WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer drug development

  1. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  2. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system.

  3. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  4. 78 FR 33851 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... No. FDA-2013-N-0596] Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and... Patient-Focused Drug Development for lung cancer. Patient-Focused Drug Development is part of FDA's... cancer on daily life as well as the available therapies for lung cancer. DATES: The public meeting...

  5. 78 FR 40485 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of... lung cancer patient-focused drug development. In the Federal Register of June 5, 2013 (78 FR 33581... comment on lung cancer patient- focused drug development and explained that the comment period would...

  6. Microvascularized 3D Breast Cancer Constructs for Drug Testing and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Constructs for Drug Testing and Development. Podium presentation at the 2014 World Congress of Biomechanics , Boston, Massachusetts, July 2014. Marshall LE...NIH for potential funding as an R21 ( Biomechanics of the Stromal Regulation of DCIS, Berry and Frost are Co-PIs). REFERENCES: Pertinent references...lymphoma, melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, testicular cancer, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, thyroid cancer

  7. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of ion...

  8. [Development of anti-cancer drugs under new renewed GCP--from the viewpoint of drug development company developer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, T; Kobayashi, T; Inoue, K; Yanagi, Y; Yamada, Y

    1998-04-01

    During the past 7 years since the enforcement of Japan's first GCP in October 1990, various standards and guidelines have been introduced in Japan. On the other hand, the harmonization of GCP has been the subject of major discussion at ICH in order to allow the mutual acceptance of clinical data from different countries. In order to further improve the reliability and consistency of clinical data and the ethics of clinical trials in Japan, the new GCP was enforced in April 1997. A clinical study is conducted by the sponsor, but will only be successful with the collaboration of trial subjects, medical institutions, heads of medical institutions, investigators, subinvestigators, pharmacists, nurses, laboratory technicians, and other assisting staff. Before the full enforcement of the new GCP, we, as sponsors of clinical trials, carried out a survey of the current status of clinical trials centering on the reactions of medical institutions to the new GCP, future of clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs in Japan, and differences in time from clinical trials to registration in Japan, the United State and Europe. We sent a questionnaire by facsimile to 21 pharmaceutical companies which have developed or are developing anti-cancer drugs and obtained replies from 20 companies (95%) from August 25 to 30, 1997. This paper reports issues concerning clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs based on the results of our survey.

  9. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  10. Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials and Drug Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0639 TITLE: Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials and Drug Approval PRINCIPAL...SEP 2014 – 29 SEP 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0639 Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer...standard methods for measuring pain palliation and pain progression in prostate cancer clinical trials that are feasible, methodologically rigorous, and

  11. Cancer epigenetics drug discovery and development: the challenge of hitting the mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M; Tummino, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been rapidly expanding evidence of epigenetic dysregulation in cancer, in which histone and DNA modification play a critical role in tumor growth and survival. These findings have gained the attention of the drug discovery and development community, and offer the potential for a second generation of cancer epigenetic agents for patients following the approved "first generation" of DNA methylation (e.g., Dacogen, Vidaza) and broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors (e.g., Vorinostat, Romidepsin). This Review provides an analysis of prospects for discovery and development of novel cancer agents that target epigenetic proteins. We will examine key examples of epigenetic dysregulation in tumors as well as challenges to epigenetic drug discovery with emerging biology and novel classes of drug targets. We will also highlight recent successes in cancer epigenetics drug discovery and consider important factors for clinical success in this burgeoning area.

  12. Targeting DDX3 in cancer: personalized drug development and delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer begins when a cell in an organ of our body starts to grow uncontrollably. Only recently has it become clear that targeting the cancer cells’ dependency on specific proteins, rather than their origin, has greater therapeutic potential. The vast majority of potential targets for cancer therapy

  13. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attent...

  14. PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PREVENT program provides a structure for the introduction of new agents, drugs and vaccines to inhibit, retard or reverse the cancer process. The program was designed to optimize translational opportunities from discovery to the clinic, and provide a mechanism to identify and study efficacy and pharmacodynamics biomarkers that will help in phase II trials to evaluate drug effects.  | Research pipeline for new prevention interventions and biomarkers headed toward clinical trials.

  15. Nano-mechanical Phenotype as a Promising Biomarker to Evaluate Cancer Development, Progression, and Anti-cancer Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeun

    2016-06-01

    Since various bio-mechanical assays have been introduced for studying mechanical properties of biological samples, much progress has been made in cancer biology. It has been noted that enhanced mechanical deformability can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis. The relation between mechanical compliances and the metastatic potential of cancer cells has been suggested to be a promising prognostic marker. Although it is yet to be conclusive about its clinical application due to the complexity in the tissue integrity, the nano-mechanical compliance of human cell samples has been evaluated by several groups as a promising marker in diagnosing cancer development and anticipating its progression. In this review, we address the mechanical properties of diverse cancer cells obtained by atomic force microscopy-based indentation experiments and reiterate prognostic relations between the nano-mechanical compliance and cancer progression. We also review the nano-mechanical responses of cancer cells to the anti-cancer drug treatment in order to interrogate a possible use of nano-mechanical compliance as a means to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs.

  16. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  17. New cast for a new era: preclinical cancer drug development revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Kung, Andrew L.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted agents promise to revolutionize therapeutics by reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. However, despite an urgent need for more effective anticancer compounds, current preclinical drug evaluations largely fail to satisfy the demand. New preclinical strategies, including the improvement of sophisticated mouse models and co-clinical study designs, are being used to augment the predictive value of animal-based translational cancer research. Here, we review the development of successful preclinical antineoplastic agents, their associated limitations, and alternative methods to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:23999436

  18. Use of Nanotechnology to Develop Multi-Drug Inhibitors For Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Raghavendra; Jones, Nathan R; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Robertson, Gavin P

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic agents that inhibit a single target often cannot combat a multifactorial disease such as cancer. Thus, multi-target inhibitors (MTIs) are needed to circumvent complications such as the development of resistance. There are two predominant types of MTIs, (a) single drug inhibitor (SDIs) that affect multiple pathways simultaneously, and (b) combinatorial agents or multi-drug inhibitors (MDIs) that inhibit multiple pathways. Single agent multi-target kinase inhibitors are amongst the most prominent class of compounds belonging to the former, whereas the latter includes many different classes of combinatorial agents that have been used to achieve synergistic efficacy against cancer. Safe delivery and accumulation at the tumor site is of paramount importance for MTIs because inhibition of multiple key signaling pathways has the potential to lead to systemic toxicity. For this reason, the development of drug delivery mechanisms using nanotechnology is preferable in order to ensure that the MDIs accumulate in the tumor vasculature, thereby increasing efficacy and minimizing off-target and systemic side effects. This review will discuss how nanotechnology can be used for the development of MTIs for cancer therapy and also it concludes with a discussion of the future of nanoparticle-based MTIs as well as the continuing obstacles being faced during the development of these unique agents.'

  19. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development: an ideal model in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chism, David D; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been shown to confer a survival advantage in two randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis. Despite level 1 evidence supporting its benefit, utilization remains dismal with nearly one-half of patients ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy because of renal dysfunction, impaired performance status, and/or coexisting medical problems. This situation highlights the need for the development of novel therapies for the management of MIBC, a disease with a lethal phenotype. The neoadjuvant paradigm in bladder cancer offers many advantages for accelerated drug development. First, there is a greater likelihood of successful therapy at an earlier disease state that may be characterized by less genomic instability compared with the metastatic setting, with an early readout of activity with results determined in months rather than years. Second, pre- and post-treatment tumor tissue collection in patients with MIBC is performed as the standard of care without the need for research-directed biopsies, allowing for the ability to perform important correlative studies and to monitor tumor response to therapy in "real time." Third, pathological complete response (pT0) predicts for improved outcome in patients with MIBC. Fourth, there is a strong biological rationale with rapidly accumulating evidence for actionable targets in bladder cancer. This review focuses on the neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development using bladder cancer as the ideal model.

  8. Neoadjuvant therapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a model for rational accelerated drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balar, Arjun V; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2015-05-01

    Since the advent of cisplatin-based combination therapy in the management of muscle-invasive and advanced bladder cancer, there has been little progress in improving outcomes for patients. Novel therapies beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy are needed. The neoadjuvant paradigm lends to acquiring ample pretreatment and posttreatment tumor tissue as a standard of care, which enables comprehensive biomarker analyses to better understand mechanisms of both response and resistance, which will aid drug development. This article discusses the evolution of neoadjuvant therapy as standard treatment and the role it may serve toward the development of novel therapies.

  9. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) ...

  11. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  12. The role of the Wnt signaling pathway in cancer stem cells: prospects for drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Mi Kim,1 Michael Kahn2,3 1Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Pathology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, 3Norris Comprehensive Cancer Research Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also known as tumor initiating cells are now considered to be the root cause of most if not all cancers, evading treatment and giving rise to disease relapse. They have become a central focus in new drug development. Prospective identification, understanding the key pathways that maintain CSCs, and being able to target CSCs, particularly if the normal stem cell population could be spared, could offer an incredible therapeutic advantage. The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance of tissues and organs through their respective somatic stem cells and in the CSC/tumor initiating cell population. Aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types. Therefore, the ability to safely target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise to target CSCs. However, just like the sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review recent efforts in modulating the Wnt signaling cascade and critically analyze therapeutic approaches at various stages of development. Keywords: beta-catenin, CBP, p300, wnt inhibition

  13. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  14. In vitro development of chemotherapy and targeted therapy drug-resistant cancer cell lines: A practical guide with case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eMcDermott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3-18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval and optimising the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between 2-8 fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically-relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299, H460 and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144 cell lines. Continuous selection produced lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954. Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical drug

  15. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  16. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harati, Sahar; Cooper, Lee A D; Moran, Josue D; Giuste, Felipe O; Du, Yuhong; Ivanov, Andrei A; Johns, Margaret A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Moreno, Carlos S

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology. Here we introduce a computational method (MEDICI) to predict PPI essentiality by combining gene knockdown studies with network models of protein interaction pathways in an analytic framework. Our method uses network topology to model how gene silencing can disrupt PPIs, relating the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs to experimentally observed protein essentialities. This model is then deconvolved to recover the unknown essentialities of individual PPIs. We demonstrate the validity of our approach via prediction of sensitivities to compounds based on PPI essentiality and differences in essentiality based on genetic mutations. We further show that lung cancer patients have improved overall survival when specific PPIs are no longer present, suggesting that these PPIs may be potentially new targets for therapeutic development. Software is freely available at https://github.com/cooperlab/MEDICI. Datasets are available at https://ctd2.nci.nih.gov/dataPortal.

  19. Urinary bladder cancer in dogs, a naturally occurring model for cancer biology and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Deborah W; Ramos-Vara, José A; Moore, George E; Dhawan, Deepika; Bonney, Patty L; Young, Kirsten E

    2014-01-01

    Each year more than 65,000 people are diagnosed with urinary bladder cancer, and more than 14,000 people die from the disease in the United States. Studies in relevant animal models are essential to improve the management of bladder cancer. Naturally occurring bladder cancer in dogs very closely mimics human invasive bladder cancer, specifically high-grade invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; also referred to as invasive urothelial carcinoma) in cellular and molecular features; biological behavior, including sites and frequency of metastasis; and response to therapy. Canine bladder cancer complements experimentally induced rodent tumors in regard to animal models of bladder cancer. Results of cellular and molecular studies and -omics analyses in dogs are expected to lead to improved detection of TCC and preneoplastic lesions, earlier intervention, better prediction of patient outcome, and more effective TCC management overall. Studies in dogs are being used to help define heritable risks (through very strong breed-associated risk) and environment risks and to evaluate prevention and treatment approaches that benefit humans as well as dogs. Clinical treatment trials in pet dogs with TCC are considered a win-win scenario by clinician scientists and pet owners. The individual dog benefits from effective treatment, the results are expected to help other dogs, and the findings are expected to ultimately help humans with TCC. This article provides an overview of canine TCC, a summary of the similarities and differences between canine and human invasive TCC, and examples of the types of valuable translational research that can be done using dogs with naturally occurring TCC.

  20. Exosomes in cancer development, metastasis, and drug resistance: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S; Bao, Bin; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-12-01

    Trafficking of biological material across membranes is an evolutionary conserved mechanism and is part of any normal cell homeostasis. Such transport is composed of active, passive, export through microparticles, and vesicular transport (exosomes) that collectively maintain proper compartmentalization of important micro- and macromolecules. In pathological states, such as cancer, aberrant activity of the export machinery results in expulsion of a number of key proteins and microRNAs resulting in their misexpression. Exosome-mediated expulsion of intracellular drugs could be another barrier in the proper action of most of the commonly used therapeutics, targeted agents, and their intracellular metabolites. Over the last decade, a number of studies have revealed that exosomes cross-talk and/or influence major tumor-related pathways, such as hypoxia-driven epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cancer stemness, angiogenesis, and metastasis involving many cell types within the tumor microenvironment. Emerging evidence suggests that exosome-secreted proteins can also propel fibroblast growth, resulting in desmoplastic reaction, a major barrier in effective cancer drug delivery. This comprehensive review highlights the advancements in the understanding of the biology of exosomes secretions and the consequence on cancer drug resistance. We propose that the successful combination of cancer treatments to tackle exosome-mediated drug resistance requires an interdisciplinary understanding of these cellular exclusion mechanisms, and how secreted biomolecules are involved in cellular cross-talk within the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances that have taken place in the past decade, including the development of novel molecular targeted agents, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of cancer treatment. In breast cancer, anthracyclines and taxanes are the two main chemotherapeutic options used on a routine...... basis. Although effective, their usefulness is limited by the inevitable development of resistance, a lack of response to drug-induced cancer cell death. A large body of research has resulted in the characterization of a plethora of mechanisms involved in resistance; ATP-binding cassette transporter...

  2. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology.

  3. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prostate cancer. The list includes generic ...

  4. Network-based approaches for drug response prediction and targeted therapy development in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, Mathurin; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei; Kuperstein, Inna

    2015-08-21

    Signaling pathways implicated in cancer create a complex network with numerous regulatory loops and redundant pathways. This complexity explains frequent failure of one-drug-one-target paradigm of treatment, resulting in drug resistance in patients. To overcome the robustness of cell signaling network, cancer treatment should be extended to a combination therapy approach. Integrating and analyzing patient high-throughput data together with the information about biological signaling machinery may help deciphering molecular patterns specific to each patient and finding the best combinations of candidates for therapeutic targeting. We review state of the art in the field of targeted cancer medicine from the computational systems biology perspective. We summarize major signaling network resources and describe their characteristics with respect to applicability for drug response prediction and intervention targets suggestion. Thus discuss methods for prediction of drug sensitivity and intervention combinations using signaling networks together with high-throughput data. Gradual integration of these approaches into clinical routine will improve prediction of response to standard treatments and adjustment of intervention schemes.

  5. Emory University: MEDICI (Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions) for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has developed a computational methodology to combine high-throughput knockdown data with known protein network topologies to infer the importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for the survival of cancer cells.  Applying these data to the Achilles shRNA results, the CCLE cell line characterizations, and known and newly identified PPIs provides novel insights for potential new drug targets for cancer therapies and identifies important PPI hubs.

  6. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Development Drugs Against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia eVasconcelos-dos-Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc, and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac, donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs.

  7. Scaffold Repurposing of Old Drugs Towards New Cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Wu, Jianlei; Gao, Yu; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    As commented by the Nobelist James Black that "The most fruitful basis of the discovery of a new drug is to start with an old drug", drug repurposing represents an attractive drug discovery strategy. Despite the success of several repurposed drugs on the market, the ultimate therapeutic potential of a large number of non-cancer drugs is hindered during their repositioning due to various issues including the limited efficacy and intellectual property. With the increasing knowledge about the pharmacological properties and newly identified targets, the scaffolds of the old drugs emerge as a great treasure-trove towards new cancer drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of novel small molecules for cancer therapy by scaffold repurposing with highlighted examples. The relevant strategies, advantages, challenges and future research directions associated with this approach are also discussed.

  8. New drugs in gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, A; Munster, P; Munster, P; Spriggs, D R

    2001-04-01

    The implementation of new drug treatments has improved the prognosis for advanced cancers of the cervix, uterus, and ovary. Platinum analogs are the most effective drugs in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Other drugs, such as oxaliplatin, have been proposed as a rational treatment of platinum refractory ovarian cancer. Epothilones are also being studied in clinical trials, as are histone deacetylase inhibitors. Several promising agents may soon receive Food and Drug Administration approval.

  9. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Device Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Pin it Email Print Step 1 Discovery and Development Discovery and Development Research for a new drug ...

  10. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, David G

    2015-01-01

    Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP). The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a) evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA), b) examine measures of gene expression (GE), copy number (CN) and mutation status (MUT) biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c) conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d) assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  11. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Covell

    Full Text Available Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP. The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA, b examine measures of gene expression (GE, copy number (CN and mutation status (MUT biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA, for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  12. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  14. 1+1=? Combinations and combination strategies in early cancer-drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Hamberg, Paul

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The path towards an established medical anticancer treatment is a long and winding road. After thorough pre-clinical studies, novel drugs or combinations of drugs enter clinical development usually in a so-called phase I dose-finding study. These studies primarily aim to determine the dose that can safely be administered and is recommended for further studies. Subsequently, in phase II studies patients with a specific tumor entity are enrolled to screen whether in...

  15. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine Drugs Approved to Treat Cervical Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Blenoxane (Bleomycin) Bleomycin Hycamtin (Topotecan ...

  16. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel Doxorubicin Hydrochloride 5-FU (Fluorouracil ...

  18. Development of special medical foods and botanical drugs using HemoHIM for cancer patients during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran

    2010-02-15

    In vivo evaluation on the reductive effects of HemoHIM on the side-effects of radiation and anticancer drug treatment. - Evaluation on the promoting effects of HemoHIM on the tumor growth inhibitory activities of radiation and anticancer drug(cisplatin) in tumor-bearing mice. - Evaluation of the reductive effects of HemoHIM on the immune suppressive side-effects of radiation and anticancer drug(cisplatin) in tumor-bearing mice. - Evaluation of reductive effects of HemoHIM on the self-renewal tissue(intestine) damage of radiation and anticancer drug(5-FU) in mice. {center_dot} Assessment of toxicological safety of HemoHIM (GLP) and establishment of analytical methods for active/index components of HemoHIM - Assurance of toxicological safety in single-dose and 3 month repeat-dose toxicity test in rats - Establishment of analytical methods for active/index compounds and content analysis result in various production lots. {center_dot} Production of Special Medical Food pilot products for cancer patients and development of dosage forms for the natural new drugs. - Establishment of optimal formulations including HemoHIM for the Special Medical Food - Production of Special Medical Food pilot products for clinical test, analysis of nutrients, and official declaration of food production - Establishment of production process of HemoHIM for natural drug and production of pilot products for toxicity tests - Development of drug dosage forms of HemoHIM (tablet, granule, capsule) {center_dot} Clinical evaluation of HemoHIM on reduction of side-effects of radiation and chemotherapy in cancer patients - Subjects: breast cancer patients who completed surgical operation and chemotherapy, HemoHIM administration during and after the radiation therapy (HemoHIM group: 15, placebo group 13) - Administration period: 3 months from few days before RT commencement - Results - Improvement of immunological biomarkers (immune cell subpopulations, cytokine production) - Reduction of and enhanced

  19. Predictive biomarkers in precision medicine and drug development against lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Bingliang; Mehran, Reza J; Heymach, John V.; Swisher, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of various cancers has shown that cancers with the same origins, histopathologic diagnoses, and clinical stages can be highly heterogeneous in their genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause tumorigenesis. A number of cancer driver genes with functional abnormalities that trigger malignant transformation and that are required for the survival of cancer cells have been identified. Therapeutic agents targeting some of these cancer drivers have been successfull...

  20. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer strategy for new drug development in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Denis; Brandes, Alba A; van den Bent, Martin

    2003-12-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) has carried out clinical trials for nearly 30 years. During this time, several disease-oriented groups within the EORTC have been shaped by rapidly changing regulations in the area of drug development. Continual networking, dissemination of knowledge, and the establishment of specialized administrative units have allowed the EORTC to play a leading role in the development of improved treatment options for patients with brain tumors. Recently, the EORTC Brain Tumor Group and the EORTC New Drug Development Group have been integrated to create a network of institutions dedicated to screening new chemotherapy agents for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. Indeed, several new regimens and agents have already been investigated by this collaboration. Most notable are the recently closed study on temozolomide (Temodar [US], Temodal [international]; Schering-Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ) in the adjuvant setting and in combination with radiotherapy in patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, and the ongoing study on oral STI571 for the treatment of gliomas. Within the current networks, a well-defined strategy has been implemented to select specific and targeted agents for the drug screening process. By sharing their expertise with the EORTC networks, medical oncologists, neuro-oncologists, and radiologists can assist in the clinical development of potentially active agents in patients with brain tumors.

  1. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    A rapidly expanding understanding of molecular derangements in cancer cell function has led to the development of selective, targeted chemotherapeutic agents. Growth factor signal transduction networks are frequently activated in an aberrant fashion, particularly through the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). This has spurred an intensive effort to develop receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKI) that are targeted to specific receptors, or receptor subfamilies. Chapter 1 reviews the pharmacology, preclinical, and clinical aspects of RTKIs that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR inhibitors demonstrate significant success at inhibiting phosphorylation-based signaling pathways that promote cancer cell proliferation. Additionally RTKIs have physicochemical and structural characteristics that enable them to function as inhibitors of multi-drug resistance transport proteins. Thus EGFR inhibitors and other RTKIs have both on-target and off-target activities that could be beneficial in cancer therapy. However, these agents exert a number of side effects, some of which arise from their hydrophobic nature and large in vivo volume of distribution. Side effects of the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib include skin rash, severe myelotoxicity when combined with certain chemotherapeutic agents, and impairment of the blood brain barrier to xenobiotics. Weighing the preclinical and clinical observations with the EGFR inhibitors, we developed the primary overall hypothesis of this research: that drug-carrier formulations of RTKIs such as the EGFR inhibitors could be developed based on nanoparticulate liposomal carriers. Theoretically, this carrier strategy would ameliorate toxicity and improve the biodistribution and tumor selectivity of these agents. We hypothesized specifically that liposomal formulations could shift the biodistribution of EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib away from skin, bone marrow, and the blood brain barrier, and toward solid tumors

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Fluorescent Antibody-Drug Conjugate for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Knutson

    Full Text Available Antibodies are widely available and cost-effective research tools in life science, and antibody conjugates are now extensively used for targeted therapy, immunohistochemical staining, or in vivo diagnostic imaging of cancer. Significant advances in site-specific antibody labeling technologies have enabled the production of highly characterized and homogenous conjugates for biomedical purposes, and some recent studies have utilized site-specific labeling to synthesize bifunctional antibody conjugates with both imaging and drug delivery properties. While these advances are important for the clinical safety and efficacy of such biologics, these techniques can also be difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. Furthermore, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs used for tumor treatment generally remain distinct from conjugates used for diagnosis. Thus, there exists a need to develop simple dual-labeling methods for efficient therapeutic and diagnostic evaluation of antibody conjugates in pre-clinical model systems. Here, we present a rapid and simple method utilizing commercially available reagents for synthesizing a dual-labeled fluorescent ADC. Further, we demonstrate the fluorescent ADC's utility for simultaneous targeted therapy and molecular imaging of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Employing non-site-specific, amine-reactive chemistry, our novel biopharmaceutical theranostic is a monoclonal antibody specific for a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA biomarker conjugated to both paclitaxel and a near-infrared (NIR, polyethylene glycol modified (PEGylated fluorophore (DyLight™ 680-4xPEG. Using in vitro systems, we demonstrate that this fluorescent ADC selectively binds a CEA-positive pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3 in immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry, exhibits efficient internalization kinetics, and is cytotoxic. Model studies using a xenograft of BxPC-3 cells in athymic mice also show the fluorescent ADC's efficacy in detecting tumors in

  3. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti......-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill...... are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process...

  4. Nonestrogenic drugs and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, D A; Jick, H; Hunter, J R; Stergachis, A; Madsen, S

    1982-08-01

    The relation between breast cancer and selected nonestrogenic drugs was evaluated in the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington, a prepaid health care organization with computerized information on diagnoses and outpatient drug use. No important positive associations with breast cancer were found in a follow-up study of 302 women aged 35-74 years. These women were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 1977-1980 and were studied in relation to exposure in the six months prior to diagnosis to one or more of the following drugs: diazepam, digitalis glycosides, medroxyprogesterone acetate, methyldopa, metronidazole, phenothiazines, tricyclic antidepressants, thiazides, thyroid/levothyroxine sodium, or spironolactone. A modest association between recent reserpine use and breast cancer was present (risk ratio = 1.7, 90% confidence interval 0.9-3.3).

  5. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with impaired function of PSA enhancer RNA (eRNA...cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with impaired function of PSA

  6. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AR variants in prostate cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with...full-length AR and truncated AR variants in prostate cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven

  7. GRP94/gp96 in Cancer: Biology, Structure, Immunology, and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bill X; Hong, Feng; Zhang, Yongliang; Ansa-Addo, Ephraim; Li, Zihai

    2016-01-01

    As an endoplasmic reticulum heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) paralog, GRP94 (glucose-regulated protein 94)/gp96 (hereafter referred to as GRP94) has been shown to be an essential master chaperone for multiple receptors including Toll-like receptors, Wnt coreceptors, and integrins. Clinically, expression of GRP94 correlates with advanced stage and poor survival in a variety of cancers. Recent preclinical studies have also revealed that GRP94 expression is closely linked to cancer growth and metastasis in melanoma, ovarian cancer, multiple myeloma, lung cancer, and inflammation-associated colon cancer. Thus, GRP94 is an attractive therapeutic target in a number of malignancies. The chaperone function of GRP94 depends on its ATPase domain, which is structurally distinct from HSP90, allowing design of highly selective GRP94-targeted inhibitors. In this chapter, we discuss the biology and structure-function relationship of GRP94. We also summarize the immunological roles of GRP94 based on the studies documented over the last two decades, as these pertain to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Finally, the structure-based rationale for the design of selective small-molecule inhibitors of GRP94 and their potential application in the treatment of cancer are highlighted.

  8. Development of cell-based quantitative evaluation method for cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs for apoptosis by high precision surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Toshihiro; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Kosaihira, Atsushi; Shibata, Junko

    2008-04-01

    In vitro rapid and quantitative cell-based assay is demanded to verify the efficacy prediction of cancer drugs since a cancer patient may have unconventional aspects of tumor development. Here, we show the rapid and non-label quantitative verifying method and instrumentation of apoptosis for cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs (Roscovitine and D-allose) by reaction analysis of living liver cancer cells cultured on a sensor chip with a newly developed high precision (50 ndeg s -1 average fluctuation) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The time-course cell reaction as the SPR angle change rate for 10 min from 30 min cell culture with a drug was significantly related to cell viability. By the simultaneous detection of differential SPR angle change and fluorescence by specific probes using the new instrument, the SPR angle was related to the nano-order potential decrease in inner mitochondrial membrane potential. The results obtained are universally valid for the cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs, which mediate apoptosis through different cell-signaling pathways, by a liver cancer cell line of Hep G2 (Pcancer cells from patients in clinical use.

  9. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Ordikhani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  10. Moving towards a customized approach for drug development: lessons from clinical trials with immune checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Sara; Carbognin, Luisa; Karachaliou, Niki; Garassino, Marina; Cuppone, Federica; Petraglia, Sandra; Rosell, Rafael; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has recently been discovered to be an immunological targetable disease, on the basis of the exciting results of the randomized trials with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nevertheless, the survival benefit appears to not be entirely captured by the usual outcome measures, thus requiring a deep reflection about the appropriateness of the traditional statistical methodologies in this context. The intrinsic biological differences existing both in terms of mechanism of action and kinetic between immunotherapy and chemotherapy or targeted therapy, impact on patients’ outcome, requiring a global revolution in the way to design clinical studies with the ideal aim to evolve towards trials carefully ‘customized’ on the basis of the investigational drug, the specific disease and the biological background. The exciting data recently obtained with immune checkpoint inhibitors, offer an ideal context and background to explore the major questions and future perspectives about the development of immunotherapeutic agents. In this regard, the choice of adequate endpoints, the use of modified statistical methods and the potential introduction of predictive biomarkers for immunotherapy clinical trials, will be discuss in this review in order to provide practical and rationale suggestions aimed to improve the existing model for cancer immunotherapy investigation. PMID:26798579

  11. Metallomics in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi Nhu Tam; Ostergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan;

    2013-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation...... to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before...... and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics....

  12. Use of analgesic drugs and risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammundsen, Henriette B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan;

    2012-01-01

    The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types.......The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types....

  13. New drugs in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Yoo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms.

  14. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  15. Drug resistance and antiretroviral drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W.; Jonathan M Schapiro

    2005-01-01

    As more drugs for treating HIV have become available, drug resistance profiles within antiretroviral drug classes have become increasingly important for researchers developing new drugs and for clinicians integrating new drugs into their clinical practice. In vitro passage experiments and comprehensive phenotypic susceptibility testing are used for the pre-clinical evaluation of drug resistance. Clinical studies are required, however, to delineate the full spectrum of mutations responsible fo...

  16. Drug cocktail optimization in chemotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Preissner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP. Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy.

  17. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  18. Emerging drugs for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, Lloyd R

    2005-05-01

    Because most patients presenting with advanced ovarian cancer are not curable by surgery alone, chemotherapy represents an essential component of treatment. The disease may be considered as chemosensitive, as in around three-quarters of patients major (complete) responses are seen to initial treatment with the platinum-containing drugs cisplatin and carboplatin either used alone or in combination with the taxane, paclitaxel. However, only 15-20% of patients experience long-term remission as tumours often become resistant. The probability of achieving a second response depends on the duration of remission after first-line therapy: if this is 6, and especially if > 12 months (platinum sensitive), responses may be seen in about a quarter of patients, to the same drugs as used first line or to drugs such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, topotecan and hexamethylmelamine (all three are approved in this setting by the FDA). Gemcitabine, oral etoposide, docetaxel and oxaliplatin also show some activity either in sequential addition to existing approved of first-line therapy (as with gemcitabine) or as second-line therapy. However, there is an urgent unmet clinical need for new drugs capable of prolonging survival either by increasing long-term remission rates and/or duration as first-line treatment or to improve on outcomes of second-line treatment. Strategies currently being exploited in clinical trials include attempts to deliver more killing selectively to tumours (e.g., intraperitoneal administration of cisplatin or radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies), agents designed to target drug resistance mechanisms (e.g., TLK-286 activated by glutathione transferase), agents targeting proteins/receptors shown to be selectively expressed in the disease (e.g., monoclonal antibodies recognising CA-125 or HER1; small molecules targeting HER1 such as gefitinib) and disrupting established tumour vasculature (e.g., 5,6-dimethyl xanthenone 4-acetic acid). At the pre-clinical level

  19. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  20. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  1. Cancer-drug associations: a complex system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Dalkic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Network analysis has been performed on large-scale medical data, capturing the global topology of drugs, targets, and disease relationships. A smaller-scale network is amenable to a more detailed and focused analysis of the individual members and their interactions in a network, which can complement the global topological descriptions of a network system. Analysis of these smaller networks can help address questions, i.e., what governs the pairing of the different cancers and drugs, is it driven by molecular findings or other factors, such as death statistics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We defined global and local lethality values representing death rates relative to other cancers vs. within a cancer. We generated two cancer networks, one of cancer types that share Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs (FDA cancer network, and another of cancer types that share clinical trials of FDA approved drugs (clinical trial cancer network. Breast cancer is the only cancer type with significant weighted degree values in both cancer networks. Lung cancer is significantly connected in the FDA cancer network, whereas ovarian cancer and lymphoma are significantly connected in the clinical trial cancer network. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that global lethality impacts the drug approval and trial numbers, whereas, local lethality impacts the amount of drug sharing in trials and approvals. However, this effect does not apply to pancreatic, liver, and esophagus cancers as the sharing of drugs for these cancers is very low. We also collected mutation target information to generate cancer type associations which were compared with the cancer type associations derived from the drug target information. The analysis showed a weak overlap between the mutation and drug target based networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clinical and FDA cancer networks are differentially connected, with only breast cancer significantly

  2. Drug development: portals of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Susan E; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A British humorist said, "There is much to be said for failure. It is much more interesting than success." This CCR Focus section is aimed at identifying lessons to be learned from difficulties encountered in recent years during development of anticancer agents. Clearly, we have not found a silver bullet tyrosine kinase inhibitor against solid tumors comparable with imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Although vemurafenib for B-Raf-mutated melanoma and crizotinib for non-small cell lung cancers with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements were developed rapidly and offer hope for individualized targeted therapies, the development of agents targeting a number of other pathways has been slower and less successful. These agents include drugs for blocking the insulin-like growth factor I/insulin receptor pathways, mitotic kinase inhibitors, and Hsp90 antagonists. Several potentially useful, if not groundbreaking, agents have had setbacks in clinical development, including trastuzumab emtansine, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and satraplatin. From experience, we have learned the following: (i) not every altered protein or pathway is a valid anticancer target; (ii) drugs must effectively engage the target; (iii) the biology of the systems we use must be very well understood; and (iv) clinical trials must be designed to assess whether the drug reached and impaired the target. It is also important that we improve the drug development enterprise to enhance enrollment, streamline clinical trials, reduce financial risk, and encourage the development of agents for niche indications. Such enormous challenges are offset by potentially tremendous gains in our understanding and treatment of cancer.

  3. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Denis R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In

  4. A Second WNT for Old Drugs: Drug Repositioning against WNT-Dependent Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal Ahmed; Shaw, Holly V.; Alexey Koval; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant WNT signaling underlies cancerous transformation and growth in many tissues, such as the colon, breast, liver, and others. Downregulation of the WNT pathway is a desired mode of development of targeted therapies against these cancers. Despite the urgent need, no WNT signaling-directed drugs currently exist, and only very few candidates have reached early phase clinical trials. Among different strategies to develop WNT-targeting anti-cancer therapies, repositioning of existing drugs p...

  5. Drug development and immunotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SugiY; IzumM

    2002-01-01

    Immunotoxicity of drugs has to be evaluated same as other kinds of toxicities,since the functions of the immune system are vital to human survival,consisting of the protection of the body from invading pathogens and to provide immune surveillance against arising tumor cells.A given drug's effect on the immune system can be classified as (1)immuno-suppression/activation.(2)antigenicity and hypersensitivity,(3)autoimmunity.The guidance of immumotoxicity has highlighted on immuno-suppression in Harmonizing Congress among EC,USA and Japan.In this paper,the strategy and methods to evaluate immunotoxicity,mainly immuno-suppression,of the drugs will be show.complexity and variety of immuno-systems make assessment of immumotoxicity complex.The testing in rats to assess immune function is thought to be the first choice for immunotoxicity evaluation in a drug development,and then other suitable testing should be added depending on the mature of drugs.

  6. FDA relations during drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchel, Jules T.

    2000-01-01

    Working closely and cooperatively with regulatory authorities during drug development is vital to successful drug development programs. In the United States, the drug development team includes not only members of the key disciplines of drug discovery, clinical research, regulatory affairs, marketing, chemistry, toxicology, and legal aspects, but also the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New regulations encourage meetings at the pre-investigational new drug (pre-IND), end-of-phase-2, and pr...

  7. Towards increased selectivity of drug delivery to cancer cells: development of a LDL-based nanodelivery system for hydrophobic photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzova, Diana; Huntosova, Veronika; Kasak, Peter; Petrovajova, Dana; Joniova, Jaroslava; Dzurova, Lenka; Nadova, Zuzana; Sureau, Franck; Midkovsky, Pavol; Jancura, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a natural in vivo carrier of cholesterol in the vascular system, play a key role in the delivery of hydrophobic photosensitizers (pts) to tumor cells in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. To make this delivery system even more efficient, we have constructed a nano-delivery system by coating of LDL surface by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to characterize redistribution of hypericin (Hyp), a natural potent pts, loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes to free LDL molecules as well as to monitor cellular uptake of Hyp by U87-MG cells. It was shown than the redistribution process of Hyp between LDL molecules is significantly suppressed by dextran coating of LDL surface. On the other hand, PEG does not significantly influence this process. The modification of LDL molecules by the polymers does not inhibit their recognition by cellular LDL receptors. U-87 MG cellular uptake of Hyp loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes appears to be similar to that one observed for Hyp transported by unmodified LDL particles. It is proposed that by polymers modified LDL molecules could be used as a basis for construction of a drug transport system for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs to cancer cells expressing high level of LDL receptors.

  8. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F; Dresch, Roger R; Carraro, João L F; Mothes, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Junior, Mário L C da Frota; Henriques, Amélia T

    2015-08-25

    Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z)-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3, 6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R)-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy.

  9. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Biegelmeyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3, 6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87 and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy.

  10. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cancer Drug Development and US Regulatory Review: Perspectives From Industry, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Geoghegan, Cindy; Coons, Stephen Joel; Gnanasakthy, Ari; Slagle, Ashley F; Papadopoulos, Elektra J; Kluetz, Paul G

    2015-06-01

    Data reported directly by patients about how they feel and function are rarely included in oncology drug labeling in the United States, in contrast to Europe and to nononcology labeling in the United States, where this practice is more common. Multiple barriers exist, including challenges unique to oncology trials, and industry's concerns regarding cost, logistical complexities, and the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) rigorous application of its 2009 guidance on the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. A panel consisting of representatives of industry, FDA, the PRO Consortium, clinicians, and patients was assembled at a 2014 workshop cosponsored by FDA to identify practical recommendations for overcoming these barriers. Key recommendations included increasing proactive encouragement by FDA to clinical trial sponsors for including PROs in drug development programs; provision of comprehensive PRO plans by sponsors to FDA early in drug development; promotion of an oncology-specific PRO research agenda; development of an approach to existing ("legacy") PRO measures, when appropriate (focused initially on symptoms and functional status); and increased FDA and industry training in PRO methodology. FDA has begun implementing several of these recommendations.

  11. Breakthrough cancer medicine and its impact on novel drug development in China:report of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) and Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Joint Session at the 17th CSCO Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Roger Luo; Ge Zhang; Li Xu; Pascal Qian; Li Yan; Jian Ding; Helen X. Chen; Hao Liu; Man-Cheong Fung; Maria Koehler; Jean Pierre Armand; Lei Jiang; Xiao Xu

    2014-01-01

    The US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) teamed up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session at the17th CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China. With a focus on breakthrough cancer medicines, the session featured innovative approaches to evaluate breakthrough agents and established a platform to interactively share successful experiences from case studies of 6 novel agents from both the United States and China. The goal of the session is to inspire scientific and practical considerations for clinical trial design and strategy to expedite cancer drug development in China. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing both early and ful development of novel cancer medicines in China.

  12. Development and validation of a general approach to predict and quantify the synergism of anti-cancer drugs using experimental design and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Tiziana; Isaia, Francesco; Trudu, Federica; Pani, Alessandra; Manca, Matteo; Perra, Daniela; Amato, Filippo; Havel, Josef

    2013-10-15

    The combination of two or more drugs using multidrug mixtures is a trend in the treatment of cancer. The goal is to search for a synergistic effect and thereby reduce the required dose and inhibit the development of resistance. An advanced model-free approach for data exploration and analysis, based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and experimental design is proposed to predict and quantify the synergism of drugs. The proposed method non-linearly correlates the concentrations of drugs with the cytotoxicity of the mixture, providing the possibility of choosing the optimal drug combination that gives the maximum synergism. The use of ANN allows for the prediction of the cytotoxicity of each combination of drugs in the chosen concentration interval. The method was validated by preparing and experimentally testing the combinations with the predicted highest synergistic effect. In all cases, the data predicted by the network were experimentally confirmed. The method was applied to several binary mixtures of cisplatin and [Cu(1,10-orthophenanthroline)2(H2O)](ClO4)2, Cu(1,10-orthophenanthroline)(H2O)2(ClO4)2 or [Cu(1,10-orthophenanthroline)2(imidazolidine-2-thione)](ClO4)2. The cytotoxicity of the two drugs, alone and in combination, was determined against human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM). For all systems, a synergistic effect was found for selected combinations.

  13. Melatonergic drugs in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carocci A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alessia Carocci,1 Alessia Catalano,1 Maria Stefania Sinicropi2 1Department of Pharmacy–Drug Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, 2Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Cosenza, Italy Abstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review. Keywords: MT1/MT2 ligands, circadian rhythms, melatonin 

  14. Melatonergic drugs in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review.

  15. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quiz Cancers by Body Location/System Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of ... Research Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Cancers ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and ...

  16. Chitosan nanoparticles for lipophilic anticancer drug delivery: Development, characterization and in vitro studies on HT29 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruzzo, Angela; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Belluti, Federica; Provenzano, Simona; Verardi, Laura; Bigucci, Federica; Cerchiara, Teresa; Luppi, Barbara; Calonghi, Natalia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop chitosan-based nanoparticles that could encapsulate lipophilic molecules and deliver them to cancer cells. Nanoparticles were prepared with different molar ratios of chitosan, hyaluronic acid and sulphobutyl-ether-β-cyclodextrin and with or without curcumin. The nanosystems were characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency and stability in different media. Intestinal epithelial and colorectal cancer cells were treated with unloaded nanoparticles in order to study their effect on cellular membrane organization and ROS production. Finally, in vitro assays on both cellular lines were performed in order to evaluate the ability of nanoparticles to promote curcumin internalization and to study their effect on cell proliferation and cell cycle. Results show that nanoparticles were positively charged and their size increased with the increasing amounts of the anionic excipient. Nanoparticles showed good encapsulation efficiency and stability in water. Unloaded nanoparticles led to a change in lipid organization in the cellular membrane of both cell lines, without inducing ROS generation. Confocal microscopy, cell proliferation and cell cycle studies allowed the selection of the best formulation to limit curcumin cytotoxicity in normal intestinal epithelial cells and to reduce cancer cell proliferation. The latter was the result of the increase of expression for genes involved in apoptosis.

  17. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  18. Development of bioluminescent chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models for primary pancreatic cancer cells: a platform for drug testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovithi, Maria; Avan, Amir; Funel, Niccola; Leon, Leticia G.; Gomez, Valentina E.; Wurdinger, Thomas; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop chick-embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) bioluminescent tumor models employing low passage cell cultures obtained from primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Primary PDAC cells transduced with lentivirus expressing Firefly-luciferase (Fluc) were established and inoculated onto the CAM membrane, with >80% engraftment. Fluc signal reliably correlated with tumor growth. Tumor features were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and genetic analyses, including analysis of mutations and mRNA expression of PDAC pivotal genes, as well as microRNA (miRNA) profiling. These studies showed that CAM tumors had histopathological and genetic characteristic comparable to the original tumors. We subsequently tested the modulation of key miRNAs and the activity of gemcitabine and crizotinib on CAM tumors, showing that combination treatment resulted in 63% inhibition of tumor growth as compared to control (p < 0.01). These results were associated with reduced expression of miR-21 and increased expression of miR-155. Our study provides the first evidence that transduced primary PDAC cells can form tumors on the CAM, retaining several histopathological and (epi)genetic characteristics of original tumors. Moreover, our results support the use of these models for drug testing, providing insights on molecular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of new drugs/combinations. PMID:28304379

  19. Developing Anticancer Copper(II) Pro-drugs Based on the Nature of Cancer Cells and the Human Serum Albumin Carrier IIA Subdomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Qi, Jinxu; Ajayi, Joshua-Paul; Zhang, Yao; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    To synergistically enhance the selectivity and efficiency of anticancer copper drugs, we proposed and built a model to develop anticancer copper pro-drugs based on the nature of human serum albumin (HSA) IIA subdomain and cancer cells. Three copper(II) compounds of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone Schiff-base ligand in the presence pyridine, imidazole, or indazole ligands were synthesized (C1-C3). The structures of three HSA complexes revealed that the Cu compounds bind to the hydrophobic cavity in the HSA IIA subdomain. Among them, the pyridine and imidazole ligands of C1 and C2 are replaced by Lys199, and His242 directly coordinates with Cu(II). The indazole and Br ligands of C3 are replaced by Lys199 and His242, respectively. Compared with the Cu(II) compounds alone, the HSA complexes enhance cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells approximately 3-5-fold, but do not raise cytotoxicity levels in normal cells in vitro through selectively accumulating in cancer cells to some extent. We find that the HSA complex has a stronger capacity for cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of MCF-7 by targeting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and down-regulating the expression of CDK1 and cyclin B1. Moreover, the HSA complex promotes MCF-7 cell apoptosis possibly through the intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated mitochondrial pathway, accompanied by the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  20. Development of Liposomal Formulation for Delivering Anticancer Drug to Breast Cancer Stem-Cell-Like Cells and its Pharmacokinetics in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Alkharfy, Khalid M

    2016-03-07

    The objective of the present study is to develop a liposomal formulation for delivering anticancer drug to breast cancer stem-cell-like cells, ANV-1, and evaluate its pharmacokinetics in an animal model. The anticancer drug ESC8 was used in dexamethasone (Dex)-associated liposome (DX) to form ESC8-entrapped liposome named DXE. ANV-1 cells showed high-level expression of NRP-1. To enhance tumor regression, we additionally adapted to codeliver the NRP-1 shRNA-encoded plasmid using the established DXE liposome. In vivo efficacy of DXE-NRP-1 was carried out in mice bearing ANV-1 cells as xenograft tumors and the extent of tumor growth inhibition was evaluated by tumor-size measurement. A significant difference in tumor volume started to reveal between DXE-NRP-1 group and DXE-Control group. DXE-NRP-1 group showed ∼4 folds and ∼2.5 folds smaller tumor volume than exhibited by untreated and DXE-Control-treated groups, respectively. DXE disposition was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats following an intraperitoneal dose (3.67 mg/kg of ESC8 in DXE). The plasma concentrations of ESC8 in the DXE formulation were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental analysis. ESC8 had a half-life of 11.01 ± 0.29 h, clearance of 2.10 ± 3.63 L/kg/h, and volume of distribution of 33.42 ± 0.83 L/kg. This suggests that the DXE liposome formulation could be administered once or twice daily for therapeutic efficacy. In overall, we developed a potent liposomal formulation with favorable pharmacokinetic and tumor regressing profile that could sensitize and kill highly aggressive and drug-resistive cancer stem-cell-like cells.

  1. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP.

  2. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein) drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagassé, H.A. Daniel; Alexaki, Aikaterini; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Katagiri, Nobuko H.; Jankowski, Wojciech; Sauna, Zuben E.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing) product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016). PMID:28232867

  4. Genomics in personalized cancer medicine and its impact on early drug development in China:report from the 6th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at the 50th ASCO Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Shi-Yuan Cheng; Li-Fang Hou; Li Yan; Yun-Guang Tong

    2014-01-01

    The 6th Annual Meeting of the United States Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) was held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on May 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois, the United States of America. With a focus on personalized medicine, the conference featured novel approaches to investigate genomic aberrations in cancer cells and innovative clinical trial designs to expedite cancer drug development in biomarker-defined patient populations. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing development of personalized cancer medicines in China. The conference also summarized USCACA key initiatives and accomplishments, including two awards designated to recognize young investigators from China for their achievements and to support their training in the United States. As an effort to promote international col aboration, USCACA wil team up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session on“Breakthrough Cancer Medicines”at the upcoming CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China.

  5. Drug development and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  6. New Zealand's drug development industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Michelle Marie; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din; Carswell, Christopher; Garg, Sanjay

    2013-09-13

    The pharmaceutical industry's profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ) from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ's clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ's clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  7. Melatonergic drugs in development

    OpenAIRE

    Carocci A; Catalano A; Sinicropi MS

    2014-01-01

    Alessia Carocci,1 Alessia Catalano,1 Maria Stefania Sinicropi2 1Department of Pharmacy–Drug Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, 2Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, Cosenza, Italy Abstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  9. Synergy between Competitive Intelligence (CI), Knowledge Management (KM) and Technological Foresight (TF) as a strategic model of prospecting--the use of biotechnology in the development of drugs against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canongia, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the synergy between Competitive Intelligence, Knowledge Management and Technological Foresight, and to emphasize the proposal of a strategic model of data prospecting as a mechanism to support decision-making in regard to three approaches for sustainable development and innovation: technological, social and economic. The use of biotechnology in the development of drugs against breast cancer is the case study. The article shows the results of data and text mining in specialized medical and patent databases, identifying the most frequently cited drugs, as well as the authors of research, and the inventors of new technology at the beginning of the 21st century. In addition, the study includes reference to Brazilian competence in breast cancer area, the international trends in drugs for treatment of this cancer, leading international institutions and Brazilian competencies. A framework is presented, which could serve as a guide and support for the decision-making process.

  10. Metallomics for drug development: an integrated CE-ICP-MS and ICP-MS approach reveals the speciation changes for an investigational ruthenium(III) drug bound to holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksenko, Svetlana S; Matczuk, Magdalena; Lu, Xifeng; Foteeva, Lidia S; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Jarosz, Maciej

    2013-08-01

    A method based on combining inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with capillary electrophoresis (CE) or an ultrafiltration step was developed to study the speciation of the serum-protein adducts of a ruthenium anticancer drug under in vitro intracellular conditions. The formation of a reactive Ru species in the cell, following the metal release from the protein, is thought to play an important role in the drug's mode of action. Glutathione and ascorbic acid at their cancer cytosol concentrations were shown to be capable of altering the metal speciation in the drug adduct with holo-transferrin but not that with albumin. The appearance of the additional peaks in ICP-MS electropherograms (by recording both Ru- and Fe-specific signals) was found to be dependent on time which allowed for kinetic assessment of the evolution of novel metal species. On the contrary, after the addition of citric acid the ruthenium ion (within the appropriately complexed scaffold) remained sequestered in the adduct. This was inferred as a proof of the speciation changes taking place by a virtue of a redox mechanism rather than due to ligand-exchange transformations. The protein-bound metallodrug was further characterized by direct ICP-MS assaying so as to confirm a partial release of ruthenium induced by glutathione.

  11. Membrane transporters and new drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EndoH

    2002-01-01

    Molecular biology has made it possible to identify membrane transporter molecules that transport hydrophilic endogenous and exogenous compounds across cellular membranes.Ther are two possibilities on transporters relevant to new drug development,drug targets and pharmacokinetics.Human genome database predicts that more than 10% of common diseases may be tightly related with membrane transporter dysfunction.Thus,membrane transporters would be possible molecular targets for new drug development.As an example,I will talk on our discovery of L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1) being oncofetal and upregulated in cancers for their rapid growth and metastasis.We provide evidence that inhibition of LAT1 functions may become novel types of anticancer tools.As another example in human pharmacokinetics,application of stable expressing cell lines of human drug transporters will be proposed including organic anion and cation transporters which are distributed in various organs including the liver and kidney.These transporters are multispecific in their substrate recognition,and better molecules to anticipate drug-drug interactions in human bodies before new drug candidates are given in clinical trials.This in vitro technique may contribute to decide suitable compounds in particular by high throughout screening strategy.

  12. Clotrimazole as a Cancer Drug: A Short Review

    OpenAIRE

    S, Kadavakollu; C, Stailey; CS, Kunapareddy; S, White

    2014-01-01

    Although clotrimazole was first used against fungal infections, a body of research was later developed indicating that this drug has anticancer properties as well. The mechanism of action is based on the inhibition of mitochondrial-bound glycolytic enzymes and calmodulin, which starves cancer cells of energy. Clotrimazole and its derivatives have been shown to decrease rates of cancer cell proliferation, induce G1 phase arrest, and promote pro-apoptotic factors, which lead to cell death.

  13. Current Status of Methods to Assess Cancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodor H. Lippert, Hans-Jörg Ruoff, Manfred Volm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the main cause of the failure of chemotherapy of malignant tumors, resistance being either preexisting (intrinsic resistance or induced by the drugs (acquired resistance. At present, resistance is usually diagnosed during treatment after a long period of drug administration.In the present paper, methods for a rapid assessment of drug resistance are described. Three main classes of test procedures can be found in the literature, i.e. fresh tumor cell culture tests, cancer biomarker tests and positron emission tomography (PET tests. The methods are based on the evaluation of molecular processes, i.e. metabolic activities of cancer cells. Drug resistance can be diagnosed before treatment in-vitro with fresh tumor cell culture tests, and after a short time of treatment in-vivo with PET tests. Cancer biomarker tests, for which great potential has been predicted, are largely still in the development stage. Individual resistance surveillance with tests delivering rapid results signifies progress in cancer therapy management, by providing the possibility to avoid drug therapies that are ineffective and only harmful.

  14. A proposal: a comprehensive platform to characterize tumors in Chinese and improve success in cancer drug discovery and development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pearl S. Huang; Peter T. Ho; Kang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a collection of complex diseases in which cell proliferation and apoptosis are dysregulated due to the acquisition of genetic changes in cancer cells. These genetic changes, combined with the interrelated physiologic adaptations of neo-angiogenesis, recruitment of stromal support tissues, and suppression of immune recognition, are measurable characteristics in tumor gene expression profiles and biochemical pathways. These measures can lead to identification of disease drivers and, ultimately, can be used to assign therapy. With advances in RNA sequencing technologies, the ability to simultaneously measure all genetic and gene expression changes with a single technology is now possible. The ability to create a comprehensive catalog of genotypic and phenotypic changes in a collection of histologically similar but otherwise distinct tumors should allow for a more precise positioning of existing targeted therapies and identification of new targets for intervention.

  15. The Stromal Contribution to the Development of Resistance to New-Generation Drugs by Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    J. Hamilton et al., Statin medication use and the risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Cancer 116, 3389 (2010). 22. D. J. Mener...Prostate specific antigen reduction following statin therapy: Mechanism of action and review of the literature. IUBMB Life 62, 584 (2010). 23. I...Ortega et al., Simvastatin Reduces Steroidogenesis by Inhibiting Cyp17a1 Gene Expression in Rat Ovarian Theca-Interstitial Cells 1. Biol. Reprod. 86

  16. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  17. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihide Nishimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib and TARCEVA (Erlotinib treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care.

  18. New use of prescription drugs prior to a cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    as for nine pre-specified individual drug classes, representing drug treatment likely to be prescribed for symptoms of the given cancers. RESULTS: The incidence rate for new drug treatment among cancer cases was stable around 130 per 1000 persons per month until 6 months prior to cancer diagnosis where......PURPOSE: Cancers often have considerable induction periods. This confers a risk of reverse causation bias in studies of cancer risk associated with drug use, as early symptoms of a yet undiagnosed cancer might lead to drug treatment in the period leading up to the diagnosis. This bias can...... drugs was assessed prior to their cancer diagnosis as well as among population controls (n = 1 402 400). Analyses were conducted for all cancers and for breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer individually. Further, analyses were performed for a composite measure of all incident drug use as well...

  19. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  20. Cancer Exosomes as Mediators of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Maria do Rosário; Pedro, Ana; Lyden, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, several studies demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is a critical determinant not only of tumor progression and metastasis, but also of resistance to therapy. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin, which contain mRNAs, DNA fragments, and proteins, and are released by many different cell types, including cancer cells. Mounting evidence has shown that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with the tumor microenvironment. Understanding how exosomes and the tumor microenvironment impact drug resistance will allow novel and better strategies to overcome drug resistance and treat cancer. Here, we describe a technique for exosome purification from cell culture, and fresh and frozen plasma, and further analysis by electron microscopy, NanoSight microscope, and Western blot.

  1. Carbon materials for drug delivery & cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes and graphene are both low-dimensional sp2 carbon nanomaterials exhibiting many unique physical and chemical properties that are interesting in a wide range of areas including nanomedicine. Since 2004, carbon nanotubes have been extensively explored as drug delivery carriers for the intracellular transport of chemotherapy drugs, proteins, and genes. In vivo cancer treatment with carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated in animal experiments by several different groups. Recently, graphene, another allotrope of carbon, has also shown promise in various biomedical applications. In this article, we will highlight recent research on these two categories of closely related carbon nanomaterials for applications in drug delivery and cancer therapy, and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this rapidly growing field.

  2. FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS IDENTIFIES TIS21-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PUTATIVE CANCER DRUG TARGETS UNDERLYING MEDULLOBLASTOMA SHH-TYPE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Gentile

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have recently generated a novel medulloblastoma (MB mouse model with activation of the Shh pathway and lacking the MB suppressor Tis21 (Patched1+-Tis21KO.ts main phenotype is a defect of migration of the cerebellar granule precursor cells (GCPs. By genomic analysis of GCPs in vivo, we identified as drug target and major responsible of this defect the down-regulation of the promigratory chemokine Cxcl3. Consequently, the GCPs remain longer in the cerebellum proliferative area, and the MB frequency is enhanced. Here, we further analyzed the genes deregulated in a Tis21-dependent manner (Patched1+-is21 wild-type versus Ptch1+-Tis21 knockout, among which are a number of down-regulated tumor inhibitors and up-regulated tumor facilitators, focusing on pathways potentially involved in the tumorigenesis and on putative new drug targets.The data analysis using bioinformatic tools revealed: i a link between the Shh signaling and the Tis21-dependent impairment of the GCPs migration, through a Shh-dependent deregulation of the clathrin-mediated chemotaxis operating in the primary cilium through the Cxcl3-Cxcr2 axis; ii a possible lineage shift of Shh-type GCPs toward retinal precursor phenotype the neural cell type involved in group 3 MB; iii the identification of a subset of putative drug targets for MB, involved, among the others, in the regulation of Hippo signaling and centrosome assembly. Finally, our findings define also the role of Tis21 in the regulation of gene expression, through epigenetic and RNA processing mechanisms, influencing the fate of the GCPs.

  3. Phase IV of Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, ...

  4. Characterization of different carbon nanotubes for the development of a mucoadhesive drug delivery system for intravesical treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Christiane; Kunhardt, David; Kaufmann, Anika; Schendel, Darja; Huebner, Doreen; Erdmann, Kati; Propping, Stefan; Wirth, Manfred P; Schwenzer, Bernd; Fuessel, Susanne; Hampel, Silke

    2015-02-20

    In order to increase the effectiveness of therapeutics for bladder carcinoma (BCa) treatment, alternative strategies for intravesical applications are needed. The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as basis for a multifunctional drug transporter is a promising possibility to combine traditional chemotherapeutics with innovative therapeutic agents such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides or small interfering RNA. In the current study four CNT types varying in length and diameter (CNT-1, CNT-2, CNT-3, CNT-4) were synthesized and then characterized with different spectroscopic techniques. Compared to the pristine CNT-1 and CNT-3, the shortened CNT-2 and CNT-4 exhibited more defects and lower aspect ratios. To analyze their mucoadhesive properties, CNTs were exposed to mouse bladders ex vivo by using Franz diffusion cells. All four tested CNT types were able to adhere to the urothelium with a mean covering area of 5-10%. In vitro studies on UM-UC-3 and EJ28 BCa cells were conducted to evaluate the toxic potential of these CNTs. Viability and cytotoxicity assays revealed that the shortened CNT-2 and CNT-4 induced stronger inhibitory effects on BCa cells than CNT-1 and CNT-3. In conclusion, CNT-1 and CNT-3 showed the most promising properties for further optimization of a multifunctional drug transporter.

  5. Microfluidics: Emerging prospects for anti-cancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-11-10

    Cancer constitutes a heterogenic cellular system with a high level of spatio-temporal complexity. Recent discoveries by systems biologists have provided emerging evidence that cellular responses to anti-cancer modalities are stochastic in nature. To uncover the intricacies of cell-to-cell variability and its relevance to cancer therapy, new analytical screening technologies are needed. The last decade has brought forth spectacular innovations in the field of cytometry and single cell cytomics, opening new avenues for systems oncology and high-throughput real-time drug screening routines. The up-and-coming microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) technology and micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) are arguably the most promising platforms to address the inherent complexity of cellular systems with massive experimental parallelization and 4D analysis on a single cell level. The vast miniaturization of LOC systems and multiplexing enables innovative strategies to reduce drug screening expenditures while increasing throughput and content of information from a given sample. Small cell numbers and operational reagent volumes are sufficient for microfluidic analyzers and, as such, they enable next generation high-throughput and high-content screening of anti-cancer drugs on patient-derived specimens. Herein we highlight the selected advancements in this emerging field of bioengineering, and provide a snapshot of developments with relevance to anti-cancer drug screening routines.

  6. Drug development, radiolabelled drugs and PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaalburg, W; Hendrikse, NH; de Vries, EFJ

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides noninvasive in vivo quantitative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information on novel and established drugs. Because only very low amounts of the (potential) drug have to be administered, far below toxicity levels, human studies can be carried out even

  7. IDICAP: A Novel Tool for Integrating Drug Intervention Based on Cancer Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle Kosarek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a heterogeneous disease afflicting millions of people of all ages and their families worldwide. Tremendous resources have been and continue to be devoted to the development of cancer treatments that target the unique mutation profiles of patients, namely targeted cancer therapy. However, the sheer volume of drugs coupled with cancer heterogeneity becomes a challenge for physicians to prescribe effective therapies targeting patients’ unique genetic mutations. Developing a web service that allows clinicians as well as patients to identify effective drug therapies, both approved and experimental, would be helpful for both parties. We have developed an innovative web service, IDICAP, which stands for Integrated Drug Intervention for CAncer Panel. It uses genes that have been linked to a cancer type to search for drug and clinical trial information from ClinicalTrials.gov and DrugBank. IDICAP selects and integrates information pertaining to clinical trials, disease conditions, drugs under trial, locations of trials, drugs that are known to target the queried gene, and any known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP effects. We tested IDICAP by gene panels that contribute to breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and cancer in general. Clinical trials and drugs listed by our tool showed improved precision compared to the results from ClinicalTrials.gov and Drug Gene Interaction Database (DGIdb. Furthermore, IDICAP provides patients and doctors with a list of clinical facilities in their proximity, a characteristic that lends credence to the Precision Medicine Initiative launched by the White House in the United States in 2015.

  8. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  9. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfen Ma

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differential gene expression profile is negatively correlated with the differentially expressed genes in the target disease. However, many of the potentially useful drugs (PUDs identified by gene expression profile correlation are likely false positives because, in C-Map, the cultured cell lines to which the drug is applied are not derived from diseased tissues. To solve this problem, we developed a combined approach for predicting candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer. We first identified PUDs for pancreatic cancer by using C-Map-based gene expression correlation analyses. We then applied an algorithm (Met-express to predict key pancreatic cancer (KPC enzymes involved in pancreatic cancer metabolism. Finally, we selected candidates from the PUDs by requiring that their targets be KPC enzymes or the substrates/products of KPC enzymes. Using this combined approach, we predicted seven candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer, three of which are supported by literature evidence, and three were experimentally validated to be inhibitory to pancreatic cancer celllines.

  10. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  11. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  12. Pathology in drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Adrian M; Koeppen, Hartmut; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pace of drug discovery and drug development in oncology, immunology and ophthalmology brings new challenges; the efficient and effective development of new targeted drugs will require more detailed molecular classifications of histologically homogeneous diseases that show heterogeneous clinical outcomes. To this end, single companion diagnostics for specific drugs will be replaced by multiplex diagnostics for entire therapeutic areas, preserving tissue and enabling rapid molecular taxonomy. The field will move away from the development of new molecular entities as single agents, to which resistance is common. Instead, a detailed understanding of the pathological mechanisms of resistance, in patients and in preclinical models, will be key to the validation of scientifically rational and clinically effective drug combinations. To remain at the heart of disease diagnosis and appropriate management, pathologists must evolve into translational biologists and biomarker scientists. Herein, we provide examples of where this metamorphosis has already taken place, in lung cancer and melanoma, where the transformation has yet to begin, in the use of immunotherapies for ophthalmology and oncology, and where there is fertile soil for a revolution in treatment, in efforts to classify glioblastoma and personalize treatment. The challenges of disease heterogeneity, the regulatory environment and adequate tissue are ever present, but these too are being overcome in dedicated academic centres. In summary, the tools necessary to overcome the 'whens' and 'ifs' of the molecular revolution are in the hands of pathologists today; it is a matter of standardization, training and leadership to bring these into routine practice and translate science into patient benefit. This Annual Review Issue of the Journal of Pathology highlights the central role for pathology in modern drug discovery and development.

  13. Development of Novel Drugs That Target Coactivation Sites of the Androgen Receptor for Treatment of Antiandrogen-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for each compound upon chromatographic isolation in liquid (LC) phases and mass spectrometry. Stability testing...shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number...hits in the AR transcriptional eGFP assay, we validated their activity by a second transcription assay, based on light detection instead of

  14. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management.

  15. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  16. A Trojan horse in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Skytte, Dorthe Mondrup; Denmeade, Samuel R;

    2009-01-01

    stage). Cytotoxins killing cells irrespective of the phase of the cell cycle will be able to kill slowly proliferating prostate cancer cells. Lack of selectivity, however, prevents their use as systemic drugs. Prostate cancer cells secrete characteristic proteolytic enzymes, e.g. PSA and hK2......, with unusual substrate specificity. Conjugation of cytotoxins with peptides, which are selective substrates for PSA or hK2, will afford prodrugs, from which the active drug only will be released in close vicinity of the cancer cells. Based on this strategy prodrugs targeted at prostate cancer cells have been...

  17. Establishment of a drug sensitivity panel using human lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsushita A

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available We established a drug sensitivity panel consisting of 24 human lung cancer cell lines. Using this panel, we evaluated 26 anti-cancer agents: three alkylators, three platinum compounds, four antimetabolites, one topoisomerase I inhibitor, five topoisomerase II inhibitors, seven antimitotic agents and three tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This panel showed the following: a Drug sensitivity patterns reflected their clinically-established patterns of action. For example, doxorubicin and etoposide were shown to be active against small cell lung cancer cell lines and mitomycin-C and 5-fluorouracil were active against non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, in agreement with clinical data. b Correlation analysis of the mean graphs derived from the logarithm of IC50 values of the drugs gave insight into the mechanism of each drug's action. Thus, two drug combinations with reverse or no correlation, such as the combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine, might be good candidates for the ideal two drug combination in the treatment of lung cancer, as is being confirmed in clinical trials. c Using cluster analysis of the cell lines in the panel with their drug sensitivity patterns, we could classify the cell lines into four groups depending on the drug sensitivity similarity. This classification will be useful to elucidate the cellular mechanism of action and drug resistance. Thus, our drug sensitivity panel will be helpful to explore new drugs or to develop a new combination of anti-cancer agents for the treatment of lung cancer.

  18. Drug targeting systems for cancer therapy: nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigli Aydin, R Seda

    2015-01-01

    Progress in cancer treatment remains challenging because of the great nature of tumor cells to be drug resistant. However, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled the delivery of drugs for cancer treatment by passively and actively targeting to tumor cells with nanoparticles. Dramatic improvements in nanotherapeutics, as applied to cancer, have rapidly accelerated clinical investigations. In this review, drug-targeting systems using nanotechnology and approved and clinically investigated nanoparticles for cancer therapy are discussed. In addition, the rationale for a nanotechnological approach to cancer therapy is emphasized because of its promising advances in the treatment of cancer patients.

  19. Development of a novel nitro-derivative of noscapine for the potential treatment of drug-resistant ovarian cancer and T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N; Lopus, Manu; Chandra, Ramesh; Panda, Dulal; Joshi, Harish C

    2006-06-01

    We have shown previously that an antitussive plant alkaloid, noscapine, binds tubulin, displays anticancer activity, and has a safe pharmacological profile in humans. Structure-function analyses pointed to a proton at position-9 of the isoquinoline ring that can be modified without compromising tubulin binding activity. Thus, many noscapine analogs with different functional moieties at position-9 were synthesized. Those analogs that kill human cancer cells resistant to other antimicrotubule agents, vincas and taxanes, were screened. Here, we present one such analog, 9-nitro-noscapine (9-nitro-nos), which binds tubulin and induces apoptosis selectively in tumor cells (ovarian and T-cell lymphoma) resistant to paclitaxel, vinblastine, and teniposide. 9-Nitro-nos treatment at doses as high as 100 microM did not affect the cell cycle profile of normal human fibroblasts. This selectivity of 9-nitro-nos for cancer cells represents a unique edge over the other available antimitotics. 9-Nitro-nos perturbs the progression of cell cycle by mitotic arrest, followed by apoptotic cell death associated with increased caspase-3 activation and appearance of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that 9-nitro-nos has great potential to be a novel therapeutic agent for ovarian and T-cell lymphoma cancers, even those that have become drug-resistant to currently available chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  1. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Colleen E.; An, Gary; Cannon, William R.; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M.

    2016-02-17

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multi-scale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multi-scale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multi-scale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical techniques employed for multi-scale modeling approaches used in pharmacology and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art regarding drug development for: Excitable Systems (Heart); Cancer (Metastasis and Differentiation); Cancer (Angiogenesis and Drug Targeting); Metabolic Disorders; and Inflammation and Sepsis. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multi-scale models.

  2. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Jin-Ku Bao; Jin-Ming Yang; Yan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process,has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases,such as cancer.Notably,autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer.To date,substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators,such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs),PI3K,mTOR,p53,and Beclin-1,may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression.Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer,it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics.With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy,we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy.

  3. A New Era for Cancer Target Therapies: Applying Systems Biology and Computer-Aided Drug Design to Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yung-Hao; Chiu, Chia-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Ting-Shou; Jheng, Bo-Ren; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jeremy; Chen, Bor-Sen

    In recent years, many systems biology approaches have been used with various cancers. The materials described here can be used to build bases to discover novel cancer therapy targets in connection with computer-aided drug design (CADD). A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cancer will provide more choices and correct strategies in the development of multiple target drug therapies, which is quite different from the traditional cancer single target therapy. Targeted therapy is one of the most powerful strategies against cancer and can also be applied to other diseases. Due to the large amount of progress in computer hardware and the theories of computational chemistry and physics, CADD has been the main strategy for developing novel drugs for cancer therapy. In contrast to traditional single target therapies, in this review we will emphasize the future direction of the field, i.e., multiple target therapies. Structure-based and ligand-based drug designs are the two main topics of CADD. The former needs both 3D protein structures and ligand structures, while the latter only needs ligand structures. Ordinarily it is estimated to take more than 14 years and 800 million dollars to develop a new drug. Many new CADD software programs and techniques have been developed in recent decades. We conclude with an example where we combined and applied systems biology and CADD to the core networks of four cancers and successfully developed a novel cocktail for drug therapy that treats multiple targets.

  4. Teratogens as anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2005-11-01

    Most anticancer drugs are teratogens, merely because they target vital cellular functions. Conversely, some plants produce agents that intentionally target embryonic signaling pathways, precisely to cause birth defects if pregnant animals eat such plants. Cyclopamine, a teratogen produced by a flowering plant, inhibits the Hh/Gli pathway, causing developmental defects such as cyclopia (one eye in the middle of the face). In theory, selective teratogens may suppress cancer cells that reactivate embryonic pathways, while sparing most normal cells. I discuss the potential (and limits) of teratogens in cancer therapy, linking diverse topics from morning sickness of pregnancy, embryonic pathways and poisonous plants to the mechanism of action of anticancer teratogens and their combinations with less selective cytotoxic agents.

  5. Cancer nanomedicine: from drug delivery to imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward Kai-Hua; Ho, Dean

    2013-12-18

    Nanotechnology-based chemotherapeutics and imaging agents represent a new era of "cancer nanomedicine" working to deliver versatile payloads with favorable pharmacokinetics and capitalize on molecular and cellular targeting for enhanced specificity, efficacy, and safety. Despite the versatility of many nanomedicine-based platforms, translating new drug or imaging agents to the clinic is costly and often hampered by regulatory hurdles. Therefore, translating cancer nanomedicine may largely be application-defined, where materials are adapted only toward specific indications where their properties confer unique advantages. This strategy may also realize therapies that can optimize clinical impact through combinatorial nanomedicine. In this review, we discuss how particular materials lend themselves to specific applications, the progress to date in clinical translation of nanomedicine, and promising approaches that may catalyze clinical acceptance of nano.

  6. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  7. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  8. New use of prescription drugs prior to a cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cancers often have considerable induction periods. This confers a risk of reverse causation bias in studies of cancer risk associated with drug use, as early symptoms of a yet undiagnosed cancer might lead to drug treatment in the period leading up to the diagnosis. This bias can...... be alleviated by disregarding exposure for some time before the cancer diagnosis (lag time). We aimed at assessing the duration of lag time needed to avoid reverse causation bias. METHODS: We identified all Danish patients with incident cancer between 2000 and 2012 (n = 353 087). Incident use of prescription...... drugs was assessed prior to their cancer diagnosis as well as among population controls (n = 1 402 400). Analyses were conducted for all cancers and for breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer individually. Further, analyses were performed for a composite measure of all incident drug use as well...

  9. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  10. How Much Longer Will We Put Up With $100,000 Cancer Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Paul; Draetta, Giulio F; Schellens, Jan H M; Bernards, René

    2017-02-09

    The spiraling cost of new drugs mandates a fundamentally different approach to keep lifesaving therapies affordable for cancer patients. We call here for the formation of new relationships between academic drug discovery centers and commercial partners, which can accelerate the development of truly transformative drugs at sustainable prices.

  11. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yeon Sook; Chung, H. Y.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.; Chung, I. S.; Park, J. Y

    1999-04-01

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  12. Towards a sustainable system of drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, Ellen H.M.; Cohen, Adam F.; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-01-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development a

  13. Treatment of cancer by using Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimendra J Patel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the “war on cancer” is now in its fourth decade and despite much progress has been made in categorizing the environmental causes and cellular and molecular biological basis for this dreaded disease, we still do not have a precise understanding of the differences between a cancer cell and its normal counterpart. If we do not understand cancer, we cannot control, conquer, and eliminate it. The completion of the human genome sequence and its subsequent improvements in the sequence data are important steps to fully comprehend cancer cell biology. Nanotechnology, a new, novel focus of research evolved from the convergence and coalescence of many diverse scientific disciplines and as a general term for the creation, manipulation, and application of structures in the nanometer size range. In this article, Nano medicine aspects of nanotechnology will be stressed and will cover areas such as drug delivery systems and new drug therapies as they relate to cancer. One of the ultimate goals of Nano medicine is to create medically useful Nano devices that can function inside the body. It is envisioned that Nano devices will be hybrids of biologic molecules and synthetic polymers that can enter cells and the organelles to interact directly with DNA and proteins. Additionally, Nano medicine will have an impact on the key challenges in cancer therapy: localized drug delivery and specific targeting. Among the newly developed Nano medicine and Nano devices such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, Nano cantilevers, and Nano pores, Nano shells and nanoparticles are the most promising applications for various cancer treatments.

  14. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  15. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  16. Prodrug Strategy in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal Kelemen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prodrugs are chemically modified derivatives introduced in therapy due to their advantageous physico-chemical properties (greater stability, improved solubility, increased permeability, used in inactive form. Biological effect is exerted by the active derivatives formed in organism through chemical transformation (biotransformation. Currently, 10% of pharmaceutical products are used as prodrugs, nearly half of them being converted to active form by hydrolysis, mainly by ester hydrolysis. The use of prodrugs aims to improve the bioavailability of compounds in order to resolve some unfavorable characteristics and to reduce first-pass metabolism. Other objectives are to increase drug absorption, to extend duration of action or to achieve a better tissue/organ selective transport in case of non-oral drug delivery forms. Prodrugs can be characterized by chemical structure, activation mechanism or through the presence of certain functional groups suitable for their preparation. Currently we distinguish in therapy traditional prodrugs prepared by chemical derivatisation, bioprecursors and targeted delivery systems. The present article is a review regarding the introduction and applications of prodrug design in various areas of drug development.

  17. Molecular approaches towards development of purified natural products and their structurally known derivatives as efficient anti-cancer drugs: current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Santu Kumar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-08-15

    Several natural products and their derivatives, either in purified or structurally identified form, exhibit immense pharmacological and biological properties, some of them showing considerable anticancer potential. Although the molecular mechanisms of action of some of these products are yet to be elucidated, extensive research in this area continues to generate new data that are clinically exploitable. Recent advancement in molecular biology, high throughput screening, biomarker identifications, target selection and genomic approaches have enabled us to understand salient interactions of natural products and their derivatives with cancer cells vis-à-vis normal cells. In this review we highlight the recent approaches and application of innovative technologies made to improve quality as well as efficiency of structurally identified natural products and their derivatives, particularly in small molecular forms capable of being used in "targeted therapies" in oncology. These products preferentially involve multiple mechanistic pathways and overcome chemo-resistance in tumor types with cumulative action. We also mention briefly a few physico-chemical features that compare natural products with drugs in recent natural product discovery approaches. We further report here a few purified natural products as examples that provide molecular interventions in cancer therapeutics to give the reader a glimpse of the current trends of approach for discovering useful anticancer drugs.

  18. Vascular permeability and drug delivery in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy eAzzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents.

  19. Drug-induced liver injury and drug development: industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Arie

    2014-05-01

    Despite intensive ongoing research, drug-induced live injury (DILI) remains a serious issue for care providers and patients, and has been a major cause of drug withdrawal and non-approval by regulatory authorities in the past 50 years. Consequently, DILI remains a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and a leading cause for attrition during drug development. In most instances, severe DILI is an uncommon idiosyncratic reaction, which typically does not present during preclinical phases or early clinical phases of drug development. In the majority of cases, drugs that caused severe DILI in humans have not shown clear and consistent hepatotoxic signals in preclinical assessment including animal studies, cell cultures, or other methods. Despite intensive efforts to develop better biomarkers that would help in predicting DILI risk in earlier phases of drug development, such biomarkers are currently not supported by sufficient evidence and are not yet available for routine use by drug makers. Due to the lack of effective and accurate methods for prediction of idiosyncratic DILI during preclinical phases of drug development, different drug makers have adopted different approaches, which are often not supported by strong systematic evidence. Based on growing experience, it is becoming increasingly evident that milder forms of liver injury occurring during clinical development, when assessed correctly, may significantly enhance our ability to predict the drug's potential to cause more severe liver injury postmarketing. Strategies based on this concept have been adopted by many drug makers, and are being increasingly implemented during drug development. Meticulous causality assessment of individual hepatic cases and adherence to strict hepatic discontinuation rules are critical components of this approach and have to rely on thorough clinical evaluation and occasionally on assessment by liver experts experienced with DILI and drug development.

  20. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  1. Latest Results for Anti-Angiogenic Drugs in Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sofie; Kopp, Sascha; Wehland, Markus;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis is a mechanism, which tumors use to recruit oxygen and nutrients in order to maintain growth. The vascular endothelial growth factor family is the primary mediator of this process. For the last couple of decades, inhibition of angiogenesis has been the subject of extensiv...... mechanisms are necessary. Moreover, biomarker studies in future clinical investigations are important for the development of the next generation of anti-angiogenic drugs....... research, but so far anti-angiogenic drugs have only shown a modest effect. METHODS: This paper reviews four relevant anti-angiogenic drugs: bevacizumab, ramucirumab, nintedanib and sunitinib. The primary focus will be recent trials investigating the effects of the drugs in lung, breast...... and gastrointestinal cancers. Furthermore, there will be a discussion of unsolved problems, such as lack of biomarkers, drug resistance, and adverse events, for which a solution is necessary in order to improve the benefit of anti-angiogenic drugs in the future. RESULTS: Anti-angiogenic therapy is extensively used...

  2. Development of Polymeric Nanoparticles of Garcinia mangostana Xanthones in Eudragit RL100/RS100 for Anti-Colon Cancer Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalrahim F. A. Aisha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthones are a group of oxygenated heterocyclic compounds with anticancer properties, but poor aqueous solubility and low oral bioavailability hinder their therapeutic application. This study sought to prepare a xanthones extract (81%  α-mangostin and 16%  γ-mangostin in polymeric nanoparticles and to investigate its intracellular delivery and cytotoxicity toward colon cancer cells. The nanoparticles were prepared in Eudragit RL100 and Eudragit RS100 by the nanoprecipitation method at drug loading and entrapment efficiency of 20% and >95%, respectively. Freeze-drying of bulk nanoparticle solutions, using glucose or sucrose as cryoprotectants, allowed the collection of nanoparticles at >95% yield. Solubility of the xanthones extract was improved from 0.1 µg/mL to 1250 µg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS of the freeze-dried final formulation showed the presence of cationic round nanoparticles, with particle size in the range of 32–130 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the presence of nanospheres, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy indicated intermolecular interaction of xanthones with Eudragit polymers. Cellular uptake of nanoparticles was mediated via endocytosis and indicated intracellular delivery of xanthones associated with potent cytotoxicity (median inhibitory concentration 26.3±0.22 µg/mL. Presented results suggest that cationic nanoparticles of xanthones may provide a novel oral drug delivery system for chemoprevention or treatment of intestinal and colon tumors.

  3. Review: DNA microarray technology and drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On the contrary to slow and non specific traditional drug discovery methods, DNA microarray technology could accelerate the identification of potential drugs for treating diseases like cancer, AIDS and provide fruitful results in the drug discovery. The technique provides efficient automation and maximum flexibility to the researchers and can test thousand compounds at a time. Scientists find DNA microarray useful in disease diagnosis, monitoring desired and adverse outcomes of therapeutic interventions, as well as, in the selection, assessment and quality con-trol of the potential drugs. In the current scenario, where new pathogens are expected every year, DNA microarray promises as an efficient technology to detect new organisms in a short time. Classification of carcinomas at the molecular level and prediction of how various types of tumor respond to different therapeutic agents can be made possible with the use of microarray analysis. Also, microarray technique can prove instrumental in personalized medicines development by providing microarray data of a patient which could be used for identifying diseases, treatment specific to individual and trailing disease prognosis. Microarray analysis could be beneficial in the area of molecular medicines for analysis of genetic variations and functions of genes in normal individuals and diseased conditions. The technique can give satisfactory results in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis and pharmacogenomics studies. The challenges that arise with the technology are high degree of variability with data obtained, frequent up gradation of methods and machines and lack of trained manpower. Despite this, DNA micro-array promises to be the next generation sequencer which could explain how organisms evolve and adapt looking at the whole genome. In a nutshell, Microarray technology makes it possible for molecular biologists to analyze simultaneously thousands of DNA samples and monitor their

  4. The new concepts on overcoming drug resistance in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weisan Zhang,1 Ping Lei,1 Xifeng Dong,2 Cuiping Xu31Department of Geriatrics, 2Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. The current first-line therapies include chemotherapy using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapies. With the current progress in identifying new molecular targets, acquired drug resistance stands as an obstacle for good prognosis. About half the patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatments develop resistance. Although extensive studies have been applied to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, evidence is far from enough to establish a well-defined picture to correct resistance. In the review, we will discuss four different currently developed strategies that have the potential to overcome drug resistance in lung cancer therapies and facilitate prolonged anticancer effects of the first-line therapies.Keywords: ALK receptors cancer stem cell, chemotherapy, EGFR-TKI, target therapy, pharmacology, molecular biology, biotherapy

  5. Alpinetin inhibits lung cancer progression and elevates sensitization drug-resistant lung cancer cells to cis-diammined dichloridoplatium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu L

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lin Wu, Wei Yang, Su-ning Zhang, Ji-bin Lu Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Alpinetin is a novel flavonoid that has demonstrated potent antitumor activity in previous studies. However, the efficacy and mechanism of alpinetin in treating lung cancer have not been determined. Methods: We evaluated the impact of different doses and durations of alpinetin treatment on the cell proliferation, the apoptosis of lung cancer cells, as well as the drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Results: This study showed that the alpinetin inhibited the cell proliferation, enhanced the apoptosis, and inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling in lung cancer cells. Moreover, alpinetin significantly increased the sensitivity of drug-resistant lung cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic effect of cis-diammined dichloridoplatium. Taken together, this study demonstrated that alpinetin significantly suppressed the development of human lung cancer possibly by influencing mitochondria and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and sensitized drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Conclusion: Alpinetin may be used as a potential compound for combinatorial therapy or as a complement to other chemotherapeutic agents when multiple lines of treatments have failed to reduce lung cancer. Keywords: alpinetin, cell proliferation and apoptosis, drug resistance reversal, PI3K/Akt, lung cancer

  6. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  7. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  8. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-10-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model - niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases.

  9. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models.

  10. Hurdles in anticancer drug development from a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Bertil; Bergh, Jonas

    2012-02-21

    Between January 2001 and January 2012, 48 new medicinal products for cancer treatment were licensed within the EU, and 77 new indications were granted for products already licensed. In some cases, a major improvement to existing therapies was achieved, for example, trastuzumab in breast cancer. In other cases, new fields for effective drug therapy opened up, such as in chronic myeloid leukemia, and renal-cell carcinoma. In most cases, however, the benefit-risk balance was considered to be only borderline favorable. Based on our assessment of advice procedures for marketing authorization, 'need for speed' seems to be the guiding principle in anticancer drug development. Although, for drugs that make a difference, early licensure is of obvious importance to patients, this is less evident in the case of borderline drugs. Without proper incentives and with hurdles inside and outside companies, a change in drug development cannot be expected; drugs improving benefit-risk modestly over available therapies will be brought forward towards licensure. In this Perspectives article, we discuss some hurdles to biomarker-driven drug development and provide some suggestions to overcome them.

  11. Stapled α-helical peptide drug development: a potent dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX for p53-dependent cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yong S; Graves, Bradford; Guerlavais, Vincent; Tovar, Christian; Packman, Kathryn; To, Kwong-Him; Olson, Karen A; Kesavan, Kamala; Gangurde, Pranoti; Mukherjee, Aditi; Baker, Theresa; Darlak, Krzysztof; Elkin, Carl; Filipovic, Zoran; Qureshi, Farooq Z; Cai, Hongliang; Berry, Pamela; Feyfant, Eric; Shi, Xiangguo E; Horstick, James; Annis, D Allen; Manning, Anthony M; Fotouhi, Nader; Nash, Huw; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2013-09-03

    Stapled α-helical peptides have emerged as a promising new modality for a wide range of therapeutic targets. Here, we report a potent and selective dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX, ATSP-7041, which effectively activates the p53 pathway in tumors in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, ATSP-7041 binds both MDM2 and MDMX with nanomolar affinities, shows submicromolar cellular activities in cancer cell lines in the presence of serum, and demonstrates highly specific, on-target mechanism of action. A high resolution (1.7-Å) X-ray crystal structure reveals its molecular interactions with the target protein MDMX, including multiple contacts with key amino acids as well as a role for the hydrocarbon staple itself in target engagement. Most importantly, ATSP-7041 demonstrates robust p53-dependent tumor growth suppression in MDM2/MDMX-overexpressing xenograft cancer models, with a high correlation to on-target pharmacodynamic activity, and possesses favorable pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution properties. Overall, ATSP-7041 demonstrates in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept that stapled peptides can be developed as therapeutically relevant inhibitors of protein-protein interaction and may offer a viable modality for cancer therapy.

  12. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  13. Towards a sustainable system of drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moors, Ellen H M; Cohen, Adam F; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-11-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development and the pharmaceutical industry, we identified the main factors causing this system failure. Although many solutions have been suggested to fix the drug development system, we believe that a combination of reforms of the regulatory and patent systems is necessary to make drug development sustainable. These reforms must be combined with a larger, open-access role for public research institutes in the discovery, clinical evaluation and safety evaluation of new drugs.

  14. Pharmacometrics in early clinical drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacometrics, the science of quantitative clinical pharmacology, has been recognized as one of the main research fields able to improve efficiency in drug development, and to reduce attrition rates on the route from drug discovery to approval. This field of drug research, which builds heavily on

  15. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  16. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Chiodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  17. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  18. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Malve

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses.

  19. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses. PMID:27134458

  20. Medical imaging in new drug clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Deng, Min

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging can help answer key questions that arise during the drug development process. The role of medical imaging in new drug clinical trials includes identification of likely responders; detection and diagnosis of lesions and evaluation of their severity; and therapy monitoring and follow-up. Nuclear imaging techniques such as PET can be used to monitor drug pharmacokinetics and distribution and study specific molecular endpoints. In assessing drug efficacy, imaging biomarkers and imaging surrogate endpoints can be more objective and faster to measure than clinical outcomes, and allow small group sizes, quick results and good statistical power. Imaging also has important role in drug safety monitoring, particularly when there is no other suitable biomarkers available. Despite the long history of radiological sciences, its application to the drug development process is relatively recent. This review highlights the processes, opportunities, and challenges of medical imaging in new drug development.

  1. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  2. Potential anti-cancer drugs commonly used for other indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusova, Veronika; Skalova, Lenka; Kralova, Vera; Matouskova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing resistance of mammalian tumor cells to chemotherapy along with the severe side effects of commonly used cytostatics has raised the urgency in the search for new anti-cancer agents. Several drugs originally approved for indications other than cancer treatment have recently been found to have a cytostatic effect on cancer cells. These drugs could be expediently repurposed as anti-cancer agents, since they have already been tested for toxicity in humans and animals. The groups of newly recognized potential cytostatics discussed in this review include benzimidazole anthelmintics (albendazole, mebendazole, flubendazole), anti-hypertensive drugs (doxazosin, propranolol), psychopharmaceuticals (chlorpromazine, clomipramine) and antidiabetic drugs (metformin, pioglitazone). All these drugs have a definite potential to be used especially in combinations with other cytostatics; the chemotherapy targeting of multiple sites now represents a promising approach in cancer treatment. The present review summarizes recent information about the anti-cancer effects of selected drugs commonly used for other medical indications. Our aim is not to collect all the reported results, but to present an overview of various possibilities. Advantages, disadvantages and further perspectives regarding individual drugs are discussed and evaluated.

  3. Functional drug-gene interactions in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smida, Michal; Nijman, Sebastian M B

    2012-04-01

    Despite the dawn of the genomic information era, the challenges of cancer treatment remain formidable. Particularly for the most prevalent cancer types, including lung cancer, successful treatment of metastatic disease is rare and escalating costs for modern targeted drugs place an increasing strain on healthcare systems. Although powerful diagnostic tools to characterize individual tumor samples in great molecular detail are becoming rapidly available, the transformation of this information into therapy provides a major challenge. A fundamental difficulty is the molecular complexity of cancer cells that often causes drug resistance, but can also render tumors exquisitely sensitive to targeted agents. By using lung cancer as an example, we outline the principles that govern drug sensitivity and resistance from a genetic perspective and discuss how in vitro chemical-genetic screens can impact on patient stratification in the clinic.

  4. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  5. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Chandra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  6. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  7. Inhalation of nanoparticle-based drug for lung cancer treatment: Advantages and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Hin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the success of developing inhalable insulin, drug delivery via pulmonary administration has become an attractive route to treat chronic diseases. Pulmonary delivery system for nanotechnology is a relatively new concept especially when applicable to lung cancer therapy. Nano-based systems such as liposome, polymeric nanoparticles or micelles are strategically designed to enhance the therapeutic index of anti-cancer drugs through improvement of their bioavailability, stability and residency at targeted lung regions. Along with these benefits, nano-based systems also provide additional diagnostic advantages during lung cancer treatment, including imaging, screening and drug tracking. Nevertheless, delivery of nano-based drugs via pulmonary administration for lung cancer therapy is still in its infancy and numerous challenges are expected. Pharmacology, immunology, toxicology and large-scale manufacturing (stability and activity of drugs are some aspects in nanotechnology that should be taken into consideration for the development of inhalable nano-based chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will focus on the current inhalable nano-based drugs for lung cancer treatment.

  8. Repositioning FDA-Approved Drugs in Combination with Epigenetic Drugs to Reprogram Colon Cancer Epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Da Costa, Elodie M; Lee, Justin T; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Zhang, Hanghang; Sato, Takahiro; Malouf, Gabriel G; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2017-02-01

    Epigenetic drugs, such as DNA methylation inhibitors (DNMTi) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are approved in monotherapy for cancer treatment. These drugs reprogram gene expression profiles, reactivate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) producing cancer cell differentiation and apoptosis. Epigenetic drugs have been shown to synergize with other epigenetic drugs or various anticancer drugs. To discover new molecular entities that enhance epigenetic therapy, we performed a high-throughput screening using FDA-approved libraries in combination with DNMTi or HDACi. As a screening model, we used YB5 system, a human colon cancer cell line, which contains an epigenetically silenced CMV-GFP locus, mimicking TSG silencing in cancer. CMV-GFP reactivation is triggered by DNMTi or HDACi and responds synergistically to DNMTi/HDACi combination, which phenocopies TSG reactivation upon epigenetic therapy. GFP fluorescence was used as a quantitative readout for epigenetic activity. We discovered that 45 FDA-approved drugs (4% of all drugs tested) in our FDA-approved libraries enhanced DNMTi and HDACi activity, mainly belonging to anticancer and antiarrhythmic drug classes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that combination of decitabine (DNMTi) with the antiarrhythmic proscillaridin A produced profound gene expression reprogramming, which was associated with downregulation of 153 epigenetic regulators, including two known oncogenes in colon cancer (SYMD3 and KDM8). Also, we identified about 85 FDA-approved drugs that antagonized DNMTi and HDACi activity through cytotoxic mechanisms, suggesting detrimental drug interactions for patients undergoing epigenetic therapy. Overall, our drug screening identified new combinations of epigenetic and FDA-approved drugs, which can be rapidly implemented into clinical trials. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 397-407. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Review: DNA Microarray Technology and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Drabu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    On the contrary to slow and non specific traditional drug discovery methods, DNA microarray technology could
    accelerate the identification of potential drugs for treating diseases like cancer, AIDS and provide fruitful results in
    the drug discovery. The technique provides efficient automation and maximum flexibility to the researchers and
    can test thousand compounds at a time. Scientists find DNA microarray useful in disease diagnosis, monitoring
    desired and adverse outcomes of therapeutic interventions, as well as, in the selection, assessment and quality control
    of the potential drugs. In the current scenario, where new pathogens are expected every year, DNA microarray
    promises as an efficient technology to detect new organisms in a short time. Classification of carcinomas at the
    molecular level and prediction of how various types of tumor respond to different therapeutic agents can be made
    possible with the use of microarray analysis. Also, microarray technique can prove instrumental in personalized
    medicines development by providing microarray data of a patient which could be used for identifying diseases,
    treatment specific to individual and trailing disease prognosis. Microarray analysis could be beneficial in the area
    of molecular medicines for analysis of genetic variations and functions of genes in normal individuals and diseased
    conditions. The technique can give satisfactory results in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis and
    pharmacogenomics studies. The challenges that arise with the technology are high degree of variability with data
    obtained, frequent up gradation of methods and machines and lack of trained manpower. Despite this, DNA microarray
    promises to be the next generation sequencer which could explain how organisms evolve and adapt looking
    at the whole

  10. An MMP-2 Responsive Liposome Integrating Antifibrosis and Chemotherapeutic Drugs for Enhanced Drug Perfusion and Efficacy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tianjiao; Li, Suping; Zhang, Yinlong; Lang, Jiayan; Ding, Yanping; Zhao, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Li, Yiye; Shi, Jian; Hao, Jihui; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-02-10

    Fibrotic stroma, a critical character of pancreatic tumor microenvironment, provides a critical barrier against the penetration and efficacy of various antitumor drugs. Therefore, new strategies are urgently needed to alleviate the fibrotic mass and increase the drug perfusion within pancreatic cancer tissue. In our current work, we developed a β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) modified matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) responsive liposome, integrating antifibrosis and chemotherapeutic drugs for regulation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a key source of the fibrosis, and targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs for pancreatic cancer therapy. These liposomes disassembed into two functional parts upon MMP-2 cleavage at the tumor site. One part was constituted by the β-CDs and the antifibrosis drug pirfenidone, which was kept in the stroma and inhibited the expression of collagen I and TGF-β in PSCs, down-regulating the fibrosis and decreasing the stromal barrier. The other segment, the RGD peptide-modified-liposome loading the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine, targeted and killed pancreatic tumor cells. This integrated nanomedicine, showing an increased drug perfusion without any overt side effects, may provide a potential strategy for improvement of the pancreatic cancer therapy.

  11. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhenzhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1 they themselves have target effects; (2 they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3 they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  12. Prostate Cancer; Metabolic Risk Factors, Drug Utilisation, Adverse Drug Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Grundmark, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Increased possibilities during the last decades for early detection of prostate cancer have sparked research on preventable or treatable risk factors and on improvements in therapy. Treatments of the disease still entail significant side effects potentially affecting men during the rest of their lives. The studies of the present thesis concern different aspects of prostate cancer from etiological risk factors and factors influencing treatment to an improved methodology for the detection of tr...

  13. Dual drug loaded chitosan nanoparticles-sugar--coated arsenal against pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Karolyn Infanta; Jaidev, Leela Raghav; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive form of cancer with poor survival rates. The increased mortality due to pancreatic cancer arises due to many factors such as development of multidrug resistance, presence of cancer stem cells, development of a stromal barrier and a hypoxic environment due to hypo-perfusion. The present study aims to develop a nanocarrier for a combination of drugs that can address these multiple issues. Quercetin and 5-fluorouracil were loaded in chitosan nanoparticles, individually as well as in combination. The nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, size, zeta potential, percentage encapsulation of drugs as well as their release profiles in different media. The dual drug-loaded carrier exhibited good entrapment efficiency (quercetin 95% and 5-fluorouracil 75%) with chitosan: quercetin: 5-fluorouracil in the ratio 3:1:2. The release profiles suggest that 5-fluorouracil preferentially localized in the periphery while quercetin was located towards the core of chitosan nanoparticles. Both drugs exhibited considerable association with the chitosan matrix. The dual drug-loaded carrier system exhibited significant toxicity towards pancreatic cancer cells both in the 2D as well as in the 3D cultures. We believe that the results from these studies can open up interesting options in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. New Zealand’s Drug Development Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Carswell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry’s profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ’s clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ’s clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  15. Methods for Elucidation of DNA-Anticancer Drug Interactions and their Applications in the Development of New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Majus; Mantegazza, Francesco; Beretta, Giovanni L

    2016-01-01

    DNA damaging agents including anthracyclines, camptothecins and platinum drugs are among most frequently used drugs in the chemotherapeutic routine. Due to their relatively low selectivity for cancer cells, administration of these drugs is associated with adverse side effects, inherent genotoxicity with risk of developing secondary cancers. Development of new drugs, which could be spared of these drawbacks and characterize by improved antitumor efficacy, remains challenging yet vitally important task. These properties are in large part dictated by the selectivity of interaction between the drug and DNA and in this way the studies aimed at elucidating the complex interactions between ligand and DNA represent a key step in the drug development. Studies of the drug-DNA interactions encompass determination of DNA sequence specificity and mode of DNA binding as well as kinetic, dynamic and structural parameters of binding. Here, we consider the types of interactions between small molecule ligands and polynucleotides, how they are affected by DNA sequence and structure, and what is their significance for the antitumor activity. Based on this knowledge, we discuss the wide array of experimental techniques available to researchers for studying drug-DNA interactions, which include absorption and emission spectroscopies, NMR, magnetic and optical tweezers or atomic force microscopy. We show, using the clinical and experimental anticancer drugs as examples, how these methods provide various types of information and at the same time complement each other to provide full picture of drug- DNA interaction and aid in the development of new drugs.

  16. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  17. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  18. Genetic variations may help identify best candidates for preventive breast cancer drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  19. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellularcarcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing causeof cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multitargetedkinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven toimprove outcomes in patients with advanced diseaseoffering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensivegenomic mapping has improved understanding of thegenetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), thisknowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The lastfew years have seen the failure of several first and secondline phase Ⅲ clinical trials of novel molecularly targetedtherapies, warranting a change in the way new therapiesare investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for thesefailures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trialdesign and a lack of biomarkers. This review discussesthe current crisis in HCC drug development and how weshould learn from recent trial failures to develop a moreeffective personalised treatment paradigm for patientswith HCC.

  20. Tumor lymphangiogenesis and new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Detmar, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have been regarded as passive by-standers, serving simply as a drainage system for interstitial fluid generated within the tumor. However, with growing evidence that tumors actively induce lymphangiogenesis, and that the number of lymphatic vessels closely correlates with metastasis and clinical outcome in various types of cancer, this picture has changed dramatically in recent years. Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have now emerged as a valid therapeutic target to control metastatic disease, and the first specific anti-lymphangiogenic drugs have recently entered clinical testing. Furthermore, we are just beginning to understand the whole functional spectrum of tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, which not only concerns transport of fluid and metastatic cells, but also includes the regulation of cancer stemness and specific inhibition of immune responses, opening new venues for therapeutic applications. Therefore, we predict that specific targeting of lymphatic vessels and their function will become an important tool for future cancer treatment.

  1. Trends in Anti-Epileptic Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Gram

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Several avenues are being explored in the development of new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs. For a number of years efforts have been directed towards compounds which may augment neuronal inhibition, and these efforts have resulted in the development of several valuable drugs. More recently, increased attention has been focused on the role which excitatory transmitters may play in epileptogenesis, and various substances which decrease excitation are currently being investigated at the preclinical level. Since considerable potential still resides in several of the drugs already on the market, resources have been spent on trying to modify/improve the chemical formula of some of these substances, and a number of new drugs has emerged as a result of this approach. The major accomplishments reviewed here in the development of new anti-epileptic drugs suggest that even more successful advances may be achieved in the near future.

  2. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  3. Improving the Tuberculosis Drug Development Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelopoulos, D; McHugh, T D

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is considered one of the most successful pathogens and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, a disease that urgently requires new chemical entities to be developed for treatment. There are currently several new molecules under clinical investigation in the tuberculosis (TB) drug development pipeline. However, the complex lifestyle of M. tuberculosis within the host presents a barrier to the development of new drugs. In this review, we highlight the reasons that make TB ...

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND REGISTRATION OF CHIRAL DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITTE, DT; ENSING, K; FRANKE, JP; DEZEEUW, RA

    1993-01-01

    In this review we describe the impact of chirality on drug development and registration in the United States, Japan and the European Community. Enantiomers may have differences in their pharmacological profiles, and, therefore, chiral drugs ask for special analytical and pharmacological attention du

  5. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-05-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering.

  6. Engineering a Brain Cancer Chip for High-throughput Drug Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yantao; Nguyen, Duong Thanh; Akay, Yasemin; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant of all human primary brain cancers, in which drug treatment is still one of the most effective treatments. However, existing drug discovery and development methods rely on the use of conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which have been proven to be poor representatives of native physiology. Here, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) brain cancer chip composed of photo-polymerizable poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel for drug screening. This chip can be produced after a few seconds of photolithography and requires no silicon wafer, replica molding, and plasma bonding like microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We then cultured glioblastoma cells (U87), which formed 3D brain cancer tissues on the chip, and used the GBM chip to perform combinatorial treatment of Pitavastatin and Irinotecan. The results indicate that this chip is capable of high-throughput GBM cancer spheroids formation, multiple-simultaneous drug administration, and a massive parallel testing of drug response. Our approach is easily reproducible, and this chip has the potential to be a powerful platform in cases such as high-throughput drug screening and prolonged drug release. The chip is also commercially promising for other clinical applications, including 3D cell culture and micro-scale tissue engineering. PMID:27151082

  7. Polyoxometalate-biomolecule conjugates: a new approach to create hybrid drugs for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Kuan; Cheng, Yi-Xing; Su, Ming-Ming; Xiao, Yu; Hu, Min-Biao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian

    2013-03-01

    Some polyoxometalate (POM) clusters have demonstrated attractive anticancer properties. Unfortunately, their cytotoxicity upon normal cell is one of fateful side effects obstructing their further clinic application as inorganic drugs. In this communication, we report a new approach to create hybrid drugs potentially for cancer therapeutics. At first, the POM cluster bioconjugates were created by attaching the bioactive ligands on an amine grafted POM via simple amidation reaction. The cytotoxicity study with breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and non-cancerous breast epithelial cell (MCF-10A) showed that rationally selected ligands with cancer-cell targeting ability on POM-biomolecule conjugates can impart enhanced anti-tumor activity and selectivity, thus representing a new concept to develop novel POM-biomolecule hybrid drugs with the potential synergistic effect: increased bioactivity and lower side effect.

  8. Atopy and development of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Nystrup Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Roswall, Nina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopy is the familial or personal propensity to develop IgE antibodies against environmental allergens. Atopy, theoretically, could both prevent and promote the development of cancer. However, evidence from epidemiologic studies has been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: We investigated...... the longitudinal association between atopy and the incidence of total and specific types of cancers of 5 Danish population-based studies. METHODS: Atopy was defined as serum specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens. A total of 14,849 persons were followed up prospectively by linkage to the Danish Cancer...... Registry. We used Cox regression analysis, and risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HR) (95% CIs) for persons with atopy versus those without atopy. RESULTS: There were 1919 incident cancers (median follow-up, 11.8 years). There were no statistically significant associations between atopy and risk of any...

  9. Bioresponsive polymer coated drug nanorods for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemthong, Tunyaboon; Kim, Hannah H.; Dunlap, Kelly; Brocker, Caitlin; Barua, Dipak; Forciniti, Daniel; Huang, Yue-Wern; Barua, Sutapa

    2017-01-01

    Ineffective drug release at the target site is among the top challenges for cancer treatment. This reflects the facts that interaction with the physiological condition can denature active ingredients of drugs, and low delivery to the disease microenvironment leads to poor therapeutic outcomes. We hypothesize that depositing a thin layer of bioresponsive polymer on the surface of drug nanoparticles would not only protect drugs from degradation but also allow the release of drugs at the target site. Here, we report a one-step process to prepare bioresponsive polymer coated drug nanorods (NRs) from liquid precursors using the solvent diffusion method. A thin layer (10.3 ± 1.4 nm) of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer coating was deposited on the surface of camptothecin (CPT) anti-cancer drug NRs. The mean size of PCL-coated CPT NRs was 500.9 ± 91.3 nm length × 122.7 ± 10.1 nm width. The PCL polymer coating was biodegradable at acidic pH 6 as determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. CPT drugs were released up to 51.5% when PCL coating dissolved into non-toxic carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. Trastuzumab (TTZ), a humanized IgG monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to the NR surface for breast cancer cell targeting. Combination treatments using CPT and TTZ decreased the HER-2 positive BT-474 breast cancer cell growth by 66.9 ± 5.3% in vitro. These results suggest effective combination treatments of breast cancer cells using bioresponsive polymer coated drug delivery.

  10. Development of biosimilars in an era of oncologic drug shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li E

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Edward Li,1 Janakiraman Subramanian,2 Scott Anderson,3 Dolca Thomas,4 Jason McKinley,5 Ira A Jacobs4 1University of New England College of Pharmacy, Portland, ME, USA; 2Hanna Cancer Associates, Knoxville, TN, USA; 3Pfizer Inc, La Jolla, CA, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 5Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA Abstract: Acute and chronic shortages of various pharmaceuticals and particularly of sterile injectable products are being reported on a global scale, prompting evaluation of more effective strategies to manage current shortages and development of new, high-quality pharmaceutical products to mitigate the risk of potential future shortages. Oncology drugs such as liposomal doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil represent examples of first-choice drugs critically affected by shortages. Survey results indicate that the majority of hospitals and practicing oncologists have experienced drug shortages, which may have compromised patient safety and clinical outcomes, and increased health care costs, due to delays or changes in treatment regimens. Clinical trials evaluating novel agents in combination with standard-of-care drugs are also being affected by drug shortages. Clinical and ethical considerations on treatment objectives, drug indication, and availability of alternative options may help in prioritizing cancer patients involved in active drug shortages. The United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have identified manufacturing problems, delays in supply, and lack of available active ingredients as the most frequent causes of recent or ongoing drug shortages, and have released specific guidance to monitor, manage, and reduce the risk of shortages. The upcoming loss of exclusivity for a number of anticancer biologics, together with the introduction of an abbreviated approval pathway for biosimilars, raises the question of whether these products will be vulnerable to shortages. Future supply by reliable

  11. Insulin-like growth factor 2 silencing restores taxol sensitivity in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone.

  12. SWCNT-Polymer Nanocomplexes for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withey, Paul; Momin, Zoya; Bommoju, Anvesh; Hoang, Trung; Rashid, Bazlur

    2015-03-01

    Utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as more effective drug-delivery agents are being considered due to their ability to easily cross cell membranes, while their high aspect ratio and large surface area provide multiple attachment sites for biocompatible drug complexes. However, excessive bundling of pristine SWCNTs caused by strong attractive Van der Walls forces between CNT sidewalls is a major obstacle. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs with both polyvinyl alcohol and Pluronic biocompatible polymers, and attached anti-cancer drugs Camptothecin (CPT) and Doxorubicin to form non-covalent CNT-polymer-drug conjugates in aqueous solution. Polymeric dispersion of SWCNTs by both polymers is confirmed by clearly identifiable near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence emission peaks of individual (7,5) and (7,6) nanotubes, and drug attachment to form complete complexes verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy. These complexes, with varying SWCNT and drug concentrations, were tested for effectiveness by exposing them to a line of human embryonic kidney cancer cells and analyzed for cell viability. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in drug effectiveness on the cancer cells, with more successful internalization due to unaltered SWCNTs as the drug carriers. Supported by the UHCL Faculty Research Support Fund.

  13. A method for predicting target drug efficiency in cancer based on the analysis of signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, Artem; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Michael; Lezhnina, Ksenia; Jellen, Leslie; Zhukov, Nikolay; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Borisov, Nicolas; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-06

    A new generation of anticancer therapeutics called target drugs has quickly developed in the 21st century. These drugs are tailored to inhibit cancer cell growth, proliferation, and viability by specific interactions with one or a few target proteins. However, despite formally known molecular targets for every "target" drug, patient response to treatment remains largely individual and unpredictable. Choosing the most effective personalized treatment remains a major challenge in oncology and is still largely trial and error. Here we present a novel approach for predicting target drug efficacy based on the gene expression signature of the individual tumor sample(s). The enclosed bioinformatic algorithm detects activation of intracellular regulatory pathways in the tumor in comparison to the corresponding normal tissues. According to the nature of the molecular targets of a drug, it predicts whether the drug can prevent cancer growth and survival in each individual case by blocking the abnormally activated tumor-promoting pathways or by reinforcing internal tumor suppressor cascades. To validate the method, we compared the distribution of predicted drug efficacy scores for five drugs (Sorafenib, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Sorafenib, Imatinib, Sunitinib) and seven cancer types (Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colon cancer, Lung adenocarcinoma, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Thyroid cancer and Sarcoma) with the available clinical trials data for the respective cancer types and drugs. The percent of responders to a drug treatment correlated significantly (Pearson's correlation 0.77 p = 0.023) with the percent of tumors showing high drug scores calculated with the current algorithm.

  14. Salinomycin as a Drug for Targeting Human Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Naujokat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess self-renewal and tumor initiation capacity and the ability to give rise to the heterogenous lineages of malignant cells that comprise a tumor. CSCs possess multiple intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, novel tumor-targeted drugs, and radiation therapy, allowing them to survive standard cancer therapies and to initiate tumor recurrence and metastasis. Various molecular complexes and pathways that confer resistance and survival of CSCs, including expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC drug transporters, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, have been identified recently. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus, has been shown to kill CSCs in different types of human cancers, most likely by interfering with ABC drug transporters, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and other CSC pathways. Promising results from preclinical trials in human xenograft mice and a few clinical pilote studies reveal that salinomycin is able to effectively eliminate CSCs and to induce partial clinical regression of heavily pretreated and therapy-resistant cancers. The ability of salinomycin to kill both CSCs and therapy-resistant cancer cells may define the compound as a novel and an effective anticancer drug.

  15. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingliang Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  16. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Bingliang [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  17. Development of cancer cooperative groups in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2010-09-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical trials are essential for improving the standard of care for cancer patients, because pharmaceutical companies do not conduct trials that evaluate combination chemotherapy using drugs from different companies, surgery, radiotherapy or multimodal treatments. Government-sponsored cooperative groups have played a vital role in developing cancer therapeutics since the 1950s in the USA; however, the establishment of these groups in Japan did not take place until 30 years later. Methodological standards for multicenter cancer clinical trials were established in the 1980s by the National Cancer Institute and cooperative groups. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group, one of the largest cooperative groups in the country, was instituted in 1990. Its data center and operations office, formed during the 1990s, applied the standard methods of US cooperative groups. At present, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group consists of 14 subgroups, a Data Center, an Operations Office, nine standing committees and an Executive Committee represented by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group Chair. Quality control and quality assurance at the Japan Clinical Oncology Group, including regular central monitoring, statistical methods, interim analyses, adverse event reporting and site visit audit, have complied with international standards. Other cooperative groups have also been established in Japan since the 1980s; however, nobody figures out all of them. A project involving the restructuring of US cooperative groups has been ongoing since 2005. Learning from the success of this project will permit further progress of the cancer clinical trials enterprise in Japan.

  18. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, V. K.; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  19. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance.Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in

  20. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  1. Discovery of Drug Synergies in Gastric Cancer Cells Predicted by Logical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flobak, Åsmund; Baudot, Anaïs; Remy, Elisabeth; Thommesen, Liv; Thieffry, Denis; Kuiper, Martin; Lægreid, Astrid

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of efficient anti-cancer drug combinations is a major challenge, since experimental testing of all possible combinations is clearly impossible. Recent efforts to computationally predict drug combination responses retain this experimental search space, as model definitions typically rely on extensive drug perturbation data. We developed a dynamical model representing a cell fate decision network in the AGS gastric cancer cell line, relying on background knowledge extracted from literature and databases. We defined a set of logical equations recapitulating AGS data observed in cells in their baseline proliferative state. Using the modeling software GINsim, model reduction and simulation compression techniques were applied to cope with the vast state space of large logical models and enable simulations of pairwise applications of specific signaling inhibitory chemical substances. Our simulations predicted synergistic growth inhibitory action of five combinations from a total of 21 possible pairs. Four of the predicted synergies were confirmed in AGS cell growth real-time assays, including known effects of combined MEK-AKT or MEK-PI3K inhibitions, along with novel synergistic effects of combined TAK1-AKT or TAK1-PI3K inhibitions. Our strategy reduces the dependence on a priori drug perturbation experimentation for well-characterized signaling networks, by demonstrating that a model predictive of combinatorial drug effects can be inferred from background knowledge on unperturbed and proliferating cancer cells. Our modeling approach can thus contribute to preclinical discovery of efficient anticancer drug combinations, and thereby to development of strategies to tailor treatment to individual cancer patients.

  2. Novel therapeutic modalities and drug delivery in pancreatic cancer – an ongoing search for improved efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an incredibly challenging disease due to its high rates of resistance to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There has been little improvement in the prognosis of pancreatic cancer cases in the past decades, highlighting the crucial need for more effective therapeutic approaches. Erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor, and gemcitabine, a nucleoside analog, are currently used in combination for chemotherapy treatment, but new developments in drug delivery systems using liposomes and nanoparticles may be promising new modalities for management of the disease. In addition to standard chemotherapeutic drugs, these delivery systems can be utilized to deliver therapeutic agents such as siRNA, oncolytic viruses, small molecule inhibitors, antibodies, and suicide genes. Further work is required to elucidate how ligands and antibodies could be used to enhance the targeted delivery of drugs, thus increasing specificity, improving stability, and reducing the effect of the drugs on healthy tissue. Despite significant preclinical data, there are currently very few clinical trials involving pancreatic cancer targeted drug delivery. This article summarizes current developments in targeted pancreatic cancer drug delivery, focusing on delivery systems, targets, and therapeutic agents.

  3. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  4. Antilipolytic drug boosts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Koziorowski, Jacek;

    2013-01-01

    The antilipolytic drug Acipimox reduces free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the blood stream. We examined the effect of reduced FFAs on glucose metabolism in androgen-dependent (CWR22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts.......The antilipolytic drug Acipimox reduces free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the blood stream. We examined the effect of reduced FFAs on glucose metabolism in androgen-dependent (CWR22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts....

  5. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  6. Chemical genetics and drug screening in Drosophila cancer models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara Gladstone; Tin Tin Su

    2011-01-01

    Drug candidates often fail in preclinical and clinical testing because of reasons of efficacy and/or safety.It would be time- and cost-efficient to have screening models that reduce the rate of such false positive candidates that appear promising at first but fail later.In this regard,it would be particularly useful to have a rapid and inexpensive whole animal model that can pre-select hits from high-throughput screens but before testing in costly rodent assays.Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a potential whole animal model for drug screening.Of particular interest have been drugs that must act in the context of multi-cellularity such as those for neurological disorders and cancer.A recent review provides a comprehensive summary of drug screening in Drosophila,but with an emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders.Here,we review Drosophila screens in the literature aimed at cancer therapeutics.

  7. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  8. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  9. Trial geography, pharmacogenetics, and global drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, R N; Florian, J; Charlab, R; Pacanowski, M

    2015-03-01

    Drug development is increasingly global. The benefits of multiregional trials include worldwide evaluation of safety and efficacy. However, clinical practice, environmental, and genetic factors can vary across geographic regions, significantly influencing trial outcomes within a specific geographic region or the global population relative to the United States (US). Genomic technologies and research discoveries continue to advance at a remarkable pace, offering opportunities to explore intrinsic factors that could account for regional variability in drug pharmacokinetics or response.

  10. TRPV3 in Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Broad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3 is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1, however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300 has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist.

  11. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  12. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-chung Lee,1,2 Qing-Dong Ling,1,3 Wan-Chun Yu,4 Chunh-Ming Hung,4 Ta-Chun Kao,4 Yi-Wei Huang,4 Akon Higuchi3–51Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, 2Department of Surgery, Cathay General Hospital, Da'an District, Taipei, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Hsi-Chi City, Taipei, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Reproduction, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Okura, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs.Methods: The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction.Results: Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the

  13. Cancer, obesity, diabetes, and antidiabetic drugs: is the fog clearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Azoulay, Laurent; Pollak, Michael N

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity, of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and of cancer are all increasing globally. The relationships between these diseases are complex, and thus difficult to elucidate; nevertheless, evidence supports the hypothesis that obesity increases the risks of both T2DM and certain cancers. Further complexity arises from controversial evidence that specific drugs used in the treatment of T2DM increase or decrease cancer risk or influence cancer prognosis. Herein, we review the current evidence from studies that have addressed these relationships, and summarize the methodological challenges that are frequently encountered in such research. We also outline the physiology that links obesity, T2DM, and neoplasia. Finally, we outline the practical principles relevant to the increasingly common challenge of managing patients who have been diagnosed with both diabetes and cancer.

  14. Polymer functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes mediated drug delivery of gliotoxin in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kiml, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, significant development has been achieved in carbon nanotube conjugated with polymer system for drug delivery system (DDS). In the present study, we have prepared functionalized single walled carbon nanotube conjugated with chitooligosaccharide (f-SWNT-COS) as a Drug Delivery System. In addition, drug Gliotoxin (GTX) and targeting molecules (Lysozyme, p53 and Folic acid) have been incorporated into f-SWNT-COS. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-lysozyme, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-FA have been physiochemically characterized for DDS. FT-IR, SEM and TEM analysis confirmed the formation of chemical interaction and polymer coating. FT-IR result clearly confirmed the interaction between f-SWNT and COS. The effective drug release was monitored against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells and Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cells and it was found that all the three drug delivery systems showed significant cytotoxicity. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 delivery vehicle and its effective cytotoxicity on HeLa cells was further checked with fluorescent activated cell sorter analysis. Our results suggest that the f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 is the most effective delivery vehicle with a controlled release and enhanced cytotoxicity rendered through apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. These systems can further be used for the delivery of other commercially available anti cancer drugs as well.

  15. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  16. Synergistic Effect of Cold Atmospheric Plasma and Drug Loaded Core-shell Nanoparticles on Inhibiting Breast Cancer Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Castro, Nathan J; Yan, Dayun; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Nano-based drug delivery devices allowing for effective and sustained targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors have revolutionized cancer treatment. As an emerging biomedical technique, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ionized non-thermal gas mixture composed of various reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and UV photons, shows great potential for cancer treatment. Here we seek to develop a new dual cancer therapeutic method by integrating promising CAP and novel drug loaded core-shell nanoparticles and evaluate its underlying mechanism for targeted breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized via co-axial electrospraying. Biocompatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) was selected as the polymer shell to encapsulate anti-cancer therapeutics. Results demonstrated uniform size distribution and high drug encapsulation efficacy of the electrosprayed nanoparticles. Cell studies demonstrated the effectiveness of drug loaded nanoparticles and CAP for synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cell growth when compared to each treatment separately. Importantly, we found CAP induced down-regulation of metastasis related gene expression (VEGF, MTDH, MMP9, and MMP2) as well as facilitated drug loaded nanoparticle uptake which may aid in minimizing drug resistance-a major problem in chemotherapy. Thus, the integration of CAP and drug encapsulated nanoparticles provides a promising tool for the development of a new cancer treatment strategy.

  17. New developments in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Wadia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past 5 years, the treatment and understanding of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC have improved dramatically. Our understanding of the mechanisms of castration resistance has allowed for the development of new drugs to target prostate cancer, and our understanding of genetic mutations may give us new tools with which to more accurately diagnose and be able to predict the course of this heterogeneous disease. This article summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the development of CRPC, as well as the new drugs and targets, which have evolved from this basic research.

  18. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  19. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-02-03

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  20. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  1. Integrating Multiscale Modeling with Drug Effects for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangfang L; Oduola, Wasiu O; Qian, Lijun; Dougherty, Edward R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review multiscale modeling for cancer treatment with the incorporation of drug effects from an applied system's pharmacology perspective. Both the classical pharmacology and systems biology are inherently quantitative; however, systems biology focuses more on networks and multi factorial controls over biological processes rather than on drugs and targets in isolation, whereas systems pharmacology has a strong focus on studying drugs with regard to the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relations accompanying drug interactions with multiscale physiology as well as the prediction of dosage-exposure responses and economic potentials of drugs. Thus, it requires multiscale methods to address the need for integrating models from the molecular levels to the cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is a common belief that tumorigenesis and tumor growth can be best understood and tackled by employing and integrating a multifaceted approach that includes in vivo and in vitro experiments, in silico models, multiscale tumor modeling, continuous/discrete modeling, agent-based modeling, and multiscale modeling with PK/PD drug effect inputs. We provide an example application of multiscale modeling employing stochastic hybrid system for a colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with the application of Lapatinib drug. It is observed that the simulation results are similar to those observed from the setup of the wet-lab experiments at the Translational Genomics Research Institute.

  2. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  3. Are isothiocyanates potential anti-cancer drugs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang WU; Qing-hua ZHOU; Ke XU

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are naturally occurring small molecules that are formed from glucosinolate precursors of cruciferous vegetables. Many isothiocyanates, both natural and synthetic, display anticarcinogenic activity because they reduce activation of carcinogens and increase their detoxification. Recent studies show that they exhibit anti-tumor activity by affecting multiple pathways including apoptosis, MAPK signaling, oxidative stress, and cell cycle progression. This review summarizes the current knowledge on isothiocyanates and focuses on their role as potential anti-cancer agents.

  4. Differential pathway dependency discovery associated with drug response across cancer cell lines. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effort to personalize treatment plans for cancer patients involves the identification of drug treatments that can effectively target the disease while minimizing the likelihood of adverse reactions. In this study, the gene-expression profile of 810 cancer cell lines and their response data to 368 small molecules from the Cancer Therapeutics Research Portal (CTRP) are analyzed to identify pathways with significant rewiring between genes, or differential gene dependency, between sensitive and non-sensitive cell lines.

  5. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  6. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing.

  7. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors meditate targeted delivery of anticancer drug with encapsulated nanoparticles to breast cancer cells with high selectivity and its potential for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Shen, Zheyu; Ma, Xuehua; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Gong, An; Xia, Tian; Guo, Junming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-03-11

    By enabling nanoparticle-based drug delivery system to actively target cancer cells with high selectivity, active targeted molecules have attracted great attention in the application of nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery. However, the clinical application of most active targeted molecules in breast cancer therapy is limited, due to the low expression of their receptors in breast tumors or coexpression in the normal and tumor breast tissues. Here, a neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors ligand PNBL-NPY, as a novel targeted molecule, is conjugated with anticancer drug doxorubicin encapsulating albumin nanoparticles to investigate the effect of Y1 receptors on the delivery of drug-loaded nanoparticles to breast cancer cells and its potential for breast cancer therapy. The PNBL-NPY can actively recognize and bind to the Y1 receptors that are significantly overexpressed on the surface of the breast cancer cells, and the drug-loaded nanoparticles are delivered directly into the cancer cells through internalization. This system is highly selective and able to distinguish the breast cancer cells from the normal cells, due to normal breast cells that express Y2 receptors only. It is anticipated that this study may provide a guidance in the development of Y1 receptor-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system for a safer and more efficient breast cancer therapy.

  8. Polymeric micelles with stimuli-triggering systems for advanced cancer drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masamichi; Akimoto, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1990s, nanoscale drug carriers have played a pivotal role in cancer chemotherapy, acting through passive drug delivery mechanisms and subsequent pharmaceutical action at tumor tissues with reduction of adverse effects. Polymeric micelles, as supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic polymers, have been considerably developed as promising drug carrier candidates, and a number of clinical studies of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric micelle carriers for cancer chemotherapy applications are now in progress. However, these systems still face several issues; at present, the simultaneous control of target-selective delivery and release of incorporated drugs remains difficult. To resolve these points, the introduction of stimuli-responsive mechanisms to drug carrier systems is believed to be a promising approach to provide better solutions for future tumor drug targeting strategies. As possible trigger signals, biological acidic pH, light, heating/cooling and ultrasound actively play significant roles in signal-triggering drug release and carrier interaction with target cells. This review article summarizes several molecular designs for stimuli-responsive polymeric micelles in response to variation of pH, light and temperature and discusses their potentials as next-generation tumor drug targeting systems.

  9. Novel candidate metastasis genes as putative drug targets for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosmalen, Wilhelmina Paulina Elisabeth van

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive studies to unravel molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis, still 3500 women die of the results of this disease in the Netherlands each year. Improving our understanding of metastasis formation remains a challenge for further drug development. The scope of this the

  10. A New Drug Combinatory Effect Prediction Algorithm on the Cancer Cell Based on Gene Expression and Dose-Response Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, C Pankaj; Cheng, L; Alexander, P S; Singal, A; Li, L

    2015-02-01

    Gene expression data before and after treatment with an individual drug and the IC20 of dose-response data were utilized to predict two drugs' interaction effects on a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cancer cell. A novel drug interaction scoring algorithm was developed to account for either synergistic or antagonistic effects between drug combinations. Different core gene selection schemes were investigated, which included the whole gene set, the drug-sensitive gene set, the drug-sensitive minus drug-resistant gene set, and the known drug target gene set. The prediction scores were compared with the observed drug interaction data at 6, 12, and 24 hours with a probability concordance (PC) index. The test result shows the concordance between observed and predicted drug interaction ranking reaches a PC index of 0.605. The scoring reliability and efficiency was further confirmed in five drug interaction studies published in the GEO database.

  11. 5-FU Metabolism in Cancer and Orally-Administrable 5-FU Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Sasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a key anticancer drug that for its broad antitumor activity, as well as for its synergism with other anticancer drugs, has been used to treat various types of malignancies. In chemotherapeutic regimens, 5-FU has been combined with oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other drugs as a continuous intravenous infusion. Recent clinical chemotherapy studies have shown that several of the regimens with oral 5-FU drugs are not inferior compared to those involving continuous 5-FU infusion chemotherapy, and it is probable that in some regimens continuous 5-FU infusion can be replaced by oral 5-FU drugs. Historically, both the pharmaceutical industry and academia in Japan have been involved in the development of oral 5-FU drugs, and this review will focus on the current knowledge of 5-FU anabolism and catabolism, and the available information about the various orally-administrable 5-FU drugs, including UFT, S-1 and capecitabine. Clinical studies comparing the efficacy and adverse events of S-1 and capecitabine have been reported, and the accumulated results should be utilized to optimize the treatment of cancer patients. On the other hand, it is essential to elucidate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of each of the newly-developed drugs, to correctly select the drugs for each patient in the clinical setting, and to further develop optimized drug derivatives.

  12. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika;

    2014-01-01

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability...

  13. Lipid-coated polymeric nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Sangeetha; Vaiyapuri, Rajendran; Zhang, Liangfang; Chan, Juliana M

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes have been the platform of choice for nanoparticle-based cancer drug delivery applications over the past decade, but extensive research has revealed their limitations as drug delivery carriers. A hybrid class of nanoparticles, aimed at combining the advantages of both polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, has received attention in recent years. These core/shell type nanoparticles, frequently referred to as lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs), possess several characteristics that make them highly suitable for drug delivery. This review introduces the formulation methods used to synthesize LPNs and discusses the strategies used to treat cancer, such as by targeting the tumor microenvironment or vasculature. Finally, it discusses the challenges that must be overcome to realize the full potential of LPNs in the clinic.

  14. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  15. Metformin: Can a Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1957, the first results from a clinical trial of the diabetes drug metformin in patients were published. Yet, it would take nearly 40 years for the drug to be approved in the United States as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Now researchers want to know whether this decades-old drug may have additional uses in another disease—cancer. |

  16. Chromatin targeting drugs in cancer and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinjha, Rab; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Recent advances in the enzymology of transcription and chromatin regulation have led to the discovery of proteins that play a prominent role in cell differentiation and the maintenance of specialized cell functions. Knowledge about post-synthetic DNA and histone modifications as well as information about the rules that guide the formation of multimolecular chromatin-bound complexes have helped to delineate gene-regulating pathways and describe how these pathways are altered in various pathological conditions. The present review focuses on the emerging area of therapeutic interference with chromatin function for the purpose of cancer treatment and immunomodulation.

  17. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  18. [Adaptive clinical study methodologies in drug development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, János

    2015-11-29

    The evolution of drug development in human, clinical phase studies triggers the overview of those technologies and procedures which are labelled as adaptive clinical trials. The most relevant procedural and operational aspects will be discussed in this overview from points of view of clinico-methodological aspect.

  19. Drug delivery by a self-assembled DNA tetrahedron for overcoming drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Kim, Da-Rae; Lee, Taemin; Yhee, Ji Young; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kwon, Ick Chan; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-03-11

    A DNA tetrahedron is employed for efficient delivery of doxorubicin into drug-resistant breast cancer cells. The drug delivered with the DNA nanoconstruct is considerably cytotoxic, whereas free doxorubicin is virtually non-cytotoxic for the drug-resistant cells. Thus, the DNA tetrahedron, made of the inherently natural and biocompatible material, can be a good candidate for the drug carrier to overcome MDR in cancer cells.

  20. Chrysin and its emerging role in cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-07-05

    This letter illustrates the significant chemosensitizing effects of chrysin to resistance cancer cells and refers to the article on "Combination of chrysin and cisplatin promotes the apoptosis of Hep G2 cells by up-regulating p53" by Li et al., published in your journal recently. Recent studies have demonstrated that chrysin is able to sensitize or kill cancer cells which are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, doxorubicin and adriamycin. Owing to its potential anti-cancer effects and devoid of toxicity to non-transformed cells, further research is required to completely explore its chemosensitizing effects in other cancers and also assess and evaluate its safety, before going for possible human application.

  1. Incorporating patient preferences into drug development and regulatory decision making: Results from a quantitative pilot study with cancer patients, carers, and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postmus, D; Mavris, M; Hillege, H L; Salmonson, T; Ryll, B; Plate, A; Moulon, I; Eichler, H-G; Bere, N; Pignatti, F

    2016-05-01

    Currently, patient preference studies are not required to be included in marketing authorization applications to regulatory authorities, and the role and methodology for such studies have not been agreed upon. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) conducted a pilot study to gain experience on how the collection of individual preferences can inform the regulatory review. Using a short online questionnaire, ordinal statements regarding the desirability of different outcomes in the treatment of advanced cancer were elicited from 139 participants (98 regulators, 29 patient or carers, and 12 healthcare professionals). This was followed by face-to-face meetings to gather feedback and validate the individual responses. In this article we summarize the EMA pilot study and discuss the role of patient preference studies within the regulatory review. Based on the results, we conclude that our preference elicitation instrument was easy to implement and sufficiently precise to learn about the distribution of the participants' individual preferences.

  2. RFS2000 (9-nitrocamptothecin) in advanced small cell lung cancer, a phase II study of the EORTC New Drug Development Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, C J A; de Jonge, M J A; Monfardini, S; Daugaard, G; Fiedler, W; Baron, B; Lacombe, D; Fumoleau, P

    2004-06-01

    Camptothecins have shown efficacy in terms of response rate in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). RFS2000 is a new camptothecin derivative, which has shown objective responses in various tumour types. The aim of this phase II study was to determine the objective response rate of RFS2000 in patients with sensitive and refractory SCLC. RFS2000 was given orally at 1.5 mg/m(2) per day for five consecutive days (five days on - two days off) on a continuous basis. Patients were evaluated weekly for toxicity and every six weeks for response. Thirty seven patients were included, 36 patients (14 with sensitive and 22 with refractory SCLC) were evaluable for toxicity, and 35 patients were evaluable for response. No objective responses were observed. Toxicity was acceptable, with myelosuppression, nausea/vomiting, and diarrhoea as the main toxicities. RFS2000 therefore has an acceptable toxicity profile but is not active as a single agent in SCLC.

  3. Outsmarting cancer: the power of hybrid genomic/proteomic biomarkers to predict drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexer, Brent N; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    A recent study by Niepel and colleagues describes a novel approach to predicting response to targeted anti-cancer therapies. The authors used biochemical profiling of signaling activity in basal and ligand-stimulated states for a panel of receptor and intracellular kinases to develop predictive models of drug sensitivity. In some cases, the response to ligand stimulation predicted drug response better than did target abundance or genomic alterations in the targeted pathway. Furthermore, combining biochemical profiles with genomic information was better at predicting drug response. This work suggests that incorporating biochemical signaling profiles with genomic alterations should provide powerful predictors of response to molecularly targeted therapies.

  4. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development.

  5. Regulatory approval of cancer risk-reducing (chemopreventive) drugs: moving what we have learned into the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyskens, Frank L; Curt, Gregory A; Brenner, Dean E; Gordon, Gary; Herberman, Ronald B; Finn, Olivera; Kelloff, Gary J; Khleif, Samir N; Sigman, Caroline C; Szabo, Eva

    2011-03-01

    This article endeavors to clarify the current requirements and status of regulatory approval for chemoprevention (risk reduction) drugs and discusses possible improvements to the regulatory pathway for chemoprevention. Covering a wide range of topics in as much depth as space allows, this report is written in a style to facilitate the understanding of nonscientists and to serve as a framework for informing the directions of experts engaged more deeply with this issue. Key topics we cover here are as follows: a history of definitive cancer chemoprevention trials and their influence on the evolution of regulatory assessments; a brief review of the long-standing success of pharmacologic risk reduction of cardiovascular diseases and its relevance to approval for cancer risk reduction drugs; the use and limitations of biomarkers for developing and the approval of cancer risk reduction drugs; the identification of individuals at a high(er) risk for cancer and who are appropriate candidates for risk reduction drugs; business models that should incentivize pharmaceutical industry investment in cancer risk reduction; a summary of scientific and institutional barriers to development of cancer risk reduction drugs; and a summary of major recommendations that should help facilitate the pathway to regulatory approval for pharmacologic cancer risk reduction drugs.

  6. Nanotechnology-based intelligent drug design for cancer metastasis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Haijun; Gu, Songen; Zhao, Rongli; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional chemotherapy used today at clinics is mainly inherited from the thinking and designs made four decades ago when the Cancer War was declared. The potency of those chemotherapy drugs on in-vitro cancer cells is clearly demonstrated at even nanomolar levels. However, due to their non-specific effects in the body on normal tissues, these drugs cause toxicity, deteriorate patient's life quality, weaken the host immunosurveillance system, and result in an irreversible damage to human's own recovery power. Owing to their unique physical and biological properties, nanotechnology-based chemotherapies seem to have an ability to specifically and safely reach tumor foci with enhanced efficacy and low toxicity. Herein, we comprehensively examine the current nanotechnology-based pharmaceutical platforms and strategies for intelligent design of new nanomedicines based on targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) for cancer metastasis treatment, analyze the pros and cons of nanomedicines versus traditional chemotherapy, and evaluate the importance that nanomaterials can bring in to significantly improve cancer metastasis treatment.

  7. The biology and clinical development of MEK inhibitors for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Ott, Patrick A; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2014-12-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK) MEK1 and MEK2 are integral members of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and are of interest in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics. The MAPK/ERK pathway is dysregulated in more than 30 % of cancers, predominately by mutations in RAS and BRAF proteins, and MEK serves as a potential downstream target for both of these. The biology of MEK inhibition is complex, as the molecule is differentially regulated by upstream RAS or RAF. This has impacted on the past development of MEK inhibitors as treatments for cancer and may be exploited in more rational, molecularly selected drug development plans in the future. The role of MEK in cancer and the mechanism of action of MEK inhibitors is reviewed. Furthermore, MEK inhibitors that are available in standard practice, as well as those most advanced in clinical development, are discussed. Finally, next steps in the development of MEK inhibitors are considered.

  8. Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructures for the detection of cancer cells and anticancer drug activity by potential sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jingjie; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shaowei; Gao, Li; Xu, Ping; Li, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a cell dysfunction disease. The detection of cancer cells is extremely important for early diagnosis and clinical treatments. At present, the pretreatment for the detection of cancer cells is costly, complicated and time-consuming. As different species of the analytes may give rise to specific voltammetric signals at distinctly different potentials, simple potential sensing has the specificity to detect different cellular species. By taking advantage of the different electrochemical characteristics of normal cells, cancer cells and biointeractions between anticancer drugs and cancer cells, we develop a specific, sensitive, direct, cost-effective and rapid method for the detection of cancer cells by electrochemical potential sensing based on Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructure electrodes that will be of significance in early cancer diagnosis, in vitro screening of anticancer drugs and molecular biology research.

  9. A green approach to dual-drug nanoformulations with targeting and synergistic effects for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Lu, Yue; Fan, Zhongxiong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Yuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2017-11-01

    Exploration of efficient dual-drug nanohybrids, particularly those with high drug loading, specific targeting property, and long-termed stability, is of highly importance in cancer therapy. A pH-driven coprecipitation was performed in the aqueous phase to obtain a dual-drug nanoformulation, composed of 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) nanoneedles integrated with an exterior thin layer of the methotrexate (MTX)-chitosan conjugate. The high stability of nanohybrids in water and the targeting property provided by the MTX ingredient function synergistically to the prolonged and sustained drug release property in tumor tissues and the increased cellular uptake. The cytotoxicity test illustrates that dual-drug nanoneedles possess the remarkable killing ability to HeLa cells with the combination index at 0.33 ± 0.07. After cellular internalization, the release of both drug ingredients results in an excellent anticancer activity in vivo with the minimized adverse side effects. Design of a green approach to the carrier-free, dual-drug nanoformulations enables to develop emerging drug delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Current scenario of drug development for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Simon L; Seifert, Karin; Yardley, Vanessa

    2006-03-01

    Although three new drugs or drug formulations, liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), miltefosine and paromomycin should be available for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) within the next year, they all suffer from limitations of either cost, specific toxicities or parenteral administration. As part of research to identify better treatments for VL and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), alternative and potentially cheaper formulations of amphotericin B, alklyphosphocholines other than miltefosine and improved formulations of paromomycin for CL have been identified. Other drugs or compounds that have demonstrated activity in experimental rodent models of infection include licochalcone derivatives, quinoline derivatives, bisphosphonates and a maesabalide; further chemistry based upon these leads is warranted. The process for discovery and development of new antileishmanials would also benefit from improved models, for example, transfected parasites, and non invasive methods of measuring parasite load in rodent models of infection.

  11. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs.

  12. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  13. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hyeong-Min Lee; Yuna Kim

    2016-01-01

    Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive,...

  14. Animal models in drug development for MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    One of the foremost challenges of drug discovery in any therapeutic area is that of solidifying the correlation between in vitro activity and clinical efficacy. Between these is the confirmation that affecting a particular target in vivo will lead to a therapeutic benefit. In antibacterial drug discovery, there is a key advantage from the start, since the targets are bacteria-therefore, it is simple to ascertain in vitro whether a drug has the desired effect, i.e., bacterial cell inhibition or killing, and to understand the mechanism by which that occurs. The downstream criteria, whether a compound reaches the infection site and achieves appropriately high levels to affect bacterial viability, can be evaluated in animal models of infection. In this way animal models of infection can be a highly valuable and predictive bridge between in vitro drug discovery and early clinical evaluation.The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide variety of infections in humans (Archer, Clin Infect Dis 26:1179-1181, 1998) and has been said to be able to infect every tissue type. Fortunately, over the years a great deal of effort has been expended toward developing infection models in rodents using this organism, with good success. This chapter will describe the advantages, methods, and outcome measurements of the rodent models most used in drug discovery for S. aureus. Mouse models will be the focus of this chapter, as they are the most economical and thus most commonly used, but a rat infection model is included as well.

  15. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  16. A study from the EORTC new drug development group: open label phase II study of sabarubicin (MEN-10755) in patients with progressive hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, W; Tchen, N; Bloch, J; Fargeot, P; Sorio, R; Vermorken, J B; Collette, L; Lacombe, D; Twelves, C

    2006-01-01

    Sabarubicin (MEN-10755), a new synthetic anthracycline analogue, was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicentre phase II study in patients with advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Thirty seven patients were included, of which 34 were evaluable for PSA response according to Bubley's criteria. Sabarubicin was administered as a short (30 min) intravenous infusion at a dose of 80 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. The main toxicity consisted of grade 3/4 neutropenia in 24 patients (64.9%), with grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia occurring in one patient only. Grade 3/4 cardiotoxicity was observed in 4 patients including one ineligible. Other toxicities were mild. Nine patients achieved a PSA response (26.5%), 10 patients had stable disease (29.4%) and 14 patients disease progression (41.2%). One patient (2.9%) had a PSA response that was not confirmed by repeat PSA testing. The objective response rate according to RECIST criteria was 6.7% in 15 patients with measurable disease. The median duration of PSA responses was relatively long 7.1 months (95% CI 4.9-20.7) as was the median time to treatment progression in patients with stable disease. The median overall survival was 18.7 months (95% CI 9.1-N), comparable to results recently observed in taxotere-containing regimens. To confirm and extend these results, further testing of sabarubicin in larger trials is warranted.

  17. The development of drugs for treatment of sleeping sickness: a historical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steverding Dietmar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Only four drugs are available for the chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness; Suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine. The history of the development of these drugs is well known and documented. suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol were developed in the first half of the last century by the then recently established methods of medicinal chemistry. Eflornithine, originally developed in the 1970s as an anti-cancer drug, became a treatment of sleeping sickness largely by accident. This review summarises the developmental processes which led to these chemotherapies from the discovery of the first bioactive lead compounds to the identification of the final drugs.

  18. Non-small-cell lung cancer: molecular targeted therapy and personalized medicine – drug resistance, mechanisms, and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechler M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Marybeth Sechler,1,2 Amber D Cizmic,3 Sreedevi Avasarala,1 Michelle Van Scoyk,1 Christine Brzezinski,1 Nicole Kelley,1 Rama Kamesh Bikkavilli,1 Robert A Winn1–3 1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care, 2Program in Cancer Biology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Targeted therapies for cancer bring the hope of specific treatment, providing high efficacy and in some cases lower toxicity than conventional treatment. Although targeted therapeutics have helped immensely in the treatment of several cancers, like chronic myelogenous leukemia, colon cancer, and breast cancer, the benefit of these agents in the treatment of lung cancer remains limited, in part due to the development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug resistance and the current strategies used to treat lung cancer. A better understanding of these drug-resistance mechanisms could potentially benefit from the development of a more robust personalized medicine approach for the treatment of lung cancer. Keywords: lung cancer, drug targets, personalized medicine, NSCLC

  19. Organizational Scope and Investment: Evidence from the Drug Development Strategies and Performance of Biopharmaceutical Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Ilan Guedj; David Scharfstein

    2004-01-01

    This paper compares the clinical trial strategies and performance of large, established ("mature") biopharmaceutical firms to those of smaller ("early stage") firms that have not yet successfully developed a drug. We study a sample of 235 cancer drug candidates that entered clinical trials during the period 1990-2002 and were sponsored by public firms. Early stage firms are more likely than mature firms to advance drug candidates from Phase I to Phase II clinical trials. However, early stage ...

  20. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  1. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  3. The anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin decreases the c-di-GMP content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa but promotes biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groizeleau, Julie; Rybtke, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    for their potential c-di-GMP-lowering effect using a recently developed c-di-GMP biosensor strain. Our screen identified the anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin as a potent c-di-GMP inhibitor. In addition, the drug decreased the transcription of many biofilm-related genes. However, despite its effect on the c...

  4. A new era of cancer treatment: carbon nanotubes as drug delivery tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Naderi, Naghmeh; Dissanayake, Oshani; Tan, Aaron; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term that encompasses a group of diseases characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of cells. There are over 200 different types of cancer, each of which gains its nomenclature according to the type of tissue the cell originates in. Many patients who succumb to cancer do not die as a result of the primary tumor, but because of the systemic effects of metastases on other regions away from the original site. One of the aims of cancer therapy is to prevent the metastatic process as early as possible. There are currently many therapies in clinical use, and recent advances in biotechnology lend credence to the potential of nanotechnology in the fight against cancer. Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), quantum dots, and dendrimers have unique properties that can be exploited for diagnostic purposes, thermal ablation, and drug delivery in cancer. CNTs are tubular materials with nanometer-sized diameters and axial symmetry, giving them unique properties that can be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In addition, CNTs have the potential to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. Alongside the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology-based materials, elucidating the toxicity of nanoparticles is also imperative. Hence, in this review, we seek to explore the biomedical applications of CNTs, with particular emphasis on their use as therapeutic platforms in oncology.

  5. Using Gold Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine Phosphate to Treat Hematological Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Steven; Hao, Yuzhi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging paradigm for creating functional nanoscale materials for various biomedical applications. In this study, a new nanotechnology-based drug delivery method was developed using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a delivery vehicle to reduce adverse drug side effects. Fludarabine Phosphate is a commercial chemotherapy drug used in cancer treatment, and has ability to kill various cancer cells. KG-1 cell, a type of acute cancer leukemia cell, was selected as a proof-of-concept target in this study. Due to the small size of GNPs, they can help Fludarabine Phosphate enter cancer cells more efficiently and better interfere with DNA synthesis in the cancer cells. To enhance targeting ability, folic acid molecules were also covalently linked to GNPs, resulting in GNP-Fludarabine-folic acid (GNP-F/f). Compared to treatments with GNP-F or drugs on its own (Fludarabine Phosphate), the GNP-F/f achieves much improved cell-killing effects. The UV-Vis spectra results also revealed that the drugs had successfully bonded covalently to the GNPs. The higher cell-killing efficiency of GNP-F/f compared with GNP-Fludarabine (GNP-F) or drugs on their own further validates the effectiveness of both the vectors (GNPs) and folic acid in enhancing the drug delivery to the cancer cells. The MTT viability tests showed that the GNPs had no cytotoxicity.

  6. 75 FR 32482 - Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; establishment of docket; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a public docket...

  7. Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs on Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although psychostimulants have been used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder for approximately 70 years, little is known about the long term effects of these drugs on developing brain. The observable effects of psychostimulants are influenced by the timing of exposure, the age of examination after drug exposure and sex. Preclinical studies point out that chronic psychostimulant exposure before adolescence cause reverse sensitization or tolerance and this leads to reduction in stimulant effectiveness in adolesecence and adulthood. Preclinical studies show the potential long term effects of psychostimulants. But it is necessary to investigate the relationship between preclinical effects and clinical practice. A developmental approach is needed to understand the impact of pediatric medications on the brain that includes assessment at multiple ages to completely characterize the long term effects of these medications. The aim of this paper is to review the effects of psychostimulants on developing brain.

  8. Texosome-based drug delivery system for cancer therapy:from past to present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini; Raheleh Halabian; Mohsen Amin; Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi

    2015-01-01

    Rising worldwide cancer incidence and resistance to current anti-cancer drugs necessitate the need for new pharmaceutical compounds and drug delivery system. Malfunction of the immune system, particularly in the tumor microenvironment, causes tumor growth and enhances tumor progression. Thus, cancer immunotherapy can be an appropriate approach to provoke the systemic immune system to combat tumor expansion. Texosomes, which are endogenous nanovesicles released by all tumor cells, contribute to cell-cell communication and modify the phenotypic features of recipient cells due to the texosomes’ ability to transport biological components. For this reason, texosome-based delivery system can be a valuable strategy for therapeutic purposes. To improve the pharmaceutical behavior of this system and to facilitate its use in medical applications, biotechnology approaches and mimetic techniques have been utilized. In this review, we present the development history of texosome-based delivery systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

  9. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed.

  10. Opioid Peptides: Potential for Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Jane V.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important targets for the treatment of pain and potentially for other disease states (e.g. mood disorders and drug abuse) as well. Significant recent advances have been made in identifying opioid peptide analogs that exhibit promising in vivo activity for treatment of these maladies. This review focuses on the development and evaluation of opioid peptide analogs demonstrating activity after systemic administration, and recent clinical evaluations of opioid peptides for po...

  11. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  12. Screening the Drug Sensitivity Genes Related to GEM and CDDP in the Lung Cancer Cell-lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu YANG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Screening of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines with gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM and cisplatin (CDDP related to drug sensitivity gene might clarify the action mechanism of anti-cancer drugs and provide a new clue for overcoming drug resistance and the development of new anti-cancer drugs, and also provide theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of individual. Methods The drug sensitivity of CDDP and GEM in 4 SCLC cell lines and 6 NSCLC cell lines was determined using MTT colorimetric assay, while the cDNA macroarray was applied to detect the gene expression state related to drug sensitivity of 10 lung cancer cell line in 1 291, and the correlation between the two was analysized. Results There were 6 genes showing significant positive correlation (r≥0.632, P < 0.05 with GEM sensitivity; 45 genes positively related to CDDP; another 41 genes related to both GEM and CDDP (r≥± 0.4. Lung cancer with GEM and CDDP sensitivity of two types of drugs significantly related genes were Metallothinein (Signal transduction molecules, Cathepsin B (Organization protease B and TIMP1 (Growth factor; the GEM, CDDP sensitivity associated genes of lung cancer cell lines mainly distributed in Metallothinein, Cathepsin B, growth factor TIMP1 categories. Conclusion There existed drug-related sensitive genes of GEM, CDDP in SCLC and NSCLC cell lines; of these genes, Metallothinein, Cathepsin B and TIMP1 genes presented a significant positive correlation with GEM drug sensitivity, a significant negative correlation with CDDP drug sensitivity.

  13. Bioavailability and Bioequivalence in Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Bioavailability is referred to as the extent and rate to which the active drug ingredient or active moiety from the drug product is absorbed and becomes available at the site of drug action. The relative bioavailability in terms of the rate and extent of drug absorption is considered predictive of clinical outcomes. In 1984, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was authorized to approve generic drug products under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act base...

  14. A new era of cancer treatment: carbon nanotubes as drug delivery tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madani SY

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Yazdan Madani1, Naghmeh Naderi1, Oshani Dissanayake1, Aaron Tan1, Alexander M Seifalian1,21Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, UK; 2Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Cancer is a generic term that encompasses a group of diseases characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of cells. There are over 200 different types of cancer, each of which gains its nomenclature according to the type of tissue the cell originates in. Many patients who succumb to cancer do not die as a result of the primary tumor, but because of the systemic effects of metastases on other regions away from the original site. One of the aims of cancer therapy is to prevent the metastatic process as early as possible. There are currently many therapies in clinical use, and recent advances in biotechnology lend credence to the potential of nanotechnology in the fight against cancer. Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs, quantum dots, and dendrimers have unique properties that can be exploited for diagnostic purposes, thermal ablation, and drug delivery in cancer. CNTs are tubular materials with nanometer-sized diameters and axial symmetry, giving them unique properties that can be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In addition, CNTs have the potential to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. Alongside the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology-based materials, elucidating the toxicity of nanoparticles is also imperative. Hence, in this review, we seek to explore the biomedical applications of CNTs, with particular emphasis on their use as therapeutic platforms in oncology.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cancer, photothermal therapy, drug delivery, cytotoxicity, near infrared

  15. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  16. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  17. Inorganic nanoparticle-based drug codelivery nanosystems to overcome the multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-08-04

    Biocompatible inorganic material-based nanosystems provide a novel choice to effectively circumvent the intrinsic drawbacks of traditional organic materials in biomedical applications, especially in overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells due to their unique structural and compositional characteristics, for example, high stability, large surface area, tunable compositions, abundant physicochemical multifunctionalities, and specific biological behaviors. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in the construction of inorganic nanoparticles-based drug codelivery nanosystems (mesoporous SiO2, Fe3O4, Au, Ag, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, LDH, etc.) to efficiently circumvent the MDR of cancer cells, including the well-known codelivery of small molecular anticancer drug/macromolecular therapeutic gene and codelivery of small molecular chemosensitizer/anticancer drug, and very recently explored codelivery of targeting ligands/anticancer drug, codelivery of energy/anticancer drug, and codelivery of contrast agent for diagnostic imaging and anticancer drug. The unsolved issues, future developments, and potential clinical translations of these codelivery nanosystems are also discussed. These elaborately designed biocompatible inorganic materials-based nanosystems offer an unprecedented opportunity and show the encouraging bright future for overcoming the MDR of tumors in clinic personalized medicine and the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Targeted therapeutic nanotubes influence the viscoelasticity of cancer cells to overcome drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Chikkaveeraiah, Bhaskara V; Srivatsan, Avinash; Niu, Gang; Jin, Albert J; Kapoor, Ankur; Wang, Zhe; Patel, Sachin; Patel, Vyomesh; Gorbach, Alexander M; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hight Walker, Angela R; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-05-27

    Resistance to chemotherapy is the primary cause of treatment failure in over 90% of cancer patients in the clinic. Research in nanotechnology-based therapeutic alternatives has helped provide innovative and promising strategies to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). By targeting CD44-overexpressing MDR cancer cells, we have developed in a single-step a self-assembled, self-targetable, therapeutic semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (sSWCNT) drug delivery system that can deliver chemotherapeutic agents to both drug-sensitive OVCAR8 and resistant OVCAR8/ADR cancer cells. The novel nanoformula with a cholanic acid-derivatized hyaluronic acid (CAHA) biopolymer wrapped around a sSWCNT and loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX, is much more effective in killing drug-resistant cancer cells compared to the free DOX and phospholipid PEG (PL-PEG)-modified sSWCNT formula, PEG-sSWCNT-DOX. The CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX affects the viscoelastic property more than free DOX and PL-PEG-sSWCNT-DOX, which in turn allows more drug molecules to be internalized. Intravenous injection of CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX (12 mg/kg DOX equivalent) followed by 808 nm laser irradiation (1 W/cm(2), 90 s) led to complete tumor eradication in a subcutaneous OVCAR8/ADR drug-resistant xenograft model, while free DOX alone failed to delay tumor growth. Our newly developed CAHA-sSWCNT-DOX nanoformula, which delivers therapeutics and acts as a sensitizer to influence drug uptake and induce apoptosis with minimal resistance factor, provides a novel effective means of counteracting the phenomenon of multidrug resistance.

  19. Challenges in developing drugs for primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Hargreaves, Richard; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    This review considers the history of drug development in primary headaches and discusses challenges to the discovery of innovative headache therapeutics. Advances in headache genetics have yet to translate to new classes of therapeutics and there are currently no clear predictive human biomarkers......, there have been many near misses and failures in the discovery and development of headache therapeutics. Glutamate receptor antagonism whilst efficacious has central side effects and some approaches such as nitric oxide synthase inhibition, substance P antagonism and cortical spreading depression blockade...

  20. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on oncotargets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozako T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomohiro Kozako,1 Naomichi Arima,2 Makoto Yoshimitsu,3 Shin-Ichro Honda,1 Shinji Soeda11Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan; 2Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 3Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, JapanAbstract: Nanotechnology is the development of an engineered device at the atomic, molecular, and macromolecular level in the nanometer range. Advances in nanotechnology have proven beneficial in therapeutic fields such as drug-delivery and gene/protein delivery. Antigen delivery systems are important for inducing and modifying immune responses. In cellular immunity, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs are important in the host defense against tumors. Key to the development of CTL-inducible vaccines is the ability to deliver antigens to antigen-presenting cells efficiently and to induce the subsequent activation of T cell-mediated immunity without adjuvants, as they can induce excessive inflammation leading to systemic febrile disease. Since expression and cloning methods for tumor-associated antigens have been reported, cancer vaccines that induce effective cell immunity may be promising therapeutic candidates, but Th2 cells are undesirable for use in cancer immunotherapy. Peptide vaccines have immunological and economic advantages as cancer vaccines because CTL epitope peptides from tumor-associated antigens have high antigen-specificity. However, cancer vaccines have had limited effectiveness in clinical responses due to the ability of cancer cells to “escape” from cancer immunity and a low efficiency of antigen-specific CTL induction due to immunogenic-free synthetic peptides. In contrast, carbohydrate-decorated particles such as carbohydrate-coated liposomes with encapsulated antigens might be more suitable as

  1. Preclinical models for interrogating drug action in human cancers using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In this review we compare the advantages and disadvantages of different model biological systems for determining the metabolic functions of cells in complex environments, how they may change in different disease states, and respond to therapeutic interventions. Background All preclinical drug-testing models have advantages and drawbacks. We compare and contrast established cell, organoid and animal models with ex vivo organ or tissue culture and in vivo human experiments in the context of metabolic readout of drug efficacy. As metabolism reports directly on the biochemical state of cells and tissues, it can be very sensitive to drugs and/or other environmental changes. This is especially so when metabolic activities are probed by stable isotope tracing methods, which can also provide detailed mechanistic information on drug action. We have developed and been applying Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to examine metabolic reprogramming of human lung cancer cells in monoculture, in mouse xenograft/explant models, and in lung cancer patients in situ (Lane et al. 2011; T. W. Fan et al. 2011; T. W-M. Fan et al. 2012; T. W. Fan et al. 2012; Xie et al. 2014b; Ren et al. 2014a; Sellers et al. 2015b). We are able to determine the influence of the tumor microenvironment using these models. We have now extended the range of models to fresh human tissue slices, similar to those originally described by O. Warburg (Warburg 1923), which retain the native tissue architecture and heterogeneity with a paired benign versus cancer design under defined cell culture conditions. This platform offers an unprecedented human tissue model for preclinical studies on metabolic reprogramming of human cancer cells in their tissue context, and response to drug treatment (Xie et al. 2014a). As the microenvironment of the target human tissue is retained and individual patient's response to drugs is obtained, this platform promises to transcend current limitations of drug selection

  2. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim eGurpinar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  3. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  4. Product development of probiotics as biological drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Ann

    2008-02-01

    Elements of product and manufacturing-process design are described for product development of live biotherapeutic biological drugs. Product design uses the history and the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the selected strain. The quality and integrity of the selected strain can be ensured by preservation in a qualified cell-bank system. Manufacturing-process design includes step-by-step description, including the necessary process-input parameters and the expected output results. The active ingredients in the biological drug are usually manufactured using aseptic processing. The manufacture of the final dosage form of live biotherapeutics requires bioburden control or aseptic manufacture, as appropriate. Specifications for live biotherapeutics must comply with regulations for licensed biological products. Evidence of stability for the duration of the shelf life, as well as stability under the recommended conditions of use, must be provided for licensure.

  5. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is number seven in WHO's list of all diseases causing disability and the third most costly neurological disorder in Europe. Acute attacks are treatable by highly selective drugs such as the triptans but there is still a huge unmet therapeutic need. Unfortunately, drug development...... for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...... responses elicited by such measures are crucial. The most naturalistic way of inducing attacks is by infusion of endogenous signaling molecules that are known to cause migraine in patients. The most valid response is recording of neural activity in the trigeminal system. The most useful headache related...

  6. Annexin A2: Its Molecular Regulation and Cellular Expression in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 orchestrates multiple biologic processes and clinical associations, especially in cancer progression. The structure of ANXA2 affects its cellular localization and function. However, posttranslational modification and protease-mediated N-terminal cleavage also play critical roles in regulating ANXA2. ANXA2 expression levels vary among different types of cancers. With some cancers, ANXA2 can be used for the detection and diagnosis of cancer and for monitoring cancer progression. ANXA2 is also required for drug-resistance. This review discusses the feasibility of ANXA2 which is active in cancer development and can be a therapeutic target in cancer management.

  7. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak Balaji; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2016-03-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties.

  8. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  9. Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery for Therapy of Lung Cancer: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed enormous advances in the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy culminating in the development of the nascent field of “cancer nanomedicine.” A nanoparticle as per the National Institutes of Health (NIH guidelines is any material that is used in the formulation of a drug resulting in a final product smaller than 1 micron in size. Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic therapies, and preferentially target disease sites. Currently, many formulations of nanocarriers are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. Innovative strategies have been employed to exploit the multicomponent, three-dimensional constructs imparting multifunctional capabilities. Engineering such designs allows simultaneous drug delivery of chemotherapeutics and anticancer gene therapies to site-specific targets. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. However, translating such advances from the bench to the bedside has been severely hampered by challenges encountered in the areas of pharmacology, toxicology, immunology, large-scale manufacturing, and regulatory issues. This review summarizes current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, citing recent examples targeted at lung cancer treatment.

  10. Potential of vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic therapy for recurrent and drug-resistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua F. Heiber; Xiang-Xi Xu; Glen N. Barber

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade,we have gained significant understanding of the mechanism by which vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) specifically kills cancer cells.Dysregulation of translation and defective innate immunity are beth thought to contribute to VSV oncolysis.Safety and efficacy are important objectives to consider in evaluating VSV as a therapy for malignant disease.Ongoing efforts may enable VSV virotherapy to be considered in the near future to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer when other options have been exhausted.In this article,we review the development of VSV as a potential therapeutic approach for recurrent or drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  11. Bayesian population PBPK approach for support of drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Krauß, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Low likelihood-of-approval rates of new drugs constitute a major problem in clinical development. Only one out of ten development programs entering the first clinical phase succeeds in being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) [1]. A main challenge is thereby an insufficient understanding and prediction of drug safety and efficacy, leading to the withdrawal of new drug candidates [2,3]. Here, model-based assessment of drug exposure and response can support the development ...

  12. The future of cancer research: prevention, screening, vaccines, and tumor-specific drug combos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, George

    2014-01-01

    New cancer research strategies have developed very rapidly over the past five years, including extensive DNA sequencing of tumor and normal cells; use of highly sensitive cancer cell detection methods; vaccine development and tumor-specific (designer) drugs. These developments have raised questions about where to concentrate efforts in the near future when establishing clinical trials, particularly important in an age of diminishing resources and during a period when competing strategies for cancer control are likely to overwhelm the opportunities for establishing large, effective clinical trials. In particular, it behooves the research community to be mindful of the inevitable, challenging obligation to responsibly choose between clinical trials that offer the credible hope of incremental advances vs. trials that are less traditional but may have revolutionary outcomes.

  13. [The history of developing anticancer Drugs and their evaluation guidelines in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The cancer therapies currently available do not yet offer fully satisfactory treatments, even in 21st century, and efforts and progress are being made daily in the area of drug development. Anticancer drugs, which play the leading role in cancer therapy, are being developed dynamically around the world, and Japan is not an exception. Looking back on the history of developing anticancer drugs, cytotoxic drugs were the mainstream of drug development until the end of the 20th century. In the 21st century, they have been replaced by molecularly targeted drugs, and thus the development of cytotoxic drugs has been declining rapidly. There were various approaches to the development of anticancer drugs and clinical trial endpoints until the 1980s. In 1991, the "Guidelines for Clinical Evaluation Methods of Anti-Cancer Drugs in Japan" was issued. From 2000 onwards, there was vigorous discussion on the clinical trial endpoints of anticancer drugs in the United States. In conjunction with this discussion, the "Guidelines for Clinical Evaluation Methods of Anti-Cancer Drugs in Japan" was revised in 2005. The revised guidelines required survival data at the time of filing a new drug application (NDA) as a general rule. Around 2005, a bridging strategy was promoted as the "International Conference on Harmonization E5" was promulgated among Japan, the U.S. and EU, resulting in an outflow of clinical trials to overseas, with more non-Japanese survival data generated outside of Japan used for NDAs than Japanese data. Subsequently, the "Guideline for Basic Principles on Global Clinical Trials" was issued in 2007, which promoted the change in the mainstream approach from a bridging strategy to a pivotal, global study involving Japan. Thus, an era of full-fledged globalization in clinical trials began. We believe Japan will need systems to enhance the motivation for anticancer drug development, such as an expedited program or pediatric program, from now on. We hope that the

  14. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of paclitaxel and carboplatin in ovarian cancer patients : A study by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Pharmacology and Molecular Mechanisms Group and New Drug Development Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joerger, Markus; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Richel, Dick J.; Dittrich, Christian; Pavlidis, Nikolas; Briasoulis, Evangelos; Vermorken, Jan B.; Strocchi, Elena; Martoni, Andrea; Sorio, Roberto; Sleeboom, Henk P.; Izquierdo, Miguel A.; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Calvert, Hilary; Boddy, Alan V.; Hollema, Harry; Fety, Regine; Van der Vijgh, Wjf J. F.; Hempel, Georg; Chatelut, Etienne; Karlsson, Mats; Wilkins, Justin; Tranchand, Brigitte; Schrijvers, Ad H. G. J.; Twelves, Christian; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Paclitaxel and carboplatin are frequently used in advanced ovarian cancer following cytoreductive surgery. Threshold models have been used to predict paclitaxel pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics, whereas the time above paclitaxel plasma concentration of 0.05 to 0.2 mu mol/L (t(c > 0.05-0.2))

  16. Repositioning "old" drugs for new causes: identifying new inhibitors of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha T; Upadhyaya, Akanksha; Philp, Lisa K; Tang, Tiffany; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gunter, Jennifer; Nelson, Colleen C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G

    2016-04-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) deaths occur due to the metastatic spread of tumor cells to distant organs. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies once tumor cells have spread outside the prostate. It is therefore imperative to rapidly develop therapeutics to inhibit the metastatic spread of tumor cells. Gain of cell motility and invasive properties is the first step of metastasis and by inhibiting motility one can potentially inhibit metastasis. Using the drug repositioning strategy, we developed a cell-based multi-parameter primary screening assay to identify drugs that inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of metastatic PC-3 PCa cells. Following the completion of the primary screening assay, 33 drugs were identified from an FDA approved drug library that either inhibited migration or were cytotoxic to the PC-3 cells. Based on the data obtained from the subsequent validation studies, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, simvastatin, fluvastatin and vandetanib were identified as strong candidates that can inhibit both the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells without significantly affecting cell viability. By employing the drug repositioning strategy instead of a de novo drug discovery and development strategy, the identified drug candidates have the potential to be rapidly translated into the clinic for the management of men with aggressive forms of PCa.

  17. Delivery of Encapsulated Drugs to Cancer Cells and Tissue: The Impact of Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Afadzi, Mercy

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated drugs have improved tumor to normal tissue uptake compared to free drugs, however, the concentration of drugs at the tumor site is still low and heterogeneous due to the tumor microenvironment which serves as barriers for the delivery to the target site. Combining ultrasound (US) with encapsulated drugs might enhance the transport of the encapsulated drug across the vasculature and into tumor tissues. US can also increase local drug release and the uptake of the drug into cancer ...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW IMMUNOMODULATING DRUG TIMOFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Kholnazarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the development of an immunomodulating drug timofer based on coordination compounds isoleucyl-tryptophan dipeptide with iron (II, including the study of coordinate isoleucyl-tryptophan dipeptide with iron (II, the study of the immunostimulatory activity of the coordination compounds, the results of the preclinical and clinical studies of timotsin are presented. Method of pH titration showed that the interaction of zinc and dipeptide isoleucyltryptophan formed in solution following complex forms: [Fe (HL±]2+ (β = 1,00×1034, [Fe(HL±2]2+ (β = 6,25×1011, [Fe (HL±OH]+ (β = 4,01×1026, [Fe (L]+ (β = 8,10×1018, [Fe (L2]+ (β = 7,50×1028, [Fe (LOH]+ (β = 1,03×1029. It was shown that the immunostimulatory activity of the coordination compounds is 2 times higher than that starting dipeptide. The substance sample and standard formulation of timofer were developed and standardized. The developed immunomodulatory drug timofer showed a high therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia patients with inflammatory processes and traumatic injuries of the maxillofacial region, with chronic inflammatory diseases of the the genitals (CMV, HSV, chlamydia, chronic endometritis, chronic salpingoopharitis, ureaplasmosis with chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pneumonia, chronic glomerulonephritis, and chronic renal failure complicated by anemia Bright, withrheumatic diseases, gynecological patients with anemia of moderate and severe degrees of severity, at surgical treatment of patients with suppurative lung disease, heart disease and chronic pericarditis operated with cardiopulmonary bypass. Timofer is registered in Tajikistan (registration number of medical drug №002866.

  19. Folate receptor targeted liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Among all available lipid based nanoparticulate systems, the success of liposomal drug delivery system is evident by the number of liposomal products available in the market or under advanced stages of preclinical and clinical trials. Liposome has the ability to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the targeted tissues or even inside the cancerous cells by enhanced intracellular penetration or improved tumour targeting. In the last decade, folate receptor mediated tumour targeting has emerged as an attractive alternative method of active targeting of cancer cells through liposomes due to its numerous advantages over other targeting methods. Folate receptors, also known as folate binding proteins, allow the binding and internalization of folate or folic acid into the cells by a method called folate receptor mediated endocytosis. They have restricted presence in normal cells and are mostly expressed during malignant transformation. In this review article, folate receptor targeting capability of liposomes has been described. This review article has focussed on the different cancer drugs which have been encapsulated in folate receptor targeted liposomes and their in vitro as well as in vivo efficacies in several tumour models.

  20. Development, use and evaluation of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E H; Launsø, Laila

    1987-01-01

    on an economic estimate of developments, expenditures, marketing costs and the anticipated share of the market. Controlled clinical trials have become the main form of documentation required by the health authorities. This method is insufficient to evaluate the (side) effects of the drugs when in actual use...... to special Danish circumstances but are valid for other countries as well [1, 2]. (Norris R. Pills, Pesticides & Profits. North River Press, 1982; Braithwaite J. Corporate Crime in the Pharmaceutical Industry. Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1984) The empirical data in this article derive from Denmark...

  1. Mind the gap: predicting cardiovascular risk during drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Chain, Anne S Y

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular safety issues, specifically drug-induced QT/QTc-interval prolongation, remain a major cause of drug attrition during clinical development and is one of the main causes for post-market drug withdrawals accounting for 15-34% of all drug discontinuation. Given the potentially fatal consequences of this concentration-dependent adverse drug reaction, regulatory authorities have reacted to this “pharmacoepidemic” by denying or delaying the approval of a number of new drugs and placin...

  2. The preclinical new drug research program of the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discovery and development of anticancer drugs with clinical potential are the responsibility of the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment, National Cancer Institute (NCI). Approximately 10,000 compounds/year are selectively acquired and screened against murine tumor models in order to discover new, active materials. The program required to accomplish this objective, as well as the subsequent tasks of formulation development and toxicology testing, is described. Since its inception in 1955, the preclinical new drug research program of the NCI has played a major role in the discovery and development of new agents which have been entered into clinical trial. The NCI has been responsible for the discovery of eight of the 16 commercially available drugs discovered since 1955. In addition, the NCI has played an important role in the clinical evaluation of all 16 of these New Drug Application (NDA)-approved drugs. During 1977-1982, the NCI filed Investigational New Drug Applications (INDA) for 33 cytotoxic agents. It was responsible for the discovery of the antitumor activity of 73% of these compounds. Most of the INDA compounds were acquired directly through NCI efforts. The DTP active acquisition program was responsible for obtaining 69% of these materials, with an additional 12% coming from the DTP intramural research program. Only 19% were received as voluntary submissions. The DTP active acquisition and screening effort is shown to have played even a larger role in identifying and obtaining those compounds which are currently in earlier stages of the NCI drug discovery and development process.

  3. Developments in Diagnosis and Antileishmanial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Bhargava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis ranks the third in disease burden in disability-adjusted life years caused by neglected tropical diseases and is the second cause of parasite-related deaths after malaria; but for a variety of reasons, it is not receiving the attention that would be justified seeing its importance. Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1–1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Improvements in diagnostic methods for early case detection and latest combitorial chemotherapeutic methods have given a new hope for combating this deadly disease. The cell biology of Leishmania and mammalian cells differs considerably and this distinctness extends to the biochemical level. This provides the promise that many of the parasite’s proteins should be sufficiently different from hosts and can be successfully exploited as drug targets. This paper gives a brief overview of recent developments in the diagnosis and approaches in antileishmanial drug discovery and development.

  4. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients.

  5. Alleviating Cancer Drug Toxicity by Inhibiting a Bacterial Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Bret D.; Wang, Hongwei; Lane, Kimberly T.; Scott, John E.; Orans, Jillian; Koo, Ja Seol; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Jobin, Christian; Yeh, Li-An; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R. (Einstein); (UNC); (North Carolina Central University)

    2011-08-12

    The dose-limiting side effect of the common colon cancer chemotherapeutic CPT-11 is severe diarrhea caused by symbiotic bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases that reactivate the drug in the gut. We sought to target these enzymes without killing the commensal bacteria essential for human health. Potent bacterial {beta}-glucuronidase inhibitors were identified by high-throughput screening and shown to have no effect on the orthologous mammalian enzyme. Crystal structures established that selectivity was based on a loop unique to bacterial {beta}-glucuronidases. Inhibitors were highly effective against the enzyme target in living aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but did not kill the bacteria or harm mammalian cells. Finally, oral administration of an inhibitor protected mice from CPT-11-induced toxicity. Thus, drugs may be designed to inhibit undesirable enzyme activities in essential microbial symbiotes to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  6. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  7. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  8. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  9. Review article : the potential of combinational regimen with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalving, M; Koornstra, JJ; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE; Kleibeuker, JH

    2005-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are chemopreventive agents in colorectal cancer. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not, however, offer complete protection against adenoma and carcinoma development. There is increasing interest in combining non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with agen

  10. Metal complexes in cancer therapy – an update from drug design perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndagi U

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umar Ndagi, Ndumiso Mhlongo, Mahmoud E Soliman Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, South Africa Abstract: In the past, metal-based compounds were widely used in the treatment of disease conditions, but the lack of clear distinction between the therapeutic and toxic doses was a major challenge. With the discovery of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in 1960, a milestone in the history of metal-based compounds used in the treatment of cancers was witnessed. This forms the foundation for the modern era of the metal-based anticancer drugs. Platinum drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are the mainstay of the metal-based compounds in the treatment of cancer, but the delay in the therapeutic accomplishment of other metal-based compounds hampered the progress of research in this field. Recently, however, there has been an upsurge of activities relying on the structural information, aimed at improving and developing other forms of metal-based compounds and nonclassical platinum complexes whose mechanism of action is distinct from known drugs such as cisplatin. In line with this, many more metal-based compounds have been synthesized by redesigning the existing chemical structure through ligand substitution or building the entire new compound with enhanced safety and cytotoxic profile. However, because of increased emphasis on the clinical relevance of metal-based complexes, a few of these drugs are currently on clinical trial and many more are awaiting ethical approval to join the trial. In this review, we seek to give an overview of previous reviews on the cytotoxic effect of metal-based complexes while focusing more on newly designed metal-based complexes and their cytotoxic effect on the cancer cell lines, as well as on new approach to metal-based drug design and molecular target in cancer therapy. We are optimistic that the concept of selective

  11. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  12. Tumor burden talks in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PEGylated liposomes are important drug carriers that can passively target tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect in neoplasm lesions. This study demonstrated that tumor burden determines the tumor uptake, and also the tumor response, in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs in a C26/tk-luc colon carcinoma-bearing mouse model. METHODS: Empty PEGylated liposomes (NanoX and those encapsulated with VNB (NanoVNB were labeled with In-111 to obtain InNanoX and InVNBL in high labeling yield and radiochemical purity (all >90%. BALB/c mice bearing either small (58.4±8.0 mm(3 or large (102.4±22.0 mm(3 C26/tk-luc tumors in the right dorsal flank were intravenously administered with NanoVNB, InNanoX, InVNBL, or NanoX as a control, every 7 days for 3 times. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by body weight loss, tumor growth inhibition (using calipers and bioluminescence imaging and survival fraction. The scintigraphic imaging of tumor mouse was performed during and after treatment. RESULTS: The biodistribution study of InVNBL revealed a clear inverse correlation (r (2 = 0.9336 between the tumor uptake and the tumor mass ranged from 27.6 to 623.9 mg. All three liposomal drugs showed better therapeutic efficacy in small-tumor mice than in large-tumor mice. Tumor-bearing mice treated with InVNBL (a combination drug showed the highest tumor growth inhibition rate and survival fraction compared to those treated with NanoVNB (chemodrug only and InNanoX (radionuclide only. Specific tumor targeting and significantly increased tumor uptake after periodical treatment with InVNBL were evidenced by scintigraphic imaging, especially in mice bearing small tumors. CONCLUSION: The significant differences in the outcomes of cancer treatment and molecular imaging between animals bearing small and large tumors revealed that tumor burden is a critical and discriminative factor in cancer therapy using PEGylated liposomal drugs.

  13. Mind the gap : predicting cardiovascular risk during drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chain, Anne S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular safety issues, specifically drug-induced QT/QTc-interval prolongation, remain a major cause of drug attrition during clinical development and is one of the main causes for post-market drug withdrawals accounting for 15-34% of all drug discontinuation. Given the potentially fatal conse

  14. Drugs for developing countries. Uncharitable stance from Oxfam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, C

    1982-12-02

    Oxfam, a British charity organization, has charged multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers with encouraging overuse and misuse of drugs in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a list of "essential" drugs which is being used by Bangladesh to restrict drug sales to only certain products. Despite signs of cooperation between some drug companies and WHO, Oxfam remains skeptical.

  15. Botanicals as "new" drugs: US development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Freddie Ann

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are ingredients that can be marketed as foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices in the United States. When a botanical is intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure a disease, it is considered to be a "drug". This article reviews the US regulatory requirements for botanicals as "new" drugs. An overview of the regulatory principles used to determine product category and the basic elements of an Investigational New Drug application and New Drug Application with the US Food and Drug Administration are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  16. Mapping Novel Metabolic Nodes Targeted by Anti-Cancer Drugs that Impair Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsay S; Yan, Peter; Bateman, Leslie A; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-08

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 receptor-negative subtypes of breast cancers that show the worst prognoses and lack targeted therapies. Here, we have coupled the screening of ∼400 anticancer agents that are under development or in the clinic with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to identify novel metabolic mechanisms for agents that impair TNBC pathogenicity. We identify 20 anticancer compounds that significantly impaired cell survival across multiple types of TNBC cells. Among these 20 leads, the phytoestrogenic natural product licochalcone A was of interest, since TNBCs are unresponsive to estrogenic therapies, indicating that licochalcone A was likely acting through another target. Using chemoproteomic profiling approaches, we reveal that licochalcone A impairs TNBC pathogenicity, not through modulating estrogen receptor activity but rather through inhibiting prostaglandin reductase 1, a metabolic enzyme involved in leukotriene B4 inactivation. We also more broadly performed metabolomic profiling to map additional metabolic mechanisms of compounds that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Overlaying lipidomic profiling with drug responses, we find that deubiquitinase inhibitors cause dramatic elevations in acyl carnitine levels, which impair mitochondrial respiration and contribute to TNBC pathogenic impairments. We thus put forth two unique metabolic nodes that are targeted by drugs or drug candidates that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Our results also showcase the utility of coupling drug screens with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to uncover unique metabolic drivers of TNBC pathogenicity.

  17. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  18. [Exploration of the Factors Influencing Multi-Drug Cancer Chemotherapy in the Elderly - A Retrospective Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kentaro; Tamura, Kazuo; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Kamimura, Hidetoshi

    2016-12-01

    Multi-drug administration is problematic in elderly patients, and the situation is further complicated in those with cancer, owing to a high possibility of side effects and augmentation due to interactions between concomitant or previous drugs the patients are receiving and the anti-cancer drugs administered. Analysis of the factors that influence the likelihood of cancer chemotherapy multi-drug administration in the elderly showed that age alone was a fundamental risk factor for multi-drug administration, comorbidities, and drug interactions. In addition, the risks of drug interaction with chemotherapy were approximately 5.8 fold for drugs administered to treat hypertension, and approximately 10.3 fold for cardiovascular agents. Because of increased cancer morbidity, it is important to reduce the risks associated with the treatment.

  19. New development of drugs against opioid addiction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJin; SuRui-bin; LuXin-qiang; LiuYin

    2004-01-01

    Opioid addiction has been a big trouble for human being for several centuries. In China, it also has become a main direct threat against national safety, society advancement, economic development and public health. Based on the national report in 2002, the number of addicts registered in due form is over 1 million, which are distributed in 2148 counties and cities in China. The real number of addicts, however, is much more than those as mentioned above. Money used for buying opioids each year in China might be over 10 billion except for other payment. Base on the statistics, 20 - 50% crimes are commited by addicts. On the other hand, drug abuse often induces contagion spread, such as tuberculosis, hepatitis and HIV disease. About 70% HIV positive subjects in China are related to drug abuse. We are very happy to see more andmore attention has been paid to the problem in our country. Recently, a program on neurobiological basis and medical biological measures of addiction has been supported by National Science and Technology Ministry as a 973 program.

  20. Targeted pancreatic cancer therapy with the small molecule drug conjugate SW IV-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Spitzer, Dirk; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Hornick, Mary C; Garg, Gunjal; Hornick, John R; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to conventional therapeutics and has been shown to evade apoptosis by deregulation of the X-linked and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (XIAP and cIAP). Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) induces and amplifies cell death by reversing the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. Thus, Smac-derived peptide analogues (peptidomimetics) have been developed and shown to represent promising cancer therapeutics. Sigma-2 receptors are overexpressed in many proliferating tumor cells including pancreatic cancer. Selected ligands to this receptor are rapidly internalized by cancer cells. These characteristics have made the sigma-2 receptor an attractive target for drug delivery because selective delivery to cancer cells has the potential to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. Here, we describe the initial characterization of SW IV-134, a chemically linked drug conjugate between the sigma-2 ligand SW43 and the Smac mimetic SW IV-52 as a novel treatment option for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor killing characteristics of our dual-domain therapeutic SW IV-134 was far greater than either component in isolation or in an equimolar mix and suggests enhanced cellular delivery when chemically linked to the sigma-2 ligand. One of the key findings was that SW IV-134 retained target selectivity of the Smac cargo with the involvement of the NF-κB/TNFα signaling pathway. Importantly, SW IV-134 slowed tumor growth and improved survival in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Our data support further study of this novel therapeutic and this drug delivery strategy because it may eventually benefit patients with pancreatic cancer.

  1. Drug Metabolism in Preclinical Drug Development: A Survey of the Discovery Process, Toxicology, and Computational Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Naiem T; Wathieu, Henri; Ojo, Abiola; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2017-03-15

    Increased R & D spending and high failure rates exist in drug development, due in part to inadequate prediction of drug metabolism and its consequences in the human body. Hence, there is a need for computational methods to supplement and complement current biological assessment strategies. In this review, we provide an overview of drug metabolism in pharmacology, and discuss the current in vitro and in vivo strategies for assessing drug metabolism in preclinical drug development. We highlight computational tools available to the scientific community for the in silico prediction of drug metabolism, and examine how these tools have been implemented to produce drug-target signatures relevant to metabolic routes. Computational workflows that assess drug metabolism and its toxicological and pharmacokinetic effects, such as by applying the adverse outcome pathway framework for risk assessment, may improve the efficiency and speed of preclinical drug development.

  2. Novel Gelatin-Adriamycin Sustained Drug Release System for Intravesical Therapy of Bladder Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To reduce recurrence in the patients with bladder cancer after tumor removal through open surgery or transurethral resection, a form of gelatin-adriamycin sustained drug release system was developed and its release kinetics both in vitro and in vivo, its efficacy in inhibiting BIU-87 bladder tumor cell growth in vitro and its safety in vivo were studied. The results showed that this system controlled adriamycin release over a period of 21 days in vitro and significantly inhibited BIU-87 cell growth. When this system was injected into rabbit bladder, it sustained adriamycin release for 12 days and the released drug could diffuse 1 cm around the injection point. No major complications were observed except minor acute nonspecific cystitis that could be tolerated well by the animals. This study suggests the possibility of applying this system locally in treating bladder cancer.

  3. The role of miRNA regulation in cancer progression and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal

    RNAs in the context of cancer biology, drug resistance and disease progression. The first project described in Chapter 6 addresses the problem of tamoxifen resistance, an anti-estrogen drug that is generally highly effective in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. The underlying molecular mechanisms......This PhD thesis presents the work carried out at Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark. The projects presented in this thesis are a purely bioinformatic in nature. Included in this thesis are the two projects that focus on the gene regulatory events mediated by mi...... lines. Following a systems biology approach of integrating evidences of functional interactions such as transcription factor (TF)-miRNA interactions, we have identified a number of biologically relevant pathways involved in the development of tamoxifen resistance. Chapter 7 presents a study highlighting...

  4. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  5. Repositioning metformin in cancer: genetics, drug targets, and new ways of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Mihaela; Craciun, Lucian; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Kacso, Gabriel; Florian, Ioan Stefan; Crivii, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    After sitting many years on the shelves of drug stores as a harmless antidiabetic drug, metformin comes back in the spotlight of the scientific community as a surprisingly effective antineoplastic drug. Metformin targets multiple pathways that play pivotal roles in cancer progression, impacting various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell death, metabolism, and even the cancer stemness features. The biomolecular characteristics of tumors, such as appropriate expression of organic cation transporters or genetic alterations including p53, K-ras, LKB1, and PI3K may impact metformin's anticancer efficiency. This could indicate a need for tumor genetic profiling in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from metformin treatment. Considering that the majority of experimental models suggest that higher, supra-clinical doses of metformin should be used in order to obtain an antineoplastic effect, new ways of drug delivery could be developed, such as metformin-loaded nanoparticles or incorporation of metformin into microparticles used in transarterial chemoembolization, with the aim of obtaining higher intratumoral drug concentrations and a targeted therapy which will ultimately maximize metformin's efficacy.

  6. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  7. Progress and controversies in developing cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speiser Daniel E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard approach for cancer management, through the use of cytokines (eg: interleukin-2 and monoclonal antibodies. Cancer vaccines hold promise as another form of immunotherapy, and there has been substantial progress in identifying shared antigens recognized by T cells, in developing vaccine approaches that induce antigen-specific T cell responses in cancer patients, and in developing new technology for monitoring immune responses in various human tissue compartments. Dramatic clinical regressions of human solid tumors have occurred with some cancer vaccines, but the rate of those responses remains low. This article is part of a 2-part point:counterpoint series on peptide vaccines and adoptive therapy approaches for cancer. The current status of cancer vaccination, and associated challenges, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need to increase our knowledge of cancer immunobiology, as well as to improve monitoring of cellular immune function after vaccination. Progress in both areas will facilitate development of effective cancer vaccines, as well as of adoptive therapy. Effective cancer vaccines promise to be useful for treatment and prevention of cancer at low cost and with low morbidity.

  8. FDA Critical Path Initiatives: Opportunities for Generic Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lionberger, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    FDA’s critical path initiative documents have focused on the challenges involved in the development of new drugs. Some of the focus areas identified apply equally to the production of generic drugs. However, there are scientific challenges unique to the development of generic drugs as well. In May 2007, FDA released a document “Critical Path Opportunities for Generic Drugs” that identified some of the specific challenges in the development of generic drugs. The key steps in generic product de...

  9. The Metaboloepigenetic Dimension of Cancer Stem Cells: Evaluating the Market Potential for New Metabostemness-Targeting Oncology Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The current global portfolio of oncology drugs is unlikely to produce durable disease remission for millions of cancer patients worldwide. This is due, in part, to the existence of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), a particularly aggressive type of malignant cell that is capable of indefinite self-replication, is refractory to conventional treatments, and is skilled at spreading and colonizing distant organs. To date, no drugs from big-league Pharma companies are capable of killing CSCs. Why? Quite simply, a classic drug development approach based on mutated genes and pathological protein products cannot efficiently target the plastic, epigenetic proclivity of cancer tissues to generate CSCs. Recent studies have proposed that certain elite metabolites (oncometabolites) and other common metabolites can significantly influence the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures of stemness and cancer. Consequently, cellular metabolism and the core epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, can be better viewed as an integrated metaboloepigenetic dimension of CSCs, which we have recently termed cancer metabostemness. By targeting weaknesses in the bridge connecting metabolism and epigenetics, a new generation of metabostemnessspecific drugs can be generated for potent and long-lasting elimination of life-threatening CSCs. Here I evaluate the market potential of re-modeling the oncology drug pipeline by discovering and developing new metabolic approaches able to target the apparently undruggable epigenetic programs that dynamically regulate the plasticity of non-CSC and CSC cellular states.

  10. Multifunctional aptamer-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to circumvent cancer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yuanyu; Deng, Hua; Kumar, Anil; Wang, Chenxuan; Liang, Zicai; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-06-01

    By its unique advantages over traditional medicine, nanomedicine has offered new strategies for cancer treatment. In particular, the development of drug delivery strategies has focused on nanoscale particles to improve bioavailability. However, many of these nanoparticles are unable to overcome tumor resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, new opportunities for drug delivery have been provided by oligonucleotides that can self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures. In this work, we have designed and developed functional DNA nanostructures to deliver the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (Dox) to resistant cancer cells. These nanostructures have two components. The first component is a DNA aptamer, which forms a dimeric G-quadruplex nanostructure to target cancer cells by binding with nucleolin. The second component is double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is rich in -GC- base pairs that can be applied for Dox delivery. We demonstrated that Dox was able to efficiently intercalate into dsDNA and this intercalation did not affect the aptamer's three-dimensional structure. In addition, the Aptamer-dsDNA (ApS) nanoparticle showed good stability and protected the dsDNA from degradation in bovine serum. More importantly, the ApS&Dox nanoparticle efficiently reversed the resistance of human breast cancer cells to Dox. The mechanism circumventing doxorubicin resistance by ApS&Dox nanoparticles may be predominantly by cell cycle arrest in S phase, effectively increased cell uptake and decreased cell efflux of doxorubicin. Furthermore, the ApS&Dox nanoparticles could effectively inhibit tumor growth, while less cardiotoxicity was observed. Overall, this functional DNA nanostructure provides new insights into the design of nanocarriers to overcome multidrug resistance through targeted drug delivery.

  11. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  12. Bioavailability and Bioequivalence in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shein-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Bioavailability is referred to as the extent and rate to which the active drug ingredient or active moiety from the drug product is absorbed and becomes available at the site of drug action. The relative bioavailability in terms of the rate and extent of drug absorption is considered predictive of clinical outcomes. In 1984, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was authorized to approve generic drug products under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act based on evidence of average bioequivalence in drug absorption through the conduct of bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. This article provides an overview (from an American point of view) of definition of bioavailability and bioequivalence, Fundamental Bioequivalence Assumption, regulatory requirements, and process for bioequivalence assessment of generic drug products. Basic considerations including criteria, study design, power analysis for sample size determination, and the conduct of bioequivalence trial, and statistical methods are provided. Practical issues such as one size-fits-all criterion, drug interchangeability and scaled average criteria for assessment of highly variable drug products are also discussed.

  13. Evolution of pre-existing versus acquired resistance to platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors in BRCA-associated cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Takeda, Shunichi; Haeno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors ("PARPis") are considered to be effective in BRCA-associated cancers with impaired DNA repair. These agents cause stalled and collapsed replication forks and create double-strand breaks effectively in the absence of repair mechanisms, resulting in arrest of the cell cycle and induction of cell death. However, recent studies have shown failure of these chemotherapeutic agents due to emerging drug resistance. In this study, we developed a stochastic model of BRCA-associated cancer progression in which there are four cancer populations: those with (i) functional BRCA, (ii) dysfunctional BRCA, (iii) functional BRCA and a growth advantage, and (iv) dysfunctional BRCA and a growth advantage. These four cancer populations expand from one cancer cell with normal repair function until the total cell number reaches a detectable amount. We derived formulas for the probability and expected numbers of each population at the time of detection. Furthermore, we extended the model to consider the tumor dynamics during treatment. Results from the model were validated and showed good agreement with clinical and experimental evidence in BRCA-associated cancers. Based on the model, we investigated conditions in which drug resistance during the treatment course originated from either a pre-existing drug-resistant population or a de novo population, due to secondary mutations. Finally, we found that platinum drugs and PARPis were effective if (i) BRCA inactivation is present, (ii) the cancer was diagnosed early, and (iii) tumor growth is rapid. Our results indicate that different types of cancers have a preferential way of acquiring resistance to platinum drugs and PARPis according to their growth and mutational characteristics.

  14. Emerging concepts on drug resistance in bladder cancer: Implications for future strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Santoni, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Santini, Daniele; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-10-01

    The combination chemotherapies with methotrexate plus vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin (MVAC or CMV regimens) or gemcitabine plus cisplatin represent the standard as first-line therapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. In Europe, vinflunine is an option for second-line therapy for patients progressed during first-line or perioperative platinum-containing regimen. Alternative regimens containing taxanes and/or gemcitabine may be valuated case by case. Furthermore, carboplatin should be considered in patients unfit for cisplatin both in the first and second-line setting. Based on these findings, a better comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the development of drug resistance in patients with bladder cancer will represent a major step forward in optimizing patients' outcome. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms and emerging strategies to overcome resistance in patients with advanced urothelial cancer.

  15. Development of Biodegradable Zinc Oxide Nanowires Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of green/red fluorescent ZnO nanoplatforms (including both NWs and NPs) and...is to develop a biodegradable ZnO nanomaterial platform (mainly focusing on the nanowire [NW] morphology) for efficient vasculature targeting of BCa...hypothesis is that suitably functionalized ZnO NWs can have long circulation lifetime and efficient tumor targeting for future drug delivery

  16. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  17. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer.

  18. Cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcome in registered nurses potentially exposed to antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Nhu D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the relationships of potential occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs with cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a historical prospective cohort study of female registered nurses (RNs from British Columbia, Canada (BC. Methods Female RNs registered with a professional regulatory body for at least one year between 1974 and 2000 formed the cohort (n = 56,213. The identifier file was linked to Canadian cancer registries. An RN offspring cohort from 1986 was created by linkages with the BC Birth and Health Status Registries. Exposure was assessed by work history in oncology or cancer agencies (method 1 and by estimating weighted duration of exposure developed from a survey of pharmacists and nursing unit administrators of all provincial hospitals and treatment centers and the work history of the nurses (method 2. Relative risks (RR were calculated using Poisson regression for cancer incidence and odds ratios (OR were calculated for congenital anomaly, stillbirth, low birth weight, and prematurity incidence, with 95% confidence intervals. Results In comparison with other female RNs, method 1 revealed that RNs who ever worked in a cancer center or in an oncology nursing unit had an increased risk of breast cancer (RR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.03 - 3.23, 12 cases and their offspring were at risk for congenital anomalies of the eye (OR = 3.46, 95% CI = 1.08 - 11.14, 3 cases. Method 2 revealed that RNs classified as having the highest weighted durations of exposure to antineoplastic drugs had an excess risk of cancer of the rectum (RR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.07 - 3.29, 14 cases. No statistically significant increased risks of leukemia, other cancers, stillbirth, low birth weight, prematurity, or other congenital anomalies in the RNs' offspring were noted. Conclusions Female RNs having had potential exposure to antineoplastic drugs were not found to have an excess risk of leukemia, stillbirth, or congenital

  19. Nanomedicine for cancer: lipid-based nanostructures for drug delivery and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Yoshihisa; Fuchigami, Teruaki; Tada, Norio; Kawamura, Ryo; Matsunuma, Satoshi; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2011-10-18

    Recent advances in nanotechnology, materials science, and biotechnology have led to innovations in the field of nanomedicine. Improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer are urgently needed, and it may now be possible to achieve marked improvements in both of these areas using nanomedicine. Lipid-coated nanoparticles containing diagnostic or therapeutic agents have been developed and studied for biomedical applications and provide a nanomedicine strategy with great potential. Lipid nanoparticles have cationic headgroups on their surfaces that bind anionic nucleic acids and contain hydrophobic drugs at the lipid membrane and hydrophilic drugs inside the hollow space in the interior. Moreover, researchers can design nanoparticles to work in combination with external stimuli such as magnetic field, light, and ionizing radiation, which adds further utility in biomedical applications. In this Account, we review several examples of lipid-based nanoparticles and describe their potential for cancer treatment and diagnosis. (1) The development of a lipid-based nanoparticle that included a promoter-enhancer and transcriptional activator greatly improved gene therapy. (2) The addition of a radiosensitive promoter to lipid nanoparticles was sufficient to confer radioisotope-activated expression of the genes delivered by the nanoparticles. (3) We successfully tailored lipid nanoparticle composition to increase gene transduction in scirrhous gastric cancer cells. (4) When lipophilic photosensitizing molecules were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles, those particles showed an increased photodynamic cytotoxic effect on the target cancer. (5) Coating an Fe(3)O(4) nanocrystal with lipids proved to be an efficient strategy for magnetically guided gene-silencing in tumor tissues. (6) An Fe(16)N(2)/lipid nanocomposite displayed effective magnetism and gene delivery in cancer cells. (7) Lipid-coated magnetic hollow capsules carried aqueous anticancer drugs and delivered

  20. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  1. Gaojushen:a novel anti-cancer drug prepared from SEC superantigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈廷祚

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Clinical observations Gaojushen is a novel anti-cancer drug developed by Xiehe Bio-pharmaceutical Company,Shenyang, China. It is prepared and processed from the filtrate of Staphylococcus aureus culture. The active component contained in it has been shown to be a SEC superantigen that is a metabolite of the culture.This superantigen is marked by its ability to stimulate T cells at a high frequency, thereby giving rise to potent cell-mediated immunological responses and producing a large variety of cytokines with the final rsult of apoptosis of tumor cells. The drug was approved for trial prodoction in 1994 by the Center of the State Evaluation and Review of New Drugs,China,and was licenced for marketing by 1996 after finishing the phase III clinical trial.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of Theranostic Polymeric Micelles for Imaging and Drug Delivery in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar, Apurva Kulkarni, Dattatri K Nagesha, Srinivas Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade engineered nanoplatforms have seen a momentous progress in developing a multimodal theranostic formulation which can be simultaneously used for imaging and therapy. In this report we describe the synthesis and application of theranostic phospholipid based polymeric micelles for optical fluorescence imaging and controlled drug delivery. CdSe quantum dots (QDs and anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox, were co-encapsulated into the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The micelles are characterized using optical spectroscopy for characteristic absorbance and fluorescence features of QDs and Dox. TEM and DLS studies yielded a size of <50 nm for the micellar formulations with very narrow size distribution. A sustained release of the drug was observed from the co-encapsulated micellar formulation. In vitro optical fluorescence imaging and cytotoxicity studies with HeLa cell line demonstrated the potential of these micellar systems as efficient optical imaging and therapeutic probes.

  3. Cancer development, progression, and therapy: an epigenetic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sibaji; Horn, Garrick; Moulton, Kimberly; Oza, Anuja; Byler, Shannon; Kokolus, Shannon; Longacre, McKenna

    2013-10-21

    Carcinogenesis involves uncontrolled cell growth, which follows the activation of oncogenes and/or the deactivation of tumor suppression genes. Metastasis requires down-regulation of cell adhesion receptors necessary for tissue-specific, cell-cell attachment, as well as up-regulation of receptors that enhance cell motility. Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and DNA hydroxymethylation, can modify these characteristics. Targets for these epigenetic changes include signaling pathways that regulate apoptosis and autophagy, as well as microRNA. We propose that predisposed normal cells convert to cancer progenitor cells that, after growing, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This process, which is partially under epigenetic control, can create a metastatic form of both progenitor and full-fledged cancer cells, after which metastasis to a distant location may occur. Identification of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms has provided potential therapeutic avenues. In particular, epigenetic drugs appear to potentiate the action of traditional therapeutics, often by demethylating and re-expressing tumor suppressor genes to inhibit tumorigenesis. Epigenetic drugs may inhibit both the formation and growth of cancer progenitor cells, thus reducing the recurrence of cancer. Adopting epigenetic alteration as a new hallmark of cancer is a logical and necessary step that will further encourage the development of novel epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  4. Cancer Development, Progression, and Therapy: An Epigenetic Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Longacre

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis involves uncontrolled cell growth, which follows the activation of oncogenes and/or the deactivation of tumor suppression genes. Metastasis requires down-regulation of cell adhesion receptors necessary for tissue-specific, cell–cell attachment, as well as up-regulation of receptors that enhance cell motility. Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and DNA hydroxymethylation, can modify these characteristics. Targets for these epigenetic changes include signaling pathways that regulate apoptosis and autophagy, as well as microRNA. We propose that predisposed normal cells convert to cancer progenitor cells that, after growing, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This process, which is partially under epigenetic control, can create a metastatic form of both progenitor and full-fledged cancer cells, after which metastasis to a distant location may occur. Identification of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms has provided potential therapeutic avenues. In particular, epigenetic drugs appear to potentiate the action of traditional therapeutics, often by demethylating and re-expressing tumor suppressor genes to inhibit tumorigenesis. Epigenetic drugs may inhibit both the formation and growth of cancer progenitor cells, thus reducing the recurrence of cancer. Adopting epigenetic alteration as a new hallmark of cancer is a logical and necessary step that will further encourage the development of novel epigenetic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  5. A novel magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier for enhanced cancer chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs loaded with antitumor drugs in combination with an external magnetic field (EMF-guided delivery can improve the efficacy of treatment and may decrease serious side effects. The purpose of this study was 1 to investigate application of PEG modified GMNPs (PGMNPs as a drug carrier of the chemotherapy compound doxorubicin (DOX in vitro; 2 to evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of DOX-conjugated PGMNPs (DOX-PGMNPs using an EMF-guided delivery in vivo. METHODS: First, DOX-PGMNPs were synthesized and the cytotoxicity of DOX-PGMNPs was assessed in vitro. Second, upon intravenous administration of DOX-PMGPNs to H22 hepatoma cell tumor-bearing mice, the DOX biodistribution in different organs (tissues was measured. The antitumor activity was evaluated using different treatment strategies such as DOX-PMGPNs or DOX-PMGPNs with an EMF-guided delivery (DOX-PGMNPs-M. RESULTS: The relative tumor volumes in DOX-PGMNPs-M, DOX-PGMNPs, and DOX groups were 5.46±1.48, 9.22±1.51, and 14.8±1.64, respectively (each p<0.05, following treatment for 33 days. The life span of tumor-bearing mice treated with DOX-PGMNPs-M, DOX-PGMNPs, and DOX were 74.8±9.95, 66.1±13.5, and 31.3±3.31 days, respectively (each p<0.05. CONCLUSION: This simple and adaptive nanoparticle design may accommodate chemotherapy for drug delivery optimization and in vivo drug-target definition in system biology profiling, increasing the margin of safety in treatment of cancers in the near future.

  6. Drug therapy of colorectal cancer%大肠癌的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖冰; 王媛媛

    2011-01-01

    大肠癌作为消化道常见的恶性肿瘤,严重威胁着人类的健康.随着医学的不断进步,目前针对大肠癌治疗也逐渐向多元化发展.除手术治疗外的多种药物治疗在大肠癌的治疗中发挥重要的作用.本文将对大肠癌的化疗、免疫治疗、生物治疗、基因治疗、靶向治疗、中医中药治疗及对症支持治疗的研究逐一论述.%Colorectal cancer as the common malignant tumor in digestive tract is seriously threatening the health of human beings.With the development of medicine, current treatment for colorectal cancer has gradually diversified.In addition to surgical treatment, the multi-type drug therapy playsan important role in the treatment of colorectal cancer.This article reviews the effect of multi-type drug therapy for colorectal cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy,biological therapy, gene therapy, targeted therapy, Chinese medicine treatment and supporting treatment.

  7. Developing phytoestrogens for breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mandy M; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Chemoprevention using phytoestrogens (PEs) for breast cancer may be a valid strategy. PEs are phytochemicals with estrogen-like structures and can be classified into four types: isoflavones, lignans, stilbenes and coumestans. They are widely distributed in diet and herbs and have shown anti-cancer activity via mechanisms including estrogen receptor modulation, aromatase inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Genistein, daidzein and resveratrol are some of the most studied PE examples. Quality control in product manufacturing and clinical study design is a critical issue in developing them as clinically effective chemopreventive agents for breast cancer.

  8. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  9. Cancer drugs inhibit morphogenesis in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushree M Routh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida infections are very common in cancer patients and it is a common practice to prescribe antifungal antibiotics along with anticancer drugs. Yeast to hyphal form switching is considered to be important in invasive candidiasis. Targeting morphogenetic switching may be useful against invasive candidiasis. In this study, we report the antimorphogenetic properties of thirty cancer drugs.

  10. TCM-based new drug discovery and development in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ying; Hou, Jin-Jun; Long, Hua-Li; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Liang, Jian; Guo, De-An

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, China has significantly improved the drug development environment by establishing a series of policies for the regulation of new drug approval. The regulatory system for new drug evaluation and registration in China was gradually developed in accordance with international standards. The approval and registration of TCM in China became as strict as those of chemical drugs and biological products. In this review, TCM-based new drug discovery and development are introduced according to the TCM classification of nine categories.

  11. Cancer megafunds with in silico and in vitro validation: accelerating cancer drug discovery via financial engineering without financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianjin; Debonneuil, Edouard; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Mishra, Bud

    2016-09-06

    Advances in financial engineering are radically reshaping the biomedical marketplace. For instance, new methods of pooling diversified drug development programs by placing them in a special purpose vehicle (SPV) have been proposed to create a securitized cancer megafund allowing for debt and equity participation. In this study, we perform theoretical and numerical simulations that highlight the role of empirical validation of the projects comprising a cancer megafund. We quantify the degree to which the deliberately designed structure of derivatives and investments is key to its liquidity. Research megafunds with comprehensive in silico and laboratory validation protocols and ability to issue both debt, and equity as well as hybrid financial products may enable conservative investors including pension funds and sovereign government funds to profit from unique securitization opportunities. Thus, while hedging investor's longevity risk, such well-validated megafunds will contribute to health, well being and longevity of the global population.

  12. Cancer megafunds with in silico and in vitro validation: Accelerating cancer drug discovery via financial engineering without financial crisis

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xianjin

    2016-06-03

    Advances in financial engineering are radically reshaping the biomedical marketplace. For instance, new methods of pooling diversified drug development programs by placing them in a special purpose vehicle (SPV) have been proposed to create a securitized cancer megafund allowing for debt and equity participation. In this study, we perform theoretical and numerical simulations that highlight the role of empirical validation of the projects comprising a cancer megafund. We quantify the degree to which the deliberately designed structure of derivatives and investments is key to its liquidity. Research megafunds with comprehensive in silico and laboratory validation protocols and ability to issue both debt, and equity as well as hybrid financial products may enable conservative investors including pension funds and sovereign government funds to profit from unique securitization opportunities. Thus, while hedging investor\\'s longevity risk, such well-validated megafunds will contribute to health, well being and longevity of the global population.

  13. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  14. PI3K/AKT/mTOR: role in breast cancer progression, drug resistance, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Zotano, Angel; Mayer, Ingrid A; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2016-12-01

    Anti-cancer cancer-targeted therapies are designed to exploit a particular vulnerability in the tumor, which in most cases results from its dependence on an oncogene and/or loss of a tumor suppressor. Mutations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway are freqcuently found in breast cancers and associated with cellular transformation, tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug resistance. Several drugs targeting PI3K/ATK/mTOR are currently in clinical trials, mainly in combination with endocrine therapy and anti-HER2 therapy. These drugs are the focus of this review.

  15. [Development of ultrasonic cancer therapy using ultrasound sensitive liposome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Utoguchi, Naoki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been utilized as a useful tool for diagnosis and therapy. US mediated drug and gene delivery is paid to attention as a non-invasive system. The combination of US and microbubbles generated microjet stream by inducing disruption of bubbles and resulted in enhancing permeability of cell membrane. This phenomenon has been utilized as driving force for drug and gene delivery. Recently, we developed ultrasound sensitive liposome [Bubble liposome (BL)] containing perfluoropropane gas. US combined with BL could effectively transfer gene in vivo compared to conventional cationic liposomes. Using this method, we succeeded to obtain a therapeutic effect in cancer gene therapy with Interleukin-12 corded plasmid DNA. Therefore, it is expected that US combined with BL might be a useful non-viral vector system. From this result, the fusion of liposomal and ultrasound technologies would be important for establishment of advanced cancer therapy.

  16. pH-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles employed in controlled drug deliver y systems for cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Ni Yang; Chun-Qiu Zhang; Wei Wang; Paul C.Wang; Jian-Ping Zhou; Xing-Jie Liang

    2014-01-01

    In the ifght against cancer, controlled drug delivery systems have emerged to enhance the therapeutic effcacy and safety of anti-cancer drugs. Among these systems, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with a functional surface possess obvious advantages and were thus rapidly developed for cancer treatment. Many stimuli-responsive materials, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and inorganic materials, have been applied as caps and gatekeepers to control drug release from MSNs. This review presents an overview of the recent progress in the production of pH-responsive MSNs based on the pH gradient between normal tissues and the tumor microenvironment. Four main categories of gatekeepers can respond to acidic conditions. hTese categories will be described in detail.

  17. PET and SPECT Imaging of Tumor Biology: New Approaches towards Oncology Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Marcian E; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D

    2008-01-01

    Spiraling drug developmental costs and lengthy time-to-market introduction are two critical challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry. The clinical trials success rate for oncology drugs is reported to be 5% as compared to other therapeutic categories (11%) with most failures often encountered late in the clinical development process. PET and SPECT nuclear imaging technologies could play an important role in facilitating the drug development process improving the speed, efficiency and cost of drug development. This review will focus on recent studies of PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology and their application in the investigation of tumor biology. The use of clinically-validated radioligands as imaging-based biomarkers in oncology could significantly impact new cancer therapeutic development.

  18. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ki Bae

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK, a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R], or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Pectin matrix as oral drug delivery vehicle for colon cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tin Wui; Colombo, Gaia; Sonvico, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Colon cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally with 639,000 deaths reported annually. Typical chemotherapy is provided by injection route to reduce tumor growth and metastasis. Recent research investigates the oral delivery profiles of chemotherapeutic agents. In comparison to injection, oral administration of drugs in the form of a colon-specific delivery system is expected to increase drug bioavailability at target site, reduce drug dose and systemic adverse effects. Pectin is suitable for use as colon-specific drug delivery vehicle as it is selectively digested by colonic microflora to release drug with minimal degradation in upper gastrointestinal tract. The present review examines the physicochemical attributes of formulation needed to retard drug release of pectin matrix prior to its arrival at colon, and evaluate the therapeutic value of pectin matrix in association with colon cancer. The review suggests that multi-particulate calcium pectinate matrix is an ideal carrier to orally deliver drugs for site-specific treatment of colon cancer as (1) crosslinking of pectin by calcium ions in a matrix negates drug release in upper gastrointestinal tract, (2) multi-particulate carrier has a slower transit and a higher contact time for drug action in colon than single-unit dosage form, and (3) both pectin and calcium have an indication to reduce the severity of colon cancer from the implication of diet and molecular biology studies. Pectin matrix demonstrates dual advantages as drug carrier and therapeutic for use in treatment of colon cancer.

  20. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  1. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  2. Selective Delivery of an Anticancer Drug with Aptamer-Functionalized Liposomes to Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Hang; Tang, Li; Yang, Xujuan; Hwang, Kevin; Wang, Wendan; Yin, Qian; Wong, Ngo Yin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Yasui, Norio; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Helferich, William G; Cheng, Jianjun; Lu, Yi

    2013-10-21

    Selective targeting of cancer cells is a critical step in cancer diagnosis and therapy. To address this need, DNA aptamers have attracted significant attention as possible targeting ligands. However, while their use in targeting cancer cells in vitro has been reported, their effectiveness has rarely been established in vivo. Here we report the development of a liposomal drug delivery system for targeted anticancer chemotherapy. Liposomes were prepared containing doxorubicin as a payload, and functionalized with AS1411, a DNA aptamer with strong binding affinity for nucleolin. AS1411 aptamer-functionalized liposomes increased cellular internalization and cytotoxicity to MCF-7 breast cancer cells as compared to non-targeting liposomes. Furthermore, targeted liposomal doxorubicin improved antitumor efficacy against xenograft MCF-7 breast tumors in athymic nude mice, attributable to their enhanced tumor tissue penetration. This study suggests that AS1411 aptamer-functionalized liposomes can recognize nucleolin overexpressed on MCF-7 cell surface, and therefore enable drug delivery with high specificity and selectivity.

  3. Ethnobotany and its role in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, M

    2000-11-01

    The botanical collections of early explorers and the later ethnobotany have played important roles in the development of new drugs for many centuries. In the middle of the last century interest in this approach had declined dramatically, but has risen again during its last decade, and new foci have developed. The systematic evaluation of indigenous pharmacopoeias in order to contribute to improved health care in marginalized regions has been placed on the agenda of international and national organizations and of NGOs. In this paper the results of various projects on Mexican Indian ethnobotany and some of the subsequent pharmacological and phytochemical studies are summarized. Medicinal plants are an important element of indigenous medical systems in Mexico. This study uses the medicinal plants in four indigenous groups of Mexican Indians-Maya, Nahua, Zapotec and Mixe-as an example. The relative importance of a medicinal plant within a culture is documented using a quantitative method and the data are compared intra- and interculturally. While the species used by the indigenous groups vary, the data indicate that there exist well-defined criteria specific for each culture, which lead to the selection of a plant as a medicine. For example, a large number of species are used for gastrointestinal illnesses by two or more of the indigenous groups. At least in this case, the multiple transfers of species and their uses within -Mexico seems to be an important reason for the widespread use of a species. Some of the data we gathered in order to evaluate the indigenous claims are also discussed, focusing on the transcription factor NF-kappaB as a molecular target. This led to the identification of sesquiterpene lactones such as parthenolide as potent and relatively specific inhibitors of this transcription factor.

  4. FAT10 is associated with the malignancy and drug resistance of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue F

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Feng Xue,1,2,* Lin Zhu,3,* Qing-wei Meng,1 Liyan Wang,2 Xue-song Chen,1 Yan-bin Zhao,1 Ying Xing,1 Xiao-yun Wang,1 Li Cai1 1The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, 3Department of Radiotherapy, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer cases. Currently, platinum-based chemotherapy drugs, including cisplatin and carboplatin, are the most effective treatment for NSCLC. However, the clinical efficacy of chemotherapy is markedly reduced later in the treatment because drug resistance develops during the treatment. Recently, a series of studies has suggested the involvement of FAT10 in the development and malignancy of multiple cancer types. In this study, we focused our research on the function of FAT10 in NSCLC, which has not been previously reported in the literature. We found that the expression levels of FAT10 were elevated in quick chemoresistance NSCLC tissues, and we demonstrated that FAT10 promotes NSCLC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, the protein levels of FAT10 were elevated in cisplatin- and carboplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, and knockdown of FAT10 reduced the drug resistance of NSCLC cells. In addition, we gained evidence that FAT10 regulates NSCLC malignancy and drug resistance by modulating the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Keywords: FAT10, NSCLC, malignancy, drug resistance, NFκB

  5. Knockdown of UbcH10 Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Dual Drug Resistant Breast Cancer Cells to Epirubicin and Docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in women. As a hub gene involved in a diversity of tumors, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme H10 (UbcH10, may also play some roles in the genesis and development of breast cancer. In the current study, we found that the expression of UbcH10 was up-regulated in some breast cancer tissues and five cell lines. We established a dual drug resistant cell line MCF-7/EPB (epirubicin/TXT (docetaxel and a lentiviral system expressing UbcH10 shRNA to investigate the effects of UbcH10 knockdown on the chemosensitivity of MCF-7/EPB/TXT cells to epirubicin and docetaxel. The knockdown of UbcH10 inhibited the proliferation of both MCF-7 and MCF-7/EPB/TXT cells, due to the G1 phase arrest in cell cycle. Furthermore, UbcH10 knockdown increased the sensitivity of MCF-7/EPB/TXT cells to epirubicin and docetaxel and promoted the apoptosis induced by these two drugs. Protein detection showed that, in addition to inhibiting the expression of Ki67 and cyclin D1, UbcH10 RNAi also impaired the increased BCL-2 and MDR-1 expression levels in MCF-7/EPB/TXT cells, which may contribute to abating the drug resistance in the breast cancer cells. Our research in the current study demonstrated that up-regulation of UbcH10 was involved in breast cancer and its knockdown can inhibit the growth of cancer cells and increase the chemosensitivity of the dual drug resistant breast cancer cells to epirubicin and docetaxel, suggesting that UbcH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of breast cancer.

  6. Anti-cancer drug discovery: update and comparisons in yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangxun; Chen, Liang; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of novel cancer chemotherapeutics focuses on screening and identifying compounds that can target 'cancer-specific' biological processes while causing minimal toxicity to non-tumor cells. Alternatively, model organisms with highly conserved cancer-related cellular processes relative to human cells may offer new opportunities for anticancer drug discovery when combined with chemical screening. Some organisms used for chemotherapeutic discovery include yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish which are similar in important ways relevant to cancer study but offer distinct advantages as well. Here, we describe these model attributes and the rationale for using them in cancer drug screening research.

  7. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

  8. Disulfide cross-linked polyurethane micelles as a reduction-triggered drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangjiang; Ding, Jianxun; He, Chaoliang; Cao, Yue; Xu, Weiguo; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-05-01

    Nanoscale carriers that stably load drugs in blood circulation and release the payloads in desirable sites in response to a specific trigger are of great interest for smart drug delivery systems. For this purpose, a novel type of disulfide core cross-linked micelles, which are facilely fabricated by cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol)/polyurethane block copolymers containing cyclic disulfide moieties via a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction, are developed. A broad-spectrum anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), is loaded into the micelles as a model drug. The drug release from the core cross-linked polyurethane micelles (CCL-PUMs) loaded with DOX is suppressed in normal phosphate buffer saline (PBS), whereas it is markedly accelerated with addition of an intracellular reducing agent, glutathione (GSH). Notably, although DOX-loaded CCL-PUMs display lower cytotoxicity in vitro compared to either free DOX or DOX-loaded uncross-linked polyurethane micelles, the drug-loaded CCL-PUMs show the highest anti-tumor efficacy with reduced toxicity in vivo. Since enhanced anti-tumor efficacy and reduced toxic side effects are key aspects of efficient cancer therapy, the novel reduction-responsive CCL-PUMs may hold great potential as a bio-triggered drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  9. Challenges and strategies in anti-cancer nanomedicine development: An industry perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hare, J.I.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.; Ashford, M.B.; Puri, S.; Storm, G.; Barry, S.T.

    2017-01-01

    Successfully translating anti-cancer nanomedicines from pre-clinical proof of concept to demonstration of therapeutic value in the clinic is challenging. Having made significant advances with drug delivery technologies, we must learn from other areas of oncology drug development, where patient strat

  10. Polymyositis and dermatomyositis as a risk of developing cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubaszek, Michał; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Maślińska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that affects striated muscles. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with presence of skin symptoms. Both are characterized by acute or subacute onset, symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, the presence of mononuclear cell infiltrates of the muscles and increased activity of muscle enzymes. The treatment still remains glucocorticoids and disease-modifying drugs. Symptoms of PM/DM can be a signal of developing cancer. Known risk factors for cancer in patients with PM/DM are older age, male gender, dysphagia, skin necrosis, cutaneous vasculitis, rapid onset of the disease, elevated creatinine kinase (CK) and C reactive protein (CRP), and an increase in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Recently three new myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSA) predicting the risk of cancer have been discovered: melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (anti-MDA-5), transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ), and nuclear matrix protein NXP-2.

  11. Novel Pharmacometric Methods for Informed Tuberculosis Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Clewe, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    With approximately nine million new cases and the attributable cause of death of an estimated two millions people every year there is an urgent need for new and effective drugs and treatment regimens targeting tuberculosis. The tuberculosis drug development pathway is however not ideal, containing non-predictive model systems and unanswered questions that may increase the risk of failure during late-phase drug development. The aim of this thesis was hence to develop pharmacometric tools in or...

  12. Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM: a framework for searching repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of cancer and an application to colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hsiang Chung

    Full Text Available Drug repurposing has become an increasingly attractive approach to drug development owing to the ever-growing cost of new drug discovery and frequent withdrawal of successful drugs caused by side effect issues. Here, we devised Functional Module Connectivity Map (FMCM for the discovery of repurposed drug compounds for systems treatment of complex diseases, and applied it to colorectal adenocarcinoma. FMCM used multiple functional gene modules to query the Connectivity Map (CMap. The functional modules were built around hub genes identified, through a gene selection by trend-of-disease-progression (GSToP procedure, from condition-specific gene-gene interaction networks constructed from sets of cohort gene expression microarrays. The candidate drug compounds were restricted to drugs exhibiting predicted minimal intracellular harmful side effects. We tested FMCM against the common practice of selecting drugs using a genomic signature represented by a single set of individual genes to query CMap (IGCM, and found FMCM to have higher robustness, accuracy, specificity, and reproducibility in identifying known anti-cancer agents. Among the 46 drug candidates selected by FMCM for colorectal adenocarcinoma treatment, 65% had literature support for association with anti-cancer activities, and 60% of the drugs predicted to have harmful effects on cancer had been reported to be associated with carcinogens/immune suppressors. Compounds were formed from the selected drug candidates where in each compound the component drugs collectively were beneficial to all the functional modules while no single component drug was harmful to any of the modules. In cell viability tests, we identified four candidate drugs: GW-8510, etacrynic acid, ginkgolide A, and 6-azathymine, as having high inhibitory activities against cancer cells. Through microarray experiments we confirmed the novel functional links predicted for three candidate drugs: phenoxybenzamine (broad effects

  13. Targeting hedgehog signaling in cancer: research and clinical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jingwu Xie, Christopher M Bartels, Scott W Barton, Dongsheng GuWells Center for Pediatric Research, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Since its first description in Drosophila by Drs Nusslein-Volhard and Wieschaus in 1980, hedgehog (Hh signaling has been implicated in regulation of cell differentiation, proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell maintenance, and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through studies of Gorlin syndrome in 1996 by two independent teams. Later, it was shown that Hh signaling may be involved in many types of cancer, including skin, leukemia, lung, brain, and gastrointestinal cancers. In early 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the clinical use of Hh inhibitor Erivedge/vismodegib for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinomas. With further investigation, it is possible to see more clinical applications of Hh signaling inhibitors. In this review, we will summarize major advances in the last 3 years in our understanding of Hh signaling activation in human cancer, and recent developments in preclinical and clinical studies using Hh signaling inhibitors.Keywords: hedgehog, smoothened, PTCH1, cancer, signal transduction, clinical trials, animal model

  14. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-01-29

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal.

  15. Overcoming drug crystallization in electrospun fibers--Elucidating key parameters and developing strategies for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Salem; Franzen, Lutz; Windbergs, Maike

    2015-01-15

    For the development of novel therapeutics, uncontrolled crystallization of drugs within delivery systems represents a major challenge. Especially for thin and flexible polymeric systems such as oral films or dermal wound dressings, the formation and growth of drug crystals can significantly affect drug distribution and release kinetics as well as physical storage stability. In this context, electrospinning was introduced as a fabrication technique with the potential to encapsulate drugs within ultrafine fibers by rapid solvent evaporation overcoming drug crystallization during fabrication and storage. However, these effects could so far only be shown for specific drug-polymer combinations and an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes of drug-loaded fiber formation and influencing key parameters is still missing. In this study, we systematically investigated crystal formation of caffeine as a model drug in electrospun fibers comparing different polymers. The solvent polarity was found to have a major impact on the drug crystal formation, whereas only a minor effect was attributed to the electrospinning process parameters. Based on an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes determining drug crystallization processes in electrospun fibers, key parameters could be identified which allow for the rational development of drug-loaded electrospun fibers overcoming drug crystallization.

  16. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  17. Clitocine targets Mcl-1 to induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth inhibition in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Li, Hua; Li, Xia; Zeng, Xueli; Wu, Ping; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Liu, Fei-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Drug resistance is a major reason for therapy failure in cancer. Clitocine is a natural amino nucleoside isolated from mushroom and has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we observed that clitocine can effectively induce drug-resistant human cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and inhibit tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Clitocine treatment inhibited drug-resistant human cancer cell growth in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Biochemical analysis revealed that clitocine-induced tumor growth inhibition is associated with activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, PARP cleavage, cytochrome c release and Bax, Bak activation, suggesting that clitocine inhibits drug-resistant cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis regulatory genes indicated that Mcl-1 level was dramatically decreased after clitocine treatment. Over-expression of Mcl-1 reversed the activation of Bax and attenuated clitocine-induced apoptosis, suggesting that clitocine-induced apoptosis was at least partially by inducing Mcl-1 degradation to release Bax and Bak. Consistent with induction of apoptosis in vitro, clitocine significantly suppressed the drug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in vivo by inducing apoptosis as well as inhibiting cell proliferation. Taken together, our data demonstrated that clitocine is a potent Mcl-1 inhibitor that can effectively induce apoptosis to suppress drug-resistant human cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, and thus holds great promise for further development as potentially a novel therapeutic agent to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy.

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4): a targetable regulator of drug resistance in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, R C; Longley, D B; Allen, W L; Stevenson, L; McLaughlin, K; Dunne, P D; Blayney, J K; Salto-Tellez, M; Van Schaeybroeck, S; Johnston, P G

    2014-02-06

    The discovery of underlying mechanisms of drug resistance, and the development of novel agents to target these pathways, is a priority for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously undertook a systems biology approach to design a functional genomic screen and identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as a potential mediator of drug resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FGFR4 in drug resistance using RNAi and the small-molecule inhibitor BGJ398 (Novartis). We found that FGFR4 is highly expressed at the RNA and protein levels in colon cancer tumour tissue compared with normal colonic mucosa and other tumours. Silencing of FGFR4 reduced cell viability in a panel of colon cancer cell lines and increased caspase-dependent apoptosis. A synergistic interaction was also observed between FGFR4 silencing and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colon cancer cell lines. Mechanistically, FGFR4 silencing decreased activity of the pro-survival STAT3 transcription factor and expression of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP. Furthermore, silencing of STAT3 resulted in downregulation of c-FLIP protein expression, suggesting that FGFR4 may regulate c-FLIP expression via STAT3. A similar phenotype and downstream pathway changes were observed following FGFR4 silencing in cell lines resistant to 5-FU, oxaliplatin and SN38 and upon exposure of parental cells to the FGFR small-molecule inhibitor BGJ398. Our results indicate that FGFR4 is a targetable regulator of chemo-resistance in CRC, and hence inhibiting FGFR4 in combination with 5-FU and oxaliplatin is a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  19. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  20. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward.

  1. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 and its role in proliferation capacity of drug-resistant cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki eMatsunaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human aldo-keto reductase AKR1B10, originally identified as an aldose reductase-like protein and human small intestine aldose reductase, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase that metabolizes a variety of endogenous compounds, such as aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and dicarbonyl compounds, and some drug ketones. The enzyme is highly expressed in solid tumors of several tissues including lung and liver, and as such has received considerable interest as a relevant biomarker for the development of those tumors. In addition, AKR1B10 has been recently reported to be significantly up-regulated in some cancer cell lines (medulloblastoma D341 and colon cancer HT29 acquiring resistance towards chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide and mitomycin c, suggesting the validity of the enzyme as a chemoresistance marker. Although the detailed information on the AKR1B10-mediated mechanisms leading to the drug resistance process is not well understood so far, the enzyme has been proposed to be involved in functional regulations of cell proliferation and metabolism of drugs and endogenous lipids during the development of chemoresistance. This article reviews the current literature focusing mainly on expression profile and roles of AKR1B10 in the drug resistance of cancer cells. Recent developments of AKR1B10 inhibitors and their usefulness in restoring sensitivity to anticancer drugs are also reviewed.

  2. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery.

  3. Current Perspectives on Novel Drug Delivery Systems and Approaches for Management of Cervical Cancer: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hani, Umme; Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Bhosale, Rohit R; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumallappa; Kulkarni, Parthasarathi K

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is uterine cervix carcinoma, the second deadly cancer and has a high incidence and mortality rate. In the developing world conventional treatment strategies such as surgical intervention and chemoradiotherapy are less widely available. Currently cancer research focuses on improving treatment of cervical cancer using various therapies such as gene therapy, recombinant protein therapy, photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy and delivery of chemotherapeutic agents using nanoparticles, hydrogel and liposomal based delivery systems and also localized delivery systems which exist in a variety of forms such as intravaginal rings, intravaginal patches, intravaginal films, etc. in order to improve the drug delivery in a controlled manner to the diseased site thereby reducing systemic side effects. The present review encloses existing diverse delivery systems and approaches intended for treatment of cervical cancer.

  4. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  5. Collections of simultaneously altered genes as biomarkers of cancer cell drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-03-15

    Computational analysis of cancer pharmacogenomics data has resulted in biomarkers predictive of drug response, but the majority of response is not captured by current methods. Methods typically select single biomarkers or groups of related biomarkers but do not account for response that is strictly dependent on many simultaneous genetic alterations. This shortcoming reflects the combinatorics and multiple-testing problem associated with many-body biologic interactions. We developed a novel approach, Multivariate Organization of Combinatorial Alterations (MOCA), to partially address these challenges. Extending on previous work that accounts for pairwise interactions, the approach rapidly combines many genomic alterations into biomarkers of drug response, using Boolean set operations coupled with optimization; in this framework, the union, intersection, and difference Boolean set operations are proxies of molecular redundancy, synergy, and resistance, respectively. The algorithm is fast, broadly applicable to cancer genomics data, is of immediate use for prioritizing cancer pharmacogenomics experiments, and recovers known clinical findings without bias. Furthermore, the results presented here connect many important, previously isolated observations.

  6. Stable RNA nanoparticles as potential new generation drugs for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yi; Pi, Fengmei; Sharma, Ashwani; Rajabi, Mehdi; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Leggas, Markos; Evers, B Mark; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-02-01

    Human genome sequencing revealed that only ~1.5% of the DNA sequence coded for proteins. More and more evidence has uncovered that a substantial part of the 98.5% so-called "junk" DNAs actually code for noncoding RNAs. Two milestones, chemical drugs and protein drugs, have already appeared in the history of drug development, and it is expected that the third milestone in drug development will be RNA drugs or drugs that target RNA. This review focuses on the development of RNA therapeutics for potential cancer treatment by applying RNA nanotechnology. A therapeutic RNA nanoparticle is unique in that its scaffold, ligand, and therapeutic component can all be composed of RNA. The special physicochemical properties lend to the delivery of siRNA, miRNA, ribozymes, or riboswitches; imaging using fluogenenic RNA; and targeting using RNA aptamers. With recent advances in solving the chemical, enzymatic, and thermodynamic stability issues, RNA nanoparticles have been found to be advantageous for in vivo applications due to their uniform nano-scale size, precise stoichiometry, polyvalent nature, low immunogenicity, low toxicity, and target specificity. In vivo animal studies have revealed that RNA nanoparticles can specifically target tumors with favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters without unwanted accumulation in normal organs. This review summarizes the key studies that have led to the detailed understanding of RNA nanoparticle formation as well as chemical and thermodynamic stability issue. The methods for RNA nanoparticle construction, and the current challenges in the clinical application of RNA nanotechnology, such as endosome trapping and production costs, are also discussed.

  7. Do companion diagnostics make economic sense for drug developers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit

    2012-09-15

    Drug developers are grappling with the impact of personalized medicine on their portfolios. The combination of molecular diagnostics with targeted biologic therapies has been hailed as a recent innovation with few historical analogs to guide behavior. However, if the definition of companion diagnostics is broadened to include any drug whose FDA approved label requires diagnostic testing before prescription then over 50 drugs across multiple therapeutic areas arise. Most importantly for current drug developers, these drugs represent a wide variety of market situations and with sufficient historical data to evaluate different commercialization strategies for the combination. Included in these examples are drugs which were not initially launched with companion diagnostics but were required to implement companion diagnostics after they were on the market for a period of time. The historical case studies demonstrate that companion diagnostics are neither a universal panacea nor an unmitigated disaster for drug developers but require an understanding of specific situations to determine the utility of companion diagnostics. Numerous case studies highlight how companion diagnostics have been a boon to drug developers including Iressa, statins, Soriatane, Arthrotec, Promacta, Nplate, Letairis, and Tracleer. Other examples provide lessons on how to avoid pitfalls such as Accutane, Ticlid, Tegretol, Ziagen, Actigall and Clozaril. By carefully evaluating these case studies, drug developers can gain insight on the appropriate companion diagnostic strategy to implement for their specific situation and develop the elements of a successful companion diagnostic strategy.

  8. Cancer incidence and novel therapies developed in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, M

    2012-01-01

    According to the ministry of Health, Labour and welfare of Japan, Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan since 1981. ([1]) As per the data in 2010, in Japan, one in every three deaths was due to cancer. ([2]) The Japanese Government has introduced so far, three terms of 10 years strategies for Cancer control since 1984 till date. The budget allocated for cancer control in 2009 was 52.5 billion yen in Japan. ([3]) Lung is the leading site for cancer in both males and females in Japan. In males, following the lung, stomach, liver, colon and pancreas are other leading sites while in the females, stomach, colon, pancreas and breast are the other leading sites. ([1]) In 2006, the cancer incidence was 694,000 and the male cancer incidence was 1.4 times as large as that of females. The peak age for cancer deaths in males is their fifties while in the females it is the sixties among Japanese. In addition to the conventional treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, some of other therapies in practice in Japan are the Hyperthermia ([4]) that uses high temperatures to kill or damage the cancer cells, the Ion Beam therapy using proton beams ([5]) to damage the DNA of the cells as cancer cells have high rate of cell divisions and lesser ability to repair DNA damage, the molecular targeted therapies that interfere with a specific molecular target involved in tumour growth and progression([6]) and most importantly the autologous cell based Immunotherapies. Modern Cancer Immunotherapy started in the 1970s in Japan. The immunopotentiators using compounds from Bacteria, Beta Glucans from fungi were the first forms of modern Immunotherapy. Then was the era of direct injection of cytokines such as Interleukins, Interferons etc. The adverse effects associated with the injection of cytokines led to development of cell based Immunotherapies in the 1980s. ([7]) Immuno-cell therapies involve isolation of immune cells which are then processed and re

  9. Microprocessor in controlled transdermal drug delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2009-12-01

    Microprocessor controlled transdermal delivery of anticancer drugs 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) was developed and in vitro evaluation was done. Drugs were loaded based on the pharmacokinetics parameters. In vitro diffusion studies were carried at different current density (0.0, 0.1, 0.22, 0.50 mA/cm2). The patches were evaluated for the drug content, thickness, weight, folding endurance, flatness, thumb tack test and adhesive properties all were well with in the specification of transdermal patches with elegant and transparent in appearance. In vitro permeation studies through human cadaver skin showed, passive delivery (0.0 mA/cm2) of 6-MP was low. As the current density was progressively increased, the flux also increased. the flux also increased with 0.1 mA/cm2 for 15-20 min, but it was less than desired flux, 0.2 mA/cm2 for 30 min showed better flux than 0.1 mA/cm2 current, but lag time was more than 4 h, 0.5 mA/cm2 current for more than 1 h, flux was >159 microg/cm2 h which was desired flux for 6-MP. 5-FU flux reached the minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 54 microg/cm2 h with 0.5 mA/cm2 current for 30-45 min, drug concentration were within the therapeutic window in post-current phase. We concluded from Ohm's Law that as the resistance decreases, current increases. Skin resistance decrease with increase in time and current, increase in the drug permeation. Interestingly, for all investigated current densities, as soon as the current was switched off, 5-FU and 6-MP flux decreased fairly, but the controlled drug delivery can be achieved by switching the current for required period of time.

  10. New generation of β-cyclodextrin-chitosan nanoparticles encapsulated quantum dots loaded with anticancer drug for tumor-target drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Guo, Jin; Ding, Li; Zhong, Wenying

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to report the drug delivery system that can integrate the functional building blocks for optical pH-sensing, cancer cell imaging and controlled drug release into a single nanoparticle. The CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were prepared by in-situ immobilization of ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in β-cyclodextrin (CD) and chitosan (CS) polymer loaded with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Synthetic CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were approximately 100 nm in size and with blue fluorescence. The drug encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles was 22.36 % and the encapsulated drug was released via a controlled release mechanism after a 9 h plateau was reached. The efficiency of the drug release in tumor microenvironments (pH 5.3 buffer solutions) was higher than that in physiological pH 7.4. In vitro cytotoxicity assay results showed that the blank nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and therefore can be used as the fluorescence tracer, and the SAHA-encapsulated nanoparticles expressed an anticancer effect. Confocal microscopy and in vivo imaging studies showed that the developed nanoparticles had cytotoxicity in resistant cancer cells and preferentially accumulated in tumors. CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles with excellent long-term optical properties have great prospects for the development of targeting tracers and anti-tumor biomedical research.

  11. Aptamer-functionalized hydrogel as effective anti-cancer drugs delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Jianfei; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Min; Bi, Sai; Gui, Rijun; Li, Yanhui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2015-10-01

    An aptamer-functionalized hydrogel has been developed, which can be regulated by the AS1411 aptamer with the sol-gel conversion. Also the hydrogel can be further utilized for the controlled encapsulation and release of the cancer drugs. Specially, the AS1411 initiates the hybridization of acrydite-modified oligonucleotides to form the hydrogels and the presence of the target protein nucleolin leads the gel to dissolve as a result of reducing the cross-linking density by competitive target-aptamer binding. Based on the rheology of hydrogels, it is possible to utilize this material for storing and releasing molecules. In this research, the cancer drug doxorubicin is encapsulated inside the gel during the formation of the hydrogel and then released in the presence of nucleolin. Further experiments are carried out to prove the specific recognition of target matter. In vitro researches confirm that the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels can be used as drug carriers in targeted therapy and other biotechnological applications.

  12. Perspectives in Engineered Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Based Anti- Cancer Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackova, Darinka Gjorgieva; Kanjevac, Tatjana; Rimondini, Lia; Bosnakovski, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and apprehension of the characteristics and circumstances in which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affect and make alterations (enhance or reduce) to the growth of tumors and metastasis spread is pivotal, not only for reaching the possibility to employ MSCs as drug delivery systems, but also for making forward movement in the existing knowledge of involvement of major factors (tumor microenvironment, soluble signaling molecules, etc.) in the process of carcinogenesis. This capability is reliable because MSCs present a great basis for engineering and constructions of new systems to target cancers, intended to secrete therapeutic proteins in the tumor region, or for delivering of oncolytic viruses' directly at the tumor site (targeted chemotherapy with enzyme prodrug conversion or induction of tumor cell apoptosis). MSCs as a crucial segment of the tumor surroundings and their confirmed tumor tropism, are assumed to be an open gateway for the design of promising drug delivery systems. The presented paper reviews current publications in this fieldwork, searches out the most recent patents that were published after 2012 (WO2014066122, US20140017787, WO2015100268, US20150086515), and tries to present the current progress and future prospective on the design and development in anti-cancer drug delivery systems based on MSCs.

  13. Bacterial exopolysaccharide based magnetic nanoparticles: a versatile nanotool for cancer cell imaging, targeted drug delivery and synergistic effect of drug and hyperthermia mediated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Balasubramanian; Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Sreejith, Raveendran; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Iwai, Seiki; Suzuki, Masashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, Dasappan Nair

    2014-06-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are highly heterogeneous polymers produced by fungi and bacteria that have garnered considerable attention and have remarkable potential in various fields, including biomedical research. The necessity of biocompatible materials to coat and stabilize nanoparticles is highly recommended for successful application of the same in biomedical regime. In our study we have coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with two bacterial EPS-mauran (MR) and gellan gum (GG). The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs was enhanced and we have made it multifunctional by attaching targeting moiety, folate and with encapsulation of a potent anticancerous drug, 5FU. We have conjugated an imaging moiety along with nanocomposite to study the effective uptake of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the dye labeled folate targeted nanoparticles could effectively enter into cancer cells and the fate of nanoparticles was tracked with Lysotracker. The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs and synergistic effect of magnetic hyperthermia and drug for enhanced antiproliferation of cancer cells was also evaluated. More than 80% of cancer cells was killed within a period of 60 min when magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) was applied along with drug loaded EPS coated MNPs, thus signifying the combined effect of drug loaded MNPs and MHT. Our results suggests that MR and GG coated MNPs exhibited excellent biocompatibility with low cell cytotoxicity, high therapeutic potential, and superparamagnetic behavior that can be employed as prospective candidates for bacterial EPS based targeted drug delivery, cancer cell imaging and for MHT for killing cancer cells within short period of time.

  14. Rethinking the paradigm for the development of inhaled drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, John N

    2015-12-30

    Nebulized treatment is an important delivery option for the young, elderly, and those with severe chronic respiratory disease, but there is a lack of new nebulized drug products being produced for these patients, leading to the potential for under-treatment. This communication describes a new drug development paradigm as a timely solution to this issue. Often, drug development is initiated with nebulizers in the early stages, to provide cheaper and faster drug development, and then switched to inhaler devices in later clinical trials to address the majority of patients. However, the waste of resource on parallel development of the inhaler can be large due to the high early attrition rate of new drug development. The new paradigm uses the nebulizer to continue drug development through to market, and initiates inhaler development after completion of the riskier early phase studies. New drug safety and efficacy can be assessed faster and more efficiently by using a nebulized formulation rather than developing an inhaler. The results of calculations of expected net present value showed that the new paradigm produced higher expected net present values than the conventional model over a range of economic scenarios. This new paradigm could therefore provide improved returns on investments, as well as more modern drugs in nebulized form for those patients unable to use inhalers.

  15. Plant natural products: from traditional compounds to new emerging drugs in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, L; Luo, Y; Tian, M; Zhang, S-Y; Lu, R; Wang, J-H; Kasimu, R; Li, X

    2014-12-01

    Natural products are chemical compounds or substances produced naturally by living organisms. With the development of modern technology, more and more plant extracts have been found to be useful to medical practice. Both micromolecules and macromolecules have been reported to have the ability to inhibit tumour progression, a novel weapon to fight cancer by targeting its 10 characteristic hallmarks. In this review, we focus on summarizing plant natural compounds and their derivatives with anti-tumour properties, into categories, according to their potential therapeutic strategies against different types of human cancer. Taken together, we present a well-grounded review of these properties, hoping to shed new light on discovery of novel anti-tumour therapeutic drugs from known plant natural sources.

  16. Apoptosis induction with electric pulses - A new approach to cancer therapy with drug free

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Liling, E-mail: lilingtang@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Chongqing University, Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yao, Chenguo; Sun, Caixin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Electrical pulses have been widely used in biomedical fields, whose applications depend on the parameters such as durations and electric intensity. Conventional electroporation (0.1-1 kV/cm, 100 {mu}s) has been used in cell fusion, transfection and electrochemotherapy. Recent studies with high-intensity (MV/cm) electric field applications with durations of several tens of nanoseconds can affect intracellular signal transduction and intracellular structures with plasma intact, resulting in an application of intracellular manipulation. The most recent development is the finding that parameters between those two ranges could be used to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Proposal of apoptosis induction and tumor inhibition has advantages to pursue the treatment of cancer free of cytotoxic drugs.

  17. The Development of CK2 Inhibitors: From Traditional Pharmacology to in Silico Rational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Giorgio

    2017-02-20

    Casein kinase II (CK2) is an ubiquitous and pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinase able to phosphorylate hundreds of substrates. Being implicated in several human diseases, from neurodegeneration to cancer, the biological roles of CK2 have been intensively studied. Upregulation of CK2 has been shown to be critical to tumor progression, making this kinase an attractive target for cancer therapy. Several CK2 inhibitors have been developed so far, the first being discovered by "trial and error testing". In the last decade, the development of in silico rational drug design has prompted the discovery, de novo design and optimization of several CK2 inhibitors, active in the low nanomolar range. The screening of big chemical libraries and the optimization of hit compounds by Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD) provide telling examples of a fruitful application of rational drug design to the development of CK2 inhibitors. Ligand Based Drug Design (LBDD) models have been also applied to CK2 drug discovery, however they were mainly focused on methodology improvements rather than being critical for de novo design and optimization. This manuscript provides detailed description of in silico methodologies whose applications to the design and development of CK2 inhibitors proved successful and promising.

  18. Ex Vivo Metrics, a preclinical tool in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, C Gerald; Bilyard, Kevin; Stephenson, Hugo

    2008-01-23

    Among the challenges facing translational medicine today is the need for greater productivity and safety during the drug development process. To meet this need, practitioners of translational medicine are developing new technologies that can facilitate decision making during the early stages of drug discovery and clinical development. Ex Vivo Metrics is an emerging technology that addresses this need by using intact human organs ethically donated for research. After hypothermic storage, the organs are reanimated by blood perfusion, providing physiologically and biochemically stable preparations. In terms of emulating human exposure to drugs, Ex Vivo Metrics is the closest biological system available for clinical trials. Early application of this tool for evaluating drug targeting, efficacy, and toxicity could result in better selection among promising drug candidates, greater drug productivity, and increased safety.

  19. Ex Vivo Metrics™, a preclinical tool in new drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilyard Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among the challenges facing translational medicine today is the need for greater productivity and safety during the drug development process. To meet this need, practitioners of translational medicine are developing new technologies that can facilitate decision making during the early stages of drug discovery and clinical development. Ex Vivo Metrics™ is an emerging technology that addresses this need by using intact human organs ethically donated for research. After hypothermic storage, the organs are reanimated by blood perfusion, providing physiologically and biochemically stable preparations. In terms of emulating human exposure to drugs, Ex Vivo Metrics is the closest biological system available for clinical trials. Early application of this tool for evaluating drug targeting, efficacy, and toxicity could result in better selection among promising drug candidates, greater drug productivity, and increased safety.

  20. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin–graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xiao, Yinghong, E-mail: yhxiao@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhou, Ninglin, E-mail: zhouninglin@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing Zhou Ninglin Advanced Materials Technology Company Limited, Nanjing 211505 (China)

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. - Highlights: • Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed as a drug carrier. • The prepared PTX-loaded nanospheres can be dispersed in aqueous medium stably. • The GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres are safe for blood-contact applications. • This newly developed PTX-delivery system could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

  1. Droplet-based microtumor model to assess cell-ECM interactions and drug resistance of gastric cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Minjeong; Koh, Ilkyoo; Lee, Seok Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Pilnam

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a common aggressive malignant tumor with high incidence and mortality worldwide. GC is classified into intestinal and diffuse types according to the histo-morphological features. Because of distinctly different clinico-pathological features, new cancer therapy strategies and in vitro preclinical models for the two pathological variants of GC is necessary. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) influence the biological behavior of tumor cells, we hypothesized that GC might be more similarly modeled in 3D with matrix rather than in 2D. Herein, we developed a microfluidic-based a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro gastric cancer model, with subsequent drug resistance assay. AGS (intestinal type) and Hs746T (diffuse type) gastric cancer cell lines were encapsulated in collagen beads with high cellular viability. AGS exhibited an aggregation pattern with expansive growth, whereas Hs746T showed single-cell-level infiltration. Importantly, in microtumor models, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastatic genes were upregulated, whereas E-cadherin was downregulated. Expression of ß-catenin was decreased in drug-resistant cells, and chemosensitivity toward the anticancer drug (5-FU) was observed in microtumors. These results suggest that in vitro microtumor models may represent a biologically relevant platform for studying gastric cancer cell biology and tumorigenesis, and for accelerating the development of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:28128310

  2. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  3. [Regularity of drugs compatibility of anti-hepatoma traditional Chinese medicine ancient prescriptions and risk evaluation of anti-hepatoma new drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hong-Fa; Fan, Wei; Liu, Zhen; Man, Shu-Li; Si, Shu-Yong; Gao, Wen-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Traditional Chinese ancient prescriptions have been used for treatment of liver cancer for a long history and the scientific and rational compatibility is a great wealth for modern research and development (R&D) of new drugs. The research and development of new drugs are often accompanied with a large investment, a long cycle and a high risk, especially for the anti-tumor drugs R&D which are facing more risks and lower successful rate. In this research, the regularity of compatibility of drugs was analyzed from 124 anti-hepatoma ancient prescriptions by computer program. The results can offer help to the R&D of anti-hepatoma new drugs and reduce the risk of drug screening. In addition, we surveyed 22 companies in this field from six provinces such as Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and so on and obtained 240 risk assessment questionaires. Then we used qualitative analysis method to interpret the greatest impacts for the risks in the process of R&D, production and sales of anti-hepatoma new drugs. The study provides a basis for anti-liver cancer drugs R&D researchers, who can take effective measures to reduce the R&D risks and improve successful rate.

  4. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed.

  5. Development and trial of the drug interaction database system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The drug interaction database system was originally developed at Songklanagarind Hospital. Data sets of drugs available in Songklanagarind Hospital comprising standard drug names, trade names, group names, and drug interactions were set up using Microsoft® Access 2000. The computer used was a Pentium III processor running at 450 MHz with 128 MB SDRAM operated by Microsoft® Windows 98. A robust structured query language algorithm was chosen for detecting interactions. The functioning of this database system, including speed and accuracy of detection, was tested at Songklanagarind Hospital and Naratiwatrachanagarind Hospital using hypothetical prescriptions. Its use in determining the incidence of drug interactions was also evaluated using a retrospective prescription data file. This study has shown that the database system correctly detected drug interactions from prescriptions. Speed of detection was approximately 1 to 2 seconds depending on the size of prescription. The database system was of benefit in determining of incidence rate of drug interaction in a hospital.

  6. The Expanding Role of NMR in Drug Discovery and Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The role of NMR in the pharmaceutical industry has changed dramatically over the last decade. Once thought of as an analytical technique used primarily to support synthetic chemistry, NMR now has an important role in the investigation of biochemical changes involved in clinical diseases and drug toxicity. It is also used extensively to elucidate the structures of drug metabolites. Data obtained using LC NMR MS and 19F NMR will be used to illustrate the utility of hyphenated methods in identifying xenobiotic metabolites as part of a drug development program. The application of NMR to the study of potential drug toxicity will also be described using the cationic, amphiphilic drugs chloroquine and amiodarone. These drugs are known to induce phospholipidosis characterized by lysosomal lamellar bodies and drug accumulation. Using a metabonomic approach, NMR spectroscopy of urine allowed the identification of a combination of urinary biomarkers of phospholipidosis.

  7. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  8. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  9. Cancer incidence and novel therapies developed in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Iwasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the ministry of Health, Labour and welfare of Japan, Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan since 1981. [1] As per the data in 2010, in Japan, one in every three deaths was due to cancer. [2] The Japanese Government has introduced so far, three terms of 10 years strategies for Cancer control since 1984 till date. The budget allocated for cancer control in 2009 was 52.5 billion yen in Japan. [3] Lung is the leading site for cancer in both males and females in Japan. In males, following the lung, stomach, liver, colon and pancreas are other leading sites while in the females, stomach, colon, pancreas and breast are the other leading sites.[1] In 2006, the cancer incidence was 694,000 and the male cancer incidence was 1.4 times as large as that of females. The peak age for cancer deaths in males is their fifties while in the females it is the sixties among Japanese. In addition to the conventional treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, some of other therapies in practice in Japan are the Hyperthermia [4] that uses high temperatures to kill or damage the cancer cells, the Ion Beam therapy using proton beams [5] to damage the DNA of the cells as cancer cells have high rate of cell divisions and lesser ability to repair DNA damage, the molecular targeted therapies that interfere with a specific molecular target involved in tumour growth and progression [6] and most importantly the autologous cell based Immunotherapies. Modern Cancer Immunotherapy started in the 1970s in Japan. The immunopotentiators using compounds from Bacteria, Beta Glucans from fungi were the first forms of modern Immunotherapy. Then was the era of direct injection of cytokines such as Interleukins, Interferons etc. The adverse effects associated with the injection of cytokines led to development of cell based Immunotherapies in the 1980s. [7] Immuno-cell therapies involve isolation of immune cells which are then processed and re

  10. Increased temperature and entropy production in cancer: the role of anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    Some cancers have been shown to have a higher temperature than surrounding normal tissue. This higher temperature is due to heat generated internally in the cancer. The higher temperature of cancer (compared to surrounding tissue) enables a thermodynamic analysis to be carried out. Here I show that there is increased entropy production in cancer compared with surrounding tissue. This is termed excess entropy production. The excess entropy production is expressed in terms of heat flow from the cancer to surrounding tissue and enzymic reactions in the cancer and surrounding tissue. The excess entropy production in cancer drives it away from the stationary state that is characterised by minimum entropy production. Treatments that reduce inflammation (and therefore temperature) should drive a cancer towards the stationary state. Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and also thyroxine analogues have been shown (using various criteria) to reduce the progress of cancer.

  11. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  12. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate.

  13. Liposome-like nanocapsules of dual drug-tailed betaine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shuo; Niu, Yuge; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yemin; Yu, Liangli; Zhang, Yingyi; Li, Xinsong

    2015-09-30

    A novel dual drug-tailed betaine conjugate amphiphile has been firstly synthesized in which the polar headgroup is derived from glycine betaine and the hydrophobic tails are chlorambucil molecules. The newly prepared conjugate undergoes self-assembly to form stable liposome-like nanocapsules as an effective carrier with high drug loading capacity. The nanocapsules showed higher cytotoxic effects to cancer cell lines than those of free chlorambucil in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth effectively in vivo. This strategy that utilizes new dual drug-tailed betaine conjugate amphiphile to construct a self-assembled nanoparticle drug delivery system may have great potential in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Nanomedicine: towards development of patient-friendly drug-delivery systems for oncological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ramya Ranganathan1,*, Shruthilaya Madanmohan1,*, Akila Kesavan1, Ganga Baskar1, Yoganathan Ramia Krishnamoorthy2, Roy Santosham3, D Ponraju4, Suresh Kumar Rayala2, Ganesh Venkatraman1 1Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, 2Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, 3Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, 4Safety Engineering Division, Nuclear and Engineering Safety Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India*Authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The focus on nanotechnology in cancer treatment and diagnosis has intensified due to the serious side effects caused by anticancer agents as a result of their cytotoxic actions on normal cells. This nonspecific action of chemotherapy has awakened a need for formulations capable of definitive targeting with enhanced tumor-killing. Nanooncology, the application of nanobiotechnology to the management of cancer, is currently the most important area of nanomedicine. Currently several nanomaterial-based drug-delivery systems are in vogue and several others are in various stages of development. Tumor-targeted drug-delivery systems are envisioned as magic bullets for cancer therapy and several groups are working globally for development of robust systems.Keywords: patient-friendly, drug-delivery systems, cancer, nanomedicine

  15. Of drug administration, war and oïkos: mediating cancer with nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeve, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on nano-enabled drug delivery systems (NDDS) in the context of cancer medicine. It regards NDDS as relational objects whose modes of existence are defined by their relationships with a complex biocultural environment that includes both the biological processes of our bodies and the values representations and metaphors our societies associate with cancer and cancer therapy. Within this framework the abundant use of war metaphors in NDDS --from 'smart bombs' to 'magic nano-bullets'--is discussed from various angles: in terms of therapeutic efficacy, it limits the potential of the technique by preventing the inclusion of the (patho)biological environment in the nanomedicine's mode of action. In terms of development opportunities, the military strategy of active specific targeting faces cost and complexity bottlenecks. In terms of ethical values, it favors the questionable image of cancer patients as 'fighters'. On the basis of these criticisms different metaphorical frameworks are suggested, in particular that of oïkos, whereby nanomedicine is reframed as a kind of domestic economy addressing the system-environment relationships of embodied processes with further imagination and care.

  16. Anthelmintic drug albendazole arrests human gastric cancer cells at the mitotic phase and induces apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Xiangyang; Pei, Dongsheng; Gao, Chao

    2017-01-01

    As microtubules have a vital function in the cell cycle, oncologists have developed microtubule inhibitors capable of preventing uncontrolled cell division, as in the case of cancer. The anthelmintic drug albendazole (ABZ) has been demonstrated to inhibit hepatocellular, ovarian and prostate cancer cells via microtubule targeting. However, its activity against human gastric cancer (GC) cells has remained to be determined. In the present study, ABZ was used to treat GC cells (MKN-45, SGC-7901 and MKN-28). A a CCK-8 cell proliferation assay was performed to assess the effects of ABZ on cell viability and cell cycle changes were assessed using flow cytometry. SGC-7901 cells were selected for further study, and flow cytometry was employed to determine the apoptotic rate, immunofluorescence analysis was employed to show changes of the microtubule structure as well as the subcellular localization and expression levels of cyclin B1, and western blot analysis was used to identify the dynamics of microtubule assembly. The expression levels of relevant proteins, including cyclin B1 and Cdc2, the two subunits of mitosis-promoting factor as well as apoptosis-asociated proteins were also assessed by western blot analysis. The results showed that ABZ exerted its anti-cancer activity in GC cell lines by disrupting microtubule formation and function to cause mitotic arrest, which is also associated with the accumulation of cyclin B1, and consequently induces apoptosis.

  17. Research Perspective: Potential Role of Nitazoxanide in Ovarian Cancer Treatment. Old Drug, New Purpose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Santo, Nicola, E-mail: nico.disanto@duke.edu; Ehrisman, Jessie [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Among gynecological malignancies epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death. Despite improvements in conventional chemotherapy combinations, the overall cure rate has remained mostly stable over the years, and only 10%–15% of patients maintain a complete response following first-line therapy. To improve the efficacy of ovarian cancer chemotherapy it is essential to develop drugs with new mechanisms of action. Compared to normal tissues, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is overexpressed in ovarian tumors. PDI is a cellular enzyme in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotes or the periplasmic region of prokaryotes. This protein catalyzes the formation and breakage of disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins, which affects protein folding. Selective inhibition of PDI activity has been exhibited both in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity in human ovarian cancer models. PDI inhibition caused accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which led to ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR), and in turn resulted in cell death. Nitazoxanide [NTZ: 2-acetyloxy-N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)benzamide] is a thiazolide antiparasitic agent with excellent activity against a wide variety of protozoa and helminths. In this article, we propose that NTZ, acting as PDI inhibitor, may be a new and potent addition to the chemotherapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer.

  18. Nanoscale Reaction Vessels Designed for Synthesis of Copper-Drug Complexes Suitable for Preclinical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamed; Anantha, Malathi; Backstrom, Ian; Leung, Ada; Chen, Kent; Malhotra, Armaan; Edwards, Katarina; Bally, Marcel B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of copper-drug complexes (CDCs) is hindered due to their very poor aqueous solubility. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is the primary metabolite of disulfiram, an approved drug for alcoholism that is being repurposed for cancer. The anticancer activity of DDC is dependent on complexation with copper to form copper bis-diethyldithiocarbamate (Cu(DDC)2), a highly insoluble complex that has not been possible to develop for indications requiring parenteral administration. We have resolved this issue by synthesizing Cu(DDC)2 inside liposomes. DDC crosses the liposomal lipid bilayer, reacting with the entrapped copper; a reaction that can be observed through a colour change as the solution goes from a light blue to dark brown. This method is successfully applied to other CDCs including the anti-parasitic drug clioquinol, the natural product quercetin and the novel targeted agent CX-5461. Our method provides a simple, transformative solution enabling, for the first time, the development of CDCs as viable candidate anticancer drugs; drugs that would represent a brand new class of therapeutics for cancer patients. PMID:27055237

  19. Nanoscale Reaction Vessels Designed for Synthesis of Copper-Drug Complexes Suitable for Preclinical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamed; Anantha, Malathi; Backstrom, Ian; Leung, Ada; Chen, Kent; Malhotra, Armaan; Edwards, Katarina; Bally, Marcel B

    2016-01-01

    The development of copper-drug complexes (CDCs) is hindered due to their very poor aqueous solubility. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is the primary metabolite of disulfiram, an approved drug for alcoholism that is being repurposed for cancer. The anticancer activity of DDC is dependent on complexation with copper to form copper bis-diethyldithiocarbamate (Cu(DDC)2), a highly insoluble complex that has not been possible to develop for indications requiring parenteral administration. We have resolved this issue by synthesizing Cu(DDC)2 inside liposomes. DDC crosses the liposomal lipid bilayer, reacting with the entrapped copper; a reaction that can be observed through a colour change as the solution goes from a light blue to dark brown. This method is successfully applied to other CDCs including the anti-parasitic drug clioquinol, the natural product quercetin and the novel targeted agent CX-5461. Our method provides a simple, transformative solution enabling, for the first time, the development of CDCs as viable candidate anticancer drugs; drugs that would represent a brand new class of therapeutics for cancer patients.

  20. [Strategies for pharmaceutical research and development. II. Generic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, M

    1996-07-01

    When the patent protection is terminated, the original registered-mark preparation becomes a generic drug, which results in a decrease in its price as compared with the original pharmaceutical. The effects of changes in price relation are discussed from the viewpoint of the generic firms and the manufacturers of original preparations. The differences in the insurance system and legislative regulations of the registration of generic preparations can markedly the size influence of the share of generic drugs in the total consumption of drugs. The future development of generic drugs from a general viewpoint is discussed in relation to the contemporary extensive expiration of patent protection of drugs. The hitherto results are summed up and the topics for the present strategy of the development of generic drugs in the Research Institute for Pharmacy and Biochemistry, or in the Czech Republic, respectively are discussed.

  1. Defining "innovativeness" in drug development: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, A S; Wang, B; Avorn, J

    2013-09-01

    Some observers of drug development argue that the pace of pharmaceutical innovation is declining, but others deny that contention. This controversy may be due to different methods of defining and assessing innovation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to develop a taxonomy of methods for measuring innovation in drug development. The 42 studies fell into four main categories: counts of new drugs approved, assessments of therapeutic value, economic outcomes, and patents issued. The definition determined whether a study found a positive or negative trend in innovative drug development. Of 21 studies that relied on counts, 9 (43%) concluded that the trend for drug discovery was favorable, 11 (52%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 1 reached no conclusion. By contrast, of 21 studies that used other measures of innovation, 0 concluded that the trend was favorable, 8 (47%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 13 reached no conclusion (P = 0.03).

  2. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA in drug-sensitive cell and drug-resistant strains of ovarian cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Li; Zehua Wang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA in drug-sensitive cell and drugresistant clones of ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods: RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in 3 clones drug-sensitive and 5 clones drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell. Results: Strong COX-2 mRNA expressions were detected in 3 clones of drug-sensitive cell and weak expressions were detected in 5 clones of drug-resistant cell. The protein expression of COX-2 in drug-sensitive cell was strongly positive reaction in immunocytochemistry stain and there was a weak positive reaction in 5clones of drug-resistant cell. Conclusion: The expression of COX-2 mRNA in drug-sensitive cell strains is much higher than that in drugresistant strains of ovarian cancer cell lines, providing a basis of the chemoprevention for ovarian cancer.

  3. The Development of Magnetic Drug Delivery and Disposition

    OpenAIRE

    Marszall, Michal Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/the-delivery-of-nanoparticles/the-development-of-magnetic-drug-deliveryand-disposition The process of drug delivery and disposition in the modern scientific aspect is very complex. Advances in many fields are converging to make the commercialisation of advanced drug delivery concepts possible. It integrates many disciplines, including biotechnology, medicine and pharmacology. Innovative devices should protect labile active ingredient...

  4. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and

  5. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  6. Non-invasive radiotracer imaging as a tool for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R E; Burns, H D; Hamill, T G; Eng, W S; Francis, B E; Ryan, C

    2000-07-01

    Non-Invasive Radiotracer Imaging (NIRI) uses either short-lived positron-emitting isotopes, such as 11C and 18F, for Positron Emis ion Tomography (PET) or single photon emitting nuclides, e.g., 123I, which provide images using planar imaging or Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). These high-resolution imaging modalities provide anatomical distribution and localization of radiolabeled drugs, which can be used to generate real time receptor occupancy and off-rate studies in humans. This can be accomplished by either isotopically labeling a potential new drug (usually with 11C), or indirectly by studying how the unlabelled drug inhibits specific radioligand binding in vivo. Competitive blockade studies can be accomplished using a radiolabeled analogue which binds to the site of interest, rather than a radiolabeled version of the potential drug. Imaging, particularly PET imaging, can be used to demonstrate the effect of a drug through a biochemical marker of processes such as glucose metabolism or blood flow. NIRI as a development tool in the pharmaceutical industry is gaining increased acceptance as its unique ability to provide such critical information in human subjects is recognized. This section will review recent examples that illustrate the utility of NIRI, principally PET, in drug development, and the potential of imaging advances in the development of cancer drugs and gene therapy. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the design of new radiotracers for novel targets.

  7. Highly sensitive quantitative imaging for monitoring single cancer cell growth kinetics and drug response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mir

    Full Text Available The detection and treatment of cancer has advanced significantly in the past several decades, with important improvements in our understanding of the fundamental molecular and genetic basis of the disease. Despite these advancements, drug-screening methodologies have remained essentially unchanged since the introduction of the in vitro human cell line screen in 1990. Although the existing methods provide information on the overall effects of compounds on cell viability, they are restricted by bulk measurements, large sample sizes, and lack capability to measure proliferation kinetics at the individual cell level. To truly understand the nature of cancer cell proliferation and to develop personalized adjuvant therapies, there is a need for new methodologies that provide quantitative information to monitor the effect of drugs on cell growth as well as morphological and phenotypic changes at the single cell level. Here we show that a quantitative phase imaging modality known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM addresses these needs and provides additional advantages over existing proliferation assays. We demonstrate these capabilities through measurements on the effects of the hormone estradiol and the antiestrogen ICI182,780 (Faslodex on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Along with providing information on changes in the overall growth, SLIM provides additional biologically relevant information. For example, we find that exposure to estradiol results in rapidly growing cells with lower dry mass than the control population. Subsequently blocking the estrogen receptor with ICI results in slower growing cells, with lower dry masses than the control. This ability to measure changes in growth kinetics in response to environmental conditions provides new insight on growth regulation mechanisms. Our results establish the capabilities of SLIM as an advanced drug screening technology that provides information on changes in proliferation

  8. Adjuvant Anti-Angiogenesis Drugs Are No Benefit in Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a recent clinical trial show that post-surgical therapy with two anti-angiogenesis drugs does not improve progression-free survival for patients with kidney cancer and may cause serious side effects.

  9. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Doan Do, Hai; Thong Phan, Quoc; Nguyet Tran Thi, Minh; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan; Nhung Hoang Thi, My; Huong Le, Mai; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Quang Bui, Thuc; Hieu Phan, Van

    2016-03-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50-100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment.

  10. Quantum-dot-conjugated graphene as a probe for simultaneous cancer-targeted fluorescent imaging, tracking, and monitoring drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; He, Ye-Ju; Chen, Xu-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-03-20

    We report a novel quantum-dot-conjugated graphene, i.e., hybrid SiO2-coated quantum dots (HQDs)-conjugated graphene, for targeted cancer fluorescent imaging, tracking, and monitoring drug delivery, as well as cancer therapy. The hybrid SiO2 shells on the surface of QDs not only mitigate its toxicity, but also protect its fluorescence from being quenched by graphene. By functionalizing the surface of HQDs-conjugated graphene (graphene-HQDs) with transferrin (Trf), we developed a targeted imaging system capable of differential uptake and imaging of cancer cells that express the Trf receptor. The widely used fluorescent antineoplastic anthracycline drug, doxorubicin (DOX), is adsorbed on the surface of graphene and results in a large loading capacity of 1.4 mg mg(-1). It is advantageous that the new delivery system exhibits different fluorescence color in between graphene-HQDs and DOX in the aqueous core upon excitation at a same wavelength for the purpose of tracking and monitoring drug delivery. This simple multifunctional nanoparticle system can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and enable us to localize the graphene-HQDs and monitor intracellular DOX release. The specificity and safety of the nanoparticle conjugate for cancer imaging, monitoring, and therapy has been demonstrated in vitro.

  11. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  12. Challenges facing the development of cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Just like any other effective immunization in medicine, cancer vaccines need to have antigens with particular specificity and immunostimulatory features, the immune responses to be elicited in the body, and therapeutic effect-regression or prevention of the cancer-must be meaningful and clinically observable. There are many choices for cancer antigens, such as tissue-specific proteins, cancer-specific proteins, class I- or class II-restricted peptides derived from those, or in situ and whole-cell-derived products are some examples. Another translational issue is that cancer patients are heterogeneous with respect to the extent to which the immune system is already activated with potential to impact the tumor growth or, conversely, the extent to which the immune system has been impaired through a prior and ongoing interaction with the tumor. Conventional or immunologic tests have potential to define a subset of patients with better chance or response, so that particular vaccines can be tested. Treatment of cancer patients is expensive, and trials are slow. To meet these challenges in practical terms will require not only careful scientific technical work for product development, coordination with clinicians to define patient subsets with diseases that can show responses, but also a comprehensive, practical implementation so that we can unlock the full potential of anticancer vaccines.

  13. Co-administration of a Tumor-Penetrating Peptide Enhances the Efficacy of Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Teesalu, Tambet; Karmali, Priya Prakash; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Agemy, Lilach; Greenwald, Daniel R.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    Poor penetration of anti-cancer drugs into tumors can be an important factor limiting their efficacy. Studying mouse tumor models, we show that a previously characterized tumor-penetrating peptide, iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC), increased vascular and tissue permeability in a tumor-specific and neuropilin-1-dependent manner, allowing co-administered drugs to penetrate into extravascular tumor tissue. Importantly, this effect did not require the drugs to be chemically conjugated to the peptide. Systemic injection with iRGD improved the therapeutic index of drugs of various compositions including a small molecule (doxorubicin), nanoparticles (nab-paclitaxel and doxorubicin liposomes), and a monoclonal antibody (trastuzumab). Thus, co-administration of iRGD may be a valuable way to enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs while reducing their side effects, a primary goal of cancer therapy research. PMID:20378772

  14. Drug Reduces Cancer Treatment-Related Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a clinical trial demonstrating that duloxetine (Cymbalta®) may reduce joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors in women being treated for early-stage breast cancer.

  15. Variation of Protein's Expression Correlated to the Drug Resistance after Sequential Anti-cancer Treatment in Human Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hong Chi; Ji-ren Zhang; Peng Li; Duan-qi Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-drug resistance is one of the leading causes for fai lure to treat patients with cancer. This study is to explore the expression of the proteins correlated with chemoresistance in a human lung cancer cell line (LPET-a-1) repeatedly treated by anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Childhood extracranial neoplasms: the role of imaging in drug development and clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, Lucy A.; Koh, Dow-Mu; MacVicar, David [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Collins, David J.; Jerome, Neil P. [Institute of Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Chua, Sue C. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Nuclear Medicine and PET Department, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Pearson, Andrew D.J. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age and new drugs are necessary to improve outcomes. Imaging is crucial to the drug development process and assessment of therapeutic response. In adults, tumours are often assessed with CT using size criteria. Unfortunately, techniques established in adults are not necessarily applicable in children due to differing pathophysiology, ability to cooperate and increased susceptibility to ionising radiation. MRI, in particular quantitative MRI, has to date not been fully utilised in children with extracranial neoplasms. The specific challenges of imaging in children, the potential for functional imaging techniques to inform upon and their inclusion in clinical trials are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Natural products against cancer: A comprehensive bibliometric study of the research projects, publications, patents and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze multi-source data including awards, publications, patents and drugs, and try to draw the whole landscape of the research and development community in the area of natural products (NPs against cancer. Materials and Methods: Awards, publications, patents and drugs data from National Institute of Health/Natural Science Foundation of China (NIH/NSFC, PubMed, Derwent Innovation Index and Cortellis were collected. Bibliometric methodologies and technology are used to investigate publications/patents/drugs, their contents and relationships. Results: NIH and NSFC respectively demonstrated a stable and sustained expenditure growth in this area. The number of publications is continuously increasing. Yet the annual patent applications worldwide and FDA drug approvals were little changed or not obviously fluctuated in 2003-2013. USA and several Asia-pacific countries/territories are important contributing powers. We described the evolution of major research topics by those MeSH Major Topics indexed in PubMed with the largest growth range in three intervals, and analyzed hot research topics in the recent 10 years which include NPs or NPs derivatives, cell line/animal model, laboratory technologies and activation mechanisms. Conclusions: China published the most publications and received the most patent applications, but drug discovery performance is no better than USA and Japan. Research on anti-neoplastic structures and compounds originated from Chinese traditional medicine (TCM, medicinal plants, herbal medicine and marine NPs are major research topics in the recent 10 years. There still exits translational gap between basic research and drug discovery. Translational research should be undertaken to strengthen the applicability of NPs.

  18. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  19. Developing new drugs from annals of Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxiang Bian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmaceuticals requires massive amounts of time, money and efforts. The key step is how to find a safe and effective entity for a disease condition and how to develop it as new drug effectively. Unfortunately, the FDA's rate of approving new entities has declined dramatically in the last three decades. There is a strong need to review the current strategy and to optimize process in developing new drugs, both to shorten the process and increase the success rate. Chinese medicine has used natural products to treat patients for thousands of years, and Chinese medicine practitioners have chronicled the patients and treatment methods for thousands of years. There is much information that has not yet been used. The success stories of artimisinin and arsentic trioxide are wonderful examples of how the annals of Chinese medicine can provide leads for discovering new drugs. This paper argues that the annals of Chinese medicine are valuable and describes how they can be used in modern drug discovery. The major topics addressed are: (i why Chinese medicine is a rich resource for finding new drugs; (ii how to identify a potential valuable record from Chinese medicine annals; (iii when a potential valuable record is identified from annals, how to proceed; and (iv both why and how the approach used for chemical drugs should be revised for drugs based on the historical documents related to herbal medicine. In conclusion, we argue here that the annals of Chinese medicine offer not only a rich resource for new drugs, but also several centuries of patient data with regard to safety and efficacy, that in effect represent pilot studies. Acknowledging and using these data can shorten new drug discovery time and improve efficiency of the drug development process, bringing more effective, safe drugs to market much more quickly and cheaply.

  20. Drug discovery and development for neglected diseases: the DNDi model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chatelain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eric Chatelain, Jean-Robert IosetDrugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi, Geneva, SwitzerlandAbstract: New models of drug discovery have been developed to overcome the lack of modern and effective drugs for neglected diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, which have no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry. With the purpose of combining the skills and research capacity in academia, pharmaceutical industry, and contract researchers, public–private partnerships or product development partnerships aim to create focused research consortia that address all aspects of drug discovery and development. These consortia not only emulate the projects within pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, eg, identification and screening of libraries, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, formulation development, and manufacturing, but also use and strengthen existing capacity in disease-endemic countries, particularly for the conduct of clinical trials. The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi has adopted a model closely related to that of a virtual biotechnology company for the identification and optimization of drug leads. The application of this model to the development of drug candidates for the kinetoplastid infections of HAT, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis has already led to the identification of new candidates issued from DNDi’s own discovery pipeline. This demonstrates that the model DNDi has been implementing is working but its DNDi, neglected diseases sustainability remains to be proven.Keywords: R&D, screening, lead optimization, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, product development partnerships

  1. Cyclodextrin-Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Sustained Drug Delivery and Proliferation Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Alexandra; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Almeida, Sérgio; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-10-21

    Over the past decade, the potential of polymeric structures has been investigated to overcome many limitations related to nanosized drug carriers by modulating their toxicity, cellular interactions, stability, and drug-release kinetics. In this study, we have developed a successful nanocomposite consisting of undecylenic acid modified thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs) loaded with an anticancer drug, sorafenib, and surface-conjugated with heptakis(6-amino-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HABCD) to show the impact of the surface polymeric functionalization on the physical and biological properties of the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Cytocompatibility studies showed that the UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs were not toxic to breast cancer cells. HABCD also enhanced the suspensibility and both the colloidal and plasma stabilities of the UnTHCPSi NPs. UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs showed a significantly increased interaction with breast cancer cells compared to bare NPs and also sustained the drug release. Furthermore, the sorafenib-loaded UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs efficiently inhibited cell proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

  2. Milk derived colloid as a novel drug delivery carrier for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masamichi; Silanikove, Nissim; Chang, Xiaofei; Ravi, Rajani; Pham, Vui; Baia, Gilson; Paz, Keren; Brait, Mariana; Koch, Wayne M; Sidransky, David

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer has an extremely poor prognosis when chemotherapy is no longer effective. To overcome drug resistance, novel drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles have had remarkable success. We produced a novel nanoparticle component 'MDC' from milk-derived colloid. In order to evaluate the anti-cancer effect of MDC, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments on cancer cell lines and a primary tumor derived breast xenograft. Doxorubicin (Dox) conjugated to MDC (MDC-Dox) showed higher cancer cell growth inhibition than MDC alone especially in cell lines with high EGFR expression. In a mouse melanoma model, MDC-Dox significantly suppressed tumor growth when compared with free Dox. Moreover, in a primary tumor derived breast xenograft, one of the mice treated with MDC-Dox showed partial regression, while mice treated with free Dox failed to show any suppression of tumor growth. We have shown that a novel nanoparticle compound made of simple milk-derived colloid has the capability for drug conjugation, and serves as a tumor-specific carrier of anti-cancer drugs. Further research on its safety and ability to carry various anti-cancer drugs into multiple drug-resistant primary breast models is warranted.

  3. Personalized drug administration for cancer treatment using Model Reference Adaptive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Naser; Salamci, Metin U

    2015-04-21

    A new Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) approach is proposed for the nonlinear regulation problem of cancer treatment via chemotherapy. We suggest an approach for determining an optimal anticancer drug delivery scenario for cancer patients without prior knowledge of nonlinear model structure and parameters by compounding State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) and MRAC which will lead to personalized drug administration. Several approaches have been proposed for eradicating cancerous cells in nonlinear tumor growth model. The main difficulty in these approaches is the requirement of nonlinear model parameters, which are unknown to physicians in reality. To cope with this shortage, we first determine the drug delivery scenario for a reference patient with known mathematical model and parameters via SDRE technique, and by using the proposed approach we adapt the drug administration scenario for another cancer patient despite unknown nonlinear model structure and model parameters. We propose an efficient approach to determine drug administration which will help physicians for prescribing a chemotherapy protocol for a cancer patient by regulating the drug delivery scenario of the reference patient. Stabilizing the tumor growth nonlinear model has been achieved via full state feedback techniques and yields a near optimal solution to cancer treatment problem. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for eradicating tumor lumps with different sizes in different patients.

  4. Cancer immunology - development of novel anti-cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Sacha I; Thommen, Daniela S; Moersig, Wolfgang; Müller, Philipp; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of tumours are characterised by high frequencies of genetic and epigenetic alterations resulting in tumour-specific antigens, which may, in principle, be recognised by cytotoxic T cells. Though early clinical immunotherapy trials have yielded mixed results with ambiguous clinical benefit, cancer immunotherapy is now attracting increasing attention as a viable therapeutic option, mainly in melanoma and lung cancer, but increasingly also in other malignancies. In particular, recent therapeutic efforts targeting inhibitory receptors on T cells to overcome tumour-induced immune dysfunction have the potential to reshape current treatment standards in oncology. The clinical development has been pioneered by the antibody ipilimumab, which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and has demonstrated survival benefit in two randomised landmark trials in melanoma. Capitalising on this success, the research on the clinical implication of T cell checkpoint inhibition has been boosted. Early clinical trials have demonstrated meaningful response rates, sustained clinical benefits with encouraging survival rates and good tolerability of next-generation checkpoint inhibitors, including programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors, across multiple cancer types. Attractive perspectives include the concurrent blockade of immunological (non-redundant) checkpoints, which has recently been demonstrated using combinations of immune checkpoint modulators themselves or with other therapies, such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy or radiotherapy. This article summarises the mechanism of action and subsequent clinical studies of immune checkpoint antibodies in oncology with a particular focus on melanoma and lung cancer.

  5. Amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to fabricate excipient-free stable nanodispersions of hydrophobic drugs for cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqi; Lee, Eunhye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Jinqiang; Zhou, Zhuxian; Li, Yixian; Li, Xiaoyi; Tang, Jianbin; Lee, Don Haeng; Liu, Xiangrui; Shen, Youqing

    2015-12-28

    Nanoformulations have been extensively explored to deliver water-insoluble drugs, but they generally use exotic new materials, for instance, amphiphilic block copolymers, which must first go through extensively clinical trials and be approved as drug excipients before any clinical uses. We hypothesize that using clinical amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to self-assemble with and thus solubilize hydrophobic drugs will lead to readily translational nanoformulations as they contain no new excipients. Herein, we show the first example of such excipient-free nanodispersions using an amphiphilic anti-tumor drug, irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT11). CPT11 self-assembles with its insoluble active parent drug, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN38), into stable and water-dispersible nanoparticles, increasing SN38's water solubility by thousands of times up to 25 mg/mL with a loading efficiency close to 100%. The versatility of this approach is also demonstrated by fabricating nanodispersions of CPT11 with other water-insoluble drugs including paclitaxel (PTX) and camptothecin (CPT). These nanodispersions have much increased bioavailability and thereby improved anti-cancer activities. Thus, this strategy, using clinically proven amphiphilic drugs as excipients to fabricate nanodispersions, avoids new materials and makes readily translational nanoformulations of hydrophobic drugs.

  6. Mechanism of cancer drug resistance and the involvement of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Hui, Kam M

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer therapies. Although our understanding of resistance to targeted cancer drugs remains incomplete, new and more creative approaches are being exploited to intercept this phenomenon. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding that cancer drug resistance can be caused by alterations of drug efflux, increases in drug metabolism, mutations of drug targets, alterations in DNA repair and cell cycle, changes in cell apoptosis and autophagy, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Furthermore, intracellular signalling pathways have been shown to play key physiological roles and the abnormal activation of signalling pathways may be correlated with drug resistance. Recently, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important regulators of gene expression and alternative splicing, which provides cells with yet another mode to greatly increase regulatory complexity and fine-tune their transcriptome and can rapidly adjust their proteome in response to stimuli. Consequently, a wide variety of biological functions have been shown to depend on the coordinated interactions between noncoding RNAs and cellular signalling networks to achieve a concerted desired physiological outcome, whereas mutations and dysregulation of ncRNAs have been linked to diverse human diseases, including cancer drug resistance. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory ncRNAs on the signalling pathways involved in cancer drug resistance and the therapeutic potential of reverse drug resistance.

  7. New drug development in digestive neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, I; Salazar, R; Casanovas, O; Arrazubi, V; Vilar, E; Siu, L L; Yao, J; Tabernero, J

    2007-08-01

    The traditional cytotoxic agents are of limited efficacy in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (NETs). Recent investigations have brought up a number of biological features in this family of neoplasms that could represent targets for anticancer treatment. NETs seem to have an extraordinary tumor vascularization with high expression of proangiogenic molecules such as the vascular endothelial growth factor along with overexpression of certain tyrosine kinase receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR) and their downstream signaling pathway components (PI3K-AKT-mTOR). The rationale of an antiangiogenic approach in the treatment of NETs and the use of other pharmacological strategies such as EGFR, IGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are discussed. Additionally, the emerging results of recent clinical trials with these targeted drugs are presented.

  8. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yan; Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili; Zhu Hong; Hu Sainan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results:The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was signiifcantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion:UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  9. Testing whether drugs that weaken norepinephrine signaling prevent or treat various types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fitzgerald

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Recently, I put forth the hypothesis that the signaling molecule, norepinephrine (NE, is an etiological factor in a number of types of cancer. In this brief commentary, I summarize evidence that NE plays a role in cancer and describe details involved in testing the hypothesis in humans through epidemiological investigation of existing medical records of persons who have taken pharmaceutical drugs that affect NE. If NE plays an etiological role in cancers of a number of organs, then taking a single pharmaceutical drug (such as clonidine, prazosin, or propranolol that weakens NE signaling systemically, may simultaneously prevent or treat many different types of cancer, and this may represent a breakthrough in pharmaceutical prevention and possibly treatment of cancer.Keywords: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cancer, clonidine, prazosin, propranolol

  10. Use of crowdsourcing for cancer clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Amanda; Sablinski, Tomasz; Diefenbach, Michael; Foster, Marc; Greenberg, Alex; Holland, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Patient and physician awareness and acceptance of trials and patient ineligibility are major cancer clinical trial accrual barriers. Yet, trials are typically conceived and designed by small teams of researchers with limited patient input. We hypothesized that through crowdsourcing, the intellectual and creative capacity of a large number of researchers, clinicians, and patients could be harnessed to improve the clinical trial design process. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and utility of using an internet-based crowdsourcing platform to inform the design of a clinical trial exploring an antidiabetic drug, metformin, in prostate cancer. Over a six-week period, crowd-sourced input was collected from 60 physicians/researchers and 42 patients/advocates leading to several major (eg, eligibility) and minor modifications to the clinical trial protocol as originally designed. Crowdsourcing clinical trial design is feasible, adds value to the protocol development process, and may ultimately improve the efficiency of trial conduct.

  11. PTPN11 Is a Central Node in Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahallad, Anirudh; Heynen, Guus J J E; Germano, Giovanni; Willems, Stefan M; Evers, Bastiaan; Vecchione, Loredana; Gambino, Valentina; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto; Bernards, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Most BRAF (V600E) mutant melanomas are sensitive to selective BRAF inhibitors, but BRAF mutant colon cancers are intrinsically resistant to these drugs because of feedback activation of EGFR. We performed an RNA-interference-based genetic screen in BRAF mutant colon cancer cells to search for phosph

  12. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives.

  13. Studies on development of controlled delivery of combination drug(s to periodontal pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study to develop the controlled delivery of combination drug(s to periodontal pocket. Materials and Methods: In the present investigation mucoadhesive gel formulations were prepared using carboxy methylcellulose (CMC, methylcellulose (MC, hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC, polyvinylpirrolidone (PVP, polycarbophil (PC, and poloxamer. Each formulation was characterized in terms of polarizing light microscopy, gelation, gel melting, hardness, compressibility, adhesiveness, cohesiveness, syringeability, adhesion to a mucin disk, rheological studies, drug release, and antibacterial activities. Addition of CMC and PVP to the gel favored hexagonal phase formation. The gelation temperature was decreased linearly with an increasing concentration of drug(s, whereas, the melting temperature increased with the concentration of drug(s. Increasing the concentrations of each polymeric component significantly increased formulation hardness, compressibility, adhesiveness, mucoadhesion, and syringeability, yet a decreased cohesiveness. Increased time of contact between the formulation and mucin significantly increased the required force of detachment. Drug release from all formulations was non-diffusion controlled and significantly decreased as the concentration of the polymer was increased, due to the concomitant increased viscosity of the formulations and the swelling kinetics of PC, following contact with the dissolution fluid. Result: Antibacterial studies revealed that a gel with 30% HEC had a growth inhibition zone on agar with all three strains. Conclusion: Formulations containing HEC exhibited superior physical characteristics for improved drug delivery to the periodontal pocket and are now the subject of long-term clinical investigations.

  14. Construction of a cancer-perturbed protein-protein interaction network for discovery of apoptosis drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is caused by genetic abnormalities, such as mutations of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, which alter downstream signal transduction pathways and protein-protein interactions. Comparisons of the interactions of proteins in cancerous and normal cells can shed light on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Results We constructed initial networks of protein-protein interactions involved in the apoptosis of cancerous and normal cells by use of two human yeast two-hybrid data sets and four online databases. Next, we applied a nonlinear stochastic model, maximum likelihood parameter estimation, and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC to eliminate false-positive protein-protein interactions in our initial protein interaction networks by use of microarray data. Comparisons of the networks of apoptosis in HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cells and in normal primary lung fibroblasts provided insight into the mechanism of apoptosis and allowed identification of potential drug targets. The potential targets include BCL2, caspase-3 and TP53. Our comparison of cancerous and normal cells also allowed derivation of several party hubs and date hubs in the human protein-protein interaction networks involved in caspase activation. Conclusion Our method allows identification of cancer-perturbed protein-protein interactions involved in apoptosis and identification of potential molecular targets for development of anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Combination therapy: the propitious rationale for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phougat, Neetu; Khatri, Savita; Singh, Anu; Dangi, Mrridula; Kumar, Manish; Dabur, Rajesh; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for many infections are extremely limited and at crisis point. We run the risk of entering a second pre-antibiotic era. There had been no miracle drug for the patients infected by resistant microbial pathogens. Most of the very few new drugs under development have problems with their toxicity, or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We are already decades behind in the discovery, characterization and development of new antimicrobials. In that scenario, we could not imagine surviving without newer and effective antimicrobial agents. Bacteria have been the champions of evolution and are still evolving continuously, where they pose serious challenges for humans. Along with the crisis of evolving resistance, the condition is made worst by the meager drug pipeline for new antimicrobials. Despite ongoing efforts only 2 new antibiotics (Telavancin in 2009 and Ceftaroline fosamil in 2010) have been approved since 2009 pipeline status report of Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). Recent approval of new combination based antiviral drugs such as Stribild (combination of four drugs for HIV treatment) and Menhibrix (combination vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children) proves that combination therapy is still the most promising approach to combat the ever evolving pathogens. Combination therapy involves the drug repurposing and regrouping of the existing antimicrobial agents to provide a synergistic approach for management of infectious diseases. This review article is an effort to highlight the challenges in new drug development and potential of combination drug therapy to deal with them.

  16. Effect of Paullinia cupana on MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to chemotherapeutic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    HERTZ, EVERALDO; CADONÁ, FRANCINE CARLA; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Azzolin, Verônica; HOLMRICH, SABRINA; ASSMANN, CHARLES; LEDUR, PAULINE; RIBEIRO, EULER ESTEVES; DE SOUZA FILHO, OLMIRO CEZIMBRA; MÂNICA-CATTANI, MARIA FERNANDA; DA CRUZ, IVANA BEATRICE MÂNICA

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that certain plants, such as guarana (Paullinia cupana), exert a protective effect against cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, guarana possesses bioactive molecules, such as caffeine and catechin, which may affect the pharmacological properties of antitumor drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guarana on breast cancer cell response to 7 chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the trea...

  17. γ突触核蛋白与肿瘤耐药%Gamma synuclein and drug resistance in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊毅; 许传亮

    2010-01-01

    γ突触核蛋白(SNCG)在许多肿瘤晚期高表达,包括乳腺癌、卵巢癌、前列腺癌、肺癌、肝癌、食管癌、直肠癌等.SNCG与BubR1相互作用损害有丝分裂检测点引起肿瘤增殖、转移和耐药.以SNCG为靶向的人工合成肽段ANK能抑制SNCG的活性,有望成为肿瘤化疗的辅助手段.%Synuclein-γ (SNCG) is overexpressed in many advanced stages cancers, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, esophagus cancer, and colon cancer.SNCG stimulates the proliferation, metastasis, and drug resistance of tumor cells, through interacting with BubR1 and damage mitotic checkpoint. A peptic ANK targeted at SNCG can inhibit activity of SNCG and may be developed as an adjuvant therapy.

  18. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  19. Benzothiazoles: how relevant in cancer drug design strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Singh, Sushil K

    2014-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds, analogs and derivatives have attracted attention due to their diverse biological and pharmacological properties. Benzoheterocycles such as benzothiazoles, benzimidazoles and benzoxazoles are constituents of many bioactive heterocyclic compounds, having wider range of applications. They have been extensively studied for their biological activities, and can serve as unique and versatile scaffolds for drug design. The benzothiazole, in the family of heterocyclic compounds has assumed special significance in synthetic chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry as well as in clinical applications because of its anti-tumor properties. This review is organized in the following ways. It begins with brief introduction on the chemical diversity of synthetic analogs of benzothiazole. After this, drug design strategy and mechanisms of action through its diverse biological targets in which benzothiazole and its derivatives display their anticancer activity are discussed. It ends with the metabolism pattern of benzothiazole and its analogs. Analysis of the structure-activity relationships (SAR), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) as well as on docking studies of this family of compounds highlights the potential that may lead to the development of novel anticancer agents. Such relationships will definitely create lot of interest among the researchers to synthesize optimized variety of benzothiazole derivatives and to screen them for their anticancer activity.

  20. Study of anti-cancer drug release (tamoxifen of the nanofibers made of polycaprolactone -chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Saeidi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a kind of cancer that begins than breast tissue. That in a kind of it, breast skin is quite involved. Than symptoms of the breast cancer is a dimple on the skin and peeling of skin and on the chest and..Natural polymers in terms of the environmental characteristics and their compatibility with the human body have vast applications in the industry: cosmetics, wound dressing, delivery of medicine scaffold, and so on.In this study, the cancer drug (tamoxifen used to complete the PCL-chitosan nanofibers made of a biocompatible polymer packag that deliver drugs will be examine. For this purpose, first the nanofibers made of PCL-chitosan-containing drugs (tamoxifen with optimal concentration of the drug was produced by electrospinning. The surface morphology of nanofibers microscopy (SEM were studied. Using infrared spectrometer instrument (FTIR evaluated the drug in nano-fibers. The effects of drug release and antimicrobial from nanofibers with standard (AATCC100 measurement and determined. According to antimicrobial test the nano-fiber manufacturing against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus Cocos considerable influence along. Based on the results of tests it was found that nano-fiber PCL-chitosan-containing drug with a ratio of 70-30 and a concentration of 1 gr and 0.3 gr, speed And release better itself show compared to concentrations and the other ratios. The test results of drug release indicate a total release rate was high.

  1. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Nanomedicine as a field has emerged from the early success of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, in particular for treatment of cancer, and the advances made in nano- and biotechnology over the past decade. A prerequisite for nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems to be effective...

  2. Functionalized immunostimulating complexes with protein A via lipid vinyl sulfones to deliver cancer drugs to trastuzumab-resistant HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Mut-Salud, Nuria; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Gomez-Samblas, Mercedes; Carrasco, Esther; Garrido, Jose Manuel; López-Jaramillo, F Javier; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Around 20%–30% of breast cancers overexpress the proto-oncogene human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and they are characterized by being very invasive. Therefore, many current studies are focused on testing new therapies against tumors that overexpress this receptor. In particular, there exists major interest in new strategies to fight breast cancer resistant to trastuzumab (Tmab), a humanized antibody that binds specifically to HER2 interfering with its mitogenic signaling. Our team has previously developed immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) as nanocapsules functionalized with lipid vinyl sulfones, which can incorporate protein A and bind to G immunoglobulins that makes them very flexible nanocarriers. Methods and results The aim of this in vitro study was to synthesize and evaluate a drug delivery system based on protein A-functionalized ISCOMs to target HER2-overexpressing cells. We describe the preparation of ISCOMs, the loading with the drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, the binding of ISCOMs to alkyl vinyl sulfone-protein A, the coupling of Tmab, and the evaluation in both HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells (HCC1954) and non-overexpressing cells (MCF-7) by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results show that the uptake is dependent on the level of overexpression of HER2, and the analysis of the cell viability reveals that targeted drugs are selective toward HCC1954, whereas MCF-7 cells remain unaffected. Conclusion Protein A-functionalized ISCOMs are versatile carriers that can be coupled to antibodies that act as targeting agents to deliver drugs. When coupling to Tmab and loading with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, they become efficient vehicles for the selective delivery of the drug to Tmab-resistant HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. These nanoparticles may pave the way for the development of novel therapies for poor prognosis resistant patients.

  3. New challenges and inspired answers for anticancer drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Teruhiro

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies worldwide specialize in oncology drug development and marketing. Among them, we have continued to take up the challenge of understanding the metabolism of pyrimidines as essential components of deoxyribonucleic acid for many years, and have provided unique products such as UFT(®) and TS-1 for cancer patients. Using our cumulative experience and knowledge, we are currently developing novel agents such as TAS-114, a dual inhibitor of deoxyuridine triphosphatase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and TAS-102, a unique pyrimidine derivative inducing deoxyribonucleic acid dysfunction in cancer cells. Regarding molecular-targeted drugs, we have made huge efforts to establish ideal drug discovery platforms for the last several years. For kinase inhibitors, we established three core platforms such as a kinase-directed chemical library, a kinase assay panel and a target selection informatics system. The core platforms were further combined with peripheral technologies to measure essential parameters such as physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicities. Unique drug candidates have been identified at an early stage by assessing all important parameters. Several promising programs are proceeding simultaneously in the clinical or preclinical development stage such as TAS-115, a dual inhibitor of c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, TAS-2104, a selective Aurora A inhibitor, TAS-117, an allosteric Akt inhibitor, TAS-2985, an irreversible fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor and TAS-2913, a T790M mutant selective epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor. Other than kinase inhibitors, another drug discovery engine was established based on the fragment-based drug discovery technology. TAS-116, a new class of Hsp-90α/β inhibitor, is one of the products. Taiho's final goal is to provide innovative anticancer drugs together with companion diagnostics that are truly beneficial for patients.

  4. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food and Drug Administration approved a drug called vismodegib (Erivedge™) for treating advanced cases of basal cell ... the trial that led to the approval of vismodegib appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine ...

  5. Research Ethics and Commercial Drug Development: When Integrity Threatens Profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélisle Pipon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This case, based on personal experiences and on those found in the literature, highlights the delicate tension faced by drug development companies having to balance research integrity and their profitability.

  6. Anti-HIV drug development on the fast track

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ An international cooperation deal was made recently in Shanghai on developing a new anti-HIV drug based on the research results of CAS scientists and their preclinical studies,marking a breakthrough progress for China's research in the field.

  7. Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Mathew J; Edelman, Elena J; Heidorn, Sonja J; Greenman, Chris D; Dastur, Anahita; Lau, King Wai; Greninger, Patricia; Thompson, I Richard; Luo, Xi; Soares, Jorge; Liu, Qingsong; Iorio, Francesco; Surdez, Didier; Chen, Li; Milano, Randy J; Bignell, Graham R; Tam, Ah T; Davies, Helen; Stevenson, Jesse A; Barthorpe, Syd; Lutz, Stephen R; Kogera, Fiona; Lawrence, Karl; McLaren-Douglas, Anne; Mitropoulos, Xeni; Mironenko, Tatiana; Thi, Helen; Richardson, Laura; Zhou, Wenjun; Jewitt, Frances; Zhang, Tinghu; O'Brien, Patrick; Boisvert, Jessica L; Price, Stacey; Hur, Wooyoung; Yang, Wanjuan; Deng, Xianming; Butler, Adam; Choi, Hwan Geun; Chang, Jae Won; Baselga, Jose; Stamenkovic, Ivan; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Sharma, Sreenath V; Delattre, Olivier; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Gray, Nathanael S; Settleman, Jeffrey; Futreal, P Andrew; Haber, Daniel A; Stratton, Michael R; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; McDermott, Ultan; Benes, Cyril H

    2012-03-28

    Clinical responses to anticancer therapies are often restricted to a subset of patients. In some cases, mutated cancer genes are potent biomarkers for responses to targeted agents. Here, to uncover new biomarkers of sensitivity and resistance to cancer therapeutics, we screened a panel of several hundred cancer cell lines--which represent much of the tissue-type and genetic diversity of human cancers--with 130 drugs under clinical and preclinical investigation. In aggregate, we found that mutated cancer genes were associated with cellular response to most currently available cancer drugs. Classic oncogene addiction paradigms were modified by additional tissue-specific or expression biomarkers, and some frequently mutated genes were associated with sensitivity to a broad range of therapeutic agents. Unexpected relationships were revealed, including the marked sensitivity of Ewing's sarcoma cells harbouring the EWS (also known as EWSR1)-FLI1 gene translocation to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. By linking drug activity to the functional complexity of cancer genomes, systematic pharmacogenomic profiling in cancer cell lines provides a powerful biomarker discovery platform to guide rational cancer therapeutic strategies.

  8. The role of neutering in cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annette N

    2014-09-01

    Increased discussion on the influence of neutering on cancer development has been recently prompted with several studies that seem to indicate that incidence of some cancers may be increased with castration or spaying in our canine populations. Although the data are thought-provoking, we may not be able to extrapolate findings in single dog breeds to the entire species. Additionally, societal and humane issues related to pet overpopulation, as well as the incidence of other noncancerous diseases, behavior issues, and potentially decreased overall lifespan in unaltered animals must be taken into consideration before wholesale rejection of neutering in pets.

  9. Application of a drug-induced apoptosis assay to identify treatment strategies in recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bosserman

    Full Text Available A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes.In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users, or elect to not use the test (non-users.The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73% used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04 and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01. Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01.The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00901264.

  10. Application of a Drug-Induced Apoptosis Assay to Identify Treatment Strategies in Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Rogers, Karl; Willis, Carl; Davidson, Dirk; Whitworth, Pat; Karimi, Misagh; Upadhyaya, Gargi; Rutledge, James; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Presant, Cary A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with re