infers combinatorial drug efficacies through system-level target inhibition networks. Case studies in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated how the target inhibition modeling allows systematic exploration of functional interactions between drugs and their targets to maximally inhibit multiple survival pathways in a given cancer type. The TIMMA prediction results were experimentally validated by means of systematic siRNA-mediated silencing of the selected targets and their pairwise combinations, showing increased ability to identify not only such druggable kinase targets that are essential for cancer survival either individually or in combination, but also synergistic interactions indicative of non-additive drug efficacies. These system-level analyses were enabled by a novel model construction method utilizing maximization and minimization rules, as well as a model selection algorithm based on sequential forward floating search. Compared with an existing computational solution, TIMMA showed both enhanced

  13. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  14. Zebrafish: predictive model for targeted cancer therapeutics from nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkhernain, Nursafwana Syazwani; Teo, Soo Hwang; Patel, Vyomesh; Tan, Pei Jean

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapy, the treatment of cancer based on an underlying genetic alteration, is rapidly gaining favor as the preferred therapeutic approach. To date, although natural products represent a rich resource of bio-diverse drug candidates, only a few have been identified to be effective as targeted cancer therapies largely due to the incompatibilities to current high-throughput screening methods. In this article, we review the utility of a zebrafish developmental screen for bioactive natural product-based compounds that target signaling pathways that are intimately shared with those in humans. Any bioactive compound perturbing signaling pathways identified from phenotypic developmental defects in zebrafish embryos provide an opportunity for developing targeted therapies for human cancers. This model provides a promising tool in the search for targeted cancer therapeutics from natural products.

  15. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  16. Therapies targeting cancer stem cells: Current trends and future challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denisa; L; Dragu; Laura; G; Necula; Coralia; Bleotu; Carmen; C; Diaconu; Mihaela; Chivu-Economescu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional therapies against cancer, chemo- and radiotherapy, have multiple limitations that lead to treatment failure and cancer recurrence. These limitations are related to systemic and local toxicity, while treatment failure and cancer relapse are due to drug resistance and self-renewal, properties of a small population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These cells are involved in cancer initiation, maintenance, metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, in order to develop efficient treatments that can induce a longlasting clinical response preventing tumor relapse it is important to develop drugs that can specifically target and eliminate CSCs. Recent identification of surface markers and understanding of molecular feature associated with CSC phenotype helped with the design of effective treatments. In this review we discuss targeting surface biomarkers, signaling pathways that regulate CSCs self-renewal and differentiation, drug-efflux pumps involved in apoptosis resistance, microenvironmental signals that sustain CSCs growth, manipulation of mi RNA expression, and induction of CSCs apoptosis and differentiation, with specific aim to hamper CSCs regeneration and cancer relapse. Some of these agents are under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies, most of them for using in combination with traditional therapies. The combined therapy using conventional anticancer drugs with CSCs-targeting agents, may offer a promising strategy for management and eradication of different types of cancers.

  17. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  18. Functional drug-gene interactions in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smida, Michal; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2012-04-01

    Despite the dawn of the genomic information era, the challenges of cancer treatment remain formidable. Particularly for the most prevalent cancer types, including lung cancer, successful treatment of metastatic disease is rare and escalating costs for modern targeted drugs place an increasing strain on healthcare systems. Although powerful diagnostic tools to characterize individual tumor samples in great molecular detail are becoming rapidly available, the transformation of this information into therapy provides a major challenge. A fundamental difficulty is the molecular complexity of cancer cells that often causes drug resistance, but can also render tumors exquisitely sensitive to targeted agents. By using lung cancer as an example, we outline the principles that govern drug sensitivity and resistance from a genetic perspective and discuss how in vitro chemical-genetic screens can impact on patient stratification in the clinic.

  19. Target Nanoparticles for Therapy - SANS and DLS of Drug Carrier Liposomes and Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, T.; Johnson, R.; Krebs, L.; Khoshakhlagh, P.; Langguth, P.; Hellmann, N.; Goerigk, G.; Boesecke, P.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Szekely, N.; Schweins, R.

    2016-09-01

    T arget Nano-Pharmaceutics shall improve therapy and diagnosis of severe diseases, e.g. cancer, by individual targeting of drug-loaded nano-pharmaceuticals towards cancer cells, and drug uptake receptors in other diseases. Specific ligands, proteins or cofactors, which are recognized by the diseased cells or cells of food and drug uptake, are bound to the nanoparticle surface, and thus capable of directing the drug carriers. The strategy has two branches: a) for parenteral cancer medicine a ligand set (2-5 different, surface-linked) are selected according to the biopsy analysis of the patient tissue e.g. from tumor.; b) in the oral drug delivery part the drug transport is enforced by excipients/ detergents in combination with targeting materials for cellular receptors resulting in an induced drug uptake. Both targeting nanomaterials are characterized by a combination of SANS + DLS and SAXS or ASAXS in a feedback process during development by synthesis, nanoparticle assembly and formulation.

  20. Rhamnogalacturonan-I based microcapsules for targeted drug release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svagan, Anna J.; Kusic, Anja; De Gobba, Cristian;

    2016-01-01

    Drug targeting to the colon via the oral administration route for local treatment of e.g. inflammatory bowel disease and colonic cancer has several advantages such as needle-free administration and low infection risk. A new source for delivery is plant-polysaccharide based delivery platforms...... such as Rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I). In the gastro-intestinal tract the RG-I is only degraded by the action of the colonic microflora. For assessment of potential drug delivery properties, RG-I based microcapsules (~1 μm in diameter) were prepared by an interfacial poly-addition reaction. The cross-linked capsules were...

  1. Synthetic lethal genetic interactions that decrease somatic cell proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans identify the alternative RFC CTF18 as a candidate cancer drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Jessica; O'Neil, Nigel; Tarailo, Sanja; Stoepel, Jan; Bryan, Jennifer; Rose, Ann; Hieter, Philip

    2009-12-01

    Somatic mutations causing chromosome instability (CIN) in tumors can be exploited for selective killing of cancer cells by knockdown of second-site genes causing synthetic lethality. We tested and statistically validated synthetic lethal (SL) interactions between mutations in six Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIN genes orthologous to genes mutated in colon tumors and five additional CIN genes. To identify which SL interactions are conserved in higher organisms and represent potential chemotherapeutic targets, we developed an assay system in Caenorhabditis elegans to test genetic interactions causing synthetic proliferation defects in somatic cells. We made use of postembryonic RNA interference and the vulval cell lineage of C. elegans as a readout for somatic cell proliferation defects. We identified SL interactions between members of the cohesin complex and CTF4, RAD27, and components of the alternative RFC(CTF18) complex. The genetic interactions tested are highly conserved between S. cerevisiae and C. elegans and suggest that the alternative RFC components DCC1, CTF8, and CTF18 are ideal therapeutic targets because of their mild phenotype when knocked down singly in C. elegans. Furthermore, the C. elegans assay system will contribute to our knowledge of genetic interactions in a multicellular animal and is a powerful approach to identify new cancer therapeutic targets.

  2. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  3. Getting to the heart of the matter in cancer: Novel approaches to targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. While cancers may initially show good response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it is not uncommon for them to recur at a later date. This phenomenon may be explained by the existence of a small population of cancer stem cells, which are inherently resistant to anti-cancer treatment as well as being capable of self-renewal. Therefore, while most of the tumour bulk consisting of cells that are not cancer stem cells respond to treatment, the cancer stem cells remain, leading to disease recurrence. Following this logic, the effective targeting of cancer stem cells holds promise for providing long-term cure in individuals with cancer. Cancer stem cells, like normal stem cells are endowed with mechanisms to protect themselves against a wide range of insults including anti-cancer treatments, such as the enhancement of the DNA damage response and the ability to extrude drugs. It is therefore important to develop new strategies if cancer stem cells are to be eradicated. In this review, we describe the strategies that we have developed to target cancer stem cells. These strategies include the targeting of the histone demethylase jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B), which we found to be functionally significant in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Other strategies being pursued include reprogramming of cancer stem cells and the targeting of a functional cell surface marker of liver cancer stem cells, the aminopeptidase CD13.

  4. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    . Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  5. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  6. Targeting the nucleolus for cancer intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quin, Jaclyn E; Devlin, Jennifer R; Cameron, Donald; Hannan, Kate M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of the nucleolus to cancer is well established with respect to its traditional role in facilitating ribosome biogenesis and proliferative capacity. More contemporary studies however, infer that nucleoli contribute a much broader role in malignant transformation. Specifically, extra-ribosomal functions of the nucleolus position it as a central integrator of cellular proliferation and stress signaling, and are emerging as important mechanisms for modulating how oncogenes and tumor suppressors operate in normal and malignant cells. The dependence of certain tumor cells to co-opt nucleolar processes to maintain their cancer phenotypes has now clearly been demonstrated by the application of small molecule inhibitors of RNA Polymerase I to block ribosomal DNA transcription and disrupt nucleolar function (Bywater et al., 2012 [1]). These drugs, which selectively kill tumor cells in vivo while sparing normal cells, have now progressed to clinical trials. It is likely that we have only just begun to scratch the surface of the potential of the nucleolus as a new target for cancer therapy, with "suppression of nucleolar stress" representing an emerging "hallmark" of cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  7. Targeting cancer with bugs and liposomes: ready, aim, fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Thornton, Katherine; Diaz, Luis A; Zhou, Shibin

    2007-10-15

    One of the major challenges facing cancer therapy today is achieving specificity. Current efforts to meet this challenge are focused on developing targeted therapeutics specific to the cancer cell. An alternative approach is to selectively deliver cytotoxic agents to the tumor site. With this end in mind, liposomes optimized for physical robustness have been developed and used clinically as drug delivery vehicles. Paradoxically, the effectiveness of these liposomes is hampered by the suboptimal release of bioavailable drug. This article will highlight the recent advance in using a novel lipase secreted by the tumor-colonizing anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT to induce the targeted release of liposomal payloads within tumors.

  8. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchè MM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Martino Maria Zacchè, Sushma Srikrishna, Linda Cardozo Department of Urogynaecology, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD. Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin, nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. Keywords: drug targeting, drug-delivery system, bladder disorders

  9. Advances of anti-EGFR family targeted drugs in the treatment of gastric cancer%抗EGFR家族靶向药物在胃癌治疗中的研究进展∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦军伟; 韩宇; 白玉贤

    2014-01-01

    Incidence of gastric cancer accounted for the fourth in global cancer incidence, and the mortality accounted for the second. Most patients bearing gastric cancer are already advanced and unresectable at the time of diagnosis. Chemotherapy and molecu⁃lar targeted therapy have been more and more emphasised on clinical research and practice as an effective means of treatment of gastric cancer. In recent years, the targeted therapy of epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) family has achieved fruitful results in the treatment of gastric cancer. This article summarizes the signal transduction mechanisms of EGFR family and associated targeted drugs in the treatment of gastric cancer.%胃癌发病率占全球癌症发病率的第4位,死亡率占第2位。大多数胃癌患者就诊时已属中晚期,失去手术机会,化疗及分子靶向治疗作为胃癌治疗的有效手段,越来越受到临床研究及实践的重视。近年来,抗表皮生长因子受体( EGFR)家族靶向治疗在胃癌治疗中取得了丰硕的成果。本文总结了EGFR家族信号转导机制及相关靶向药物在胃癌治疗中的研究进展。

  10. Amphotericin B formulations and drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, J J; Espada, R; Ballesteros, M P; Torrado-Santiago, S

    2008-07-01

    Amphotericin B is a low-soluble polyene antibiotic which is able to self-aggregate. The aggregation state can modify its activity and pharmacokinetical characteristics. In spite of its high toxicity it is still widely employed for the treatment of systemic fungal infections and parasitic disease and different formulations are marketed. Some of these formulations, such as liposomal formulations, can be considered as classical examples of drug targeting. The pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity are clearly dependent on the type of amphotericin B formulation. New drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanospheres and microspheres can result in higher concentrations of AMB in the liver and spleen, but lower concentrations in kidney and lungs, so decreasing its toxicity. Moreover, the administration of these drug delivery systems can enhance the drug accessibility to organs and tissues (e.g., bone marrow) otherwise inaccessible to the free drug. During the last few years, new AMB formulations (AmBisome, Abelcet, and Amphotec) with an improved efficacy/toxicity ratio have been marketed. This review compares the different formulations of amphotericin B in terms of pharmacokinetics, toxicity and activity and discusses the possible drug targeting effect of some of these new formulations.

  11. Targeted therapies in upper gastrointestinal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, S.

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, as esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer, are still highly lethal diseases, in spite of advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and specific targeted therapy. Especially when patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastasized disease, upper

  12. New targets for drug discovery against malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Santos

    Full Text Available A mathematical model which predicts the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum infection was developed using data from malaria-infected mice. Variables selected accounted for levels of healthy red blood cells, merozoite (Plasmodium asexual phase infected red blood cells, gametocyte (Plasmodium sexual phase infected red blood cells and a phenomenological variable which accounts for the mean activity of the immune system of the host. The model built was able to reproduce the behavior of three different scenarios of malaria. It predicts the later dynamics of malaria-infected humans well after the first peak of parasitemia, the qualitative response of malaria-infected monkeys to vaccination and the changes observed in malaria-infected mice when they are treated with antimalarial drugs. The mathematical model was used to identify new targets to be focused on drug design. Optimization methodologies were applied to identify five targets for minimizing the parasite load; four of the targets thus identified have never before been taken into account in drug design. The potential targets include: 1 increasing the death rate of the gametocytes, 2 decreasing the invasion rate of the red blood cells by the merozoites, 3 increasing the transformation of merozoites into gametocytes, 4 decreasing the activation of the immune system by the gametocytes, and finally 5 a combination of the previous target with decreasing the recycling rate of the red blood cells. The first target is already used in current therapies, whereas the remainders are proposals for potential new targets. Furthermore, the combined target (the simultaneous decrease of the activation of IS by gRBC and the decrease of the influence of IS on the recycling of hRBC is interesting, since this combination does not affect the parasite directly. Thus, it is not expected to generate selective pressure on the parasites, which means that it would not produce resistance in Plasmodium.

  13. Complementary Approaches to Existing Target Based Drug Discovery for Identifying Novel Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Vasaikar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, it was observed that the relationship between the emerging New Molecular Entities and the quantum of R&D investment has not been favorable. There might be numerous reasons but few studies stress the introduction of target based drug discovery approach as one of the factors. Although a number of drugs have been developed with an emphasis on a single protein target, yet identification of valid target is complex. The approach focuses on an in vitro single target, which overlooks the complexity of cell and makes process of validation drug targets uncertain. Thus, it is imperative to search for alternatives rather than looking at success stories of target-based drug discovery. It would be beneficial if the drugs were developed to target multiple components. New approaches like reverse engineering and translational research need to take into account both system and target-based approach. This review evaluates the strengths and limitations of known drug discovery approaches and proposes alternative approaches for increasing efficiency against treatment.

  14. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  15. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  16. Aptamers: active targeting ligands for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment.

  17. Targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric anti-cancer drugs using β-cyclodextrin assemblied Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congli; Huang, Lizhen; Song, Shengmei; Saif, Bassam; Zhou, Yehong; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-12-01

    The β-cyclodextrin assemblied magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (β-CD-MNPs) were successfully fabricated via a layer-by-layer method. Possessing an average size 14 nm, good stability and super-paramagnetic response (Ms 64 emu/g), the resultant nanocomposites could be served as a versatile biocompatible platform for selective loading, targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric doxorubicin (DOX) and epirubicin (EPI). 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and the computer simulation further give the evidence that partial anthracene ring of drug molecule is included by β-CD. In addition, non-toxic β-CD-MNPs have excellent biocompatibility on MCF-7 cells, and cellular uptake indicate that different amounts of DOX or EPI can be transported to targeting site and released from the internalized carriers. The results demonstrate that as-prepared β-CD-MNPs could be a very promising vehicle for DOX and EPI.

  18. Folate targeted polymeric 'green' nanotherapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, Sreeja; Binulal, N S; Mony, Ullas; Manzoor, Koyakutty; Nair, Shantikumar; Menon, Deepthy, E-mail: deepthymenon@aims.amrita.edu [Amrita Center for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi-682 041, Kerala (India)

    2010-07-16

    The concept of 'green' chemotherapy by employing targeted nanoparticle mediated delivery to enhance the efficacy of phytomedicines is reported. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles encapsulating a well known nutraceutical namely, grape seed extract (GSE)-'NanoGSE'-was prepared by a nanoprecipitation technique. The drug-loaded nanoparticles of size {approx} 100 nm exhibited high colloidal stability at physiological pH. Molecular receptor targeting of this nanophytomedicine against folate receptor over-expressing cancers was demonstrated in vitro by conjugation with a potential cancer targeting ligand, folic acid (FA). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry data showed highly specific cellular uptake of FA conjugated NanoGSE on folate receptor positive cancer cells. Studies were also conducted to investigate the efficiency of targeted (FA conjugated) versus non-targeted (non-FA conjugated) nanoformulations in causing cancer cell death. The IC{sub 50} values were lowered by a factor of {approx} 3 for FA-NanoGSE compared to the free drug, indicating substantially enhanced bioavailability to the tumor cells, sparing the normal ones. Receptor targeting of FA-NanoGSE resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic index, which was also quantified by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. This in vitro study provides a basis for the use of nanoparticle mediated delivery of anticancer nutraceuticals to enhance bioavailability and effectively target cancer by a 'green' approach.

  19. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  20. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  1. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant, E-mail: prashant_pharmacy04@rediffmail.com; Jain, Narendra K., E-mail: jnarendr@yahoo.co.in [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-09-15

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  2. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  3. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  4. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy.

  5. Cancer nanomedicine: from drug delivery to imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward Kai-Hua; Ho, Dean

    2013-12-18

    Nanotechnology-based chemotherapeutics and imaging agents represent a new era of "cancer nanomedicine" working to deliver versatile payloads with favorable pharmacokinetics and capitalize on molecular and cellular targeting for enhanced specificity, efficacy, and safety. Despite the versatility of many nanomedicine-based platforms, translating new drug or imaging agents to the clinic is costly and often hampered by regulatory hurdles. Therefore, translating cancer nanomedicine may largely be application-defined, where materials are adapted only toward specific indications where their properties confer unique advantages. This strategy may also realize therapies that can optimize clinical impact through combinatorial nanomedicine. In this review, we discuss how particular materials lend themselves to specific applications, the progress to date in clinical translation of nanomedicine, and promising approaches that may catalyze clinical acceptance of nano.

  6. DNA-based aptamer fails as a simultaneous cancer targeting agent and drug delivery vehicle for a phenanthroline-based platinum(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinely, Nicola L; Plumb, Jane A; Wheate, Nial J

    2013-11-01

    The sgc8c aptamer is a 41-base DNA oligonucleotide that binds to leukaemia cells with high affinity and specificity. In this work we examined the utility of this aptamer as both a delivery vehicle and an active targeting agent for an inert platinum complex [(1,10-phenathroline)(ethylenediamine)platinum(II)](2+). The aptamer forms a stem-and-loop confirmation as determined by circular dichroism. This conformation is adopted in both water and phosphate buffered saline solutions. The metal complex binds through intercalation into the aptamer's double helical stem with a binding constant of approximately 4.3 × 10(4) M(-1). Binding of the metal complex to the aptamer had a significant effect on the aptamer's global conformation, and increased its melting temperature by 28°C possibly through lengthening and stiffening of the aptamer stem. The effect of the aptamer on the metal complex's cytotoxicity and cellular uptake was determined using in vitro assays with the target leukaemia cell line CCRF-CEM and the off-target ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and A2780cp70. The aptamer has little inherent cytotoxicity and when used to deliver the metal complex results in a significant decrease in the metal complex's cytotoxicity and uptake. The reason(s) for the poor uptake and activity may be due to the change in aptamer conformation which affects its ability to recognise leukaemia cells.

  7. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  8. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  9. Targeting FGFR Signaling in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touat, Mehdi; Ileana, Ecaterina; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-06-15

    The fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway (FGFR signaling) is an evolutionary conserved signaling cascade that regulates several basic biologic processes, including tissue development, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Substantial evidence indicates that aberrant FGFR signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Recent developments of deep sequencing technologies have allowed the discovery of frequent molecular alterations in components of FGFR signaling among several solid tumor types. Moreover, compelling preclinical models have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of these aberrations in driving tumor growth, promoting angiogenesis, and conferring resistance mechanisms to anticancer therapies. Recently, the field of FGFR targeting has exponentially progressed thanks to the development of novel agents inhibiting FGFs or FGFRs, which had manageable safety profiles in early-phase trials. Promising treatment efficacy has been observed in different types of malignancies, particularly in tumors harboring aberrant FGFR signaling, thus offering novel therapeutic opportunities in the era of precision medicine. The most exciting challenges now focus on selecting patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents, increasing the efficacy of therapies with the development of novel potent compounds and combination strategies, and overcoming toxicities associated with FGFR inhibitors. After examination of the basic and translational research studies that validated the oncogenic potential of aberrant FGFR signaling, this review focuses on recent data from clinical trials evaluating FGFR targeting therapies and discusses the challenges and perspectives for the development of these agents.

  10. Immune targets and neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy and precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Fu; Wang, Helen Y

    2017-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to eradicate malignant cells is becoming a most powerful new approach to cancer therapy. FDA approval of the immunotherapy-based drugs, sipuleucel-T (Provenge), ipilimumab (Yervoy, anti-CTLA-4), and more recently, the programmed cell death (PD)-1 antibody (pembrolizumab, Keytruda), for the treatment of multiple types of cancer has greatly advanced research and clinical studies in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, recent clinical trials, using NY-ESO-1-specific T cell receptor (TCR) or CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), have shown promising clinical results for patients with metastatic cancer. Current success of cancer immunotherapy is built upon the work of cancer antigens and co-inhibitory signaling molecules identified 20 years ago. Among the large numbers of target antigens, CD19 is the best target for CAR T cell therapy for blood cancer, but CAR-engineered T cell immunotherapy does not yet work in solid cancer. NY-ESO-1 is one of the best targets for TCR-based immunotherapy in solid cancer. Despite the great success of checkpoint blockade therapy, more than 50% of cancer patients fail to respond to blockade therapy. The advent of new technologies such as next-generation sequencing has enhanced our ability to search for new immune targets in onco-immunology and accelerated the development of immunotherapy with potentially broader coverage of cancer patients. In this review, we will discuss the recent progresses of cancer immunotherapy and novel strategies in the identification of new immune targets and mutation-derived antigens (neoantigens) for cancer immunotherapy and immunoprecision medicine.

  11. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihide Nishimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib and TARCEVA (Erlotinib treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care.

  12. Phosphoproteomics Reveals HMGA1, a CK2 Substrate, as a Drug-Resistant Target in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Pan, Szu-Hua; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Hsu, Yuan-Ling; Yen, Hsin-Yung; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Yen-Chen; Hong, Tse-Ming; Sung, Ting-Yi; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Although EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated good efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR mutations, most patients develop intrinsic and acquired resistance. We quantitatively profiled the phosphoproteome and proteome of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant NSCLC cells under gefitinib treatment. The construction of a dose-dependent responsive kinase-substrate network of 1548 phosphoproteins and 3834 proteins revealed CK2-centric modules as the dominant core network for the potential gefitinib resistance-associated proteins. CK2 knockdown decreased cell survival in gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs. Using motif analysis to identify the CK2 core sub-network, we verified that elevated phosphorylation level of a CK2 substrate, HMGA1 was a critical node contributing to EGFR-TKI resistance in NSCLC cell. Both HMGA1 knockdown or mutation of the CK2 phosphorylation site, S102, of HMGA1 reinforced the efficacy of gefitinib in resistant NSCLC cells through reactivation of the downstream signaling of EGFR. Our results delineate the TKI resistance-associated kinase-substrate network, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming TKI-induced resistance in NSCLC. PMID:28290473

  13. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  14. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  15. Targeting the LOX/hypoxia axis reverses many of the features that make pancreatic cancer deadly: inhibition of LOX abrogates metastasis and enhances drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bryan W; Morton, Jennifer P; Pinese, Mark; Saturno, Grazia; Jamieson, Nigel B; McGhee, Ewan; Timpson, Paul; Leach, Joshua; McGarry, Lynn; Shanks, Emma; Bailey, Peter; Chang, David; Oien, Karin; Karim, Saadia; Au, Amy; Steele, Colin; Carter, Christopher Ross; McKay, Colin; Anderson, Kurt; Evans, Thomas R Jeffry; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline; Biankin, Andrew; Erler, Janine T; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality. Despite significant advances made in the treatment of other cancers, current chemotherapies offer little survival benefit in this disease. Pancreaticoduodenectomy offers patients the possibility of a cure, but most will die of recurrent or metastatic disease. Hence, preventing metastatic disease in these patients would be of significant benefit. Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identified a LOX/hypoxia signature associated with poor patient survival in resectable patients. We found that LOX expression is upregulated in metastatic tumors from Pdx1-Cre Kras(G12D/+) Trp53(R172H/+) (KPC) mice and that inhibition of LOX in these mice suppressed metastasis. Mechanistically, LOX inhibition suppressed both migration and invasion of KPC cells. LOX inhibition also synergized with gemcitabine to kill tumors and significantly prolonged tumor-free survival in KPC mice with early-stage tumors. This was associated with stromal alterations, including increased vasculature and decreased fibrillar collagen, and increased infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into tumors. Therefore, LOX inhibition is able to reverse many of the features that make PDAC inherently refractory to conventional therapies and targeting LOX could improve outcome in surgically resectable disease.

  16. Epigenetic targets in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Manoharan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of leading cause of cancer related deaths in men. Various aspects of cancer epigenetics are rapidly evolving and the role of 2 major epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in prostate cancer is being studied widely. The epigenetic changes are early event in the cancer development and are reversible. Novel epigenetic markers are being studied, which have the potential as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic marker. Variety of drugs targeting epigenetic changes are being studied, which can be effective individually or in combination with other conventional drugs in PC treatment. In this review, we discuss epigenetic changes associated with PC and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications including future areas of research.

  17. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  18. Exploiting novel molecular targets in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Novel molecular targets are being discovered as we learn more about the aberrant processes underlying various cancers. Efforts to translate this knowledge are starting to impact on the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway and angiogenesis have been targeted successfully in colorectal cancer with cetuximab, panitunumab and bevacizumab. Similarly, EGFR-targeting with erlotinib yielded significant survival benefit in pancreatic cancer when combined with gemcitabine. The multi-targeting approach with sorafenib has made it the first agent to achieve significant survival benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma. Efforts to exploit the dysregulated Akt/mTOR pathway in GI cancer therapy are ongoing. These molecular targets can be disrupted by various approaches, including the use of monoclonal antibody to intercept extracellular ligands and disrupt receptor-ligand binding, and small molecule inhibitors that interrupt the activation of intracellular kinases.

  19. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  20. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...mutations found in breast cancer using both structural and cell based assays. We have now have evidence for the effects of the most recurrent

  1. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  2. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  3. Potential anti-cancer drugs commonly used for other indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusova, Veronika; Skalova, Lenka; Kralova, Vera; Matouskova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing resistance of mammalian tumor cells to chemotherapy along with the severe side effects of commonly used cytostatics has raised the urgency in the search for new anti-cancer agents. Several drugs originally approved for indications other than cancer treatment have recently been found to have a cytostatic effect on cancer cells. These drugs could be expediently repurposed as anti-cancer agents, since they have already been tested for toxicity in humans and animals. The groups of newly recognized potential cytostatics discussed in this review include benzimidazole anthelmintics (albendazole, mebendazole, flubendazole), anti-hypertensive drugs (doxazosin, propranolol), psychopharmaceuticals (chlorpromazine, clomipramine) and antidiabetic drugs (metformin, pioglitazone). All these drugs have a definite potential to be used especially in combinations with other cytostatics; the chemotherapy targeting of multiple sites now represents a promising approach in cancer treatment. The present review summarizes recent information about the anti-cancer effects of selected drugs commonly used for other medical indications. Our aim is not to collect all the reported results, but to present an overview of various possibilities. Advantages, disadvantages and further perspectives regarding individual drugs are discussed and evaluated.

  4. Development of Biodegradable Zinc Oxide Nanowires Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of green/red fluorescent ZnO nanoplatforms (including both NWs and NPs) and...is to develop a biodegradable ZnO nanomaterial platform (mainly focusing on the nanowire [NW] morphology) for efficient vasculature targeting of BCa...hypothesis is that suitably functionalized ZnO NWs can have long circulation lifetime and efficient tumor targeting for future drug delivery

  5. Microtubule-Targeting Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Cancer1828 Mol Cancer Ther 2005;4(12). December 2005 22. Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T. Molecular cloning : a laboratory manual. 2nd ed. Cold Spring...Harbor (NY): Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; 1989. 23. Zhu XX, Kozarsky K, Strahler JR, et al. Molecular cloning of a novel human leukemia-associated...of Cancer Research, Abstract #4940, 2005. 3. Mistry, SJ, Atweh, GF. Microtubule targeting therapy: Anti-stathmin based molecular cancer

  6. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  7. Bioresponsive polymer coated drug nanorods for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemthong, Tunyaboon; Kim, Hannah H.; Dunlap, Kelly; Brocker, Caitlin; Barua, Dipak; Forciniti, Daniel; Huang, Yue-Wern; Barua, Sutapa

    2017-01-01

    Ineffective drug release at the target site is among the top challenges for cancer treatment. This reflects the facts that interaction with the physiological condition can denature active ingredients of drugs, and low delivery to the disease microenvironment leads to poor therapeutic outcomes. We hypothesize that depositing a thin layer of bioresponsive polymer on the surface of drug nanoparticles would not only protect drugs from degradation but also allow the release of drugs at the target site. Here, we report a one-step process to prepare bioresponsive polymer coated drug nanorods (NRs) from liquid precursors using the solvent diffusion method. A thin layer (10.3 ± 1.4 nm) of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer coating was deposited on the surface of camptothecin (CPT) anti-cancer drug NRs. The mean size of PCL-coated CPT NRs was 500.9 ± 91.3 nm length × 122.7 ± 10.1 nm width. The PCL polymer coating was biodegradable at acidic pH 6 as determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. CPT drugs were released up to 51.5% when PCL coating dissolved into non-toxic carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. Trastuzumab (TTZ), a humanized IgG monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to the NR surface for breast cancer cell targeting. Combination treatments using CPT and TTZ decreased the HER-2 positive BT-474 breast cancer cell growth by 66.9 ± 5.3% in vitro. These results suggest effective combination treatments of breast cancer cells using bioresponsive polymer coated drug delivery.

  8. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  9. New drugs and treatment targets in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming years. We need to be aware of the limitations of drug safety data when selecting new novel treatments. Monitoring and clinical registries are still important tools.

  10. Targeting DNA Repair in Cancer: Beyond PARP Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica S; O'Carrigan, Brent; Jackson, Stephen P; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-01-01

    Germline aberrations in critical DNA-repair and DNA damage-response (DDR) genes cause cancer predisposition, whereas various tumors harbor somatic mutations causing defective DDR/DNA repair. The concept of synthetic lethality can be exploited in such malignancies, as exemplified by approval of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors for treating BRCA1/2-mutated ovarian cancers. Herein, we detail how cellular DDR processes engage various proteins that sense DNA damage, initiate signaling pathways to promote cell-cycle checkpoint activation, trigger apoptosis, and coordinate DNA repair. We focus on novel therapeutic strategies targeting promising DDR targets and discuss challenges of patient selection and the development of rational drug combinations.

  11. Molecular targeting of acid ceramidase: implications to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Youssef H; Jenkins, Russell W; Korman, John B; Liu, Xiang; Obeid, Lina M; Norris, James S; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2008-08-01

    Increasingly recognized as bioactive molecules, sphingolipids have been studied in a variety of disease models. The impact of sphingolipids on cancer research facilitated the entry of sphingolipid analogues and enzyme modulators into clinical trials. Owing to its ability to regulate two bioactive sphingolipids, ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, acid ceramidase (AC) emerges as an attractive target for drug development within the sphingolipid metabolic pathway. Indeed, there is extensive evidence supporting a pivotal role for AC in lipid metabolism and cancer biology. In this article, we review the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of AC, its relevance to tumor promotion, and its molecular targeting approaches.

  12. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  13. Janus "nano-bullets" for magnetic targeting liver cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dan; Li, Jing; Zheng, Xiao; Pan, Yue; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi-Xian; Dong, Wen-Fei; Chen, Li

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs with controlled drug release function has been recognized as a promising strategy for pursuit of increased chemotherapeutic efficacy and reduced adverse effects. Development of magnetic nanoparticulates as delivery carriers to accommodate cytotoxic drugs for liver cancer treatment has evoked immense interest with respect to their convenience in biomedical application. Herein, we engineered multifunctional Janus nanocomposites, characterized by a head of magnetic Fe3O4 and a body of mesoporous SiO2 containing doxorubicin (DOX) as "nano-bullets" (M-MSNs-DOX). This nanodrug formulation possessed nanosize with controlled aspect-ratio, defined abundance in pore structures, and superior magnetic properties. M-MSN-DOX was determined to induce selective growth inhibition to the cancer cell under magnetic field rather than human normal cells due to its preferable endocytosis by the tumor cells and pH-promoted DOX release in the interior of cancer cells. Ultimately, both subcutaneous and orthotropic liver tumor models in mice have demonstrated that the proposed Janus nano-bullets imposed remarkable suppression of the tumor growth and significantly reduced systematic toxicity. Taken together, this study demonstrates an intriguing targeting strategy for liver cancer treatment based on a novel Janus nano-bullet, aiming for utilization of nanotechnology to obtain safe and efficient treatment of liver cancer.

  14. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a "targeted" therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Liang-Fu Han

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology.In the past decade,such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible.In general,the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies.However,improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment,notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).In this review,the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  16. Differential pathway dependency discovery associated with drug response across cancer cell lines. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effort to personalize treatment plans for cancer patients involves the identification of drug treatments that can effectively target the disease while minimizing the likelihood of adverse reactions. In this study, the gene-expression profile of 810 cancer cell lines and their response data to 368 small molecules from the Cancer Therapeutics Research Portal (CTRP) are analyzed to identify pathways with significant rewiring between genes, or differential gene dependency, between sensitive and non-sensitive cell lines.

  17. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  18. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  19. Targeted multidrug delivery system to overcome chemoresistance in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Tang,1 Fariborz Soroush,1 Zhaohui Tong,2 Mohammad F Kiani,1 Bin Wang1,3 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Widener University, Chester, PA, USA Abstract: Chemotherapy has been widely used in breast cancer patients to reduce tumor size. However, most anticancer agents cannot differentiate between cancerous and normal cells, resulting in severe systemic toxicity. In addition, acquired drug resistance during the chemotherapy treatment further decreases treatment efficacy. With the proper treatment strategy, nanodrug carriers, such as liposomes/immunoliposomes, may be able to reduce undesired side effects of chemotherapy, to overcome the acquired multidrug resistance, and to further improve the treatment efficacy. In this study, a novel combinational targeted drug delivery system was developed by encapsulating antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab into liposomes and encapsulating chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX into immunoliposomes where the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 antibody was used as a targeting ligand. This novel combinational system was tested in vitro using a HER2 positive and multidrug resistant breast cancer cell line (BT-474/MDR, and in vivo using a xenograft mouse tumor model. In vitro cell culture experiments show that immunoliposome delivery led to a high cell nucleus accumulation of DOX, whereas free DOX was observed mostly near the cell membrane and in cytoplasm due to the action of P-gp. Combining liposomal bevacizumab with immunoliposomal DOX achieved the best tumor growth inhibition and the lowest toxicity. Tumor size decreased steadily within a 60-day observation period indicating a potential synergistic effect between DOX and bevacizumab through the targeted delivery. Our findings clearly indicate that tumor growth was significantly

  20. Engineering Remotely Triggered Liposomes to Target Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneider, Alexandra; Jadia, Rahul; Piel, Brandon; VanDyke, Derek; Tsiros, Christopher; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) continues to present a challenge in the clinic, as there is still no approved targeted therapy. TNBC is the worst sub-type of breast cancer in terms of prognosis and exhibits a deficiency in estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors. One possible option for the treatment of TNBC is chemotherapy. The issue with many chemotherapy drugs is that their effectiveness is diminished due to poor water solubility, and the method of administration directly or with a co-solvent intravenously can lead to an increase in toxicity. The issues of drug solubility can be avoided by using liposomes as a drug delivery carrier. Liposomes are engineered, biological nanoconstructs that possess the ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and have been clinically approved to treat cancer. Specific targeting of cancer cell receptors through the use of ligands conjugated to the surface of drug-loaded liposomes could lessen damage to normal, healthy tissue. This study focuses on polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated, folate conjugated, benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD)-loaded liposomes for treatment via photodynamic therapy (PDT). The folate receptor is over expressed on TNBC cells so these liposomes are targeted for greater uptake into cancer cells. PDT involves remotely irradiating light at 690 nm to trigger BPD, a hydrophobic photosensitive drug, to form reactive oxygen species that cause tumor cell death. BPD also displays a fluorescence signal when excited by light making it possible to image the fluorescence prior to PDT and for theranostics. In this study, free BPD, non-targeted and folate-targeted PEGylated BPD-loaded liposomes were introduced to a metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) in vitro. The liposomes were reproducibly synthesized and characterized for size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential, stability, and BPD release kinetics. Folate competition tests, fluorescence

  1. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Janine T. Erler

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM). Many ECM proteins are significantly deregulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic casc...

  2. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-04

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery.

  3. Delivery of Encapsulated Drugs to Cancer Cells and Tissue: The Impact of Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Afadzi, Mercy

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated drugs have improved tumor to normal tissue uptake compared to free drugs, however, the concentration of drugs at the tumor site is still low and heterogeneous due to the tumor microenvironment which serves as barriers for the delivery to the target site. Combining ultrasound (US) with encapsulated drugs might enhance the transport of the encapsulated drug across the vasculature and into tumor tissues. US can also increase local drug release and the uptake of the drug into cancer ...

  4. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape, stiffness (composition and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it is difficult to choose the proper one for targeted functions. In this work, we will review several representative experimental and computational studies in selecting the proper surface functional groups. Experimental studies reveal that: (1 the NPs with surface decorated amphiphilic polymers can enter the cell interior through penetrating pathway; (2 the NPs with tunable stiffness and identical surface chemistry can be selectively accepted by the diseased cells according to their stiffness; and (3 the NPs grafted with pH-responsive polymers can be accepted or rejected by the cells due to the local pH environment. In addition, we show that computer simulations could be useful to understand the detailed physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and guide the design of next-generation NP-based drug carriers with high selectivity, affinity, and low toxicity. For example, the detailed free energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulation reveals that amphiphilic polymer-decorated NPs can penetrate into the cell membrane through the “snorkeling” mechanism, by maximizing the interaction energy between the hydrophobic ligands and lipid tails. We anticipate that this work will inspire future studies in the design of environment-responsive NPs for targeted drug delivery.

  5. Drug-target interaction prediction: databases, web servers and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Feng; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yongdong

    2016-07-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions is an important process in drug discovery. Although high-throughput screening and other biological assays are becoming available, experimental methods for drug-target interaction identification remain to be extremely costly, time-consuming and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, various computational models have been developed to predict potential drug-target associations on a large scale. In this review, databases and web servers involved in drug-target identification and drug discovery are summarized. In addition, we mainly introduced some state-of-the-art computational models for drug-target interactions prediction, including network-based method, machine learning-based method and so on. Specially, for the machine learning-based method, much attention was paid to supervised and semi-supervised models, which have essential difference in the adoption of negative samples. Although significant improvements for drug-target interaction prediction have been obtained by many effective computational models, both network-based and machine learning-based methods have their disadvantages, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of the network-based drug discovery and network approach for personalized drug discovery based on personalized medicine, genome sequencing, tumor clone-based network and cancer hallmark-based network. Finally, we discussed the new evaluation validation framework and the formulation of drug-target interactions prediction problem by more realistic regression formulation based on quantitative bioactivity data.

  6. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quiz Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of ... Research Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Cancers ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and ...

  7. Targeting ECM Disrupts Cancer Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja A; Wullkopf, Lena; Erler, Janine T

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multistep process, with each step involving intricate cross talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the ex...

  8. Targeted treatment of advanced and metastatic breast cancer with lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Corkery

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Brendan Corkery1,2, Norma O’Donovan2, John Crown1,21St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: Improved molecular understanding of breast cancer in recent years has led to the discovery of important drug targets such as HER-2 and EGFR. Lapatinib is a potent dual inhibitor of HER-2 and EGFR. Preclinical and phase I studies have shown activity with lapatinib in a number of cancers, including breast cancer, and the drug is well tolerated. The main known drug interactions are with paclitaxel and irinotecan. The most significant side-effects of lapatinib are diarrhea and adverse skin events. Rates of cardiotoxicity compare favorably with trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2. This paper focuses on lapatinib in advanced and metastatic breast cancer, which remains an important therapeutic challenge. Phase II and III studies show activity as monotherapy, and in combination with chemotherapy or hormonal agents. Results from these studies suggest that the main benefit from lapatinib is in the HER-2 positive breast cancer population. Combinations of lapatinib and trastuzumab are also being studied and show encouraging results, particularly in trastuzumab-refractory metastatic breast cancer. Lapatinib may have a specific role in treating HER-2 positive CNS metastases. The role of lapatinib as neoadjuvant therapy and in early breast cancer is also being evaluated.Keywords: HER-2, EGFR, erbB, lapatinib, Tykerb®, tyrosine kinase

  9. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  10. Challenges and limitations of targeting cancer stem cells and/or the tumour microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian Yakisich

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The existence of cancer cells with stem cell properties (Cancer Stem Cells, CSCs and their association with tumor resistance and relapse has led to the search for active compounds to eliminate these cells or modulate their stemness in the hope of curing cancer. So far, three classes of drugs that target cancer stemness (Stemness Modulator Drugs have been identified: i drugs that selectively eliminate CSCs (stem cell targeting drugs; ii drugs that decrease stemness (stemness inhibitor drugs; and iii drugs that promote stemness (stemness promoting drugs. In addition, microenvironment modulating drugs aimed at selectively targeting the stem cell niche are being investigated and may represent an important class of drug for cancer therapy. This article will briefly review the current use of these substances and discuss the potential outcomes, challenges and limitations of treatment modalities using these classes of drugs for cancer treatment. Finally, a modular tumor model will be proposed as a guide to integrate our knowledge on the biology of cancer stem cell with that of the tumor microenvironment to promote a more rational development of anticancer therapy.

  11. IDICAP: A Novel Tool for Integrating Drug Intervention Based on Cancer Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle Kosarek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a heterogeneous disease afflicting millions of people of all ages and their families worldwide. Tremendous resources have been and continue to be devoted to the development of cancer treatments that target the unique mutation profiles of patients, namely targeted cancer therapy. However, the sheer volume of drugs coupled with cancer heterogeneity becomes a challenge for physicians to prescribe effective therapies targeting patients’ unique genetic mutations. Developing a web service that allows clinicians as well as patients to identify effective drug therapies, both approved and experimental, would be helpful for both parties. We have developed an innovative web service, IDICAP, which stands for Integrated Drug Intervention for CAncer Panel. It uses genes that have been linked to a cancer type to search for drug and clinical trial information from ClinicalTrials.gov and DrugBank. IDICAP selects and integrates information pertaining to clinical trials, disease conditions, drugs under trial, locations of trials, drugs that are known to target the queried gene, and any known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP effects. We tested IDICAP by gene panels that contribute to breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and cancer in general. Clinical trials and drugs listed by our tool showed improved precision compared to the results from ClinicalTrials.gov and Drug Gene Interaction Database (DGIdb. Furthermore, IDICAP provides patients and doctors with a list of clinical facilities in their proximity, a characteristic that lends credence to the Precision Medicine Initiative launched by the White House in the United States in 2015.

  12. Application of phage display technology in targeted therapy of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mian Kong; Junye Wang; Baojiang Li

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is a technology of gene expression and screening, it is widely used in the fields of defining antigenepitopes, signal transduction, genetic treatment, parasites research and tumor targeted therapy. Breast cancer is the mostcommon cancer in women, we can obtain peptides specially associated with breast cancer by using phage display technology,and this method has great potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer and development new targeted drugs.

  13. Targeting the EGFR pathway for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, JB; Navaratnam, S; Pitz, MW

    2006-01-01

    provided the rationale for the targeting of the components of the EGFR signaling pathways for cancer therapy. Below we discuss various aspects of EGFR-targeted therapies mainly in hematologic malignancies, lung cancer and breast cancer. Beside novel therapeutic approaches, we also discuss specific side......Clinical studies have shown that HER-2/Neu is over-expressed in up to one-third of patients with a variety of cancers, including B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), breast cancer and lung cancer, and that these patients are frequently resistant to conventional chemo-therapies. Additionally...... effects associated with the therapeutic inhibition of components of the EGFR-pathways. Alongside small inhibitors, such as Lapatinib (Tykerb, GW572016), Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839), and Erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), a significant part of the review is also dedicated to therapeutic antibodies (e...

  14. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-11-01

    Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110 nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery.

  15. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chao Xu,1,* Hong Zhao,1,* Haitao Chen,1 Qinghua Yao2,3 1First Clinical College of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 2Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 3Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4, also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12. CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, CXCR4, drug target, chemokine, angiogenesis

  16. DDX3, a potential target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Guus Martinus; Xie, Min; Raman, Venu

    2015-11-05

    RNA helicases are a large family of proteins with a distinct motif, referred to as the DEAD/H (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp/His). The exact functions of all the human DEAD/H box proteins are unknown. However, it has been consistently demonstrated that these proteins are associated with several aspects of energy-dependent RNA metabolism, including translation, ribosome biogenesis, and pre-mRNA splicing. In addition, DEAD/H box proteins participate in nuclear-cytoplasmic transport and organellar gene expression.A member of this RNA helicase family, DDX3, has been identified in a variety of cellular biogenesis processes, including cell-cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, cell survival, and apoptosis. In cancer, DDX3 expression has been evaluated in patient samples of breast, lung, colon, oral, and liver cancer. Both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions have been attributed to DDX3 and are discussed in this review. In general, there is concordance with in vitro evidence to support the hypothesis that DDX3 is associated with an aggressive phenotype in human malignancies. Interestingly, very few cancer types harbor mutations in DDX3, which result in altered protein function rather than a loss of function.Efficacy of drugs to curtail cancer growth is hindered by adaptive responses that promote drug resistance, eventually leading to treatment failure. One way to circumvent development of resistant disease is to develop novel drugs that target over-expressed proteins involved in this adaptive response. Moreover, if the target gene is developmentally regulated, there is less of a possibility to abruptly accumulate mutations leading to drug resistance. In this regard, DDX3 could be a druggable target for cancer treatment. We present an overview of DDX3 biology and the currently available DDX3 inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  17. Targeted Drug Delivery in Covalent Organic Nanosheets (CONs) via Sequential Postsynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Shouvik; Sasmal, Himadri Sekhar; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Illath, Kavya S; Díaz Díaz, David; Banerjee, Rahul

    2017-03-03

    Covalent organic nanosheets (CONs) have emerged as a new class of functional two-dimensional (2D) porous organic polymeric materials with a high accessible surface, diverse functionality and chemical stability. They could become a versa-tile candidate for targeted drug delivery. Despite their many advantages, there are limitations to use them for target specific drug delivery. We anticipated that these drawbacks could be overturned by judicious postsynthetic modification steps to use CONs for targeted drug delivery. The postsynthetic modification would not only produce the desired functionality, it would also help in exfoliation to CONs as well. In order to meet this requirement, we have developed a facile, salt-mediated synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) in presence of p-toluenesulphonic acid (PTSA). The COFs were subjected to sequential postsynthetic modifications to yield functionalized targeted CONs for targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the breast cancer cells. This postsynthetic modification resulted in simultaneous chemical delamination and functionalization to targeted CONs. Targeted CONs showed sustained release of the drug to the cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, which led to cancer cell death via apoptosis. Considering easy and facile COF synthesis, functionality based postsynthetic modifications and chemical delamination to CONs for potential advantageous targeted drug delivery, this process can have a significant impact in biomedical applications.

  18. Improving the pH-response of pHLIP insertion at tumor acidity for targeted drug delivery against cancer: Biophysical studies in model membranes and evaluations in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Joab Otieno

    pH (Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP) possesses unique qualities that can be applied in cancer biology. It is a peptide that lives in three worlds: In State I, pHLIP exists as an unstructured monomer in solution at neutral pH; In State II, pHLIP partitions to the surface of a lipid bilayer at neutral pH; In State III, pHLIP inserts across the lipid bilayer by forming a transmembrane (TM) alpha helix under slightly acidic conditions (pH 6). These properties allow pHLIP to target acidosis (pH 6.5-7.0), a ubiquitous feature of solid tumors. Although pHLIP shows promise as a drug delivery vehicle, insertion properties such as pH50 (i.e. the pH at which 50% of pHLIP are inserted) and Hill coefficient must be tuned to improve tumor targeting and drug delivery in vivo. When TM region D14 and D25 residues were replaced with two glutamic acid residues as well as noncanonical amino acids such as alpha amino adipic acid (Aad) and gamma carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), we discovered pHLIP variants that possess a pH50 that can match tumor extracellular pH. pHLIP variants D25EE, Asp25Aad, and Asp14Gla/Asp25Aad, insert with pH50 of 6.60, 6.74, and 6.79, respectively. We also tuned pH-response (cooperativity of insertion) and we found that the Asp14Gla variant can insert into membrane with the sharpest transition observed so far for a pHLIP (i.e. over half pH unit vs. one pH unit for WT). Furthermore, we used turn-on fluorescence to evaluate the new variants in cancer cells. The most promising Asp25Aad pHLIP gave near theoretical maximum level of dequenching in cancerous A549 cells at pH 6.2 and 6.4, indicating a high level of plasma-membrane insertion. Under the same conditions, the `WT' and D25E pHLIP variants have low levels of plasma-membrane insertion in cells. Dequenching levels were low in non-cancerous HK2 cell line.

  19. New Drugs and Treatment Targets in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic...... in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors......, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming...

  20. Aptamer conjugated paclitaxel and magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravind, Athulya; Nair, Remya; Raveendran, Sreejith; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takahashi; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D., E-mail: sakthi@toyo.jp

    2013-10-15

    Controlled and targeted drug delivery is an essential criterion in cancer therapy to reduce the side effects caused by non-specific drug release and toxicity. Targeted chemotherapy, sustained drug release and optical imaging have been achieved using a multifunctional nanocarrier constructed from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), an anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX), a fluorescent dye Nile red (NR), magnetic fluid (MF) and aptamers (Apt, AS1411, anti-nucleolin aptamer). The magnetic fluid and paclitaxel loaded fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs (MF-PTX-NR-PLGA NPs) were synthesized by a single-emulsion technique/solvent evaporation method using a chemical cross linker bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) to enable binding of aptamer on to the surface of the nanoparticles. Targeting aptamers were then introduced to the particles through the reaction with the cross linker to target the nucleolin receptors over expressed on the cancer cell surface. Specific binding and uptake of the aptamer conjugated magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA NPs (Apt-MF-NR-PLGA NPs) to the target cancer cells induced by aptamers was observed using confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity assay conducted in two cell lines (L929 and MCF-7) confirmed that targeted MCF-7 cancer cells were killed while control cells were unharmed. In addition, aptamer mediated delivery resulting in enhanced binding and uptake to the target cancer cells exhibited increased therapeutic effect of the drug. Moreover, these aptamer conjugated magnetic polymer vehicles apart from actively transporting drugs into specifically targeted tumor regions can also be used to induce hyperthermia or for facilitating magnetic guiding of particles to the tumor regions. - Highlights: • Aptamer escorted, theranostic biodegradable PLGA carriers were developed. • Can target cancer cells, control drug release, image and magnetically guide. • Highly specific to the targeted cancer cells thus delivering

  1. Targets for molecular therapy of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-02-01

    Cancers of the skin encompass the first and second most common neoplasms in the United States, epidermal basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), respectively, as well as the melanocytic malignancy, malignant melanoma (MM). Recently identified alterations in the function of specific genes in these cancers provide new potential therapeutic targets. These alterations affect conserved regulators of cellular proliferation and viability, including the Sonic Hedgehog, Ras/Raf, ARF/p53, p16(INK4A)/CDK4/Rb and NF-kappaB pathways. New modalities designed to target these specific proteins may represent promising approaches to therapy of human skin cancers.

  2. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  3. Recent progress in target therapy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Lara Maria; Bortolami, Alberto; Falci, Cristina; Sinigaglia, Giulietta; Monfardini, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a new class of agents targeting at specific receptors on cancer cells. In addition to having direct cellular effects, antibodies can cany substances, such as radioactive isotopes, toxins and antineoplastic agents, to the targeted cells. Two of them, cetuximab (Erbitux) and bevacizumab (Avastin), seem to have acquired a significant role in the management of patients with radically resected and advanced colorectal carcinoma. Cetuximab plus irinotecan has been approved as second-line therapy in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer patients; bevacizumab plus 5FU/LV has resulted in higher response and longer survival than 5FU/LV alone in first line metastatic colorectal cancer; its combination with oxaliplatin has recently doubled results. The superior therapeutic efficacy of these molecular targeting agents over traditional chemotherapy has been shown by the survival benefit achieved by patients with advanced or recurrent cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanism by which these agents produce or enhance an antitumour effect, alone or in combination with anticancer drugs, is unknown, the specific inhibition of target genes critically involved in tumour progression and metastasis is clear. Further studies to determine which patient groups and anticancer drugs are more appropriate for combination therapy with these agents are needed. All the most important data obtained through recent studies are discussed, emphasizing their mechanisms of action, safety profiles and clinical applications.

  4. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  5. Targeted Magnetic Hyperthermia for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    O R R EC TE D PR O O F 928 were evident. In contrast, MRI scans of treated mice showed 929 no signs of intra-thoracic lung cancer (Fig. 4). The...mice that received SPIO-loaded nanoemulsion 1010 (either targeted or non-targeted) appeared hypointense, in- 1011 dicating SPIO accumulation in these

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Mirzaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  7. Reimbursement of targeted cancer therapies within 3 different European health care systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlović, Jovan; Dolk, Christiaan; Tolley, Keith; Simoens, Steven; Postma, Maarten J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeted cancer therapies (TCTs) are drugs that specifically act on molecular targets within the cancer cell, causing its regression and/or destruction. Although TCTs offer clinically important gains in survival in one of the most challenging therapeutic areas, these gains are followed by c

  8. Delineation on Therapeutic Significance of Transporters as Molecular Targets of Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANAI Yoshikat; HE Xin; LIU Chang-xiao

    2011-01-01

    Transporters are membrane proteins mediating permeation of organic and inorganic solutes through the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organella.They play essential roles in the epithelial absorption and cellular uptake of nutrients as well as absorption,distribution,metabolism,and excretion of drugs.Because transporters contribute to determining the distribution of compounds in the body in concert with metabolic/synthetic enzymes,the drugs that affect the functions of transporters are expected to alter the distribution of compounds in the body and to ameliorate disrupted homeostasis.In this context,drugs targeting transporters have been used clinically.Such drugs include antidepressants targeting monoamine transporters,diuretics targeting inorganic ion transporters of renal tubules,and uricosuric agents targeting renal urate transporters.Now new transporter-targeting drugs designed based on post-genome drug development strategy have been in the process of clinical trials or basic/clinical researches.For example,the inhibitors of renal Na/glucose cotransporter SGLT2 have been proved for their efficacy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.The cancer L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1)has been considered as a target of cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.The transporter-targeting drugs are expected to provide new rationale in the therapeutics of various diseases.

  9. Dynamics of target-mediated drug disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peletier, Lambertus A; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2009-12-08

    We present a mathematical analysis of the basic model underlying target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) in which a ligand is supplied through an initial bolus or through a constant rate infusion and forms a complex with a receptor (target), which is supplied and removed continuously. Ligand and complex may be eliminated according to first-order processes. We assume that the total receptor pool (free and bound) is constant in time and we give a geometrical description of the evolution of the concentrations of ligand, receptor and receptor-ligand complex which offers a transparent way to compare the full model with simpler models such as the quasi-steady-state (QSS) model, the quasi-equilibrium (QE) model and the empirical Michaelis-Menten (MM) model; we also give precise conditions on the parameters in the TMDD model for the validity of these reduced models. We relate characteristic properties of time courses to parameter regimes and, in particular, we identify and explain non-monotone dependence of the time-to-steady-state on the infusion rate. Finally, we discuss how the volume of the central compartment may be overestimated because of singular initial behaviour of the time course of the ligand concentration.

  10. Comparison of the cancer gene targeting and biochemical selectivities of all targeted kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost C M Uitdehaag

    Full Text Available The anti-proliferative activities of all twenty-five targeted kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical use were measured in two large assay panels: (1 a panel of proliferation assays of forty-four human cancer cell lines from diverse tumour tissue origins; and (2 a panel of more than 300 kinase enzyme activity assays. This study provides a head-on comparison of all kinase inhibitor drugs in use (status Nov. 2013, and for six of these drugs, the first kinome profiling data in the public domain. Correlation of drug activities with cancer gene mutations revealed novel drug sensitivity markers, suggesting that cancers dependent on mutant CTNNB1 will respond to trametinib and other MEK inhibitors, and cancers dependent on SMAD4 to small molecule EGFR inhibitor drugs. Comparison of cellular targeting efficacies reveals the most targeted inhibitors for EGFR, ABL1 and BRAF(V600E-driven cell growth, and demonstrates that the best targeted agents combine high biochemical potency with good selectivity. For ABL1 inhibitors, we computationally deduce optimized kinase profiles for use in a next generation of drugs. Our study shows the power of combining biochemical and cellular profiling data in the evaluation of kinase inhibitor drug action.

  11. Trastuzumab Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to EGFR-targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilken Jason A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early studies have demonstrated comparable levels of HER2/ErbB2 expression in both breast and ovarian cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody directed against HER2, is FDA-approved for the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer. However, clinical studies of trastuzumab in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC patients have not met the same level of success. Surprisingly, however, no reports have examined either the basis for primary trastuzumab resistance in ovarian cancer or potential ways of salvaging trastuzumab as a potential ovarian cancer therapeutic. Methods An in vitro model of primary trastuzumab-resistant ovarian cancer was created by long-term culture of HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab treated vs. untreated parental cells were compared for HER receptor expression, trastuzumab sensitivity, and sensitivity to other HER-targeted therapeutics. Results In contrast to widely held assumptions, here we show that ovarian cancer cells that are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab are still responsive to trastuzumab. Specifically, we show that responsiveness to alternative HER-targeted inhibitors, such as gefitinib and cetuximab, is dramatically potentiated by long-term trastuzumab treatment of ovarian cancer cells. HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cells are, therefore, not "unresponsive" to trastuzumab as previously assumed, even when they not growth inhibited by this drug. Conclusions Given the recent success of EGFR-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of other solid tumors, and the well-established safety profile of trastuzumab, results presented here provide a rationale for re-evaluation of trastuzumab as an experimental ovarian cancer therapeutic, either in concert with, or perhaps as a "primer" for EGFR-targeted therapeutics.

  12. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude;

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  13. Apoptosis : Target of cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, CG; Epping, M; Kruyt, FAE; Giaccone, G

    2002-01-01

    Recent knowledge on apoptosis has made it possible to devise novel approaches, which exploit this process to treat cancer. In this review, we discuss in detail approaches to induce tumor cell apoptosis, their mechanism of action, stage of development, and possible drawbacks. Finally, the obstacles y

  14. Targeting notch to eradicate pancreatic cancer stem cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Azmi, Asfar S; Miele, Lucio; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive malignant disease once it is diagnosed and it remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S.A. Recent data indicates that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence also suggests that the activation of the Notch signaling pathway is mechanistically associated with molecular characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, CSCs are known to be highly drug-resistant, suggesting that targeted inactivation of Notch signaling would be useful for overcoming drug resistance and the elimination of CSCs. This review describes the roles of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer with a special emphasis on its novel functions in the regulation of pancreatic CSC. Moreover, the review also proposes that targeting the Notch signaling pathway by natural agents may represent a novel strategy for overcoming drug resistance and the elimination of CSCs, which would be useful for the successful treatment of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

  15. PI3K/AKT/mTOR: role in breast cancer progression, drug resistance, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Zotano, Angel; Mayer, Ingrid A; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2016-12-01

    Anti-cancer cancer-targeted therapies are designed to exploit a particular vulnerability in the tumor, which in most cases results from its dependence on an oncogene and/or loss of a tumor suppressor. Mutations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway are freqcuently found in breast cancers and associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug resistance. Several drugs targeting PI3K/ATK/mTOR are currently in clinical trials, mainly in combination with endocrine therapy and anti-HER2 therapy. These drugs are the focus of this review.

  16. Advances of Driver Gene and Targeted Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan ZHANG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the worldwide. The discovery of drive gene makes tumor treatment is no longer "one-size-fits-all". Targeted therapy to change the present situation of cancer drugs become "bullet" with eyes, the effect is visible and bring a revolution in the treatment of lung cancer. The diver gene and targeted therapy have became the new cedule of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO has showed 11 kinds of diver genes. Here, we review the functional and structural characteristics and the targeted therapy in the 11 kinds of driver gene mutations.

  17. [Advances of driver gene and targeted therapy of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Yan; Wang, Hongyang

    2014-10-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the worldwide. The discovery of drive gene makes tumor treatment is no longer "one-size-fits-all". Targeted therapy to change the present situation of cancer drugs become "bullet" with eyes, the effect is visible and bring a revolution in the treatment of lung cancer. The diver gene and targeted therapy have became the new cedule of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has showed 11 kinds of diver genes. Here, we review the functional and structural characteristics and the targeted therapy in the 11 kinds of driver gene mutations.

  18. Cancer TARGETases: DSB repair as a pharmacological target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadder, Pounami; Aithal, Rakesh; Belan, Ondrej; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is a disease attributed to the accumulation of DNA damages due to incapacitation of DNA repair pathways resulting in genomic instability and a mutator phenotype. Among the DNA lesions, double stranded breaks (DSBs) are the most toxic forms of DNA damage which may arise as a result of extrinsic DNA damaging agents or intrinsic replication stress in fast proliferating cancer cells. Accurate repair of DSBs is therefore paramount to the cell survival, and several classes of proteins such as kinases, nucleases, helicases or core recombinational proteins have pre-defined jobs in precise execution of DSB repair pathways. On one hand, the proper functioning of these proteins ensures maintenance of genomic stability in normal cells, and on the other hand results in resistance to various drugs employed in cancer therapy and therefore presents a suitable opportunity for therapeutic targeting. Higher relapse and resistance in cancer patients due to non-specific, cytotoxic therapies is an alarming situation and it is becoming more evident to employ personalized treatment based on the genetic landscape of the cancer cells. For the success of personalized treatment, it is of immense importance to identify more suitable targetable proteins in DSB repair pathways and also to explore new synthetic lethal interactions with these pathways. Here we review the various alternative approaches to target the various protein classes termed as cancer TARGETases in DSB repair pathway to obtain more beneficial and selective therapy.

  19. Targeting the TGFβ pathway for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cohen, Romain; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; de Gramont, Armand

    2015-03-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway has pleiotropic functions regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, motility and invasion, extracellular matrix production, angiogenesis, and immune response. TGFβ signaling deregulation is frequent in tumors and has crucial roles in tumor initiation, development and metastasis. TGFβ signaling inhibition is an emerging strategy for cancer therapy. The role of the TGFβ pathway as a tumor-promoter or suppressor at the cancer cell level is still a matter of debate, due to its differential effects at the early and late stages of carcinogenesis. In contrast, at the microenvironment level, the TGFβ pathway contributes to generate a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and metastasis throughout all the steps of carcinogenesis. Then, targeting the TGFβ pathway in cancer may be considered primarily as a microenvironment-targeted strategy. In this review, we focus on the TGFβ pathway as a target for cancer therapy. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive overview of the roles played by this pathway and its deregulation in cancer, at the cancer cell and microenvironment levels. We go on to describe the preclinical and clinical results of pharmacological strategies to target the TGFβ pathway, with a highlight on the effects on tumor microenvironment. We then explore the perspectives to optimize TGFβ inhibition therapy in different tumor settings.

  20. Micro RNA, A Review: Pharmacogenomic drug targets for complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Bajaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro RNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression to target several mRNAs in a gene regulatory network. MiRNA related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (S.N.P.s represent a newly identified type of genetic variability that can be of influence to the risk of certain human diseases and also affect how drugs can be activated and metabolized by patients. This will help in personalized medicines which are used for adminis-trating the correct dosage of drug and drug efficacy. miRNA deregulated expression has been extensively de-scribed in a variety of diseases such as Cancer, Obesity , Diabetes, Schizophrenia and control and self renewal of stem cells. MiRNA can function as oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors. MiRNAs may act as key regulators of processes as diverse as early development, cell proliferation and cell death, apoptosis and fat metabolism and cell differentiation .miRNA expression have shown their role in brain development chronic lymphocytic leukemia, colonic adeno carcinoma, Burkiff′s lymphoma and viral infection. These show their links with viral disease, neu-rodevelopment and cancer. It has been shown that they play a key role in melanoma metastasis. These may be differentially expressed in malignant cells compared to normal cells altering the regulation of expression of many important genes. MiRNA expression has been used for prognosis and early diagnosis of these complex diseases. The present paper focuses on the role of miRNAs in various complex diseases, which will help in improving the drug discovery process and personalized medicines.

  1. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly intercon- nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action in terms of informatics. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac- tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins in the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem- onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  2. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU MingZhu; GAO Lei; LI Xia; LIU ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation Inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly Intercon-nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action In terms of informatice. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac-tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins In the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem-onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  3. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  4. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Cancer drugs inhibit morphogenesis in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushree M Routh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida infections are very common in cancer patients and it is a common practice to prescribe antifungal antibiotics along with anticancer drugs. Yeast to hyphal form switching is considered to be important in invasive candidiasis. Targeting morphogenetic switching may be useful against invasive candidiasis. In this study, we report the antimorphogenetic properties of thirty cancer drugs.

  6. Slit/Robo pathway: a promising therapeutic target for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Rishi K; Kumari, Sonam; Ganju, Aditya; Yallapu, Murali M; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance molecules, slit glycoprotein (Slit) and Roundabout receptor (Robo), have implications in the regulation of physiological processes. Recent studies indicate that Slit and Robo also have important roles in tumorigenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The Slit/Robo pathway can be considered a master regulator for multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of these molecules and their associated signaling pathways in cancer progression and metastasis. Overall, the current available data suggest that the Slit/Robo pathway could be a promising target for development of anticancer drugs.

  7. WNT signalling pathways as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Jamie N; Moon, Randall T

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of the oncogenic activity of WNT1 in mouse mammary glands, our appreciation for the complex roles for WNT signalling pathways in cancer has increased dramatically. WNTs and their downstream effectors regulate various processes that are important for cancer progression, including tumour initiation, tumour growth, cell senescence, cell death, differentiation and metastasis. Although WNT signalling pathways have been difficult to target, improved drug-discovery platforms and new technologies have facilitated the discovery of agents that can alter WNT signalling in preclinical models, thus setting the stage for clinical trials in humans.

  8. Core signaling pathways and new therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Lei; CHEN Ge; ZHAO Yu-pei

    2010-01-01

    Objective Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy that has been resistant to treatment. Advances in cancer genetics have improved our understanding of this disease, but the genetics of pancreatic cancer remain poorly understood. A better understanding of the pathogenic role of specific gene mutations and core signaling pathways would propel the development of more effective treatments. The objective in this review was to highlight recent research that shows promise for new treatments for pancreatic cancer. Data sources All articles cited in this review were mainly searched from PubMed, which were published in English from 1993 to 2009. Study selection Original articles and critical reviews selected were relevant to the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic cancer. Results Dysregulation of core signaling pathways and processes through frequently genetic alterations can explain the major features of pancreatic tumorigenesis. New therapeutic targets based on recent research are emerging that hold promise for the future management of pancreatic cancer. Conclusion New agents used in conjunction with standard radiotherapy and chemotherapy might help to overcome drug resistance by targeting multiple signaling pathways to induce responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells to death signals.

  9. MicroRNA-873 mediates multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells by targeting ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di-di; Li, Xue-Song; Meng, Xiao-Na; Yan, Jing; Zong, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly treated with cisplatin and paclitaxel combination chemotherapy; however, ovarian cancer cells often develop resistance to these drugs. Increasingly, microRNAs (miRNAs) including miR-873 have been implicated in drug resistance in many cancers, but the role of miR-873 in ovarian cancer remains unknown. MTT cell viability assays revealed that the sensitivities of ovarian cancer lines to cisplatin and paclitaxel increased following transfection with miR-873 (P ovarian cancer in vivo (P ovarian cancer lines OVCAR3 and A2780 to cisplatin and paclitaxel, which can be reversed by miR-873 mimic transfection (P ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and paclitaxel by targeting MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that combination therapies with chemotherapy agents and miR-873 may suppress drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  10. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  11. 靶向血管内皮生长因子及其受体的抗肿瘤药物研究进展%Anti-cancer drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factors and receptors: research advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 姚文兵; 徐晨

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical rede in the process of tumor growth and metastasis, and vascular endothelial growth factor and its' receptor (VEGF/VEGFR) signaling pathway is an important mechanism of neovascularization, At present, drug inhibition of angiogenesis has become a significant research topic and a variety of anti-angiogenesis agents aimed at blocking VECF or its receptor-signaling system have been marketed or issued to the clinical trials. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the available information regarding the importance of VEGF/VEGFR in cancer therapy, with a focus on the latest development, clinical use and challenges of the anti-cancer drugs targeting VEGF/VEGFR.%血管生成对肿瘤的生长和转移起着关键作用,血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)及其受体信号通路是调节肿瘤新生血管生成的重要途径,因此,近年来以VEGF及其受体为作用靶标的抗肿瘤血管生成治疗已经成为研究热点,目前已有多种药物上市或处于临床试验阶段.本文主要综述了VEGF及其受体在肿瘤血管生成调节机制中的作用,同时着重介绍靶向VEGF及其受体的抗肿瘤药物的新近研究进展、临床应用及存在的问题.

  12. Drug-loading capacity and nuclear targeting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grafted with anionic amphiphilic copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai HC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hsieh-Chih Tsai,1,* Jeng-Yee Lin,2,* Faiza Maryani,1 Chun-Chiang Huang,1 Toyoko Imae1,31Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this study, three types of hybrid nanotubes (NTs, ie, oxidized multiwalled carbon NTs (COOH MWCNTs, heparin (Hep-conjugated MWCNTs (Hep MWCNTs, and diblock copolymer polyglycolic acid (PGA-co-heparin conjugated to MWCNTs (PGA MWCNTs, were synthesized with improved biocompatibility and drug-loading capacity. Hydrophilic Hep substituents on MWCNTs improved biocompatibility and acted as nucleus-sensitive segments on the CNT carrier, whereas the addition of PGA enhanced drug-loading capacity. In the PGA MWCNT system, the amphiphilic copolymer (PGA-Hep formed micelles on the side walls of CNTs, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The PGA system encapsulated the hydrophobic drug with high efficiency compared to the COOH MWCNT and Hep MWCNT systems. This is because the drug was loaded onto the PGA MWCNTs through hydrophobic forces and onto the CNTs by ∏–∏ stacking interactions. Additionally, most of the current drug-carrier designs that target cancer cells release the drug in the lysosome or cytoplasm. However, nuclear-targeted drug release is expected to kill cancer cells more directly and efficiently. In our study, PGA MWCNT carriers effectively delivered the active anticancer drug doxorubicin into targeted nuclei. This study may provide an effective strategy for the development of carbon-based drug carriers for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. Keywords: carbon nanotube, amphiphilic copolymer, drug loading, nucleus targeting, cancer therapy

  13. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  14. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

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    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  15. Targeted pharmacotherapy after somatic cancer mutation screening [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Thomas M. Polasek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with solid tumours are treated with targeted pharmacotherapy based on the results of genetic testing (‘precision medicine’. This study investigated the use of targeted drugs after OncoFOCUS™+KIT screening in patients with malignant melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer, and then audited the results against the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines. Patients who were not indicated for targeted pharmacotherapy did not receive such treatment (99%, 100/101. Of the patients indicated for targeted drugs, 79% (33/42 received treatment according to NCCN guidelines. In 48% (20/42 of these patients the results from OncoFOCUS™+KIT screening were required for targeted drug selection, with the remaining 52% (22/42 prescribed drugs independent of the screening results for various reasons. This study highlights the growing importance of precision medicine approaches in directing pharmacotherapy in medical oncology.

  16. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-03-13

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  17. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  18. Emerging Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesal C. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. However, despite initial responses, almost all men eventually develop castration refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC and die of their disease. Over the last decade, it has been recognized that despite the failure of ADT, most prostate cancers maintain some dependence on androgen and/or androgen receptor (AR signaling for proliferation. Furthermore, androgen independent molecular pathways have been identified as drivers of continued progression of CRPC. Subsequently, drugs have been developed targeting these pathways, many of which have received regulatory approval. Agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, orteronel (TAK-700, and ARN-509 target androgen signaling. Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, and tasquinimod augment immune-mediated tumor killing. Agents targeting classic tumorogenesis pathways including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1, tumor suppressor, and those which regulate apoptosis and cell cycles are currently being developed. This paper aims to focus on emerging molecular pathways underlying progression of CRPC, and the drugs targeting these pathways, which have recently been approved or have reached advanced stages of development in either phase II or phase III clinical trials.

  19. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    disease-free survival, the majority of breast cancer patients will present recurrent antiestrogen resistant metastatic lesions following prolonged...exposure to these therapies. By investigating how these lesions become resistant to antiestrogen while maintaining expression of ERα, we found...Retreat. Invited oral presentation. C) Other products Nothing to report. Targeting  ESR1-­‐Mutant  Breast  Cancer   W81XWH-­‐14-­‐1-­‐0360

  20. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    technique for treating left-sided breast cancer, which allows sparing of the heart. The Calypso system provides a previously unavailable level of...from both centers. Task 6. Post-prostatectomy Daily Target Guided Radiotherapy Using Real-Time, State-of-the-Art Motion Tracking with the Calypso...the skin surface to track breathing motion during a breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer treatment. Analysis would reveal the

  1. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of ER+ breast cancers harbor expression of the estrogen receptor and are dependent upon its activity for various aspects of the...resistance to current FDA approved ER antagonists, but that more potent and selective estrogen receptor antagonists will be sufficiently active to...antagonists and their potency against ER mutants both in vitro and in vivo . Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer W81XWH-14-1-0359 9 4. Impact A) Impact

  2. Systems Pharmacology‐Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P

    2017-01-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration‐approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products. PMID:28294568

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  5. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  6. Target based drug design - a reality in virtual sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saroj; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2015-01-01

    The target based drug design approaches are a series of computational procedures, including visualization tools, to support the decision systems of drug design/discovery process. In the essence of biological targets shaping the potential lead/drug molecules, this review presents a comprehensive position of different components of target based drug design which include target identification, protein modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, binding/catalytic sites identification, docking, virtual screening, fragment based strategies, substructure treatment of targets in tackling drug resistance, in silico ADMET, structural vaccinology, etc along with the key issues involved therein and some well investigated case studies. The concepts and working of these procedures are critically discussed to arouse interest and to advance the drug research.

  7. Polo-like kinase 1 as target for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiß Lily

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1 is an interesting molecule both as a biomarker and as a target for highly specific cancer therapy for several reasons. Firstly, it is over-expressed in many cancers and can serve as a biomarker to monitor treatment efficacy of Plk1 inhibitors. Furthermore, the Plk1 enzyme is expressed only in dividing cells and is a major regulator of the cell cycle. It controls entry into mitosis and regulates the spindle checkpoint. The expression of Plk1 in normal cells is not nearly as strong as that in cancer cells, which makes Plk1 a discriminating tartget for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RNA interference experiments in vitro and in vivo have indicated that downregulation of Plk1 expression represents an attractive concept for cancer therapy. Over the years, a number of Plk1 inhibitors have been discovered. Many of these inhibitors are substances that compete with ATP for the substrate binding site. The ATP-competitive inhibitor BI 6727 is currently being clinically tested in cancer patients. Another drug in development, poloxin, is the first Polo-box domain inhibitor of Plk1. This compound is a derivative of the natural product, thymoquinone, derived from Nigella sativa. A novel and promising strategy is to synthesize bifunctional inhibitors that combine the high binding affinity of ATP inhibitors with the specificity of competitive inhibitors.

  8. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfen Ma

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differential gene expression profile is negatively correlated with the differentially expressed genes in the target disease. However, many of the potentially useful drugs (PUDs identified by gene expression profile correlation are likely false positives because, in C-Map, the cultured cell lines to which the drug is applied are not derived from diseased tissues. To solve this problem, we developed a combined approach for predicting candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer. We first identified PUDs for pancreatic cancer by using C-Map-based gene expression correlation analyses. We then applied an algorithm (Met-express to predict key pancreatic cancer (KPC enzymes involved in pancreatic cancer metabolism. Finally, we selected candidates from the PUDs by requiring that their targets be KPC enzymes or the substrates/products of KPC enzymes. Using this combined approach, we predicted seven candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer, three of which are supported by literature evidence, and three were experimentally validated to be inhibitory to pancreatic cancer celllines.

  9. Novel epigenetic target therapy for prostate cancer: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Naldi

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap and hormone refractory (DU145 prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs drug delivery system (DDS carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours.

  10. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  11. Assessing drug target association using semantic linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Ding, Ying; Wild, David J

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of public data in chemistry and biology provides new opportunities for large-scale data mining for drug discovery. Systematic integration of these heterogeneous sets and provision of algorithms to data mine the integrated sets would permit investigation of complex mechanisms of action of drugs. In this work we integrated and annotated data from public datasets relating to drugs, chemical compounds, protein targets, diseases, side effects and pathways, building a semantic linked network consisting of over 290,000 nodes and 720,000 edges. We developed a statistical model to assess the association of drug target pairs based on their relation with other linked objects. Validation experiments demonstrate the model can correctly identify known direct drug target pairs with high precision. Indirect drug target pairs (for example drugs which change gene expression level) are also identified but not as strongly as direct pairs. We further calculated the association scores for 157 drugs from 10 disease areas against 1683 human targets, and measured their similarity using a [Formula: see text] score matrix. The similarity network indicates that drugs from the same disease area tend to cluster together in ways that are not captured by structural similarity, with several potential new drug pairings being identified. This work thus provides a novel, validated alternative to existing drug target prediction algorithms. The web service is freely available at: http://chem2bio2rdf.org/slap.

  12. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyshak Alva Venur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6 pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  13. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET] have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”.

  14. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET]) have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc) have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment) has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc) are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In) are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”. PMID:19578524

  15. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    leptin and Ob-R in cancer cells compared to normal cells, makes leptin an ideal drug target for the prevention and treatment of HCC, especially in obese patients. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, leptin, leptin antagonist, leptin signaling, tumor angiogenesis, drug target

  16. Triple-negative breast cancer: new perspectives for targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomao F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Federica Tomao,1 Anselmo Papa,2 Eleonora Zaccarelli,2 Luigi Rossi,2 Davide Caruso,2 Marina Minozzi,2 Patrizia Vici,3 Luigi Frati,4 Silverio Tomao21Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Oncology Unit, Istituto Chirurgico Ortopedico Traumatologico, Latina, 3Division of Medical Oncology B, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Molecular Medicine, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Policlinico “Umberto I”, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, encompassing a large number of entities showing different morphological features and having clinical behaviors. It has became apparent that this diversity may be justified by distinct patterns of genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic aberrations. The identification of gene-expression microarray-based characteristics has led to the identification of at least five breast cancer subgroups: luminal A, luminal B, normal breast-like, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and basal-like. Triple-negative breast cancer is a complex disease diagnosed by immunohistochemistry, and it is characterized by malignant cells not expressing estrogen receptors or progesterone receptors at all, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Along with this knowledge, recent data show that triple-negative breast cancer has specific molecular features that could be possible targets for new biological targeted drugs. The aim of this article is to explore the use of new drugs in this particular setting, which is still associated with poor prognosis and high risk of distant recurrence and death.Keywords: basal-like breast cancer, estrogen–progesterone receptors, gene-expression microarray, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, chemotherapy, target therapy

  17. Importins and exportins as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahipal, Amit; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear transport proteins, importins and exportins (karyopherin-β proteins), may play an important role in cancer by transporting key mediators of oncogenesis across the nuclear membrane in cancer cells. During nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators during the processing of these proteins, aberrant cellular growth signaling and inactivation of apoptosis can occur, both critical to growth and development of tumors. Karyopherin-β proteins bind to these cargo proteins and RanGTP for active transport across the nuclear membrane through the nuclear pore complex. Importins and exportins are overexpressed in multiple tumors including melanoma, pancreatic, breast, colon, gastric, prostate, esophageal, lung cancer, and lymphomas. Furthermore, some of the karyopherin-β proteins such as exportin-1 have been implicated in drug resistance in cancer. Importin and exportin inhibitors are being considered as therapeutic targets against cancer and have shown preclinical anticancer activity. Moreover, synergistic activity has been observed with various chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. However, clinical development of the exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin B was stopped due to adverse events, including vomiting, anorexia, and dehydration. Selinexor, a selective nuclear export inhibitor, is being tested in multiple clinical trials both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy. Selinexor has demonstrated clinical activity in multiple cancers, especially acute myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma. The roles of other importin and exportin inhibitors still need to be investigated clinically. Targeting the key mediators of nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer cells represents a novel strategy in cancer intervention with the potential to significantly affect outcomes.

  18. 'One-pot' synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

    2014-06-13

    A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the 'one pot' method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

  19. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  20. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  1. Targeting cytotoxic T lymphocytes for cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, J; Davies, E. T.

    2004-01-01

    In light of their preeminent role in cellular immunity, there is considerable interest in targeting of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes to cancer. This review summarises the active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches under development to achieve this goal, emphasising how recent advances in tumour immunology and gene transfer have impacted upon this field.

  2. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  3. Targeting EGFR in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto T. Ueno, Dongwei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our preliminary data show that erlotinib inhibits Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC in a xenograft model. However, inhibition of metastasis by erlotinib is accompanied by nonspecific effects because erlotinib can inhibit other kinases; thus, more direct targets that regulate TNBC metastasis need to be identified to improve its therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Drug cocktail optimization in chemotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Preissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP. Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy.

  5. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Dong Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development.

  6. Blood Exosomes Endowed with Magnetic and Targeting Properties for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongzhao; Liu, Chaoyong; Long, Lixia; Ren, Yu; Zhang, Shanshan; Chang, Xiaodan; Qian, Xiaomin; Jia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Jin; Sun, Jinjin; Hou, Xin; Yuan, Xubo; Kang, Chunsheng

    2016-03-22

    Exosomes are a class of naturally occurring nanoparticles that are secreted endogenously by mammalian cells. Clinical applications for exosomes remain a challenge because of their unsuitable donors, low scalability, and insufficient targeting ability. In this study, we developed a dual-functional exosome-based superparamagnetic nanoparticle cluster as a targeted drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The resulting exosome-based drug delivery vehicle exhibits superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, with a stronger response to an external magnetic field than individual superparamagnetic nanoparticles. These properties enable exosomes to be separated from the blood and to target diseased cells. In vivo studies using murine hepatoma 22 subcutaneous cancer cells showed that drug-loaded exosome-based vehicle delivery enhanced cancer targeting under an external magnetic field and suppressed tumor growth. Our developments overcome major barriers to the utility of exosomes for cancer application.

  7. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  8. Lipid-coated polymeric nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Sangeetha; Vaiyapuri, Rajendran; Zhang, Liangfang; Chan, Juliana M

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes have been the platform of choice for nanoparticle-based cancer drug delivery applications over the past decade, but extensive research has revealed their limitations as drug delivery carriers. A hybrid class of nanoparticles, aimed at combining the advantages of both polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, has received attention in recent years. These core/shell type nanoparticles, frequently referred to as lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs), possess several characteristics that make them highly suitable for drug delivery. This review introduces the formulation methods used to synthesize LPNs and discusses the strategies used to treat cancer, such as by targeting the tumor microenvironment or vasculature. Finally, it discusses the challenges that must be overcome to realize the full potential of LPNs in the clinic.

  9. Aptamer-loaded Gold Nanoconstructs for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Duncan Hieu Minh

    Traditional cancer treatments, including chemotherapy, often cause severe side effects in patients. Targeted therapy where tumor cells are targeted via biomarkers overexpressed on the cell surface has been shown to reduce such adverse effects. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently the most common chemotherapeutic agents that bind with high affinity to these cancer markers. However, poor intratumoral uptake of mAb and release of drugs from mAb carriers have been the biggest challenge for this delivery method. As a result, recent work has focused on other strategies to improve the efficacy of drug delivery in targeted therapy. Among potential carriers for drug delivery, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have emerged as one of the most promising vehicles. This thesis describes the development of a drug delivery nanoconstruct that can both target cancer cells and induce therapeutic effects. The nanoconstructs are composed of gold nanostars (AuNS) as delivery vehicles loaded with the DNA aptamer AS1411 that can target the ubiquitous shuttle protein nucleolin (NCL) in various cancer cell types. The gold nanocarrier stabilizes the oligonucleotides for intracellular delivery and promotes high loading densities of the oligonucleotide drugs. We have investigated the interactions of the nanoconstruct with different subcellular compartments of the cancer cells. This physical phenomenon has shown to correlate with the biological activities such as apoptosis and cell death that happen in the cancer cells after incubation with the nanoconstructs. A thorough screening of the nanoconstructs in 13 different cancer cell lines is conducted to narrow down the potential targets for in vivo study. Before testing the in vivo efficacy, we evaluate the toxicity of the nanoconstructs in non-tumor animals, which confirms its safety for further in vivo applications. The accumulation of the nanoconstructs in two different cancerous tumors, however, suggests that further optimization of the design

  10. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Doo Rhee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading to apoptosome formation, which activates the intrinsic pathway. This is modulated by the extent of mitochondrial oxidative stress. The peroxiredoxin (Prx system is a cellular defense system against oxidative stress, and mitochondria in cancer cells are known to contain high levels of Prx III. Here, we review accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress is involved in cancer, and discuss the role of the mitochondrial Prx III antioxidant system as a potential target for cancer therapy. We hope that this review will provide the basis for new strategic approaches in the development of effective cancer treatments.

  11. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  12. Target-based drug discovery for human African trypanosomiasis: selection of molecular target and chemical matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Target-based approaches for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and related parasites can be a valuable route for drug discovery for these diseases. However, care needs to be taken in selection of both the actual drug target and the chemical matter that is developed. In this article, potential criteria to aid target selection are described. Then the physiochemical properties of typical oral drugs are discussed and compared to those of known anti-parasitics.

  13. Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maria Santos Amaral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, who progress after docetaxel therapy, had until very recently, only a few therapeutic options. Recent advances in this field brought about new perspectives in the treatment of this disease. Molecular, basic, and translational research has given us a better understanding on the mechanisms of CRPC. This great investment has turned into a more rational approach to the development of new drugs. Some of the new treatments are already available to our patients outside clinical trials and may include inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis; new chemotherapy agents; bone-targeted therapy; and immunotherapy. This paper aims to review the mechanisms of prostate cancer resistance, possible therapeutic targets, as well as new options to treat CRPC.

  14. Computational optimisation of targeted DNA sequencing for cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2013-01-01

    detection. Dividing 4,467 samples into one discovery and two independent validation cohorts, we show that up to 76% of 10 cancer types harbour at least one mutation in a panel of only 25 genes, with high sensitivity across most tumour types. Our analyses demonstrate that targeting "hotspot" regions would......Despite recent progress thanks to next-generation sequencing technologies, personalised cancer medicine is still hampered by intra-tumour heterogeneity and drug resistance. As most patients with advanced metastatic disease face poor survival, there is need to improve early diagnosis. Analysing...... circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) might represent a non-invasive method to detect mutations in patients, facilitating early detection. In this article, we define reduced gene panels from publicly available datasets as a first step to assess and optimise the potential of targeted ctDNA scans for early tumour...

  15. Integrating Multiscale Modeling with Drug Effects for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangfang L; Oduola, Wasiu O; Qian, Lijun; Dougherty, Edward R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review multiscale modeling for cancer treatment with the incorporation of drug effects from an applied system's pharmacology perspective. Both the classical pharmacology and systems biology are inherently quantitative; however, systems biology focuses more on networks and multi factorial controls over biological processes rather than on drugs and targets in isolation, whereas systems pharmacology has a strong focus on studying drugs with regard to the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relations accompanying drug interactions with multiscale physiology as well as the prediction of dosage-exposure responses and economic potentials of drugs. Thus, it requires multiscale methods to address the need for integrating models from the molecular levels to the cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is a common belief that tumorigenesis and tumor growth can be best understood and tackled by employing and integrating a multifaceted approach that includes in vivo and in vitro experiments, in silico models, multiscale tumor modeling, continuous/discrete modeling, agent-based modeling, and multiscale modeling with PK/PD drug effect inputs. We provide an example application of multiscale modeling employing stochastic hybrid system for a colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with the application of Lapatinib drug. It is observed that the simulation results are similar to those observed from the setup of the wet-lab experiments at the Translational Genomics Research Institute.

  16. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  17. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  18. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  19. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  20. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M, E-mail: akasard@saske.s [Hameln rds a.s., 900 01 Modra (Slovakia)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  1. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  2. Study Progress on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by EGFR-targeted Drug%EGFR靶向治疗非小细胞肺癌研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇

    2013-01-01

    非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)是造成死亡最多的恶性肿瘤之一,发现晚、进展快、预后差,而且对于常规放疗化疗敏感性极低,数十年来其五年生存率一直徘徊在20%以下.EGFR靶向药物的发现为NSCLC的治疗带来了新的希望,以gefitinib(吉非替尼)和erlotinib(厄洛替尼)为代表的EGFR酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor,EGFRTKI)对于携带某些EGFR突变的非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)具有良好的疗效.虽然在EGFR靶向治疗非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)上已经取得了一定成果,但是目前依然有很多相关问题亟待解决.%Of all malignant tumors, non - small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the biggest killers all over the world, normally with a late discovery, a rapid progression and a poor prognosis. NSCLC has a very low sensibility to conventional radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy, which make its five - year survival rate low than 20 % . However, recently the discovery of EGFR- targeted drug brings new hope to NSCLC patients. Represented by gefitinib and erlotinib, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR- TKI) has a good therapeutic effect on a part of NSCLC patients, who have some special EGFR mutations. Even if we get a big step on EGFR- targeted therapy on NSCLC, we still have many problems to solve.

  3. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of immune response to cancer have been studied extensively and great effort has been invested into harnessing the therapeutic potential of the immune system. Immunotherapies have seen significant advances in the past 20 years, but the full potential of protective and therapeutic...... cancer immunotherapies has yet to be fulfilled. The insufficient efficacy of existing treatments can be attributed to a number of biological and technical issues. In this review, we detail the current limitations of immunotherapy target selection and design, and review computational methods to streamline...

  4. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem Cells with Alpha-Particle Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Jens; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    Modern molecular and radiopharmaceutical development has brought the promise of tumor-selective delivery of antibody–drug conjugates to tumor cells for the diagnosis and treatment of primary and disseminated tumor disease. The classical mode of discourse regarding targeted therapy has been that the antigen targeted must be highly and homogenously expressed in the tumor cell population, and at the same time exhibit low expression in healthy tissue. However, there is increasing evidence that the reason cancer patients are not cured by current protocols is that there exist subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional therapy including radioresistance and that these cells express other target antigens than the bulk of the tumor cells. These types of cells are often referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSCs are tumorigenic and have the ability to give rise to all types of cells found in a cancerous disease through the processes of self-renewal and differentiation. If the CSCs are not eradicated, the cancer is likely to recur after therapy. Due to some of the characteristics of alpha particles, such as short path length and high density of energy depositions per distance traveled in tissue, they are especially well suited for use in targeted therapies against microscopic cancerous disease. The characteristics of alpha particles further make it possible to minimize the irradiation of non-targeted surrounding healthy tissue, but most importantly, make it possible to deliver high-absorbed doses locally and therefore eradicating small tumor cell clusters on the submillimeter level, or even single tumor cells. When alpha particles pass through a cell, they cause severe damage to the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, including double-strand breaks of DNA that are very difficult to repair for the cell. This means that very few hits to a cell by alpha particles are needed in order to cause cell death, enabling killing of cells, such as CSCs

  5. Metformin: An Emerging New Therapeutic Option for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Rattan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is an intricate process by which a small number of cancer cells from the primary tumor site undergo numerous alterations, which enables them to form secondary tumors at another and often multiple sites in the host. Transition of a cancer cell from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype is thought to be the first step in the progression of metastasis. Recently, the recognition of cancer stem cells has added to the perplexity in understanding metastasis, as studies suggest cancer stem cells to be the originators of metastasis. All current and investigative drugs have been unable to prevent or reverse metastasis, as a result of which most metastatic cancers are incurable. A potential drug that can be considered is metformin, an oral hypoglycemic drug. In this review we discuss the potential of metformin in targeting both epithelial to mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells in combating cancer metastases.

  6. Evaluation of Giardia lamblia thioredoxin reductase as drug activating enzyme and as drug target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2016-12-01

    Our results constitute first direct evidence for the notion that TrxR is an activator of metronidazole and furazolidone but rather question that it is a relevant drug target of presently used antigiardial drugs.

  7. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardo A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Accardo,1 Luigi Aloj,2 Michela Aurilio,2 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Diego Tesauro11Centro interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPeB, Department of Pharmacy and Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBB CNR, University of Naples “Federico II”, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs; and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors.Keywords: receptors binding peptides, drug delivery

  8. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  9. A meta-analysis for CXCR4 as a prognostic marker and potential drug target in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Changyuan Zhang,1,* Jie Li,2,* Yi Han,3 Jian Jiang4 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region People’s Hospital, Inner Mongolia; 2Department of Oncology, 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Beijing Chest Hospital, 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Recent reports have shown that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 is a candidate oncogene in several types of human tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, the correlation between CXCR4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains controversial and has not been emphasized. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the association of CXCR4 expression with the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics by performing a meta-analysis.Methods: A detailed literature search was carried out for related research publications. Only articles in which CXCR4 expression was detected by immunohistochemical staining were included. Odds ratio (OR and hazard ratio (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated and summarized.Results: Final analysis of 1,872 NSCLC patients from 19 eligible studies was performed. We observed that CXCR4 expression was significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, based on the pooled OR from ten studies, including 678 NSCLCs and 189 normal lung tissues (OR =16.66, 95% CI =6.94–40.02, P<0.00001. CXCR4 expression was also significantly associated with clinical stages, metastatic status, and overall survival (OS in NSCLC patients. In addition, CXCR4 mRNA high expression was found to correlate with worse OS of all NSCLC patients followed for 20 years, HR =1.24, P=0.0047.Conclusion: The present meta-analysis indicated that CXCR4 protein expression is associated with an increased risk and worse survival in NSCLC patients

  10. Efficient intracellular delivery of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine into colon cancer cells by targeted immunoliposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, GA; Kamps, JAAM; Scherphof, GL

    2002-01-01

    Immunoliposomes, liposomes with monoclonal antibodies attached, are being developed for targeting the anti-cancer drug 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) to colon cancer cells. A monoclonal antibody against the rat colon carcinoma CC531 was covalently coupled to liposomes containing a dipalmitoylated d

  11. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  12. New use of prescription drugs prior to a cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    as for nine pre-specified individual drug classes, representing drug treatment likely to be prescribed for symptoms of the given cancers. RESULTS: The incidence rate for new drug treatment among cancer cases was stable around 130 per 1000 persons per month until 6 months prior to cancer diagnosis where......PURPOSE: Cancers often have considerable induction periods. This confers a risk of reverse causation bias in studies of cancer risk associated with drug use, as early symptoms of a yet undiagnosed cancer might lead to drug treatment in the period leading up to the diagnosis. This bias can...... drugs was assessed prior to their cancer diagnosis as well as among population controls (n = 1 402 400). Analyses were conducted for all cancers and for breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer individually. Further, analyses were performed for a composite measure of all incident drug use as well...

  13. Advances in Smoothened-targeting therapies for pancreatic cancer: implication for drug discovery from herbal medicines%胰腺癌SMO靶标治疗研究启示:从中药中发现新药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩尽斌; 花永强; 陈联誉; 刘鲁明

    2012-01-01

    跨膜蛋白Smoothened(SMO)是音猬因子(sonic hedgehog homology,SHH)信号转导通路的主要成员,在SHH通信过程里发挥桥梁作用.在多种肿瘤组织中均可以检测到SHH的异常表达,胰腺癌干细胞SHH信号的表达明显高于普通胰腺癌细胞.SHH信号与肿瘤干细胞的自我复制,肿瘤血管和基质形成密切相关.使用以环巴胺、GDC-0449等SMO拮抗剂可以抑制SHH信号的异常转导,有效阻止肿瘤的生长和转移.目前已有多种SMO拮抗剂作为抗肿瘤药物进入Ⅰ期或Ⅱ期临床试验,已经有以SMO拮抗剂治疗胰腺癌的Ⅰ期临床试验.作为经典的SMO拮抗剂,环巴胺是从传统药用植物中提取出来的生物碱,这可能为中医药研究者提供思路,从中药中研发更加有效的SMO拮抗剂.%Smoothened (SMO) is a member of sonic hedgehog homology (SHH) signaling pathway.It plays a key role as a bridge between patched-1 (PTCH-1) and Gli.Aberrant SHH expression can be detected in various malignant tissues,and the expression in pancreatic cancer stem cells is higher apparently.SHH signals are closely associated with self-duplication of cancer stem cells,formation of tumor vessels as well as matrixes.SMO antagonists such as cyclopamine,GDC-0449 and so on show potential to inhibit activity of SHH signaling,and arrest the growth as well as metastases of tumors.Recently,a few of SMO antagonists have been studied in phase Ⅰ clinical trials and some are in phase Ⅱ,meanwhile,phase Ⅰ or Ⅱ trials of SMO antagonists to treat pancreatic cancer are performed currently.As the classical SMO antagonist,cyclopamine is extracted from a medicinal plant.Perhaps researchers may be able to determine more effective SMO-targeting drugs from herbal medicines in the future.

  14. Anti-cancer drug discovery: update and comparisons in yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangxun; Chen, Liang; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of novel cancer chemotherapeutics focuses on screening and identifying compounds that can target 'cancer-specific' biological processes while causing minimal toxicity to non-tumor cells. Alternatively, model organisms with highly conserved cancer-related cellular processes relative to human cells may offer new opportunities for anticancer drug discovery when combined with chemical screening. Some organisms used for chemotherapeutic discovery include yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish which are similar in important ways relevant to cancer study but offer distinct advantages as well. Here, we describe these model attributes and the rationale for using them in cancer drug screening research.

  15. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways.

  16. Cancer Exosomes as Mediators of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Maria do Rosário; Pedro, Ana; Lyden, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, several studies demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is a critical determinant not only of tumor progression and metastasis, but also of resistance to therapy. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin, which contain mRNAs, DNA fragments, and proteins, and are released by many different cell types, including cancer cells. Mounting evidence has shown that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with the tumor microenvironment. Understanding how exosomes and the tumor microenvironment impact drug resistance will allow novel and better strategies to overcome drug resistance and treat cancer. Here, we describe a technique for exosome purification from cell culture, and fresh and frozen plasma, and further analysis by electron microscopy, NanoSight microscope, and Western blot.

  17. Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0030 TITLE: Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D...Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design DAMD17-03-1-0030 6. A UTHOR(S) Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...Report: by Principal Investigator - Michael K. Riscoe, Ph.D. DAMD1 7-03-1-0030: "Hemozoin Formation as a Target for Antimalarial Drug Design " INTRODUCTION

  18. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  19. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  20. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  1. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous