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Sample records for cancer dosimetric comparison

  1. Dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT versus IMRT in whole breast irradiation of early stage breast cancer

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    Mudasir Ashraf

    2014-08-01

    .......................................................Cite this article as:Ashraf M, Janardhan N, Bhavani P, Shivakumar R, Ibrahim S, Reddy PY, Surrendharen J, Sarangnathan B, Johnson B, Madhuri B, Dar RA. Dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT versus IMRT in whole breast irradiation of early stage breast cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:020318. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.18

  2. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

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    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  3. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

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    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  4. Postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy in high risk prostate cancer: a dosimetric comparison.

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    Digesú, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D A; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  5. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer; Comparacion dosimetrica de las tecnicas de tratamiento IMRT y VMAT para cancer en mama

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    Urbina, G. L. [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Maestria en Fisica Medica, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru); Garcia, B. G., E-mail: gerlup@hotmail.com [Red AUNA, Clinica Delgado, Av. Angamos Cdra. 4 esquina Gral. Borgono, Miraflores, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  6. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

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    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji [Division of Clinical Radiology Service, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: m-nkmr@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the

  7. Dosimetric comparison between coplanar and non coplanar field radiotherapy for ethmoid sinus cancer

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    Serre Antoine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare non coplanar field (NCF with coplanar field (CF -intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for ethmoid cancer. Methods Seven patients treated with NCF IMRT for ethmoid cancer were studied. A CF IMRT optimization was prepared with the same constraints as for the NCF treatment. The maximum point doses (D max obtained for the different optic pathway structures (OPS should differ no more than 3% from those achieved with the NCF IMRT plan. The distribution of the dose in the target volume and in the critical structures was compared between the two techniques, as well as the Conformity (CI and the Homogeneity Indexes (HI in the target volume. Results We noted no difference between the two techniques in the OPS for the D1, D2, and D5%, in the inner ear and controlateral lens for the average Dmax, in the temporo-mandibular joints for the average mean dose, in the cord and brainstem for the average D1%. The dose-volume histograms were slightly better with the NCF treatment plan for the planning target volume (PTV with a marginally better HI but no impact on CI. We found a great improvement in the PTV coverage with the CF treatment plan for two patients with T4 tumors. Conclusion IMRT is one of the treatment options for ethmoid cancer. The PTV coverage is optimal without compromising the protection of the OPS. The impact of non coplanar versus coplanar set up is very slight.

  8. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

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    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland and Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

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    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  10. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

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    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: Edgar.Ben-Josef@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Mayekar, Sonal U. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of free-breathing and deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer

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    Marchand, V.; Desrousseaux, J.; Dauphinot, C. [Institut Curie, Paris (France). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Zefkili, S.; Simon, L. [Institut Curie, Paris (France). Dept. of Radiophysics; Giraud, P. [Institut Curie, Paris (France). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris Descartes Univ., Paris (France). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of intensity-modulated arc therapy {+-} cisplatin (IMAT {+-} C) followed by hysterectomy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Patients and methods: A total of 30 patients were included in the study. The primary tumour and PET-positive lymph node(s) received a simultaneous integrated boost. Four weeks after IMAT {+-} C treatment, response was evaluated. Resection consisted of hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy. Tumour response, acute and late radiation toxicity, postoperative morbidity and outcome were evaluated. Results: All hysterectomy specimens were macroscopically tumour-free with negative resection margins; pathological complete response was 40%. In 2 patients, one resected lymph node was positive. There was no excess in postoperative morbidity. Apart from two grade 3 hematologic toxicities, no grade 3 or 4 acute radiation toxicity was observed. No grade 3, 1 grade 4 (4%) intestinal, and 4 grade 3 (14%) urinary late toxicities were observed. The 2-year local and regional control rates were 96% and 100%, respectively. The 2-year distant control rate was 92%. Actuarial 2-year progression free survival rate was 89%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 96% and 91%, while 3-year overall survival was 84%. Conclusion: Surgery after IMAT {+-} C is feasible with low postoperative morbidity and radiation toxicity. Local, regional, distant control and survival rates are promising. (orig.)

  12. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

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    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  13. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of partial and whole breast external beam irradiation in the treatment of early stage breast cancer.

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    Kim, Yongbok; Parda, David S; Trombetta, Mark G; Colonias, Athanasios; Werts, E Day; Miller, Linda; Miften, Moyed

    2007-12-01

    A dosimetric comparison was performed on external-beam three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (PBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) plans for patients enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol at our institution. Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with either PBI (12 patients) or WBI (12 patients). In the PBI arm, the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 38.5 Gy at 3.85 Gy per fraction twice daily using a four-field noncoplanar beam setup. A minimum 6 h interval was required between fractions. In the WBI arm, the whole breast including the entirety of the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction daily using opposed tangential beams. The lumpectomy cavity volume, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL), and critical structure volumes were contoured for both the PBI and WBI patients. Dosimetric parameters, dose volume histograms (DVHs), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for target and critical structures were compared. Dosimetric results show the PBI plans, compared to the WBI plans, have smaller hot spots in the PTV_EVAL (maximum dose: 104.2% versus 110.9%) and reduced dose to the ipsilateral breast (V50: 48.6% versus 92.1% and V100: 10.2% versus 50.5%), contralateral breast (V3: 0.16% versus 2.04%), ipsilateral lung (V30: 5.8% versus 12.7%), and thyroid (maximum dose: 0.5% versus 2.0%) with p values < or = 0.01. However, similar dose coverage of the PTV_EVAL (98% for PBI and 99% for WBI, on average) was observed and the dose difference for other critical structures was clinically insignificant in both arms. The gEUD data analysis showed the reduction of dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung, contralateral breast and thyroid. In addition, preliminary dermatologic adverse event assessment data suggested reduced skin toxicity for patients treated with the PBI technique.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy

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    Ruijie Yang; Weijuan Jiang; Junjie Wang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Peking Univ. Third Hospital, Beijing (China)], E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Shouping Xu; Chuanbin Xie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital of the People' s Liberation ArmyBeijing (China)

    2010-02-15

    Background. The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. Material and methods. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. Results. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. Conclusions. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

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    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy

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    Ruijie Yang; Weijuan Jiang; Junjie Wang (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Peking Univ. Third Hospital, Beijing (China)), E-mail: ruijyang@yahoo.com; Shouping Xu; Chuanbin Xie (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital of the People' s Liberation ArmyBeijing (China))

    2010-02-15

    Background. The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. Material and methods. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. Results. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. Conclusions. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue

  18. Radiotherapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: Dosimetric comparison and risk assessment of solid secondary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sook [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung Hee [Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We compared the dosimetric parameters and the risk of solid secondary cancer from scattered doses among anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior parallel-opposed fields (AP/PA), anterior, posterior, right, and left lateral fields (4{sub f}ield), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using noncoplanar beams, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy composed of 7 coplanar beams (IMRT{sub c}o) and 7 coplanar and noncoplanar beams (IMRT{sub n}on). We retrospectively generated 5 planning techniques for 5 patients with gastric MALToma. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and mean doses of the kidney and liver were calculated from the dose-volume histograms. Applied the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report to scattered doses, the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) was calculated to estimate the risk of solid secondary cancer. The best value of CI was obtained with IMRT, although the HI varied among patients. The mean kidney dose was the highest with AP/PA, followed by 4{sub f}ield, 3D-CRT, IMRT{sub c}o, and IMRT{sub n}on. On the other hand, the mean liver dose was the highest with 4{sub f}ield and the lowest with AP/PA. Compared with 4{sub f}ield, the LAR for 3D-CRT decreased except the lungs, and the LAR for IMRT{sub c}o and IMRT{sub n}on increased except the lungs. However, the absolute differences were much lower than <1%. Tailored RT techniques seem to be beneficial because it could achieve adjacent organ sparing with very small and clinically irrelevant increase of secondary solid cancer risk compared to the conventional techniques.

  19. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ling-ling; FENG Lin-chun; WANG Yun-lai; DAI Xiang-kun; XIE Chuan-bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique.It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT.Methods There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd),and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs <30%,V50 to the heart <50%, and V55 to the esophagus <50%. Both plans were evaluated by means of the dose coverage of the targets, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and other dosimetric indices.Results The dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the targets' volumes were found to be satisfactory in both plans, but the homogeneity of the HT plan was better than that of IMRT. The high-dose radiation volume (V20-V30) to the lung and the mean lung dose (MLD) decreased (P<0.05), but the low-dose radiation volume (V5-V10) increased slightly in the HT plan (P>0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant.Conclusions The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protectiqn for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V{sub 20} (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum D{sub max} (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D{sub 200cc} (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D{sub 50} (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia D{sub max} (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus D{sub mean} (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D{sub 5} (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D{sub 5} (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D{sub 50} (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients.

  1. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Gao-Feng Li; Xiu-Yu Hou; Hong Gao; Yong-Gang Xu; Ting Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer,which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction.IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate.The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field,step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods:We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n =12) or VMAT (n =12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015.Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator.Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images.A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study.Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner.Results:Compared with 7-field,step-and-shoot IMRT,VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs.7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy,P < 0.001).VMAT reduced the rectal D25 (P < 0.001),D35 (P < 0.001),and D50 (P < 0.001),bladder V50 (P < 0.001),D25 (P =0.002),D35 (P =0.028),and D50 (P =0.029).However,VMAT did not statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50,compared with 7-field,step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs.27.43 ± 8.79%,P =0.087).Conclusions:To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer,VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent

  2. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Gao-Feng; Hou, Xiu-Yu; Gao, Hong; Xu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer, which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction. IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field, step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n = 12) or VMAT (n = 12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015. Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator. Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study. Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner. Results: Compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs. 7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy, P V50 (P statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50, compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs. 27.43 ± 8.79%, P = 0.087). Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent normal tissues comparing to 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT. Daily online image-guidance and better management of bladder and rectum could make a more precise

  3. SU-E-T-25: A Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimension Conformal and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, N; Maneru, F; Fuentemilla, N; Olasolo, J; Gracia, M; Pellejero, S; Bragado, L; Lozares, S; Miquelez, S; Martin, M [Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT and IMRT in 9 esophageal cancer. The aim of this paper is to know which of these two techniques is dosimetrically more favorable dosimetrically at both the CTV coverage and dose obtained in the relevant organs at risk, in this case, lungs and heart, as the spinal cord received in all cases below 45 Gy. Methods: we chose 9 patients from our center (CHN) with the same type of esophageal cancer and in which the prescribed dose was the same, 54 Gy. For these treatments we have used the same fields and the same angles (AP (0 °), OPD (225°–240°) and OPI (125°–135°)).All plans have been implemented using Eclipse (version 11.0) with AAA( Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm )(Version 11.0.31). Results: To analyze the coverage of the CTV, we have evaluated the D99% and found that the average dose received by 99% of CTV with IMRT is 53.8 ± 0.4 Gy (99.6% of the prescribed dose) and the mean value obtained with 3DCRT is 52.3 ± 0.6 Gy (96.8% of the prescribed dose).The last data analyzed was the D2% of PTV, a fact that gives us information on the maximum dose received by our PTV. D2% of the PTV for IMRT planning is 55.4 ± 0.4 Gy (102.6% of the prescribed dose) and with 3DCRT is 56.8 ± 0.7 Gy (105.2% of the prescribed dose).All parameters analyzed at risk organs (V30, V40, V45 and V50 for the case of heart and V5, V10, V15 and V20 for the case of the lungs) provide us irradiated volume percentages lower in IMRT than 3DCRT. Conclusion: IMRT provides a considerable improvement in the coverage of the CTV and the doses to organs at risk.

  4. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  5. [Dosimetric comparison of non-small cell lung cancer treatment with multi fields dynamic-MLC IMRT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Longying; Wang, Delin; Cao, Yujuan; Du, Fang; Cao, Feng; Liu, Chengwei

    2015-05-19

    We compared the dosimetric differences between the target and surrounding tissues/organs of the 5-field and 7,9-field (Hereinafter referred to as F5, F7, F9) treatment plan in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by the dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (dIMRT), to provide reference for clinical application. Using Varian planning system (Eclipse 7.3), we randomly selected 30 cases of patients who received dIMRT to study, all patients were 5, 7, 9 fixed field dynamics intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans to meet the target prescription requirements (95% dose curve enveloping 100% of the PTV), by comparing dose-volume histogram DVH evaluation, and the maximum dose D(max), the minimum dose D(min), and the mean dose D(mean), and conformal index CI of PTV,organs at risk of spinal cord the maximum dose D(max), lung V(5), V(10), V(20), V(30), heart V(30) and esophageal V(50), V(60) of F5,F7 and F9 dIMRT plans,and compare the mu of the three treatment programs. The D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F5's PTV are (7 203 ± 128), (5 493 ± 331), (6 900 ± 138) cGy respectively; the D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F7's PTV are (7 304 ± 96), (5 526 ± 296), (6 976 ± 130) cGy respectively; and the D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F9's PTV are (7 356 ± 54), (5 578 ± 287), (7 019 ± 56) cGy respectively. The data shows that while we increased the numbers of fields, the isodose line surrounding the target area would also promote slightly. The conformity index CI of target became better with the increase of radiation fields. The whole lung V(5) and V(10) slightly became larger with increase of fields and the V(20) showed no significant difference in three models, V(30) of double lungs slightly decreased with the increase of fields. The above date was statistically meaningless (P > 0.05). With the increase of fields esophagus V(50) were reduced by 3% and 5% respectively, V(60) of the esophagus were reduced by 6% and 11%, the average dose reduced by 5% and 10

  6. Comparison of dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy or VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan; Aichmeier, Sylvia; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Habermehl, Daniel [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hapfelmeier, Alexander [TU Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology (IMSE), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Feith, Marcus [TU Muenchen, Department of Visceral Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) achieves high conformity to the planned target volume (PTV) and good sparing of organs at risk (OAR). This study compares dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2007 and 2014, 17 SC patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) with VMAT. Dose-volume histograms and toxicity were compared between these patients and 20 treated with 3D-CRT. All patients were irradiated with a total dose of 45 Gy. All VMAT patients received simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment weeks 1 and 5. Of 20 patients treated with 3D-CRT, 13 (65 %) also received CRT with cisplatin and 5-FU, whereas 6 patients (30 %) received CRT with weekly oxaliplatin and cetuximab, and a continuous infusion of 5-FU (OE-7). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. For the lungs, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 90.1 % vs. 79.7 %; p = 0.013) and V{sub 10} (68.2 % vs. 56.6 %; p = 0.014), but with a lower V{sub 30} (median 6.6 % vs. 11.0 %; p = 0.030). Regarding heart parameters, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 100.0 % vs. 91.0 %; p = 0.043), V{sub 10} (92.0 % vs. 79.2 %; p = 0.047), and D{sub max} (47.5 Gy vs. 46.3 Gy; p = 0.003), but with a lower median dose (18.7 Gy vs. 30.0 Gy; p = 0.026) and V{sub 30} (17.7 % vs. 50.4 %; p = 0.015). Complete resection was achieved in 16 VMAT and 19 3D-CRT patients. Due to systemic progression, 2 patients did not undergo surgery. The most frequent postoperative complication was anastomosis insufficiency, occurring in 1 VMAT (6.7 %) and 5 3D-CRT patients (27.8 %; p = 0.180). Postoperative pneumonia was seen in 2 patients of each group (p = 1.000). There was no significant difference in 3-year overall (65 % VMAT vs. 45 % 3D-CRT; p = 0.493) or 3-year progression-free survival (53 % VMAT vs. 35 % 3D-CRT; p = 0

  7. Radiation exposure of the heart, lung and skin by radiation therapy for breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison between partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy and whole breast teletherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettmaier, Sebastian; Kreppner, Stephan; Lotter, Michael; Walser, Marc; Ott, Oliver J; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav

    2011-08-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation by means of multicatheter brachytherapy shows great promise in the modern treatment of early breast cancer combining high efficacy in preventing tumour recurrence with low levels of toxicity. The present work attempts a dosimetric comparison between this treatment modality and conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy by looking at differences in risk organ exposure to radiation. The planning CT data sets of 16 consecutive patients with left-sided breast cancer who received external beam radiotherapy to the whole breast followed by a boost to the tumour bed using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy after breast conserving surgery were used to create two independent physical treatment plans - one for an external radiotherapy, one for sole partial breast brachytherapy in each case assuming a total reference dose of 50Gy for each patient. Dose-volume parameters D(0.1cc), D(0.5cc), D(1cc,)D(2cc), D(5cc,)D(10cc), D(25cc), D(50cc), V(100), V(90), V(50), V(10), V(5) for the ipsilateral lung, the heart and the adjacent skin were calculated and compared between the two treatment modalities. All organs at risk showed a substantially lower radiation exposure in the brachytherapy plan. This was most pronounced for the heart with values differing by a factor of four. Although somewhat less marked this was also true for the ipsilateral lung and the adjacent skin with exposure ratios of three and two, respectively. With the use of multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy substantial reductions in the radiation exposure of risk organs can be achieved in comparison to whole breast external beam radiotherapy. These are likely to translate into profound clinical benefits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  9. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p VMAT is dosimetrically advantageous in treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR compared to fixed-beam, while providing significantly shorter treatment times.

  10. SU-E-T-125: Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Robotic Versus Traditional Linac Platform in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, T; Rella, J [Alliance Oncology, Newburyport, MA (United States); Yang, J [Alliance Oncology, Newburyport, MA (United States); Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sims, C [Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Fung, C [Commonwealth Hematology Oncology, Newburyport, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent development of an MLC for robotic external beam radiotherapy has the potential of new clinical application in conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This study offers a dosimetric comparison of IMRT plans using Cyberknife with MLC versus conventional linac plans. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients treated on a traditional linac with IMRT to 7920cGy at 180cGy/fraction were randomly selected. GTVs were defined as prostate plus proximal seminal vesicles. PTVs were defined as GTV+8mm in all directions except 5mm posteriorly. Conventional IMRT planning was performed on Philips Pinnacle and delivered on a standard linac with CBCT and 10mm collimator leaf width. For each case a Cyberknife plan was created using Accuray Multiplan with same CT data set, contours, and dose constraints. All dosimetric data was transferred to third party software for independent computation of contour volumes and DVH. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using total MU, treatment time, number of beams, and number of segments. Results: Evaluation criteria including percent target coverage, homogeneity index, and conformity index were found to be comparable. All dose constraints from QUANTEC were found to be statistically similar except rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy. Average rectum V50Gy was lower for robotic IMRT (30.07%±6.57) versus traditional (34.73%±3.62, p=0.0130). Average bladder V65Gy was lower for robotic (17.87%±12.74) versus traditional (21.03%±11.93, p=0.0405). Linac plans utilized 9 coplanar beams, 48.9±3.8 segments, and 19381±2399MU. Robotic plans utilized 38.4±9.0 non-coplanar beams, 85.5±21.0 segments and 42554.71±16381.54 MU. The average treatment was 15.02±0.60 minutes for traditional versus 20.90±2.51 for robotic. Conclusion: The robotic IMRT plans were comparable to the traditional IMRT plans in meeting the target volume dose objectives. Critical structure dose constraints were largely comparable although statistically significant

  11. Dosimetric comparison of carbon ion and X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the dose–volume histograms of patients with Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with carbon ion radiotherapy with those of patients treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach) were enrolled. Both radiotherapy plans were calculated with the same targets and organs at risk on the same CT. The treatment plan for the prophylactic lymph node and primary tumor (PTV1) delivered 40 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 40 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The total doses for the primary tumor and clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV2) were 60 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 60 Gy (RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The homogeneity indexes for PTV1 and PTV2 were superior for carbon ion radiotherapy in comparison with X-ray radiotherapy (PTV1, 0.57 vs 0.65, P = 0.009; PTV2, 0.07 vs 0.16, P = 0.005). The normal lung mean dose, V5, V10 and V20 for carbon ion radiotherapy were 7.7 Gy (RBE), 21.4%, 19.7% and 17.0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding doses for X-ray radiotherapy were 11.9 Gy, 34.9%, 26.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Maximum spinal cord dose, esophageal maximum dose and V50, and bone V10, V30 and V50 were lower with carbon ion radiotherapy than with X-ray radiotherapy. The present study indicates that carbon ion radiotherapy provides a more homogeneous target dose and a lower dose to organs at risk than X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:27242341

  12. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT and modulated arc-therapy techniques in the treatment of cervical cancers; Comparaison dosimetrique des techniques de RCMI et d'arctherapie modulee dans le traitement des cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard-Oldrini, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V.; Bouziz, D.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the dosimetric comparison of two techniques used for the treatment of cervical cancers: the intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) with static beams and modulated arc-therapy with RapidArc. The treatment plans of 15 patients have been compared. The clinical target volume (CTV) comprises the gross target volume, the cervix, the upper third of the vagina, and ganglionary areas. The previsional target volume comprises the clinical target volume and a one centimetre margin. Organs at risk are rectum, bladder, intestine and bone marrow. Arc-therapy seems to provide a better sparing of intestine that IMRT, while maintaining a good coverage of the previsional target volume and decreasing treatment duration. Short communication

  13. SU-E-T-618: Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, X; Sun, T; Liu, T; Zhang, G; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan with beam angle optimization. Methods: Ten post-operation patients with cervical cancer were included in this analysis. Two IMRT plans using seven beams were designed in each patient. A standard coplanar equi-space beam angles were used in the first plan (plan 1), whereas the selection of beam angle was optimized by beam angle optimization algorithm in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for the same number of beams in the second plan (plan 2). Two plans were designed for each patient with the same dose-volume constraints and prescription dose. All plans were normalized to the mean dose to PTV. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk and total MU were compared. Results: For conformity and homogeneity in PTV, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. For the mean dose in bladder, plan 2 were significantly lower than plan 1(p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between two plans for the mean doses in rectum, left and right femur heads. Compared with plan1, the average monitor units reduced 16% in plan 2. Conclusion: The IMRT plan based on beam angle optimization for cervical cancer could reduce the dose delivered to bladder and also reduce MU. Therefore there were some dosimetric advantages in the IMRT plan with beam angle optimization for cervical cancer.

  14. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P plans, 1.25 versus 1.25 ( P = .98). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri

  15. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent normal tissues comparing to 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT. Daily online image-guidance and better management of bladder and rectum could make a more precise treatment delivery.

  16. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, David, E-mail: d-pasquier@o-lambret.fr [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille (France); Cavillon, Fabrice [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille (France); Lacornerie, Thomas [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Touzeau, Claire [Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille (France); Tresch, Emmanuelle [Unite de Methodologie et Biostatistique, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Lartigau, Eric [Departement Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Lille (France); Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of RapidPlan and manually optimized plans in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Kazuki; Monzen, Hajime; Ishii, Kentaro; Tamura, Mikoto; Kawamorita, Ryu; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2017-07-10

    This study evaluated whether RapidPlan based plans (RP plans) created by a single optimization, are usable in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with prostate cancer. We used 51 previously administered VMAT plans to train a RP model. Thirty RP plans were created by a single optimization without planner intervention during optimization. Differences between RP plans and clinical manual optimization (CMO) plans created by an experienced planner for the same patients were analyzed (Wilcoxon tests) in terms of homogeneity index (HI), conformation number (CN), D95%, and D2% to planning target volume (PTV), mean dose, V50Gy, V70Gy, V75Gy, and V78Gy to rectum and bladder, monitor unit (MU), and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) sequence complexity. RP and CMO values for PTV D95%, PTV D2%, HI, and CN were significantly similar (pplans (pplans (pplans created by a single optimization were clinically acceptable in VMAT for patient with prostate cancer. Our simple model could reduce optimization time, independently of planner's skill and knowledge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  19. SU-E-J-21: Setup Variability of Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated in the Prone Position and Dosimetric Comparison with the Supine Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A; Foster, J; Chu, W; Karotki, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre/Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cancer centers treat colorectal patients in the prone position on a belly board to minimize dose to the small bowel. That may potentially Result in patient setup instability with corresponding impact on dose delivery accuracy for highly conformal techniques such as IMRT/VMAT. Two aims of this work are 1) to investigate setup accuracy of rectum patients treated in the prone position on a belly board using CBCT and 2) to evaluate dosimetric impact on bladder and small bowel of treating rectum patients in supine vs. prone position. Methods: For the setup accuracy study, 10 patients were selected. Weekly CBCTs were acquired and matched to bone. The CBCT-determined shifts were recorded. For the dosimetric study, 7 prone-setup patients and 7 supine-setup patients were randomly selected from our clinical database. Various clinically relevant dose volume histogram values were recorded for the small bowel and bladder. Results: The CBCT-determined rotational shifts had a wide variation. For the dataset acquired at the time of this writing, the ranges of rotational setup errors for pitch, roll, and yaw were [−3.6° 4.7°], [−4.3° 3.2°], and [−1.4° 1.4°]. For the dosimetric study: the small bowel V(45Gy) and mean dose for the prone position was 5.6±12.1% and 18.4±6.2Gy (ranges indicate standard deviations); for the supine position the corresponding dose values were 12.9±15.8% and 24.7±8.8Gy. For the bladder, the V(30Gy) and mean dose for prone position were 68.7±12.7% and 38.4±3.3Gy; for supine position these dose values were 77.1±13.7% and 40.7±3.1Gy. Conclusion: There is evidence of significant rotational instability in the prone position. The OAR dosimetry study indicates that there are some patients that may still benefit from the prone position, though many patients can be safely treated supine.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal and field-in-field radiotherapy techniques for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Acar, Hilal; Buyukyoruk, Ahmet; Cobanoglu, Gokcen; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Yavas, Ozlem; Celik, Cetin

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare field-in-field radiotherapy (FIF) with conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in terms of dosimetric benefits for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Ten consecutive early stage endometrial cancer patients who underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy were included in the study. For each patient, two different treatment plans were created. FIF and CRT plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the organ at risk (OAR) volumes including rectum, bladder, bowel, bilateral femurs and bone marrow, the dose homogeneity index, and the monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique significantly reduced the maximum dose of the PTV, rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow (p values were: 30 and >45 Gy were compared, the results were in favor of the FIF technique. The volumes of rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow receiving more than the prescription dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced with FIF technique (p values were 0.016, 0.039, 0.01, 0.04, 0.037 and 0.01 respectively). The dose homogeneity index (DHI) was significantly improved with FIF technique (p radiotherapy for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated, conformal, and four-field pelvic radiotherapy boost plans for gynecologic cancer: a retrospective planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Gregory

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT as an alternative to conformal radiotherapy (CRT or 4-field box boost (4FB in women with gynecologic malignancies who are unsuitable for brachytherapy for technical or medical reasons. Methods Dosimetric and toxicity information was analyzed for 12 patients with cervical (8, endometrial (2 or vaginal (2 cancer previously treated with external beam pelvic radiotherapy and a CRT boost. Optimized IMRT boost treatment plans were then developed for each of the 12 patients and compared to CRT and 4FB plans. The plans were compared in terms of dose conformality and critical normal tissue avoidance. Results The median planning target volume (PTV was 151 cm3 (range 58–512 cm3. The median overlap of the contoured rectum with the PTV was 15 (1–56 %, and 11 (4–35 % for the bladder. Two of the 12 patients, both with large PTVs and large overlap of the contoured rectum and PTV, developed grade 3 rectal bleeding. The dose conformity was significantly improved with IMRT over CRT and 4FB (p ≤ 0.001 for both. IMRT also yielded an overall improvement in the rectal and bladder dose-volume distributions relative to CRT and 4FB. The volume of rectum that received the highest doses (>66% of the prescription was reduced by 22% (p Conclusion These results indicate that IMRT can improve target coverage and reduce dose to critical structures in gynecologic patients receiving an external beam radiotherapy boost. This dosimetric advantage will be integrated with other patient and treatment-specific factors, particularly internal tumor movement during fractionated radiotherapy, in the context of a future image-guided radiation therapy study.

  2. Triple-tandem high-dose-rate brachytherapy for early-stage medically inoperable endometrial cancer: Initial report on acute toxicity and dosimetric comparison to stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Greg; Wu, Tianming; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may be appealing in medically inoperable endometrial cancer to avoid procedural risks. We performed a dosimetric comparison to triple-tandem, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Six consecutive clinical stage I, grade 1-2, medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients were treated with triple-tandem HDR brachytherapy. We report patient factors and acute toxicity. Also, we performed dosimetric comparison to SBRT using both 3D conformal arc (3DArc) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. D2cc values for normal tissues were calculated and compared to the HDR plans. Median age was 57 years. Patient comorbidities included morbid obesity, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and pulmonary emboli. In three patients who received prior external beam radiation (EBRT), median EBRT and HDR doses were 46 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The median dose with HDR brachytherapy monotherapy was 35 Gy. Acute toxicities during EBRT included gastrointestinal (3/3 with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (3/3 with grade 1-2). Acute toxicities during HDR brachytherapy were gastrointestinal (2/6 total with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (2/6 total with grade 1). The mean D2cc/Gy of prescription dose for rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 0.58, 0.40, and 0.47 respectively. Overall, doses to normal tissues were higher for SBRT plans as compared to HDR. Also, the R50 (ratio of the 50% prescription isodose volume to the PTV) was lowest with HDR brachytherapy. In medically inoperable, clinical stage I endometrial cancer patients with multiple comorbidities, definitive triple-tandem, HDR brachytherapy results in mild acute toxicity. In addition, HDR brachytherapy achieves relatively lower doses to surrounding normal tissues as compared to SBRT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Shawn, E-mail: smalone@ottawahospital.on.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Croke, Jennifer [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric [Department of Pathology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Avruch, Leonard [Department of Radiology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Malone, Colin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Morash, Christopher [Division of Urology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Nyiri, Balazs [Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Spaans, Johanna [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  4. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jia-Fu [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Dah-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Hui-Ling, E-mail: hlyeh@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen-Fa [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  5. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  6. SU-E-T-126: Dosimetric Comparisons of VMAT, IMRT and 3DCRT for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J; Wang, J; Zhang, Z; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Caner Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), fixed-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for the preoperative locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Ten LARC patients treated in our department using the simultaneous escalate strategy were retrospectively analyzed in this study. All patients had T3 with N+/− and were treated with IMRT. Two additional VMAT and 3DCRT plans were created for each patient. Both IMRT and VMAT had similar optimization objectives. The prescription was 50Gy to the PTV and 55Gy to the GTV. The target coverage and organs at risk were compared for all the techniques.The paired, two-tailed Wilcoxcon signed-rank test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: IMRT and VMAT plans achieved comparable tumor response except for the conformality index (1.07 vs 1.19 and 1.08 vs 1.03 of IMRT vs VMAT for PTV-G and PTV-C respectively). Compared to VMAT, IMRT showed superior or similar dose sparing in the small bowel, bladder, femoral head. Both IMRT and VMAT had better organs at risk sparing and homogeneity index of PTV-G. Conclusion: All 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT meet the prescript. The IMRT and VMAT provided comparable dosemitric parameters for target volume. IMRT shows better sparing for small bowel, bladder, femoral heads and normal tissue to 3DCRT and VMAT.

  7. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  8. Dosimetric comparison in a cancer of the Cervix with different therapeutic modalities; Comparacion dosimetrica en un cancer de Cervix con distintas modalidades terapeuticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso Iracheta, L.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Samper Ots, P.; Penas Cabrera, M. D. de las; Jimenez Gonzalez, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer is usually treated with radiotherapy composed of 3D (RC3D) and supine position, and is usually not usually outline the small intestine in cases of exclusively pelvic irradiation. In our Center we wanted to check what dose receives the small intestine in these cases and if the positioning of the patient or used irradiation technique influence the distribution of the histogram dose-volume. (Author)

  9. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast in 25 fractions, with 3D-CRT were selected. The FiF-FP-IMRT plans were created by combining two open fields with three to four segments in two tangential beam directions. Eight different beam directions were chosen to create IP-IMRT plans and were inversely optimized. The homogeneity of dose to planning target volume (PTV) and the dose delivered to heart and contralateral breast were compared among the techniques in all the 20 patients. All the three radiotherapy techniques achieved comparable radiation dose delivery to PTV-95% of the prescribed dose covering > 95% of the breast PTV. The mean volume of PTV receiving 105% (V105) of the prescribed dose was 1.7% (range 0-6.8%) for IP-IMRT, 1.9% for FP-IMRT, and 3.7% for 3D-CRT. The homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) were similar for 3D-CRT and FP-IMRT, whereas the IP-IMRT plans had better conformity index at the cost of less homogeneity. The 3D-CRT and FiF-FP-IMRT plans achieved similar sparing of critical organs. The low-dose volumes (V5Gy) in the heart and lungs were larger in IP-IMRT than in the other techniques. The value of the mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was higher for IP-IMRT than the values for with FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT. In the current study, the relative volume of contralateral breast receiving low doses (0.01, 0.6, 1, and 2Gy) was significantly lower for the FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans than for the IP-IMRT plan. Compared with 3D-CRT and IP-IMRT, FiF-FP-IMRT proved to be a

  10. Dosimetric Comparison Between VMAT and IMRT for Liver Cancer%基于肝癌的VMAT与IMRT放疗计划的剂量学对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙长江; 李军; 张西志; 张先稳; 桂龙刚; 陈雪梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较分析肝癌旋转容积调强放疗( VMAT)计划与固定野调强放疗( IMRT)计划靶区及其周围危机器官的剂量学差异。方法选择36例肝癌患者的CT图像数据,分别设计VMAT计划、IMRT计划,比较两者的靶区剂量分布、危及器官受量、正常组织受量、机器跳数及治疗时间等。结果 VMAT计划的靶区剂量最大值比IMRT计划低( Z=2.090,P<0.05);VMAT计划的90%的处方剂量的适形指数比IMRT计划小(Z=2.809,P<0.05);VMAT计划的正常肝组织的V30低于IMRT计划(Z=2.395,P<0.05);VMAT计划的正常肾脏组织的V20低于 IMRT计划(Z=2.201,P<0.05);VMAT计划机器跳数是 IMRT计划的<40%,治疗时间低于IMRT计划的50%。结论2种治疗计划在剂量学上均能满足临床要求,并且剂量分布基本一致,VMAT计划的适形指数比IMRT好,危及器官剂量比IMRT计划略有降低,正常组织的低剂量区VMAT计划与IMRT相比有先高后低的趋势,并且机器跳数少,治疗时间短,更值得临床推广应用。%Objective To compare the dosimetric differences of the target volume and the surrounding organ at risk between volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy( VMAT)and fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy ( IMRT)plans for liver cancer. Methods The CT image data of 36 patients with liver cancer were observed,the VMAT plan and the IMRT plan were designed,the target dose distribution of the two plans,organs at risk affected by quantity ,normal tissue by volume ,the number of machine unit and treatment time of the two plans were compared .Results The maximum value in the target region of the VMAT plan was lower than that of the IMRT plan( Z=2. 090,P<0. 05);the conformal index of 90% of prescription dose in the VMAT plan was smaller than that in the IMRT plan(Z=2. 809,P<0. 05);the V30 of liver in the VMAT plan was lower than that in the IMRT plan(Z=2. 395,P<0. 05);the V20 of kidney in the

  11. Dosimetric comparison study between intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal proton therapy for pelvic bone marrow sparing in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, William Y; Huh, Soon N; Liang, Yun; White, Greg; Nichols, R Charles; Watkins, W Tyler; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2010-08-15

    The objective was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal proton therapy (3DCPT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. In particular, each technique's ability to spare pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was of primary interest in this study. A total of six cervical cancer patients (3 postoperative and 3 intact) were planned and analyzed. All plans had uniform 1.0 cm CTV-PTV margin and satisfied the 95% PTV with 100% isodose (prescription dose = 45 Gy) coverage. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were analyzed for comparison. The overall PTV and PBM volumes were 1035.9 ± 192.2 cc and 1151.4 ± 198.3 cc, respectively. In terms of PTV dose conformity index (DCI) and dose homogeneity index (DHI), 3DCPT was slightly superior to IMRT with 1.00 ± 0.001, 1.01 ± 0.02, and 1.10 ± 0.02, 1.13 ± 0.01, respectively. In addition, 3DCPT demonstrated superiority in reducing lower doses (i.e., V30 or less) to PBM, small bowel and bladder. Particularly in PBM, average V10 and V20 reductions of 10.8% and 7.4% (p = 0.001 and 0.04), respectively, were observed. However, in the higher dose range, IMRT provided better sparing (> V30). For example, in small bowel and PBM, average reductions in V45 of 4.9% and 10.0% (p = 0.048 and 0.008), respectively, were observed. Due to its physical characteristics such as low entrance dose, spread-out Bragg peak and finite particle range of protons, 3DCPT illustrated superior target coverage uniformity and sparing of the lower doses in PBM and other organs. Further studies are, however, needed to fully exploit the benefits of protons for general use in cervical cancer.

  12. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, L; Deng, G [Department of Oncology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xie, J; Cheng, J; Liang, N; Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, J; Luo, H [Division of Oncology, Department of Graduate, Weifang Medical College, 2610, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number.

  13. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of different radiation treatment modalities for acoustic neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Oh [Kyung Hee Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The dosimetric differences for intensity-modulatedradiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), proton therapy(PROTON) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patient with acoustic neuroma (AN) were compared by using the dose-volume histogram (DVH). In the present study, we estimated the dosimetric differences for patient with AN who received different treatment modalities. In this study, we found proton therapy is relatively effective treatment techniques than the other.

  15. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer. Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Erichsen, Patricia [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Nielinger, Lisa [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Hochschule Hamm-Lippstadt, Lippstadt (Germany); Abdallah, Abdallah [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Senologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Galalae, Razvan [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Medizinische Fakultaet, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3}), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V{sub 5}), 10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL. (orig.) [German] Die adjuvante Strahlentherapie nach brusterhaltener Operation (BCS) bei Brustkrebs (BC) ist eine seit langem anerkannte Behandlungsform. Das postradiogene Risiko einer kardialen Ischaemie steigt linear ohne erkennbaren Schwellenwert mit der mittleren Herzdosis. Die Bestrahlung der linken Brust in tiefer Inspiration unter Anhalten der

  16. Dosimetric study of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer and comparison with 3-dimensional conformal technique for definitive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Falk, Alexander T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Auberdiac, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique Claude Bernard, Albi (France); Cartier, Lysian; Vallard, Alexis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Ollier, Edouard [Department of Pharmacology-Toxicology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Trone, Jane-Chloé; Khodri, Moustapha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital d’instruction de Armées du Val-de-Grâce, Paris (France); Magné, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@icloire.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire Lucien Neuwirth, Saint-Priest en Jarez (France)

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.

  17. Analysis of superficial fluorescence patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer during photodynamic therapy by a dosimetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the superficial fluorescence patterns in different nonmelanoma skin cancers and their photodynamic treatment response are analysed by a fluorescence based dosimetric model. Results show differences of even more than 50% in the fluorescence patterns as photodynamic therapy progresses depending on the malignant tissue type. They demonstrate the great relevance of the biological media as an additional dosimetric factor and contribute to the development of a future customized therapy with the assistance of dosimetric tools to interpret the fluorescence images obtained during the treatment monitoring and the differential photodiagnosis.

  18. Dosimetric and efficiency comparison of high-dose radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: volumetric modulated arc therapy versus fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-Y; Huang, W-Y; Jen, Y-M; Chen, C-M; Su, Y-F; Chao, H-L; Lin, C-S

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare high-dose volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ff-IMRT) plans for the treatment of patients with middle-thoracic esophageal cancer. Eight patients with cT2-3N0M0 middle-thoracic esophageal cancer were enrolled. The treatment planning system was the version 9 of the Pinnacle(3) with SmartArc (Philips Healthcare, Fitchburg, WI, USA). VMAT and ff-IMRT treatment plans were generated for each case, and both techniques were used to deliver 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV(50)) and then provided a 16-Gy boost (PTV(66)). The VMAT plans provided superior PTV(66) coverage compared with the ff-IMRT plans (P = 0.034), whereas the ff-IMRT plans provided more appropriate dose homogeneity to the PTV(50) (P = 0.017). In the lung, the V(5) and V(10) were lower for the ff-IMRT plans than for the VMAT plans, whereas the V(20) was lower for the VMAT plans. The delivery time was significantly shorter for the VMAT plans than for the ff-IMRT plans (P = 0.012). In addition, the VMAT plans delivered fewer monitor units. The VMAT technique required a shorter planning time than the ff-IMRT technique (3.8 ± 0.8 hours vs. 5.4 ± 0.6 hours, P = 0.011). The major advantages of VMAT plans are higher efficiency and an approximately 50% reduction in delivery time compared with the ff-IMRT plans, with comparable plan quality. Further clinical investigations to evaluate the use of high-dose VMAT for the treatment of esophageal cancer are warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. SmartArc-based volumetric modulated arc therapy for endometrial cancer: a dosimetric comparison with helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S) to achieve radiation delivery efficiency higher than that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) when treating endometrial cancer, while maintaining plan quality. Methods Nine patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively studied. Three plans per patient were generated for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT. The dose distributions for the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Results The average homogeneity index was 1.06, 1.10 and 1.07 for the VMAT-S, IMRT and HT plans, respectively. The V40 for the rectum, bladder and pelvis bone decreased by 9.0%, 3.0% and 3.0%, respectively, in the VMAT-S plan relative to the IMRT plan. The target coverage and sparing of OARs were comparable between the VMAT-S and HT plans. The average MU was 823, 1105 and 8403 for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT, respectively; the average delivery time was 2.6, 8.6 and 9.5 minutes, respectively. Conclusions For endometrial cancer, the VMAT-S plan provided comparable quality with significantly shorter delivery time and fewer MUs than with the IMRT and HT plans. In addition, more homogeneous PTV coverage and superior sparing of OARs in the medium to high dose region were observed in the VMAT-S relative to the IMRT plan. PMID:24175929

  20. Dosimetric comparison of MRI-based HDR brachytherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer: A virtual brachytherapy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otahal, Bretislav; Dolezel, Martin; Cvek, Jakub; Simetka, Ondrej; Klat, Jaroslav; Knybel, Lukas; Molenda, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Hlavka, Ales; Feltl, David

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the treatment plans of 3D image-guided brachytherapy (BT) and stereotactic robotic radiotherapy with online image guidance – CyberKnife (CK) in patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. Methods and materials Ten pairs of plans for patients with locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer were created using MR based 3D brachytherapy and stereotaxis CK. The dose that covers 98% of the target volume (HR CTV D98) was taken as a reference and other parameters were compared. Results Of the ten studied cases, the dose from D100 GTV was comparable for both devices, on average, the BT GTV D90 was 10–20% higher than for CK. The HR CTV D90 was higher for CK with an average difference of 10–20%, but only fifteen percent of HR CTV (the peripheral part) received a higher dose from CK, while 85% of the target volume received higher doses from BT. We found a significant organ-sparing effect of CK compared to brachytherapy (20–30% lower doses in 0.1 cm3, 1 cm3, and 2 cm3). Conclusion BT remains to be the best method for dose escalation. Due to the significant organ-sparing effect of CK, patients that are not candidates for BT could benefit from stereotaxis more than from classical external beam radiotherapy. PMID:25337413

  1. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of Forward Tangent Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (FT-IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for early stage whole breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri Sedeh, Nader

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a well-known type of external beam radiation therapy. The advancement in technology has had an inevitable influence in radiation oncology as well that has led to a newer and faster dose delivery technique called Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Since the presence of the VMAT modality in clinics in the late 2000, there have been many studies in order to compare the results of the VMAT modality with the current popular modality IMRT for various tumor sites in the body such as brain, prostate, head and neck, cervix and anal carcinoma. This is the first study to compare VMAT with IMRT for breast cancer. The results show that the RapidArc technique in Eclipse version 11 does not improve all aspects of the treatment plans for the breast cases automatically and easily, but it needs to be manipulated by extra techniques to create acceptable plans thus further research is needed.

  2. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm in prostate cancer treatment using RapidArc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the dosimetric impact of Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm (AXB, in comparisons with Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA calculations in prostate cancer treatment using RapidArc. Materials and Methods: A computed tomography (CT dataset of low-risk prostate cancer patients treated at Arizona Center for Cancer Care was selected and contoured for prostate, seminal vesicles, and organs at risk (OARs(rectum, bladder, and femur heads. Plans were created for 6 MV photon beam using RapidArc technique in Eclipse treatment planning system. Dose calculations were performed with AAA and AXB for same number of monitor units and identical beam setup. Mean and maximum doses to planning target volume (PTV and OARs were analyzed. Additionally, minimum dose to PTV and V100 was analyzed. Finally, point-dose difference between planar dose distributions of AAA and AXB plans was investigated. Results: The highest dose difference was up to 0.43% (range: 0.05−0.43%, P> 0.05 for PTV and 1.98% (range: 0.22−1.98%, P> 0.05 for OARs with AAA predicting higher dose than AXB. The V100 values of AAA plans (95 % and AXB plans (range: 93.1−97.9 % had an average difference of 0.89±1.47% with no statistical significance (P = 0.25411. The point-dose difference analysis showed that AAA predicted higher dose than AXB at significantly higher percentage (in average 94.15 of total evaluated points. Conclusion: The dosimetric results of this study suggest that the AXB can perform the dose computation comparable to AAA in RapidArc prostate cancer treatment plans that are generated by a partial single-arc technique.

  3. Incidental dose to coronary arteries is higher in prone than in supine whole breast irradiation. A dosimetric comparison in adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerschmidt, Florian; Stoltenberg, Solveigh; Kretschmer, Matthias; Petersen, Cordula

    2014-06-15

    Sparing of normal lung is best achieved in prone whole breast irradiation (WBI). However, exposure of the heart and coronary arteries might increase due to anterior movement of the heart in prone WBI. Treatment plans of 46 patients with large breasts irradiated for mammary cancer after breast-conserving surgery were retrospectively analyzed. The average treated breast volume of right-sided breasts (n = 33) was 1,804 ccm and 1,500 ccm for left-sided breasts (n = 13). The majority had invasive cancer (96 %) of which 61 % were pT1 and 39 % pT2 tumors. All patients received radiation therapy to the breast only. For three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning, all patients underwent a noncontrast-enhanced CT in the supine position with a wingboard and a second CT in the prone position using a prone breastboard. Nontarget volumes of the lung, heart, and coronary arteries were contoured. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was prescribed to the breast only. Differences were calculated for each patient and compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Treatment of left-sided breasts resulted in similar average mean heart doses in prone versus supine WBI (4.16 vs. 4.01 Gy; p = 0.70). The left anterior descending artery (LAD) had significantly higher dose exposure in left versus right WBI independent of position. Prone WBI always resulted in significantly higher exposures of the right circumflex artery (RCA) and LAD as compared to supine WBI. In left WBI, the mean LADprone was 33.5 Gy vs. LADsupine of 25.6 Gy (p = 0.0051). The V20prone of the LAD was 73.6 % vs. V20supine 50.4 % (p = 0.0006). The heart dose is not different between supine and prone WBI. However, in left WBI the incidental dose to the LAD with clinically relevant doses can be significantly higher in prone WBI. This is discussed controversially in the literature as it might depend on contouring and treatment techniques. We recommend contouring of LAD if patients are treated in prone WBI and evaluation of alternative

  4. Dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Biostatistics Unit, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: to investigate dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: all patients who underwent external-beam radiotherapy as part of treatment for localized prostate cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, from May 2002 to November 2006 were extracted from the own database. From the cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), the absolute volumes (V-value) of intestinal cavity (IC) receiving 15, 30, and 45 Gy were extracted for each patient. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was prospectively scored at each weekly treatment visit according to CTC (common toxicity criteria) v2.0. The endpoint was the development of peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during RT. Various patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: 149 patients were included in the analysis, 112 (75.2%) treated with whole-pelvis intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) and 37 (24.8%) with prostate-only RT, including or not including, the seminal vesicles (PORT {+-} SV). 45 patients (30.2%) developed peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during treatment. At univariate analysis, IC-V{sub 15} and IC-V{sub 30}, but not IC-V{sub 45}, were correlated to the endpoint; at multivariate analysis, only IC-V{sub 15} (p = 0.047) along with peak acute proctitis (p = 0.041) was independently correlated with the endpoint. Conclusion: these data provide a novel and prostate treatment-specific ''upper limit'' DVH for IC. (orig.)

  5. Incorporating breath holding and image guidance in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Weigang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory related target motion and setup error will lead to a large margin in the gastric radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric benefit and the possibility of incorporating the breath-hold (BH technique with online image-guided radiotherapy in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy. Methods Setup errors and target motions of 22 post-operative gastric cancer patients with surgical clips were analyzed. Clips movement was recorded using the digital fluoroscopics and the probability distribution functions (pdf of the target motions were created for both the free breathing (FB and BH treatment. For dosimetric comparisons, two intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans, i.e. the free breathing treatment plan (IMRTFB and the image-guided BH treatment plan (IMRTIGBH using the same beam parameters were performed among 6 randomly selected patients. Different margins for FB and BH plans were derived. The plan dose map was convoluted with various pdfs of the setup errors and the target motions. Target coverage and dose to organs at risk were compared and the dose-escalation probability was assessed. Results The mean setup errors were 1.2 mm in the superior-inferior (SI, 0.0 mm in the left-right (LR, and 1.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP directions. The mean target motion for the free breathing (vs. BH was 11.1 mm (vs. 2.2 mm, 1.9 mm (vs. 1.1 mm, and 5.5 mm (vs. 1.7 mm in the SI, LR, and AP direction, respectively. The target coverage was comparable for all the original plans. IMRTIGBH showed lower dose to the liver compared with IMRTFB (p = 0.01 but no significant difference in the kidneys. Convolved IMRTIGBH showed better sparing in kidneys (p  Conclusions Combining BH technique with online image guided IMRT can minimize the organ motion and improve the setup accuracy. The dosimetric comparison showed the dose could be escalated to 54 Gy without

  6. Dosimetric comparison between model 9011 and 6711 sources in prostate implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualin; Beyer, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the model 9011 iodine-125 ((125)I) in prostate implants by comparing dosimetric coverage provided by the 6711 vs 9011 source implants. Postimplant dosimetry was performed in 18 consecutively implanted patients with prostate cancer. Two were implanted with the 9011 source and 16 with the 6711 source. For purposes of comparison, each implant was then recalculated assuming use of the other source. The same commercially available planning system was used and the specific source data for both 6711 and 9011 products were entered. The results of these calculations are compared side by side in the terms of the isodose values covering 100% (D100) and 90% (D90) of prostate volume, and the percentages of volumes of prostate, bladder, rectum, and urethra covered by 200% (V200), 150% (V150), 100% (V100), 50% (V50), and 20% (V20) of the prescribed dose as well. The 6711 source data overestimate coverage by 6.4% (ranging from 4.9% to 6.9%; median 6.6%) at D100 and by 6.6% (ranging from 6.2% to 6.8%; median 6.6%) at D90 compared with actual 9011 data. Greater discrepancies of up to 67% are seen at higher dose levels: average reduction for V100 is 2.7% (ranging from 0.6% to 7.7%; median 2.3%), for V150 is 14.6% (ranging from 6.1% to 20.5%; median 15.3%), for V200 is 14.9% (ranging from 4.8% to 19.1%; median 16%); similarly seen in bladder, rectal, and urethral coverage. This work demonstrates a clear difference in dosimetric behavior between the 9011 and 6711 sources. Using the 6711 source data for 9011 source implants would create a pronounced error in dose calculation. This study provides evidence that the 9011 source can provide the same dosimetric quality as the 6711 source, if properly used; however, the 6711 source data should not be considered as a surrogate for the 9011 source implants. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric comparison between model 9011 and 6711 sources in prostate implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: zhang248@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Beyer, David [Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the model 9011 iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) in prostate implants by comparing dosimetric coverage provided by the 6711 vs 9011 source implants. Postimplant dosimetry was performed in 18 consecutively implanted patients with prostate cancer. Two were implanted with the 9011 source and 16 with the 6711 source. For purposes of comparison, each implant was then recalculated assuming use of the other source. The same commercially available planning system was used and the specific source data for both 6711 and 9011 products were entered. The results of these calculations are compared side by side in the terms of the isodose values covering 100% (D100) and 90% (D90) of prostate volume, and the percentages of volumes of prostate, bladder, rectum, and urethra covered by 200% (V200), 150% (V150), 100% (V100), 50% (V50), and 20% (V20) of the prescribed dose as well. The 6711 source data overestimate coverage by 6.4% (ranging from 4.9% to 6.9%; median 6.6%) at D100 and by 6.6% (ranging from 6.2% to 6.8%; median 6.6%) at D90 compared with actual 9011 data. Greater discrepancies of up to 67% are seen at higher dose levels: average reduction for V100 is 2.7% (ranging from 0.6% to 7.7%; median 2.3%), for V150 is 14.6% (ranging from 6.1% to 20.5%; median 15.3%), for V200 is 14.9% (ranging from 4.8% to 19.1%; median 16%); similarly seen in bladder, rectal, and urethral coverage. This work demonstrates a clear difference in dosimetric behavior between the 9011 and 6711 sources. Using the 6711 source data for 9011 source implants would create a pronounced error in dose calculation. This study provides evidence that the 9011 source can provide the same dosimetric quality as the 6711 source, if properly used; however, the 6711 source data should not be considered as a surrogate for the 9011 source implants.

  8. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lima Souza Castro, Andre [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Institute of Radiation San Francisco, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto [Cancer Hospital in Uberlandia, Uberlandia (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  9. Dosimetric comparison between techniques for irradiation of breast plastron;Comparacao dosimetrica entre tecnicas de irradiacao de plastrao mamario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinca, W.C.; Bruning, F.F.; Caldeira, F A.M.; Silveira, T.B da; Batista, D.V.S. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Area de Fisica Medica; Andrade, R.R. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    Patients with breast cancer undergoing radical mastectomy has as an indication of adjuvancy the irradiation of the breast plastron. This paper makes a comparison between different techniques for treatment of breast plastron routinely used in the National Cancer Institute of Brazil (INCA): The irradiation with tangential fields of photons at 6 MV linear accelerator and irradiation with direct angled fields of electron beams of 6 and 9 MeV. We performed dosimetric comparisons in a tissue-equivalent phantom with the use of radiochromic films for verification of coverage and homogeneity of dose for all technical requirements. Tangential fields in the coverage and homogeneity were satisfactory and well cover the clinical aspects as well as beam 9 MeV, despite a small loss at the edge of the external field. Already in 6 MeV beam, there was significant loss in the end, with significant subdoses of 3 cm in the last field. (author)

  10. SU-E-T-310: Dosimetric Comparison of Tandem and Ovoid (TO) Vs. Tandem and Ring (TR) Applicators in High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy (BT) for the Treatment of Locally-Advanced Cervical-Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, L; Viswanathan, A; Damato, A [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences associated with the use of TO or TR applicators for cervical-cancer HDR BT. Methods: The records of all cervical-cancer patients treated with image-guided HDR BT in 2013 were reviewed. Image-based planning based on isodose line and DVH metrics inspections was performed following the GEC-ESTRO recommendations. CTV volume, CTV D90, and rectum, bladder and sigmoid D2cc were collected as % of the prescription dose (80Gy EQD2). Patients receiving both TO and TR were identified and plans were compared (paired analysis). A Student T-test was used to evaluate statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Twenty-eight patients were identified (20 TR only, 4 TO only, 4 TO and TR), associated with 116 plans (109 TR, 7 TO). Overall metrics: CTV volume, 26.5±10.4 cm3 (TR) and 39.1±14.0 cm3 (TO, p < 0.01); CTV D90, 126±28% (TR) and 110±15% (TO, p = 0.15); rectum D2cc, 56±11% (TR) and 58±19% (TO, p = 0.91); bladder D2cc, 74±20% (TR) and 88±19% (TO, p = 0.09); sigmoid D2cc, 52±17% (TR) and 49±20% (TO, p = 0.63). The paired analysis results were: CTV volume, 37.3±11.9 cm3 (TR) and 51.0±23.1 cm3 (TO, p = 0.23); CTV D90, 111±12% (TR) and 101±17% (TO, p = 0.50); rectum D2cc, 56±12% (TR) and 53±16% (TO, p = 0.71); bladder D2cc, 73±14% (TR) and 90±20% (TO, p = 0.22); sigmoid D2cc, 59±10% (TR) and 59±22% (TO, p = 0.98). Conclusion: TR and TO were both used with good dosimetric results. TO were used for patients with larger CTV volumes than TR, although paired analysis suggest that tissue distortion and contouring bias may partially explain this Result. CTV D90 on average > 80 Gy EQD2 were achieved in both groups despite the different CTV volume. Higher bladder D2cc for TO than TR was observed.

  11. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy sparing the thyroid gland for early-stage glottic cancer: A dosimetrical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies on advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques for early stage glottic cancer have focused on sparing the carotid artery. However, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the dosimetric advantages of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of sparing the thyroid gland in early-stage glottic cancer patients. In total, 15 cT1N0M0 glottic cancer patients treated with definitive RT using VMAT were selected, and for dosimetric comparison, a conventional RT plan comprising opposed-lateral wedged fields was generated for each patient. The carotid artery, thyroid gland and spinal cord were considered organs at risk. The prescription dose was 63 Gy at 2.25 Gy per fraction. For the thyroid gland and carotid artery, all compared parameters were significantly lower with VMAT compared with conventional RT. For the thyroid gland, the median reduction rates of the mean dose (Dmean), the volume receiving ≥30% of the prescription dose (V30) and the V50 were 32.6, 40.9 and 46.0%, respectively. The Dmean was 14.7±2.6 Gy when using VMAT compared with 22.2±3.9 Gy when using conventional RT. The differences between the techniques in terms of planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were not significant. When considering a recent normal tissue complication probability model, which indicated the mean thyroid gland dose as the most significant predictor of radiation-induced hypothyroidism, the dosimetric advantage shown in this study may be valuable in reducing hypothyroidism following RT for early stage glottic cancer patients.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of two arcs VMAT plan and IMRT plan for breast cancer post-mastectomy%乳腺癌根治术后双弧VMAT与IMRT计划的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳浩; 李夏东; 邓清华; 吴稚冰; 夏冰; 赖建军; 唐荣军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the biophysical dosimetric characteristics and clinical application ability of VMAT technology for breast cancer post-mastectomy.Methods 28 patients with breast cancer (10 at left side and the other at right side) were planned in different ways respectively.One was two 90 degree arc VMAT plan and the other were 5 beam IMRT plan.The dosimetric parameters of two different plans including tumor control probability (TCP),conformity index(CI),homogeneity index (HI),V95and V110 in target,normal tissue complication probability (NTCP),V5,V20,V30 for ipsilateral lung,NCTP,D V25 for heart,D for the contralateral breast in OARs,MU and times were compared.Results The average tumor control probability (TCP) in VMAT and IMRT group was(96 ±2)% and (90 ±2)% (t =-6.28,P < 0.01),respectively.The PTV dose average homogeneity index (HI) of VMAT plans was better than that of IMRT plan (0.15 ±0.04 vs 0.22 ±0.02,t =13.29,P <0.01).For cancer position in left side,the mean dose of heart was decreased by 433.24 cGy in the VMAT plan.The NTCP of the hearts in VMAT plans had statistically significant difference compared with IMRT plans [(1.00±0.12)% vs (1.70±0.13)%,t =2.14,P <0.05].For plans of right breast cancer,the average mean dose of hearts in two control group was (3.27 ± 0.26) Gy and (6.00 ± 0.47) Gy (t =9.21,P<0.01).The total monitor unit (MU) was 530.7 in the VMAT arm and 693.9 in the IMRT arm (t =9.58,P <0.01).The treatment time was shorter in VMAT arm (t =8.40,P <0.05).Conclusions VMAT plans have better clinical value and more superior biophysical dosimetric characteristics for breast cancer post-mastectomy.%目的 比较乳腺癌根治术后双弧的容积旋转调强放射治疗(VMAT)与5野的静态调强放射治疗(IMRT)2种计划之间的剂量学差异,评估VMAT技术在乳腺癌根治术后的剂量学特点与应用能力.方法 选取28例乳腺癌根治术后患者(左侧10例,右侧18例),分别制定双90

  13. 保乳术后全乳照射 VMAT 与 IMRT 的计量学比较%Dosimetric comparison of volumetric -modulated arc therapy and intensity -modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金; 吴文安; 廖娟; 雎岩; 梁静; 宋丽萍

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较保乳术后全乳照射 VMAT 与静态 IMRT 的剂量学差异,探索 VMAT 的可行性。方法:2014年-2015年入组乳腺癌患者10例,左侧、右侧乳腺癌各5例。用 Varian Eclipse 计划系统分别设计双弧VMAT 和5野 IMRT 计划,PTV 处方剂量50Gy 分25次,用 Delta 4进行剂量验证。配对 t 检验比较两组计划PTV、OAR 受量、机器跳数及有效治疗时间。结果:两组计划均能满足临床剂量学要求。 VMAT 与 IMRT相比CI 值分别为(1.01±0.1)和(1.36±0.2)(P <0.05);HI 值分别为(0.124±0.01)和(0.173±0.02)(P <0.05);心脏 V20、V30、Dmean增高(P =0.041、0.012、0.002);肺 V20-V30无明显统计学差异,但是增加了患侧肺的 V5(58.2±3.5)% vs (51.4±4.2)%(P <0.05);机器跳数分别为(452±98)和(786±32)(P <0.05);有效治疗时间(2.5±0.89)min 和(15±1.78)min(P <0.05)。结论:在靶区覆盖率相似前提下,VMAT 可降低部分 OAR 受量,并能改善 CI 值、减少机器跳数、缩短有效治疗时间。Synergy 平台上的 VMAT 计划剂量稳定可靠。%Objective:To compare the dosimetric difference in VMAT and IMRT planning for breast cancer.Methods:Varian Eclipse,ten patients received radiotherapy alone after breast-conserving surgery were randomly selected.For each patient,two plans(VMAT and IMRT)were designed.In each plan,the volume of planning target volume (PTV)received prescription dose was not less than 95%.The dosimetric parameters were assessed with dosevolume histogram (DVH)and mean dose in PTV and organ at risk(OAR).Results:The irradition volume and meandose of heart and V5 of the lung can be increased by VMAT.Better conformal index(CI)and homogeneity index (HI)of PTV can be achieved.The MU and the therapy time can be reduced by the VMAT.Conclusion:The design ofVMAT plan for breast cancer should

  14. Comparison of dosimetric standards of USA and France for HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douysset, Guilhem; Gouriou, Jean; Delaunay, Frank; DeWerd, Larry; Stump, Kurt; Micka, John

    2005-05-01

    A bilateral comparison of national dosimetric standards for high dose rate brachytherapy has been conducted between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. A complete overview of the methods that are currently in use to establish the two national standards is given. The comparison has been carried out using well-type transfer ionization chambers. Three units have been calibrated in both laboratories, and calibration coefficients have been compared. The discrepancies between the two measurements are within 0.3%.

  15. Patient feature based dosimetric Pareto front prediction in esophageal cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Zhao, Kuaike; Peng, Jiayuan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang, E-mail: jackhuwg@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jin, Xiance [The 1st Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China); Studenski, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami-Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of the dosimetric Pareto front (PF) prediction based on patient’s anatomic and dosimetric parameters for esophageal cancer patients. Methods: Eighty esophagus patients in the authors’ institution were enrolled in this study. A total of 2928 intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were obtained and used to generate PF for each patient. On average, each patient had 36.6 plans. The anatomic and dosimetric features were extracted from these plans. The mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose (MHD), spinal cord max dose, and PTV homogeneity index were recorded for each plan. Principal component analysis was used to extract overlap volume histogram (OVH) features between PTV and other organs at risk. The full dataset was separated into two parts; a training dataset and a validation dataset. The prediction outcomes were the MHD and MLD. The spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the anatomical features and dosimetric features. The stepwise multiple regression method was used to fit the PF. The cross validation method was used to evaluate the model. Results: With 1000 repetitions, the mean prediction error of the MHD was 469 cGy. The most correlated factor was the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between heart and PTV in Z-axis. The mean prediction error of the MLD was 284 cGy. The most correlated factors were the first principal components of the OVH between heart and PTV and the overlap between lung and PTV in Z-axis. Conclusions: It is feasible to use patients’ anatomic and dosimetric features to generate a predicted Pareto front. Additional samples and further studies are required improve the prediction model.

  16. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiahao, E-mail: mashenglin@medmail.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Liu, Jian [Department of Breast Surgery, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Shenglin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  18. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  19. Dosimetric comparison of four different external beams for breast irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook; Kwon, Oh Young

    2017-02-01

    An intensity-modulated radiation-therapy (IMRT)-based technique, blocked single iso-centric IMRT (IMRT), is compared to multi-center IMRT (MIRT) and other conventional techniques such as three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of breast cancer patients. Four different plans were devised and compared for 15 breast cancer patients, all of whom had early stage disease and had undergone breast conserving surgery. A total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was prescribed as the planning target volume in all treatment plans. The doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and opposite breast were compared using a dose-volume histogram. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and coverage index (CoVI) were evaluated and compared among the four treatment techniques. The lifetime attributable risk (LAR) associated with each of the four techniques from age at exposure of 30 to 100 years was measured for the organs at risk. We found that MIRT had a better CoVI (1.02 ± 0.13 and 1.01 ± 0.04, respectively) and IMRT had a better CI (0.88 ± 0.04, and 0.87 ± 0.02, respectively) compared to the other three modalities. All four techniques had similar HIs. Moreover, we found that IMRT and MIRT were less likely to cause radiation induced-pneumonitis, 3D-CRT had the lowest LAR, IMRT and MIRT had similar LARs and VMAT had the highest LAR. In study we found that compared to the VMAT, MIRT and IMRT provided adequate the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and reduced the risk of secondary cancers in most of the organs at risk (OARs), while 3D-CRT had the lowest secondary-cancer risks. Therefore, 3D-CRT is still a reasonable choice for whole breast RT except for patients with complex PTV shapes, in which cases IMRT and MIRT may provide better target coverage.

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of synthetic CT for magnetic resonance-only based radiotherapy planning of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hesheng; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Vahle, Thomas; Fenchel, Matthias; Das, Indra J

    2017-06-26

    Interest in MR-only treatment planning for radiation therapy is growing rapidly with the emergence of integrated MRI/linear accelerator technology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using synthetic CT images generated from conventional Dixon-based MRI scans for radiation treatment planning of lung cancer. Eleven patients who underwent whole-body PET/MR imaging following a PET/CT exam were randomly selected from an ongoing prospective IRB-approved study. Attenuation maps derived from the Dixon MR Images and atlas-based method was used to create CT data (synCT). Treatment planning for radiation treatment of lung cancer was optimized on the synCT and subsequently copied to the registered CT (planCT) for dose calculation. Planning target volumes (PTVs) with three sizes and four different locations in the lung were planned for irradiation. The dose-volume metrics comparison and 3D gamma analysis were performed to assess agreement between the synCT and CT calculated dose distributions. Mean differences between PTV doses on synCT and CT across all the plans were -0.1% ± 0.4%, 0.1% ± 0.5%, and 0.4% ± 0.5% for D95, D98 and D100, respectively. Difference in dose between the two datasets for organs at risk (OARs) had average differences of -0.14 ± 0.07 Gy, 0.0% ± 0.1%, and -0.1% ± 0.2% for maximum spinal cord, lung V20, and heart V40 respectively. In patient groups based on tumor size and location, no significant differences were observed in the PTV and OARs dose-volume metrics (p > 0.05), except for the maximum spinal-cord dose when the target volumes were located at the lung apex (p = 0.001). Gamma analysis revealed a pass rate of 99.3% ± 1.1% for 2%/2 mm (dose difference/distance to agreement) acceptance criteria in every plan. The synCT generated from Dixon-based MRI allows for dose calculation of comparable accuracy to the standard CT for lung cancer treatment planning. The dosimetric agreement

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis, E-mail: louis.archambault@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Goudreault, Julie [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, CSSS de Gatineau–Hôpital de Gatineau, 909 Boulevard La Vérendrye, Gatineau, Québec J8P 7H2 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  2. Dosimetric comparison of Helical Tomotherapy and Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for single brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linskey Mark E

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical Tomotherapy (HT integrates linear accelerator and computerized tomography (CT technology to deliver IMRT. Targets are localized (i.e. outlined as gross tumor volume [GTV] and planning target volume [PTV] on the planning kVCT study while daily MVCT is used for correction of patient's set-up and assessment of inter-fraction anatomy changes. Based on dosimetric comparisons, this study aims to find dosimetric equivalency between single fraction HT and Gamma Knife® stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS for the treatment of single brain metastasis. Methods The targeting MRI data set from the GKSRS were used for tomotherapy planning. Five patients with single brain metastasis treated with GKSRS were re-planned in the HT planning station using the same prescribed doses. There was no expansion of the GTV to create the PTV. Sub-volumes were created within the PTV and prescribed to the maximum dose seen in the GKSRS plans to imitate the hot spot normally seen in GKSRS. The PTV objective was set as a region at risk in HT planning using the same prescribed dose to the PTV periphery as seen in the corresponding GKSRS plan. The tumor volumes ranged from 437–1840 mm3. Results Conformality indices are inconsistent between HT and GKSRS. HT generally shows larger lower isodose line volumes, has longer treatment time than GKSRS and can treat a much larger lesion than GKSRS. Both HT and GKSRS single fraction dose-volume toxicity may be prohibitive in treating single or multiple lesions depending on the number and the sizes of the lesions. Conclusion Based on the trend for larger lower dose volumes and more constricted higher dose volumes in HT as compared to GKSRS, dosimetric equivalency was not reached between HT and GKSRS.

  3. SU-E-T-123: Dosimetric Comparison Between Portrait and Landscape Orientations in Radiochromic Film Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinohana, Y [University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Toita, T; Kasuya, G; Ariga, T; Heianna, J; Murayama, S [University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric properties of radiochromic films with different orientation. Methods: A sheet of EBT3 film was cut into eight pieces with the following sizes: 15×15 cm2 (one piece), 5x15 cm{sup 2} (two) and 4×5 cm{sup 2} (five). A set of two EBT3 sheets was used at each dose level. Two sets were used changing the delivered doses (1 and 2 Gy). The 5×15 cm{sup 2} pieces were rotated by 90 degrees in relation to each other, such that one had landscape orientation and the other had portrait orientation. All 5×15 cm2 pieces were irradiated with their long side aligned with the x-axis of the radiation field. The 15×15 cm{sup 2} pieces were irradiated rotated at 90 degrees to each other. Five pieces, (a total of ten from two sheets) were used to obtain a calibration curve. The irradiated films were scanned using an Epson ES-2200 scanner and were analyzed using ImageJ software. In this study, no correction was applied for the nonuniform scanner signal that is evident in the direction of the scanner lamp. Each film piece was scanned both in portrait and landscape orientations. Dosimetric comparisons of the beam profiles were made in terms of the film orientations (portrait and landscape) and scanner bed directions (perpendicular and parallel to the scanner movement). Results: In general, portrait orientation exhibited higher noise than landscape and was adversely affected to a great extent by the nonuniformity in the direction of the scanner lamp. A significant difference in the measured field widths between the perpendicular and parallel directions was found for both orientations. Conclusion: Without correction for the nonuniform scanner signal in the direction of the scanner lamp, a landscape orientation is preferable. A more detailed investigation is planned to evaluate quantitatively the effect of orientation on the dosimetric properties of a film.

  4. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul [Radiation Oncology Department, Shifa International Hospitals Ltd. Sector H-8/4 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation in teletherapy for male breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Nilmara Almeida; Crispim, Verginia Reis, E-mail: nguimaraes@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The present study evaluated dose distribution in the male breast using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The rate of male breast cancers has increased in recent years, due to the deficiency of preventive examinations (male mammography). Still, male breasts have smaller volumes than female breasts, thus, from the point of view of radiation protection, it is essential to monitor the doses received by the male breast, as well as those received by healthy and critical organs in order to evaluate radiotherapy performance and aid treatment planning. For this reason, the treatment of male breast cancer was simulated with the radiation by linear accelerator in Alderson Rando phantom and doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results of the treatment planning and measured were compared. (author)

  6. Clinical and dosimetric predictors of acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Son, Christina H.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with hematologic toxicity (HT) during chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Materials and methods We analyzed 120 rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The coxal (ilium, ischium, and pubis) bone marrow (BM), sacral BM, and femoral BM were contoured and dose-volume parameters were extracted. Associations between cell count trend and clinical predictors were tested using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Associations between clinical variables, Vx (percentage volume receiving x Gy), and cell count ratio at nadir were tested using linear regression models. Results Nadirs for white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and platelets (PLT) occurred in the second week of PRT and the fifth week for hemoglobin and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Using cell count ratio, patients treated with 3DCRT had a lower WBC ratio trend during PRT compared to patients treated with IMRT (p = 0.04), and patients ≥59 years of age had a lower hemoglobin ratio trend during PRT (p = 0.02). Using absolute cell count, patients treated with 3DCRT had lower ANC cell count trend (p = 0.03), and women had lower hemoglobin cell count trend compared to men (p = 0.03). On univariate analysis, use of 3DCRT was associated with a lower WBC ratio at nadir (p = 0.02). On multiple regression analysis using dosimetric variables, coxal BM V45 (p = 0.03) and sacral BM V45 (p = 0.03) were associated with a lower WBC and ANC ratio at nadir, respectively. Conclusions HT trends during PRT revealed distinct patterns: WBC, ANC, and PLT cell counts reach nadirs early and recover, while hemoglobin and ALC decline steadily. Patients who were treated with 3DCRT and older patients experienced lower cell count ratio trend during PRT. Dosimetric constraints using coxal BM V45 and sacral BM V45 can be considered. PMID

  7. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Stewart, James [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Valerie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xie, Jason [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moseley, Joanne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael, E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  8. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaojuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. Materials and methods 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time comparison. Results The SA-VMAT plans showed the superior target dose coverage, although the minimum/mean/maximum doses to the target were similar. For the total and contralateral lungs, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and mean lung dose (MLD were observed in the SA/PA-VMAT plans (p 20, V30 and MLD of the controlateral lung more notably, comparing to those parameters of the IMRT and SA-VMAT plans respectively. The delivered monitor units (MUs and treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT plans, especially PA-VMAT plans (for MUs: mean 458.3 vs. 439.2 vs. 435.7 MUs, p vs. 10.6 vs. 6.4 minutes, p Conclusions The SA-VMAT technique achieves highly conformal dose distribution to the target. Comparing to the IMRT plans, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and MLD were observed in the total and contralateral lungs in the VMAT plans, especially in the PA-VMAT plans. The SA/PA-VMAT plans also reduced treatment time with more efficient dose delivering. But the clinical benefit of the VMAT technique for locally advanced lung cancer needs further investigations.

  9. Lung SBRT: dosimetric and delivery comparison of RapidArc, TomoTherapy, and IMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyh, Ashleigh; Konski, Andre; Nalichowski, Adrian; Maier, Jordan; Lack, Danielle

    2013-07-08

    This study seeks to compare fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FF IMRT), RapidArc (RA), and helical tomotherapy (HT) to discover the optimal treatment modality to deliver SBRT to the peripheral lung. Eight patients with peripheral primary lung cancer were reviewed. Plans were prescribed a dose of 48 Gy and optimized similarly with heterogeneity corrections. Plan quality was assessed using conformality index (CI100%), homogeneity index (HI), the ratio of the 50% isodose volume to PTV (R50%) to assess intermediate dose spillage, and normal tissue constraints. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using treatment time and MUs. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed using gamma index (3% dose difference, 3 mm DTA, 10% threshold), and measured with a PTW ARRAY seven29 and OCTAVIUS phantom. CI100%, HI, and R50% were lowest for HT compared to seven-field coplanar IMRT and two-arc coplanar RA (p < 0.05). Normal tissue constraints were met for all modalities, except maximum rib dose due to close proximity to the PTV. RA reduced delivery time by 60% compared to HT, and 40% when compared to FF IMRT. RA also reduced the mean MUs by 77% when compared to HT, and by 22% compared to FF IMRT. All modalities can be delivered accurately, with mean QA pass rates over 97%. For peripheral lung SBRT treatments, HT performed better dosimetrically, reducing maximum rib dose, as well as improving dose conformity and uniformity. RA and FF IMRT plan quality was equivalent to HT for patients with minimal or no overlap of the PTV with the chest wall, but was reduced for patients with a larger overlap. RA and IMRT were equivalent, but the reduced treatment times of RA make it a more efficient modality.

  10. Dosimetric effects of multileaf collimator leaf width on intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Jin Man; Suh, Tae-Suk; Han, Youngyih; Ahn, Yong Chan; Choi, Doo Ho; Nam, Heerim; Park, Hee Chul

    2014-02-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width (2.5 vs. 5 mm) on dosimetric parameters and delivery efficiencies of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head and neck (H&N) cancers. The authors employed two types of mock phantoms: large-sized head and neck (LH&N) and small-sized C-shape (C-shape) phantoms. Step-and-shoot IMRT (S&S_IMRT) and VMAT treatment plans were designed with 2.5- and 5.0-mm MLC for both C-shape and LH&N phantoms. Their dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planning target volume (PTV), the dose to organs at risk (OARs), and the dose-spillage volume. To analyze the effects of the field and arc numbers, 9-field IMRT (9F-IMRT) and 13-field IMRT (13F-IMRT) plans were established for S&S_IMRT. For VMAT, single arc (VMAT1) and double arc (VMAT2) plans were established. For all plans, dosimetric verification was performed using the phantom to examine the relationship between dosimetric errors and the two leaf widths. Delivery efficiency of the two MLCs was compared in terms of beam delivery times, monitor units (MUs) per fraction, and the number of segments for each plan. 2.5-mm MLC showed better dosimetric characteristics in S&S_IMRT and VMAT for C-shape, providing better CI for PTV and lower spinal cord dose and high and intermediate dose-spillage volume as compared with the 5-mm MLC (p 0.05). Further, beam delivery efficiency was not observed to be significantly associated with leaf width for either C-shape or LH&N. However, MUs per fraction were significantly reduced for the 2.5-mm MLC for the LH&N. In dosimetric error analysis, absolute dose evaluations had errors of less than 3%, while the Gamma passing rate was greater than 95% according to the 3%/3 mm criteria. There were no significant differences in dosimetric error between the 2.5- and 5-mm MLCs. As compared with MLC of 5-mm leaf

  11. Experimental dosimetric comparison of 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O scanned ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-05-01

    At the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, scanned helium and oxygen ion beams are available in addition to the clinically used protons and carbon ions for physical and biological experiments. In this work, a study of the basic dosimetric features of the different ions is performed in the entire therapeutic energy range. Depth dose distributions are investigated for pencil-like beam irradiation, with and without a modulating ripple filter, focusing on the extraction of key Bragg curve parameters, such as the range, the peak-width and the distal 80%-20% fall-off. Pencil-beam lateral profiles are measured at different depths in water, and parameterized with multiple Gaussian functions. A more complex situation of an extended treatment field is analyzed through a physically optimized spread-out Bragg peak, delivered with beam scanning. The experimental results of this physical beam characterization indicate that helium ions could afford a more conformal treatment and in turn, increased tumor control. This is mainly due to a smaller lateral scattering than with protons, leading to better lateral and distal fall-off, as well as a lower fragmentation tail compared to carbon and oxygen ions. Moreover, the dosimetric dataset can be used directly for comparison with results from analytical dose engines or Monte Carlo codes. Specifically, it was used at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to generate a new input database for a research analytical treatment planning system, as well as for validation of a general purpose Monte Carlo program, in order to lay the groundwork for biological experiments and further patient planning studies.

  12. Dose escalation in permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer: dosimetric and biological considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1595 (United States); Wang, Jian Z [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1595 (United States); Stewart, Robert D [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1338 (United States); Di Biase, Steven J [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1595 (United States)

    2003-09-07

    . For example, increasing the PB prescribed dose from 145 to 180 Gy increases EUD for the rectum by only 3%. Our studies indicate that the dose to urethra can be kept within 100-120% of the prescription dose for all the dose levels studied. In conclusion, dose escalation in permanent implant for localized prostate cancer may be advantageous. It is dosimetrically possible to increase dose to prostate without a substantial increase in the dose to the rectum and urethra. Based on the results of our studies, a prospective dose escalation trial for prostate permanent implants has been initiated at our institution.

  13. Forward-planned intensity modulated radiation therapy using a cobalt source: A dosimetric study in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Cilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis evaluates the feasibility and dosimetric results of a simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment using a cobalt-therapy unit for post-operative breast cancer. Fourteen patients were included. Three plans per patient were produced by a cobalt-60 source: A standard plan with two wedged tangential beams, a standard tangential plan optimized without the use of wedges and a plan based on the forward-planned "field-in-field" IMRT technique (Co-FinF where the dose on each of the two tangential beams was split into two different segments and the two segments weight was determined with an iterative process. For comparison purposes, a 6-MV photon standard wedged tangential treatment plan was generated. D mean , D 98% , D 2% , V 95% , V 107%, homogeneity, and conformity indices were chosen as parameters for comparison. Co-FinF technique improved the planning target volume dose homogeneity compared to other cobalt-based techniques and reduced maximum doses (D 2% and high-dose volume (V 110% . Moreover, it showed a better lung and heart dose sparing with respect to the standard approach. The higher dose homogeneity may encourage the adoption of accelerated-hypofractionated treatments also with the cobalt sources. This approach can promote the spread of breast conservative treatment in developing countries.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiosurgery with dynamic conformal arc radiosurgery for small cranial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Calvo-Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We have shown that IMRS provides the dosimetric advantages compared with DCARS. Based on the dosimetric findings in this study, fixed gantry IMRS technique can be adopted as a standard procedure for cranial SRS when micro-MLC technology is not available on the linear accelerator.

  15. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  16. Dosimetric comparison between conventional and conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix: Are we treating the right volumes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirup Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Conventional portals, based on bony anatomy, for external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer have been repeatedly demonstrated as inadequate. Conversely, with image-based conformal radiotherapy, better target coverage may be offset by the greater toxicities and poorer compliance associated with treating larger volumes. This study was meant to dosimetrically compare conformal and conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Five patients of carcinoma cervix underwent planning CT scan with IV contrast and targets, and organs at risk (OAR were contoured. Two sets of plans-conventional and conformal were generated for each patient. Field sizes were recorded, and dose volume histograms of both sets of plans were generated and compared on the basis of target coverage and OAR sparing. Results: Target coverage was significantly improved with conformal plans though field sizes required were significantly larger. On the other hand, dose homogeneity was not significantly improved. Doses to the OARs (rectum, urinary bladder, and small bowel were not significantly different across the 2 arms. Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy gives significantly better target coverage, which may translate into better local control and survival. On the other hand, it also requires significantly larger field sizes though doses to the OARs are not significantly increased.

  17. Dosimetric comparison between jaw tracking and static jaw techniques in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhongsu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yibao; Zhang, Yunjun; Cheng, Jinsheng; Su, Xu

    2015-01-27

    To compare the dosimetric differences between jaw tracking technique (JTT) and static jaw technique (SJT) in dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (d-IMRT) and assess the potential advantages of jaw tracking technique. Two techniques, jaw tracking and static jaw, were used respectively to develop the d-IMRT plans for 28 cancer patients with various lesion sites: head and neck, lungs, esophageal, abdominal, prostate, rectal and cervical. The dose volume histograms (DVH) and selected dosimetric indexes for the whole body and for organs at risk (OARs) were compared. A two dimensional ionization chamber Array Seven29 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) and OCTAVIUS Octagonal phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used to verify all the plans. For all patients, the treatment plans using both techniques met the clinical requirements. The V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy at least, respectively), mean dose (Dmean) for the whole body and V5, V10, V20, Dmean for lungs in the JTT d-IMRT plans were significantly less than the corresponding values of the SJT d-IMRT plans (p < 0.001). The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited lower maximum dose (Dmax) to the lens, eyes, brainstem, spinal cord, and right optic nerve, the doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 2.2% to 28.6%. The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited significantly lower Dmean to various OARs (all p values < 0.05), the mean doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 1.1% to 31.0%, and the value reductions depend on the volume and the location of the OARs. The γ evaluation method showed an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement for all techniques with criteria of 3%/3 mm. Both jaw tracking and static jaw d-IMRT plans can achieve comparable target dose coverage. JTT displays superior OARs sparing than SJT plans. These results are of clinical importance, especially for the patients with large and complex targets but close to some highly radio-sensitive organs to spare, and for patients

  18. Comparison and utilization of two dosimetric systems for e-beam industrial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Marcio Z., E-mail: mzamboti@aceletron.com.b [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia Tecnica e Operacoes; Sousa, Fernando N.C. de; Boente, Otavio C., E-mail: fernando.nuno@aceletron.com.b, E-mail: otavio@aceletron.com.b [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Desenvolvimento de Produtos; Sousa, Nuno R.A., E-mail: engenheiro.nuno.sousa@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2009-07-01

    The utilization of electron linear accelerators (LINAC's) for industrial irradiation of several products like turf, sterilization of medical products, cosmetics, polymers, food, and gems, can only be successful if a reliable dosimetric system is chosen. There are several different available technologies and two were selected for this study. The first one uses alanine dosimeters which can be read with electron spin resonance spectrometers (ESR); the second uses B3 radiochromic dosimeters which are read with a spectrophotometer. This study presents a comparison of both technologies in the dose range of 1 to 80 kGy, taking into account initial cost, precision, reading time, calibration, among others, for a typical 24 hour production run, and for normal operational routines and tests. It is shown that each system has its own advantages and disadvantages, and that both can be used in an e-beam installation. However, for industrial applications it is necessary to optimize the process, so it is presented which dosimeter is used for each routine application. (author)

  19. A dosimetric evaluation of VMAT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrow, Caitlin E; Wang, Iris Z; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Fourteen patients treated with 3D CRT with varying tumor locations, tumor sizes, and dose fractionation schemes were chosen for study. The prescription doses were 48 Gy in 4 fractions, 52.5 Gy in 5 fractions, 57.5 Gy in 5 fractions, and 60 Gy in 3 fractions for 2, 5, 1, and 6 patients, respectively. VMAT treatment plans with a mix of two to three full and partial noncoplanar arcs with 5°-25° separations were retrospectively generated using Eclipse version 10.0. The 3D CRT and VMAT plans were then evaluated by comparing their target dose, critical structure dose, high dose spillage, and low dose spillage as defined according to RTOG 0813 and RTOG 0236 protocols. In the most dosimetrically improved case, VMAT was able to decrease the dose from 17.35 Gy to 1.54 Gy to the heart. The D(2cm) decreased in 11 of 14 cases when using VMAT. The three that worsened were still within the acceptance criteria. Of the 14 3D CRT plans, seven had a D(2cm) minor deviation, while only one of the 14 VMAT plans had a D(2cm) minor deviation. The R(50%) improved in 13 of the 14 VMAT cases. The one case that worsened was still within the acceptance criteria of the RTOG protocol. Of the 14 3D CRT plans, seven had an R(50%) deviation. Only one of the 14 VMAT plans had an R(50%) deviation, but it was still improved compared to the 3D CRT plan. In this cohort of patients, no evident dosimetric compromises resulted from planning SBRT treatments with VMAT relative to the 3D CRT treatment plans actually used in their treatment.

  20. Determination of dosimetric parameters for shielded 153Gd source in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Ghatei, Najmeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Meigooni, Ali S.; Shahraini, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) is a recently developed method for treatment of prostate cancer. In the present study TG-43 dosimetric parameters of a 153Gd source were obtained for use in I-RSBT. Materials and methods A 153Gd source located inside a needle including a Pt shield and an aluminum window was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dosimetric parameters of this source model, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function, with and without the shields were calculated according to the TG-43 report. Results The air kerma strength was found to be 6.71 U for the non-shielded source with 1 GBq activity. This value was found to be 0.04 U and 6.19 U for the Pt shield and Al window cases, respectively. Dose rate constant for the non-shielded source was found to be 1.20 cGy/(hU). However, for a shielded source with Pt and aluminum window, dose rate constants were found to be 0.07 cGy/(hU) and 0.96 cGy/(hU), on the shielded and window sides, respectively. The values of radial dose function and anisotropy function were tabulated for these sources. Additionally, isodose curves were drawn for sources with and without shield, in order to evaluate the effect of shield on dose distribution. Conclusions Existence of the Pt shield may greatly reduce the dose to organs at risk and normal tissues which are located toward the shielded side. The calculated air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data for the 153Gd source for the non-shielded and the shielded sources can be used in the treatment planning system (TPS). PMID:28265239

  1. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abdul Haneefa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB and collapsed cone convolution (CCC algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3 are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV. Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters and constraints except the beam energy. For each patient’s plan of high energy photons, one set of photoneutron measurements using solid state neutron track detector (SSNTD was taken for this study. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in the rectum is 18.55±2.8, 14.58±2.1, and 16.77±4.7 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in bladder is 16.54±2.1, 17.42±2.1, and 16.94±41.9 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mixed fields neutron contribution at the beam entrance surface is 45.62% less than at 15 MV photon beam. Our result shows that, with negligible neutron contributions, mixed field IMRT has considerable dosimetric advantage.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of interstitial brachytherapy with multi-channel vaginal cylinder plans in patients with vaginal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lucas C; Paudel, Moti; Wronski, Matt; Ravi, Ananth; Barbera, Lisa; Leung, Eric

    2017-05-18

    To evaluate the dosimetric performance of multi-channel vaginal cylinder (MCVC) against interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for the treatment of vaginal tumors. Vaginal tumors with extension of > 0.5 cm and ≤ 2 cm from the lateral vaginal wall and/or ≤ 1 cm in height above the vaginal vault were retrospectively selected from a ISBT registry trial database. The selected patients were treated with ISBT and targets included the intermediate (IRCTV) or high-risk (HRCTV) clinical target volumes. For technique comparison, a 35 mm MCVC was registered with the interstitial intra-vaginal cylinder. Bladder and rectum contours were transferred from the ISBT to the MCVC-BT plans. Vaginal mucosa was achieved by 3 mm uniform expansion from cylinder surface. Both the ISBT and MCVC-BT plans were optimized using the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing optimization algorithm. After normalizing target D90 to 700 cGy, dose to organs at risk were measured and compared between ISBT and MCVC plans. Six interstitial patient plans met the inclusion criteria for this study. Four patients had vaginal primaries and two recurrent cancers in the vagina. Lower doses to bladder and rectum were seen with ISBT plans. In half of the MCVC plans, the rectal dose met the recommended constraints. For plans in which the rectal constraint was not met, the target volumes were abutting the rectum and had a cranial-caudal length ≥ 5 cm. Dose to vaginal mucosa was lower in ISBT plans directed to the HRCTVs, although no difference was seen in circumferential IRCTVs. Overall, ISBT results in decreased dose to OARs as compared to MCVC. However, MCVC BT results in acceptable doses to OARs with possible improvement in vaginal doses for circumferential targets. Careful consideration to tumor geometry and location may help guide optimal techniques in vaginal tumor brachytherapy.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of multilumen intracavitary balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G

    2014-01-06

    The objective of this work is to evaluate dosimetric impact of multilumen balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer. Highly asymmetrical dose distribution was generated for patients A and B, depending upon applicator proximity to skin and rib. Both skin and rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for A; only rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for B. Thirty-five rotation scenarios were simulated for each patient by rotating outer lumens every 10° over ± 180° range with respect to central lumen using mathematically calculated rotational matrix. Thirty-five rotated plans were compared with three plans: 1) original multidwell multilumen (MDML) plan, 2) multidwell single-lumen (MDSL) plan, and 3) single-dwell single-lumen (SDSL) plan. For plan comparison, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) coverage (dose to 95% and 90% volume of PTV_EVAL) (D95 and D90), skin and rib maximal dose (Dmax), and normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) of prescribed dose (PD) were evaluated. Dose variation due to device rotation ranged from -5.6% to 0.8% (A) and -6.5% to 0.2% (B) for PTV_EVAL D95; -5.2% to 0.4% (A) and -4.1% to 0.7% (B) for PTV_EVAL D90; -2.0 to 18.4% (A) and -7.8 to 17.5% (B) for skin Dmax; -11.1 to 22.8% (A) and -4.7 to 55.1% (B) of PD for rib Dmax, respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 and V200 variation was < 1.0 cc, except for -0.1 to 2.5cc (B) of V200. Furthermore, 30° device rotation increased rib Dmax over 145% of PD: 152.9% (A) by clockwise 30° rotation and 152.5% (B) by counterclockwise 30° rotation. For a highly asymmetric dose distribution, device rotation can outweigh the potential benefit of improved dose shaping capability afforded by multilumen and make dosimetric data worse than single-lumen plans unless it is properly corrected.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of tandem and Ovoids vs. tandem and ring for intracavitary gynecologic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Daphne; Menhel, Janna; Rabin, Tanya; Pfeffer, M Raphael; Symon, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated dosimetric differences in tandem and ovoid (TO) and tandem and ring (TR) gynecologic brachytherapy applicators. Seventeen patients with cervical cancer (Stages II-IV) receiving 3 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications (both TO and TR) were studied. Patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scans with contrast in bladder, and were prescribed 8 Gy to ICRU points A, with additional optimization goals of maintaining the pear-shaped dose distribution and minimizing bladder and rectum doses. Bladder and rectum point doses, mean, and maximum doses were calculated. Total treatment time and volumes treated to 95%, 85%, 50%, and 20% or the prescription dose were compared. There were no significant differences between TO and TR applicators in doses to prescription points or critical organs. However, there were significant differences (p < 0.001) between the applicators in treated volumes and total treatment time. The TO treated larger volumes over a longer time. Within each patient, when the applicators were compared, treated volumes were also found to be significantly different (p < 0.01, chi(2)). Our results demonstrate that the 2 applicators, while delivering the prescribed dose to points A and keeping critical organ doses below tolerance, treat significantly different volumes. It is unclear if this difference is clinically meaningful. TO applicators may be treating surrounding healthy tissue unnecessarily, or TR applicators may be underdosing tumor tissue. Further investigation with appropriate imaging modalities is required for accurate delineation of target volumes. Clearly, the TO and TR are not identical, and should not be used interchangeably without further study.

  5. Investigating dosimetric effect of rotational setup errors in IMPT planning of synchronous bilateral lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of rotational setup errors on the synchronous bi-lateral lung cancer plans generated by the intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT technique.Methods: The original IMPT plans were generated in for the left planning target volume (PTV and right PTV of the left lung and right lung, respectively. Each plan was generated using two beams (lateral and posterior-anterior with an isocenter placed at the center of the corresponding PTV. The IMPT plans were optimized for a total dose of 74 Gy[RBE] prescribed to each PTV with 2 Gy(RBE per fraction. Original plans were recalculated by introducing simulated rotational errors. For each PTV, 18 rotational plans (±1⁰, ±2⁰, and ±3⁰ for each of the yaw, roll, and pitch rotations were generated. Results: Rotational errors caused the reduction in the clinical target volume (CTV and PTV coverage in new rotational IMPT plans when compared to the original IMPT lung plans. The CTV D99 was reduced by up to 13.3%, 9.1%, and 5.9% for the yaw (+3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰, respectively. The PTV D95 was reduced by up to 8.7%, 7.3%, and 4.6% for the yaw (+3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰, respectively. The PTV V100 showed the highest deviation with a reduction of dose coverage by up to 40.1%, 31.8%, and 33.9% for the yaw (-3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰ respectively. Conclusion: The rotational setup errors with magnitude of ≥2⁰ can produce a significant loss of dose coverage to the target volume in the IMPT of a synchronous bi-lateral lung cancer. The yaw had the most severe impact on the dosimetric results when compared to other two rotational errors (roll and pitch.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of 4 MeV and 6 MeV electron beams for total skin irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung In; Park, So Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Ye, Sung Joon; Kim, Il Han [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) was developed by Stanford University in the 1950s and introduced for the treatment of mycosis fungoides, the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma which generally affects the skin. In this study, dosimetric aspects of TSEI consisting of a 4 MeV beam with no spoiler were investigated in comparison to a nominal 6 MeV beam applications was evaluated. The suggested 4 MeV beam for TSEI could be applied to shallow depth skin diseases and to electron boost as second treatment course.

  7. Effects of Dosimetrically Guided I-131 Therapy on Hematopoiesis in Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikas, Athanasios; Schneider, Mark; Desale, Sameer; Atkins, Frank; Mete, Mihriye; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Van Nostrand, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of dosimetrically-guided I-131 treatment on hematopoiesis. Statistically significant decreases in CBC parameters following a specific time-pattern were shown.

  8. Dosimetric Comparison Between VMAT and IMRT for Different Tumor Volume and Different Lesion Length of E-sophageal Cancer%VMAT与IMRT在不同瘤体体积和瘤体长度食管癌中的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑜; 刘丽虹; 韩春; 王澜; 田华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT ) and static intensity modulated radiotherapy ( IMRT) for different tumor volume and different lesion length of esophageal cancer. Meth-ods The Elekta Oncentra4. 1 Planning System was adopted to design both VMAT and IMRT plans for fifty patients who were diag-nosed with thoracic esophageal cancer. All treatment plans of the 50 cases were evaluated using the dose-volume histogram parame-ters of PTV and the organs at risk. The monitor units (MUs) were Also examined. Results ①For GTV volume55cm 3 group. ②For lesion length9cm group,VMAT plan achieved lower D90 and V100, whereas HI and CI were not significantly different.③For GTV vol-ume9cm group, VMAT plan resulted in a slightly lower lung V10 and higher lung V30. For GTV volume>55cm 3 group,VMAT plan resulted in a lower lung V10. For 5~9cm group,sparing of lungs showed no statistically significant differences between the two techniques.④The Dmean of heart in VMAT plan was not statistically different in comparison with IMRT plan for GTV volume>55cm 3 group and lesion length>9cm group, but higher than in IMRT for GTV volume55cm 3 group, and by an average of 16. 1% and 16. 0% in the 5~9cm group and >9cm group. However, VMAT plan provided an aver-age of 10. 4% and 14. 4% more monitor units than IMRT plan in the volume55cm3组, VMAT PTVV100低于IMRT。②GTV长度9cm组,VMAT D90、V100低于IMRT,HI和CI无明显差异。③体积9cm组,VMAT肺V10降低,V30增高;体积>55cm 3组,VMAT肺V10低于IMRT;长度5~9cm组,两种计划差异无统计学意义。④GTV体积55cm 3和长度>9cm组两种计划心脏受量相似。脊髓Dmax两种计划比较差异无统计学意义。⑤在机器调数( MU)方面GTV体积15~55cm 3和>55cm 3组及GTV长度5~9cm和>9cm组,VMAT的MU较IMRT分别减少11.3%、18.1%、16.1%和16.0%。而体积<15cm3和长度<5cm组,VMAT的MU则分别增加了10.4%和14.4%。结论在

  9. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krema, Hatem, E-mail: htmkrm19@yahoo.com [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weisbrod, Daniel [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J.; Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plans were planned for 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT and IMRT plans were compared using the planning target volume (PTV dose and doses to the other organs at risk (OARs. Results: For the PTV, comparable minimum, mean, maximum, median, and modal dose as well equivalent sphere diameter of the structure (Equis were observed between VMAT and IMRT plans and found that these values were significantly equal in both techniques. The right lung mean and modal doses were considerably higher in VMAT plans while maximum value was considerably lower when compared with IMRT plans. The left lung mean and modal doses were higher with VMAT while maximum doses were higher in IMRT plans. The mean dose to the heart and maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT. The mean dose to the body was higher in VMAT plans while the maximum dose was higher in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Four field tangential IMRT delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in our breast cancer treatment study. The IMRT plans typically had more favourable dose characteristics to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and body dose when compared with VMAT. The only minor advantage of VMAT for breast cases was slightly better PTV coverage.

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  12. Matched-pair analysis and dosimetric variations of two types of software for interstitial permanent brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi, E-mail: hishiyam@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuji [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Satoh, Takefumi [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanji, Susumu [Department of Urology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Uemae, Mineko [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Baba, Shiro [Department of Urology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether identical dosimetric results could be achieved using different planning software for permanent interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Data from 492 patients treated with brachytherapy were used for matched-pair analysis. Interplant and Variseed were used as software for ultrasound-based treatment planning. Institution, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, prostate volume, and source strength were used for factors to match the 2 groups. The study population comprised of 126 patients with treatment planning using Interplant software and 127 matched patients using Variseed software. Dosimetric results were compared between the 2 groups. The Variseed group showed significantly higher values for dose covering 90% of prostate volume (pD90), prostate volume covered by 150% of prescription dose (pV150), and dose covering 30% of the urethra (uD30) compared with the Interplant group. Our results showed that use of different software could lead to different dosimetric results, which might affect the clinical outcomes.

  13. A dosimetric comparison of whole-lung treatment techniques in the pediatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosarge, Christina L., E-mail: cbosarge@umail.iu.edu; Ewing, Marvene M.; DesRosiers, Colleen M.; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.

    2016-07-01

    To demonstrate the dosimetric advantages and disadvantages of standard anteroposterior-posteroanterior (S-AP/PA{sub AAA}), inverse-planned AP/PA (IP-AP/PA) and volumetry-modulated arc (VMAT) radiotherapies in the treatment of children undergoing whole-lung irradiation. Each technique was evaluated by means of target coverage and normal tissue sparing, including data regarding low doses. A historical approach with and without tissue heterogeneity corrections is also demonstrated. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 children scanned from the neck to the reproductive organs were used. For each scan, 6 plans were created: (1) S-AP/PA{sub AAA} using the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), (2) IP-AP/PA, (3) VMAT, (4) S-AP/PA{sub NONE} without heterogeneity corrections, (5) S-AP/PA{sub PB} using the Pencil-Beam algorithm and enforcing monitor units from technique 4, and (6) S-AP/PA{sub AAA[FM]} using AAA and forcing fixed monitor units. The first 3 plans compare modern methods and were evaluated based on target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Body maximum and lower body doses (50% and 30%) were also analyzed. Plans 4 to 6 provide a historic view on the progression of heterogeneity algorithms and elucidate what was actually delivered in the past. Averages of each comparison parameter were calculated for all techniques. The S-AP/PA{sub AAA} technique resulted in superior target coverage but had the highest maximum dose to every normal tissue structure. The IP-AP/PA technique provided the lowest dose to the esophagus, stomach, and lower body doses. VMAT excelled at body maximum dose and maximum doses to the heart, spine, and spleen, but resulted in the highest dose in the 30% body range. It was, however, superior to the S-AP/PA{sub AAA} approach in the 50% range. Each approach has strengths and weaknesses thus associated. Techniques may be selected on a case-by-case basis and by physician preference of target coverage vs normal tissue sparing.

  14. Comparison of therapeutic dosimetric data from passively scattered proton and photon craniospinal irradiations for medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell Rebecca M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many decades, the standard of care radiotherapy regimen for medulloblastoma has been photon (megavoltage x-rays craniospinal irradiation (CSI. The late effects associated with CSI are well-documented in the literature and are in-part attributed to unwanted dose to healthy tissue. Recently, there is growing interest in using proton therapy for CSI in pediatric and adolescent patients to reduce this undesirable dose. Previous comparisons of dose to target and non-target organs from conventional photon CSI and passively scattered proton CSI have been limited to small populations (n ≤ 3 and have not considered the use of age-dependent target volumes in proton CSI. Methods Standard of care treatment plans were developed for both photon and proton CSI for 18 patients. This cohort included both male and female medulloblastoma patients whose ages, heights, and weights spanned a clinically relevant and representative spectrum (age 2–16, BMI 16.4–37.9 kg/m2. Differences in plans were evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank tests for various dosimetric parameters for the target volumes and normal tissue. Results Proton CSI improved normal tissue sparing while also providing more homogeneous target coverage than photon CSI for patients across a wide age and BMI spectrum. Of the 24 parameters (V5, V10, V15, and V20 in the esophagus, heart, liver, thyroid, kidneys, and lungs Wilcoxon signed rank test results indicated 20 were significantly higher for photon CSI compared to proton CSI (p ≤ 0.05 . Specifically, V15 and V20 in all six organs and V5, V10 in the esophagus, heart, liver, and thyroid were significantly higher with photon CSI. Conclusions Our patient cohort is the largest, to date, in which CSI with proton and photon therapies have been compared. This work adds to the body of literature that proton CSI reduces dose to normal tissue compared to photon CSI for pediatric patients who are at substantial risk for

  15. Dosimetric predictors of radiation-induced pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Ichiro; Watanabe, Shigenobu [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa-prefecture (Japan); Sakamaki, Kentaro [Yokohama City University, Department of Biostatistics, Yokohama City University, Yokohama (Japan); Ogino, Yuka [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Systems and Control Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Kunisaki, Chikara [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kimura, Kazuo [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the dose-volume parameters of the pericardium and heart in order to reduce the risk of radiation-induced pericardial effusion (PE) and symptomatic PE (SPE) in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. In 86 of 303 esophageal cancer patients, follow-up CT was obtained at least 24 months after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Correlations between clinical factors, including risk factors for cardiac disease, dosimetric factors, and the incidence of PE and SPE after radiotherapy were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Significant dosimetric factors with the highest hazard ratios were investigated using zones separated according to their distance from esophagus. PE developed in 49 patients. Univariate analysis showed the mean heart dose, heart V{sub 5}-V{sub 55}, mean pericardium dose, and pericardium V{sub 5}-V{sub 50} to all significantly affect the incidence of PE. Additionally, body surface area was correlated with the incidence of PE in multivariate analysis. Grade 3 and 4 SPE developed in 5 patients. The pericardium V{sub 50} and pericardium D{sub 10} significantly affected the incidence of SPE. The pericardium V{sub 50} in patients with SPE ranged from 17.1 to 21.7%. Factors affecting the incidence of SPE were the V{sub 50} of the pericardium zones within 3 cm and 4 cm of the esophagus. A wide range of radiation doses to the heart and pericardium were related to the incidence of PE. A pericardium V{sub 50} ≤ 17% is important to avoid symptomatic PE in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Dosis-Volumen-Parameter fuer Perikard und Herz zur Risikoreduzierung eines strahleninduzierten Perikardergusses (PE) und eines symptomatischen PE (SPE) bei mit kombinierter Strahlenchemotherapie behandelten Speiseroehrenkrebspatienten. Bei 86 von 303 Speiseroehrenkrebspatienten wurde mindestens 24 Monate nach der Strahlenchemotherapie ein Kontroll

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy and tomotherapy in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma after curative surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the dosimetric differences between IMRT, VMAT and TOMO planning for gastric cancer patients.Methods: A total of 14 patients with gastric cancer after curative surgery were prospectively enrolled. In each case, IMRT, VMAT and TOMO plans were created (45Gy/25f). Dose distributions and dose–volume histograms for PTV and normal tissue were compared. A paired t test or signed-rank test was applied to compare the averages between techniques.Results:Comparison of the PTV revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope in three plans. However, significantly higher conformity index (CI) and lower V20 of bone marrow were observed in TOMO plan. Moreover, IMRT and TOMO techniques both showed signiifcant reduced mean dose of the bilateral lungs compared to the VMAT. Not much difference was found in parameters of the kidney, intestine, spine, liver and heart.Conclusion:The IMRT, VMAT and TOMO plans all achieved favorable target coverage and dose sparing of the critical organs in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. However, the TOMO technique displayed the best target dose conformity and superior sparing of the bone marrow and lungs.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  18. SU-E-T-293: Dosimetric Analysis of Microscopic Disease in SBRT for Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, R; Tian, L; Ge, H [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, henan (China); Zhang, Y; Ren, L; Gao, R; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetry of microscopic disease (MD) region of lung cancer in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: For simplicity, we assume organ moves along one dimension. The probability distribution function of tumor position was calculated according to the breathing cycle. The dose to the MD region was obtained through accumulating the treatment planning system calculated doses at different positions in a breathing cycle. A phantom experiment was then conducted to validate the calculated results using a motion phantom (The CIRS ‘Dynamic’ Thorax Phantom). The simulated breathing pattern used a cos4(x) curve with an amplitude of 10mm. A 3-D conformal 7-field plan with 6X energy was created and the dose was calculated in the average intensity projection (AIP) simulation CT images. Both films (EBT2) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors were inserted in the target of the phantom to measure the dose during radiation delivery (Varian Truebeam) and results were compared to planning dose parameters. Results: The Gamma analysis (3%/3mm) between measured dose using EBT2 film and calculated dose using AIP was 80.5%, indicating substantial dosimetric differences. While the Gamma analysis (3%/3mm) between measured dose using EBT2 and accumulated dose using 4D-CT was 98.9%, indicating the necessity of dose accumulation using 4D-CT. The measured doses using OSL and theoretically calculated doses using probability distribution function at the corresponding position were comparable. Conclusion: Use of static dose calculation in the treatment planning system could substantially underestimate the actually delivered dose in the MD region for a moving target. Funding Supported by NSFC, No.81372436.

  19. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Emanuela

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc® (RA technology. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC is presented as well. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC, presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. Conclusion RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects.

  20. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org; D' Agostino, Harry [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Pham, Dat C. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Bajwa, Abubakr A. [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  1. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and dynamic conformal arc therapy in stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chao, Pei-Ju; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Yu-Je; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sung, Chieh-Cheng; Su, Te-Jen; Lian, Shi-Long; Fang, Fu-Min

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) performed using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) with the Novalis system and helical TomoTherapy (HT) were compared using plan quality indices. The HT plans were created for 10 consecutive patients with VS previously treated with SRS using the Novalis system. The dosimetric indices used to compare the techniques included the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planned target volume (PTV), the comprehensive quality index (CQI) for nine organs at risk (OARs), gradient score index (GSI) for the dose drop-off outside the PTV, and plan quality index (PQI), which was verified using the plan quality discerning power (PQDP) to incorporate 3 plan indices, to evaluate the rival plans. The PTV ranged from 0.27-19.99 cm(3) (median 3.39 cm(3)), with minimum required PTV prescribed doses of 10-16 Gy (median 12 Gy). Both systems satisfied the minimum required PTV prescription doses. HT conformed better to the PTV (CI: 1.51 ± 0.23 vs. 1.94 ± 0.34; p < 0.01), but had a worse drop-off outside the PTV (GSI: 40.3 ± 10.9 vs. 64.9 ± 13.6; p < 0.01) compared with DCAT. No significant difference in PTV homogeneity was observed (HI: 1.08 ± 0.03 vs. 1.09 ± 0.02; p = 0.20). HT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 4 OARs and significant lower mean dose in 1 OAR; by contrast, DCAT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 1 OAR and significant lower mean dose in 2 OARs, with the CQI of the 9 OARs = 0.92 ± 0.45. Plan analysis using PQI (HT 0.37 ± 0.12 vs. DCAT 0.65 ± 0.08; p < 0.01), and verified using the PQDP, confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT. However, the HT system had a longer beam-on time (33.2 ± 7.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 min; p < 0.01) and consumed more monitor units (16772 ± 3803 vs. 1776 ± 356.3; p < 0.01). HT had a better dose conformity and similar dose homogeneity but worse dose gradient than DCAT. Plan analysis confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT

  2. Dosimetric Comparison of Combined Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Proton Therapy Versus IMRT Alone for Pelvic and Para-Aortic Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman Milby, Abigail [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Both, Stefan, E-mail: both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ingram, Mark; Lin, Lilie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to the para-aortic (PA) nodal region in women with locally advanced gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The CT treatment planning scans of 10 consecutive patients treated with IMRT to the pelvis and PA nodes were identified. The clinical target volume was defined by the primary tumor for patients with cervical cancer and by the vagina and paravaginal tissues for patients with endometrial cancer, in addition to the regional lymph nodes. The IMRT, PSPT, and IMPT plans were generated using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System and were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. Two groups of treatment plans including proton radiotherapy were created: IMRT to pelvic nodes with PSPT to PA nodes (PSPT/IMRT), and IMRT to pelvic nodes with IMPT to PA nodes (IMPT/IMRT). The IMRT and proton RT plans were optimized to deliver 50.4 Gy or Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE)), respectively. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed for all of the organs at risk. The paired t test was used for all statistical comparison. Results: The small-bowel V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, andV{sub 40} were reduced in PSPT/IMRT by 11%, 18%, 27%, and 43%, respectively (p < 0.01). Treatment with IMPT/IMRT demonstrated a 32% decrease in the small-bowel V{sub 20}. Treatment with PSPT/IMRT showed statistically significant reductions in the body V{sub 5-20}; IMPT/IMRT showed reductions in the body V{sub 5-15}. The dose received by half of both kidneys was reduced by PSPT/IMRT and by IMPT/IMRT. All plans maintained excellent coverage of the planning target volume. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT alone, PSPT/IMRT and IMPT/IMRT had a statistically significant decrease in dose to the small and large bowel and kidneys, while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage. Further studies should be done to

  3. Clinical Dosimetric Comparison among Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the dosimetric differences of different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Methods: 5-, 7- and 9-fields of IMRT plans in 16 NPC patients were respectively designed and synchronous dimention technology was applied to compare the dosimetric differences in target areas and involved organs. Results: The recovery rate in target area was 95% while the plan was evidently worse in 5-field than in 7- and 9-fields (P < 0.05. Whereas the maximum dosage (Dmax, mean dosage (Dmean and minimum dosage (Dmin were similar between 7- and 9-fields (P > 0.05, which were obviously lower in 5-field, and the differences were both significant (P < 0.05. In addition, the conformity and homogeneity indexes in target area had no significant difference between 7- and 9-fields, but were markedly better than in 5-field (P < 0.05. Indexes in each involved organs were the lowest in 5-field than in other fields (P < 0.05, but were similar between 7- and 9-fields (P > 0.05, which were all lower than tolerant dosage. As for BODY, there were significant differences in V10 - V20 between 5-field and other fields (P < 0.05, but were similar in V25 - V30 (P > 0.05. However, 7- and 9-fields were similar in V10 - V20 (P > 0.05. Conclusion: 7-field IMRT plan is the optimal one for NPC on both clinical dosimetric requirements and field-establishment principles.

  4. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)—also called mini-ridge filter—is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively.

  5. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)-also called mini-ridge filter-is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively.

  6. Comparison of dose accuracy between 2D array detectors and Epid for IMRT of nasopharynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Duygu; Coban, Yasin; Merih, Adil; Avci, Gulhan Guler; Yigitoglu, Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to perform the dosimetric controls of nasopharynx cancer patient's intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans that generated by treatment planing system (TPS) with using two different equipments and also to make comparison in terms of their reliability and practicability. This study has been performed at Radiation Oncology Department, Medicine Faculty in Gaziosmanpasa University by using the VARIAN CLINAC DHX linear accelerator which is operated in the range of 6 MV. Selected 10 nasopharynx patients planned in TPS (Eclipce V13.0) and approved for treatment by medical physicists and radiation oncologists. These plans recalculated on EPID and mapcheck which are 2D dosimetric equipments to obtain dose maps. To compare these two dosimetric equipments gamma analysis method has been preferred. Achieved data is presented and discussed.

  7. Comparison of dosimetric characteristics of Siemens virtual and physical wedges for ONCOR linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attalla Ehab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric properties of virtual wedge (VW and physical wedge (PW in 6- and 10-MV photon beams from a Siemens ONCOR linear accelerator, including wedge factors, depth doses, dose profiles, peripheral doses, are compared. While there is a great difference in absolute values of wedge factors, VW factors (VWFs and PW factors (PWFs have a similar trend as a function of field size. PWFs have stronger depth dependence than VWF due to beam hardening in PW fields. VW dose profiles in the wedge direction, in general, match very well with those of PW, except in the toe area of large wedge angles with large field sizes. Dose profiles in the nonwedge direction show a significant reduction in PW fields due to off-axis beam softening and oblique filtration. PW fields have significantly higher peripheral doses than open and VW fields. VW fields have similar surface doses as the open fields, while PW fields have lower surface doses. Surface doses for both VW and PW increase with field size and slightly with wedge angle. For VW fields with wedge angles 45° and less, the initial gap up to 3 cm is dosimetrically acceptable when compared to dose profiles of PW. VW fields in general use less monitor units than PW fields.

  8. 直肠癌术前五野静态调强和容积弧形调强放疗剂量学的比较研究%Dosimetric comparison between preoperative five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy in the treatment of rectum cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶序卷; 高远红; 陈利; 杜乐辉; 张广顺; 贾钰铭; 雷开键; 刘孟忠

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨直肠癌术前五野静态调强(5 F-IMRT)和容积弧形调强(VMAT)放疗计划的剂量学特点.方法 应用CMS monaco治疗计划系统分别对23例术前同期放化疗的直肠癌患者行5F-IMRT和VMAT放疗计划设计,比较两种放疗技术的靶区剂量分布特点以及小肠、膀胱、双侧股骨头等正常组织的受照射剂量及体积.结果 5F-IMRT计划的适形指数(CI)为0.810±0.043,VMAT计划的CI为0.822±0.062,两者均能很好满足95%等剂量曲线对100% PTV体积的完全覆盖;5F-IMRT计划中GTV、CTV和PTV的均匀指数(HI)分别为1.052±0.019、1.063±0.016、1.075±0.020,VMAT计划分别为1.037±0.008、1.047 ±0.008、1.072±0.018,差异均无统计学意义.5F-IMRT和 VMAT计划中重耍的危及器官如小肠、膀胱和股骨头等的关键剂量评价指标(D5、Dmin、Dmean和Dmax)差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).小肠、膀胱和股骨头等受照射体积的关键评价指标(V20、V30、V40和V50)在两种放疗计划中差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 5F-IMRT和VMAT计划靶区的剂量分布均较理想,对小肠、膀胱、双侧股骨头等正常组织均有很好的保护作用.%Objective To investigate the dosimetric comparison between prenperalive live-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (5F-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) in the. rectum cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods With the application of CMS monaco syslems( V2. 0,Sweden) , 5F-IMRT and VMAT plans were simulated in 23 rectum cancer patients with preoperative concurrent chemoradlotherapy. The dose characteristic of target volume was evaluated and the dose-volume relationship of small bowel, bladder and bilateral femoral head was compared. Results The CI was similar between the 5F-IMRT(0. 810 ±0. 043) and VMAT plans(0. 822 ±0. 062) , which could satisfy 95% of prescribed dose for covered PTV. The HI of the prescribed dose to GTV( 1. 052 ±0. 019 vs. 1

  9. A dosimetric study of volumetric modulated arc therapy planning techniques for treatment of low-risk prostate cancer in patients with bilateral hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Recently, megavoltage (MV photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has gained widespread acceptance as the technique of choice for prostate cancer patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy. However, radiation treatment planning for patients with metallic hip prostheses composed of high-Z materials can be challenging due to (1 presence of streak artifacts from prosthetic hips in computed tomography dataset, and (2 inhomogeneous dose distribution within the target volume. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric quality of VMAT techniques in the form of Rapid Arc (RA for treating low-risk prostate cancer patient with bilateral prostheses. Materials and Methods: Three treatment plans were created using RA techniques utilizing 2 arcs (2-RA, 3 arcs (3-RA, and 4 arcs (4-RA for 6 MV photon beam in Eclipse treatment planning system. Each plan was optimized for total dose of 79.2 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV over 44 fractions. All three RA plans were calculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm. Results : The mean and maximum doses to the PTV as well as the homogeneity index among all three RA plans were comparable. The plan conformity index was highest in the 2-Arc plan (1.19 and lowest in the 4-Arc plan (1.10. In comparison to the 2-RA technique, the 4-RA technique reduced the doses to rectum by up to 18.8% and to bladder by up to 7.8%. In comparison to the 3-RA technique, the 4-RA technique reduced the doses to rectum by up to 14.6% and to bladder by up to 3.5%. Conclusion: Based on the RA techniques investigated for a low-risk prostate cancer patient with bilateral prostheses, the 4-RA plan produced lower rectal and bladder dose and better dose conformity across the PTV in comparison with the 2-RA and 3-RA plans.

  10. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs and mixed-energy plans (MEPs were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV energy for both the primary and boost plans. Second, the MEPs were created using 16 MV energy for the primary plan and 6 MV energy for the boost plan. The primary and boost MEPs used identical beam parameters and same dose optimization values as in the primary and boost SEPs for the corresponding case. The dosimetric parameters from the composite plans (SEPs and MEPs were evaluated. Results: The dose to the target volume was slightly higher (on average <1% in the SEPs than in the MEPs. The conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI values between the SEPs and MEPs were comparable. The dose to rectum and bladder was always higher in the SEPs (average difference up to 3.7% for the rectum and up to 8.4% for the bladder than in the MEPs. The mean dose to femoral heads was higher by about 0.8% (on average in the MEPs than in the SEPs. The number of monitor units and integral dose were higher in the SEPs compared to the MEPs by average differences of 9.1% and 5.5%, respectively.Conclusion: The preliminary results from this study suggest that use of mixed-energy VMAT plan for high-risk prostate cancer could potentially reduce the integral dose and minimize the dose to rectum and bladder, but for the higher femoral head dose.-----------------------------------------------Cite this article as:Pokharel S. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:01011.DOI: http

  11. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Osei, E [Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, In Young; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with early left-sided breast cancer. Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with whole breast radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in this study, and the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were generated for each patient. To evaluate the dose delivered to the skin, 2 mm thickness skin (2-mm skin) and 3 mm thickness skin (3-mm skin) were contoured and a dosimetric comparison between the 2 plans was performed. The target volume coverage was better in IMRT than in 3D-CRT. The mean dose was 50.8 Gy for 3D-CRT and 51.1 Gy for IMRT. V40Gy was 99.4% for 3D-CRT and 99.9% for IMRT. In the case of skin, the mean dose was higher in 3D-CRT than in IMRT (mean dose of 2-mm skin: 32.8 Gy and 24.2 Gy; mean dose of 3-mm skin: 37.2 Gy and 27.8 Gy, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). These results indicated that the skin-sparing effect is more prominent in IMRT compared to 3D-CRT without compromising the target volume coverage.

  13. SU-D-19A-07: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Plesiotherapy and Electron Beam Therapy for Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A; Jacob, D; Andreou, K; Raben, A; Chen, H; Koprowski, C; Mourtada, F [Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large superficial (skin, soft tissue sarcoma) lesions located on curved areas are hard to treat with electrons. The Freiburg Flap (Nucletron, Netherlands) is a flexible mesh style surface which can be easily shaped to fit curved surfaces for reproducible HDR fraction delivery. To understand the fundamental dosimetric differences, a dosimetric comparison was made between HDR plesiotherapy (Freiburg applicator for lesions over 4cm) and external electron beam radiotherapy over cases with varying target curvature (both stylized and clinical cases). Methods: Four stylized cases with variable complexity were created using artificial DICOM axial CT slices and RT structures (a square and three curved structures on a 4.5cm radius cylinder). They were planned using Oncentra v4.3 and exported to Pinnacle v9.6 for electrons planning. The HDR source dwell positions were optimized for the best coverage of the targets using graphical optimization. Electron treatment plans were created in Pinnacle using the same CT and RT structures of three HDR cases with surface lesions previously treated with the Freiburg flap. The En face electron plans used 6-12 MeV electrons and 0.5–1 cm bolus was added to increase surface dose. The electron plans were prescribed to an isodose line to conform to the target. Results: For all lesions, the average target dose coverage was similar (D90ave of 100% for HDR vs 101% for electrons). For lesions with high curvature, the HDR coverage was better (D90 102% vs D90 97% for electron). For all cases, adjacent structures high dose region was lower for HDR than electrons (D1cc 100% for HDR vs D1cc 111% for electrons). Conclusion: HDR plesiotherapy offers excellent target conformity for superficial targets similar to electrons. However, for lesions with complex curved surfaces, HDR has the advantage to achieve better dose distributions using graphical optimization to spare adjacent normal tissue while maximizing target coverage.

  14. Selective omission of level V nodal coverage for patients with oropharyngeal cancer: Clinical validation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy experience and dosimetric significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohindra, Pranshu; Urban, Erich; Pagan, Jonathan D; Geye, Heather M; Patel, Vatsal B; Bayliss, R Adam A; Bender, Edward T; Harari, Paul M

    2016-04-01

    We sought to validate the consensus recommendation and assess dosimetric significance of selective omission of nodal level V from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) clinical target volume (CTV) for oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT plans and clinical outcomes for 112 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (nodal classification N0-N2b) were analyzed for coverage of ipsilateral and contralateral nodal level V. Additionally, new IMRT plans were generated in 6 randomly selected patients to assess its dosimetric impact. With median follow-up of 3.4 years, there were no failures identified in nodal level V with or without nodal level V omission. Upon dosimetric evaluation, significant reduction in integral dose, V10 Gy , V20 Gy , V30 Gy , V40 Gy , and V50 Gy was observed by excluding unilateral and bilateral level V from the CTV. We clinically validate the consensus recommendation for selective omission of level V nodal coverage in IMRT planning of patients with oropharyngeal cancer and demonstrate significant dosimetric advantages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. SU-E-T-29: A Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, T; Lin, X; Yin, Y; Liu, T [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric differences among fixed field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and double-arc volumetricmodulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with simultaneous integrated boost in rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients with rectal cancer previously treated with IMRT were included in this analysis. For each patient, two treatment techniques were designed for each patient: the fixed 7 fields IMRT and double-arc VMAT with RapidArc technique. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). The prescribed doses to the planning target volume of the subclinical disease (PTV1) and the gross disease (PTV2) were 45 Gy and 55 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk, total MU and the delivery time in two techniques were compared to explore the dosimetric differences. Results: For the target dose and homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. VMAT plans showed a better conformity in PTV1. VMAT plans reduced the mean dose to bladder, small bowel, femur heads and iliac wings. For iliac wings, VMAT plans resulted in a statistically significant reduction in irradiated volume of 15 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy but increased the 10 Gy irradiated volume. VMAT plans reduced the small bowel irradiated volume of 20 Gy and 30 Gy. Compared with IMRT plans, VMAT plans showed a significant reduction of monitor units by nearly 30% and reduced treatment time by an average of 70% Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, VMAT plans showed the similar target dose and reduced the dose of the organs at risk, especially for small bowel and iliac wings. For rectal cancer, VMAT with simultaneous integrated boost can be carried out with high quality and efficiency.

  16. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Saurabha; Majumder, Dipanjan; Adurkar, Pranjal; Swamidas, Jamema; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1), after 50 ml (series 2), and 100 ml (series 3) bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results The mean (± SD) bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25) cc, 116.2 (± 28) cc, and 172.9 (± 29) cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm3,1 cm3, 2 cm3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm3, 1 cm3, and 2 cm3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1) compared to full bladder (series 3) (p = 0.03) was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume during cervical

  17. Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Tangential Radiotherapy of Post-Lumpectomy Breast at Two Different Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robab Anbiaee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation therapy following breast conserving surgery is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is almost always the technique of choice for this purpose. This technique is often performed based on 3D treatment planning. The aim of this study was to compare 3D treatment planning for two different energies (Cobalt 60 versus 6 MV photon beams in tangential irradiation of breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses within the breast volume and dose received by lungs were considered. Materials and Methods: In this study, twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included. A CT scan was performed on selected patients. Three-dimensional treatment planning with 6 MV photon beams was carried out for patients on the  Eclipse 3D treatment planning system (TPS. The volumes receiving lower than 95% (Vol105 (hot areas of the reference dose, and the volume of lung receiving ≥30Gy (Vol≥30Gy were derived from dose volume histograms (DVHs. Dose homogeneity index was calculated as: DHI = 100 – (Vol>105 + Vol

  18. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  19. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Andrea [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John, E-mail: john.atyeo@sydney.edu.au [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Rinks, Marianne [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Radiation Oncology, Cancer Services, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  20. Dosimetric comparison among different head and neck radiotherapy techniques using PRESAGE® dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Rehman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to investigate dose distribution of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for Head and Neck cancer using 3-dimensional PRESAGE® dosimeter. Method: Computer Tomography (CT scans of Radiological Physics Center (RPC Head and Neck anthropomorphic phantom with both RPC standard insert and PRESAGE® insert were acquired separated with Philipp’s CT scanner and both CT scans were exported via DICOM to the pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS. Each plan was delivered twice to the RPC phantom first containing the RPC standard insert having Thermoluminescent detectors (TLD and film dosimeters and then again containing the PRESAGE® insert having three dimensional dosimeter (PRESAGE® by using a Varian True beam linear accelerator. After irradiation, the standard insert including point dose measurement (TLD and planner GafChromic® EBT film measurement was read using RPC standard procedure. The 3D dose distribution from PRESAGE® was read out with the Duke Midsized optical scanner dedicated to RPC (DMOS-RPC. Dose volume histogram (DVH, mean and maximal doses for organ-at-risk (OARs were calculated and compared among each Head and Neck technique. The prescription dose was same for all Head and Neck radiotherapy techniques which was 6.60 Gy per friction. Beam profile comparison and gamma analysis were used to quantify agreement among film measurement, PRESAGE® measurement and calculated dose distribution. Quality assurances of all plans were performed by using ArcCHECK method. Results: VMAT delivered the lowest mean and maximal doses to organ at risk (spinal cord and parotid than IMRT and 3DCRT. Such dose distribution was verified by absolute dose distribution using TLD system. 2D gamma 5%/3 mm criteria of Pinnacle vs. EBT2 film 3DCRT (92.34%, IMRT (92.3% and VMAT (96.63% in axial plan respectively. It was

  1. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu; Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.; Romer, Jeanna L.; Monaco, Debra L.; Elliott, David A.; Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction external beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.

  2. Organ motion study and dosimetric impact of respiratory gating radiotherapy for esophageal cancer; Etude de mobilite organique et impact dosimetrique de l'asservissement respiratoire dans la radiotherapie des cancers de l'oesophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorchel, F

    2007-04-15

    Chemoradiotherapy is now the standard treatment for locally advanced or inoperable esophageal carcinoma. In this indication, conformal radiotherapy is generally used. However, prognosis remains poor for these patients. Respiratory gating radiotherapy can decrease healthy tissues irradiation and allows escalation dose in lung, liver and breast cancer. In order to improve radiotherapy technique, we propose to study the feasibility of respiratory gating for esophageal cancer. We will study the respiratory motions of esophageal cancer to optimize target volume delineation, especially the internal margin (I.M.). We will test the correlation between tumour and chest wall displacements to prove that esophageal cancer motions are induced by respiration. This is essential before using free breathing respiratory gating systems. We will work out the dosimetric impact of respiratory gating using various dosimetric analysis parameters. We will compare dosimetric plans at end expiration, end inspiration and deep inspiration with dosimetric plan in free-breathing condition. This will allow us to establish the best respiratory phase to irradiate for each gating system. This dosimetric study will be completed with linear quadratic equivalent uniform dose (E.U.D.) calculation for each volume of interest. Previously, we will do a theoretical study of histogram dose volume gradation to point up its use. (author)

  3. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Bzdusek, K [Philips, Fitchburg, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  4. Dosimetric study comparing intensity modulated and conformal pelvic radiotherapy boost plans in locally advanced cancer cervix in NCI-Cairo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. EL-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Mahmoud Shosha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare 5 field conformal technique to the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) 8 fields technique in boosting locally advanced cancer cervix cases after external beam radiotherapy with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Methods: We conducted a single institutional comparative dosimetric analysis of 10 patients with cancer cervix who was presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between June 2012 to September 2012 and received a CRT boost in the place of planned brachytherapy after large field pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively identified. All tumors were situated in the low central pelvis. Two plans were done for every patient; one using the 8 fields IMRT and the second one using 5 fields' 3DCRT the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis for the PTV, bladder, rectum and both femoral heads. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both plans while it was demonstrates that the 8 fields IMRT technique carried less doses reaching OARs (rectum, bladder, both femoral heads). Conclusion: From the present study, it is concluded that IMRT technique spared more efficiently OARs than CRT technique but both techniques covered the PTV adequately so whenever possible IMRT technique should be used.

  5. A dosimetric analysis of volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with jaw width restriction vs 7 field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B; Fang, Z; Huang, Y; Lin, P; Chen, Z

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning was performed to compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc™ v. 10; Varian® Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7f-IMRT) in the definitive treatment of cervical cancer. 13 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Planning target volume (PTV) 50 and PTV60 were prescribed at a dose of 50 and 60 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively. The dose to the PTV60 was delivered as a simultaneous integrated boost to the pelvic lymph nodes. Owing to the mechanical limitation of the multileaf collimator in which the maximum displacement was limited to 15 cm, two types of RapidArc with different jaw width restrictions (15 and 20-23 cm) were investigated to evaluate their dosimetric differences. The RapidArc plan type with dosimetric superiority was then compared against the 7f-IMRT on the target coverage, sparing of the organs at risk (OARs), monitor units, treatment time and delivery accuracy to determine whether RapidArc is beneficial for the treatment of cervical cancer. The 15-cm jaw width restriction had better performance compared with the restrictions that were longer than 15 cm in the sparing of the OARs. The 15-cm RapidArc spared the OARs, that is, the bladder, rectum, small intestine, femoral heads and bones, and improved treatment efficiency compared with 7f-IMRT. Both techniques delivered a high quality-assurance passing rate (>90%) according to the Γ3mm,3% criterion. RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction spares the OARs and improves treatment efficiency in cervical cancer compared with 7f-IMRT. This study describes the dosimetric superiority of RapidArc with a 15-cm jaw width restriction and explores the feasibility of using RapidArc for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer.

  6. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  7. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Colonias, Athanasios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Parda, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Trombetta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Reitz, Bodo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  8. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  9. SU-E-J-169: The Dosimetric and Temporal Effects of Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouabhi, O; Gross, B; Xia, J [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Bayouth, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and temporal effects of high dose rate treatment mode for respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients. Methods: Treatment plans from five lung cancer patients (3 nongated (Group 1), 2 gated at 80EX-80IN (Group 2)) were retrospectively evaluated. The maximum tumor motions range from 6–12 mm. Using the same planning criteria, four new treatment plans, corresponding to four gating windows (20EX–20IN, 40EX–40IN, 60EX–60IN, and 80EX–80IN), were generated for each patient. Mean tumor dose (MTD), mean lung dose (MLD), and lung V20 were used to assess the dosimetric effects. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to compute treatment time by considering gantry rotation time, time to position collimator leaves, dose delivery time (scaled relative to the gating window), and communication overhead. Treatment delivery time for each plan was estimated using a 500 MU/min dose rate for the original plans and a 1500 MU/min dose rate for the gated plans. Results: Differences in MTD were less than 1Gy across plans for all five patients. MLD and lung V20 were on average reduced between −16.1% to −6.0% and −20.0% to −7.2%, respectively for non-gated plans when compared with the corresponding gated plans, and between − 5.8% to −4.2% and −7.0% to −5.4%, respectively for plans originally gated at 80EX–80IN when compared with the corresponding 20EX-20IN to 60EX– 60IN gated plans. Treatment delivery times of gated plans using high dose rate were reduced on average between −19.7% (−1.9min) to −27.2% (−2.7min) for originally non-gated plans and −15.6% (−0.9min) to −20.3% (−1.2min) for originally 80EX-80IN gated plans. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients can reduce lung toxicity, while maintaining tumor dose. Using a gated high-dose-rate treatment, delivery time comparable to non-gated normal-dose-rate treatment can be achieved. This research is supported by Siemens

  10. Evaluation of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT radiotherapy plans for left breast cancer based on clinical dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyun; Chen, Xinde; He, Zhijian; Li, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to compare dosimetric differences based on three types of radiotherapy plans for postoperative left breast cancer. In particular, based on a clinical dosimetric study, the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity- modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and VMAT plans were implemented on 15 cases of postoperative patients with left breast cancer with prescription doses of 5000cGy. Dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to analyze each evaluation index of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Except for homogeneous index (HI), D2, each CTV evaluation index of 3D-CRT plan was inferior to IMRT and VMAT plans (Pplans, IMRT has a statistical significance only in Dmean, V95 (Pplan is much closer to the prescription dose with a V95 coverage rate as high as 97.44%. For the infected lung, V5, V10 of 3D-CRT were the lowest (Pplans. Here, the V5, V10 of infected lung were slightly higher (Pplans. Each evaluation index of the contralateral lung and heart in 3D-CRT was the lowest (Pplans, which were 1770.89±121.16cGy and 1839.92±92.77cGy, respectively. While D1 of the spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT plans was higher, which were 1990.12±61.52cGy and 1927.38±43.67cGy, respectively. When the radiation dose of 500-1500cGy was delivered to the normal tissues, 3D-CRT significantly shows the lowest volume, VMAT is relatively higher. Monitor Units (MU) and treatment time (T) of VMAT were the least, only 49.33% and 55.86% of those of IMRT. The three types of plans can meet the clinical dosimetry demands of postoperative radiotherapy for left breast cancer. The target of IMRT and VMAT plans has a better conformity, and the VMAT plan takes the advantages of less MU and treatment time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery with an adapted linear accelerator vs. robotic radiosurgery: Comparison of dosimetric treatment plan quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuer, Harald; Hoevels, Moritz; Luyken, Klaus; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Wirths, Jochen; Kocher, Martin; Ruge, Maximilian

    2015-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery with an adapted linear accelerator (linac-SRS) is an established therapy option for brain metastases, benign brain tumors, and arteriovenous malformations. We intended to investigate whether the dosimetric quality of treatment plans achieved with a CyberKnife (CK) is at least equivalent to that for linac-SRS with circular or micromultileaf collimators (microMLC). A random sample of 16 patients with 23 target volumes, previously treated with linac-SRS, was replanned with CK. Planning constraints were identical dose prescription and clinical applicability. In all cases uniform optimization scripts and inverse planning objectives were used. Plans were compared with respect to coverage, minimal dose within target volume, conformity index, and volume of brain tissue irradiated with ≥ 10 Gy. Generating the CK plan was unproblematic with simple optimization scripts in all cases. With the CK plans, coverage, minimal target volume dosage, and conformity index were significantly better, while no significant improvement could be shown regarding the 10 Gy volume. Multiobjective comparison for the irradiated target volumes was superior in the CK plan in 20 out of 23 cases and equivalent in 3 out of 23 cases. Multiobjective comparison for the treated patients was superior in the CK plan in all 16 cases. The results clearly demonstrate the superiority of the irradiation plan for CK compared to classical linac-SRS with circular collimators and microMLC. In particular, the average minimal target volume dose per patient, increased by 1.9 Gy, and at the same time a 14% better conformation index seems to be an improvement with clinical relevance.

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  13. Helium ions at the heidelberg ion beam therapy center: comparisons between FLUKA Monte Carlo code predictions and dosimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, T.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Sala, P.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-08-01

    In the field of particle therapy helium ion beams could offer an alternative for radiotherapy treatments, owing to their interesting physical and biological properties intermediate between protons and carbon ions. We present in this work the comparisons and validations of the Monte Carlo FLUKA code against in-depth dosimetric measurements acquired at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Depth dose distributions in water with and without ripple filter, lateral profiles at different depths in water and a spread-out Bragg peak were investigated. After experimentally-driven tuning of the less known initial beam characteristics in vacuum (beam lateral size and momentum spread) and simulation parameters (water ionization potential), comparisons of depth dose distributions were performed between simulations and measurements, which showed overall good agreement with range differences below 0.1 mm and dose-weighted average dose-differences below 2.3% throughout the entire energy range. Comparisons of lateral dose profiles showed differences in full-width-half-maximum lower than 0.7 mm. Measurements of the spread-out Bragg peak indicated differences with simulations below 1% in the high dose regions and 3% in all other regions, with a range difference less than 0.5 mm. Despite the promising results, some discrepancies between simulations and measurements were observed, particularly at high energies. These differences were attributed to an underestimation of dose contributions from secondary particles at large angles, as seen in a triple Gaussian parametrization of the lateral profiles along the depth. However, the results allowed us to validate FLUKA simulations against measurements, confirming its suitability for 4He ion beam modeling in preparation of clinical establishment at HIT. Future activities building on this work will include treatment plan comparisons using validated biological models between proton and helium ions, either within a Monte Carlo

  14. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    2017-09-18

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTVprostate+3mm. The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTVprostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-induced Acute Nausea and Vomiting in IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victor H.F., E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Ng, Sherry C.Y.; Leung, T.W.; Au, Gordon K.H.; Kwong, Dora L.W. [Department of Clinical Oncology, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We wanted to investigate dosimetric parameters that would predict radiation-induced acute nausea and vomiting in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NPC). Methods and Materials: Forty-nine consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NPC were treated with IMRT alone in this prospective study. Patients receiving any form of chemotherapy were excluded. The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) as well as the left and right vestibules (VB-L and VB-R, respectively) were contoured on planning computed tomography images. A structure combining both the VB-L and the VB-R, named VB-T, was also generated. All structures were labeled organs at risk (OAR). A 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to these structures and labeled DVC+3 mm, VB-L+3 mm, VB-R+3 mm, and VB-T+3 mm to account for physiological body motion and setup error. No weightings were given to these structures during optimization in treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were recorded from dose-volume histograms. Statistical analysis of parameters' association with nausea and vomiting was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Six patients (12.2%) reported Grade 1 nausea, and 8 patients (16.3%) reported Grade 2 nausea. Also, 4 patients (8.2%) complained of Grade 1 vomiting, and 4 patients (8.2%) experienced Grade 2 vomiting. No patients developed protracted nausea and vomiting after completion of IMRT. For radiation-induced acute nausea, V40 (percentage volume receiving at least 40Gy) to the VB-T and V40>=80% to the VB-T were predictors, using univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, V40>=80% to the VB-T was the only predictor. There were no predictors of radiation-induced acute vomiting, as the number of events was too small for analysis. Conclusions: This is the first study demonstrating that a V40 to the VB-T is predictive of radiation-induced acute nausea. The vestibules should be labeled as sensitive OARs

  16. 直肠癌术前容积调强与固定野调强技术的剂量学比较%Dosimetric Comparison between Preoperative Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Fixed-field Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 庞廷田; 孙显松; 胡克; 邱杰; 张福泉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy ( FF-IMRT) for rectal cancer .Methods The CT images of 15 patients with rectal cancer were transferred into Eclipse planning system .FF-IMRT and VMAT plans were optimized on an Eclipse treatment planning system using beam data generated for Varian Trilogy linear accelerator .Same institutional dose-volume constraints for rectal cancer were used in both techniques .Targets and organs at risk were evaluated .Results The target volume coverage could meet the requirement of described dosage in both VMAT plan group and FF-IMRT plan group .Compared with the FF-IMRT plan group , the plan-ning target volume ( PTV) 105% ( PTV105%) coverage, Dmean, and Dmax significantly increased in the VMAT plan group ( P=0.011, P=0.017, and P=0.006, respectively), the radiation conformity index (CI) significantly decreased ( P=0.008 ) , and the homogeneity index showed no significant difference ( P=0.193 ) . Compared with the FF-IMRT plan group , the V50 of the bladder in the VMAT plan group was increased by about 15%( P=0.009 ) , and the Dmax increased by 0.7 Gy ( P=0.003 );the V30 of the small intestine decreased by 10% (P=0.004), and the Dmax was increased by 0.9 Gy (P=0.000); the V10, V30, and V40 of the bone marrow reduced by 2%, 10%, and 10%( P=0.000 , P=0.000 , and P=0.000 ) , and the Dmean re-duced by 1.7 Gy ( P=0.000 );the D5 of the left and right femoral heads reduced by 3.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy ( P=0.000 , P=0.000 ); the V10 , V20 , V30 , and V40 of the body also significantly decreased ( P=0.003 , P=0.000 , P=0.000 , and P=0.004 ) .The VMAT group also had significantly lower number of monitor units ( MU) when compared with the FF-IMRT plan group ( P=0.000 ) .Conclusions In patients with rectal canc-er, preoperative VMAT can achieve equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the FF -IMRT.In addi-tion, VMAT can

  17. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen, E-mail: Qiuwen.Wu@Duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2011-08-07

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  18. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-08-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  19. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, Eelco, E-mail: e.lens@amc.uva.nl; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  20. 直肠癌术前容积旋转调强放疗和五野静态调强放疗的剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison between preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy and five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪琳; 张红雁; 钱立庭; 吴爱东; 方为; 闫冰

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较直肠癌术前患者应用五野静态调强放疗(5F-IMRT)和容积弧形调强放疗( VMAT)两种计划的剂量学差别。方法分别将16例术前行同期放化疗的直肠癌患者进行5F-IMRT和VMAT两种计划设计,应用剂量体积直方图比较分析靶区和危及器官的剂量学差异及治疗参数。结果两种治疗计划均能满足临床剂量要求。5F-IMRT计划的适形指数(CI)为0.88±0.04,VMAT计划的CI为0.90±0.03,两种计划均能很好满足95%等剂量曲线对100%PTV体积的完全覆盖;VMAT 和 IMRT 计划的均匀性指数(HI)分别为1.06±0.01和1.05±0.01,差异无统计学意义(t=1.37,P>0.05)。5F-IMRT和VMAT计划中重要的危及器官如小肠、膀胱和股骨头等的关键剂量评价指标( Dmean、Dmax)及受照射体积的关键评价指标( V20、V30、V40和V50)在两种放疗计划中差异无统计学意义( P >0.05)。VMAT计划组较5F-IMRT计划组机器跳数( MU)平均值减少39%(P=0.000)。结论直肠癌术前放疗中采用VMAT技术可获得等同于5F-IMRT计划的剂量分布,危及器官均能得到较好的保护, VMAT计划MU明显降低,治疗时间明显缩短。%Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy( VMAT) and five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy(5F-IMRT) in preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods Six-teen patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemo-radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. VMAT and 5F-IMRT plans were designed for each patient. The dose distribution in target volumes and organs at risk was e-valuated according to the dose-volume histogram. Results Both plans could meet target dose specifications and nor-mal tissue constraint. The CI was similar between the 5F-IMRT(0. 88 ± 0. 04) and VMAT plans (0. 90 ± 0. 03), which could satisfy 95% of prescribed dose for covered PTV. The HI of the VMAT plan was 1. 06 ± 0. 01 compared to 1. 05 ± 0. 01

  1. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomo-therapy and standard three-dimensional conformations radiotherapy within the frame of the treatment of a left breast cancer; Comparaison dosimetrique d'une tomotherapie helicoidale et d'une radiotherapie standard conformationnelle tridimensionnelle dans le cadre du traitement du cancer du sein gauche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrous-Anane, S.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Durdux, C.; Giraud, P.; Housset, M.; Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Yassa, M. [Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal (Canada); Hijal, T. [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    The use of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) resulted in a reduction of early side effects for patients treated by total mammary irradiation. Helical tomo-therapy uses a great number of circumferential beams which are modulated by an ultra-fast multi-blade collimator to deliver an IMRT with a high dose gradient. However, the use of this technique has been limited for the treatment of breast cancer because of the increased treatment duration and of the increase of low doses for organs at risk. The authors describe a simple technique to irradiate in a conformational and homogeneous way the whole mammary target volume while reducing the dose delivered to organs at risk. They discuss the results obtained during eight treatments of patients suffering from a left breast cancer. Short communication

  2. Dosimetric comparison of three different treatment techniques in extensive scalp lesion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicka, Jadwiga B; Lasher, Donette E; McAfee, Sandra S; Fortier, Gregory A

    2009-05-01

    This study compared lateral photon/electron plan (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan, and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy plan for total scalp irradiation. The techniques were planned on a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp for a prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Conformity indexes and dose volume histograms were used for the comparison. Clinical target volume coverage factors for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HDR were 0.976, 0.998, and 0.967, and Conformation Numbers were 0.532, 0.713, and 0.761, respectively. The dose gradient across the target was 59-136%, 91-129%, and 58-242% for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HDR techniques, respectively. The 3DCRT and IMRT techniques produced low optical structure doses. 3DCRT produced hotspots in the brain, while IMRT produced brain sparing. HDR produced the highest integral doses to the brain and optical structures. IMRT provided the best target dose homogeneity and coverage, and delivered clinically acceptable doses to normal structures. HDR produced the most conformal plan, but the total dose delivered is limited by doses to the brain and eyes. HDR is a clinically feasible alternative for less extensive lesions, lower prescription doses, and for patients who cannot lie on the treatment table.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  5. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy for rectal cancer using flattening filter-free and flattening filter modes%直肠癌有无均整器模式下容积旋转调强放疗的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张基永; 陆佳扬; 吴丽丽; 马长春; 张武哲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric differences of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter-free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) modes.Methods FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed for 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system (Eclipse 10.0),respectively.Prescription dose of PTV was 50 Gy in 25 fractions.When the plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95 % of PTV,the dose volume histogram (DVH),target and risk organ doses,conformity indexes (CI),homogeneity indexes (HI),low dose volume of normal tissue (B-P),monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans.Results FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean,V105,HI (P < 0.05),and higher CI (P < 0.05) compared with FFF-VMAT.Small intestine (D5),Bladder (D5,Dmean V40,V50),L-femoral head (V40),R-femoral head (Dmean) were lower in FF-VMAT than those in FFF-VMAT (P < 0.05).FF-VMAT had higher B-P (V5) compared with FFF-VMAT (P < 0.05).FF-VMAT reduced the monitor units (MU) by 21% (382±53 vs 483±26,P < 0.05),as well as the treatment time (TT) in FF-VMAT was no significant difference compared with that in FFF-VMAT [(148±4) s vs (146±3) s,P > 0.05)].Conclusions The qualities of FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable.When comparing two plans,FF-VMAT showed better target coverage and some of OARs sparing.The MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than those of FF-VMAT,yet were not delivered within the same time.%目的 比较TrueBeam直线加速器6MVX射线均整模式(FF)和非均整模式(FFF)下容积旋转调强放疗(VMAT)在直肠癌术前放疗中的剂量学差异.方法 选取15例直肠癌术前患者,在Eclipse 10.0计划系统上分别进行FF-VMAT和FFF-VMAT计划设计.计划靶体积(PTV)处方剂量为50 Gy/25次,2 Gy/次.在95%的PTV达到处方剂量前提下,比较两种计划的剂量体积直方图(DVH)、靶

  6. Dosimetric comparison between volumetric modulated arc therapy and fixed-gantry dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy for rectal cancer radiotherapy%直肠癌旋转容积调强与固定野动态调强的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花威; 李军; 谭飞; 陈婷婷; 汪步海

    2012-01-01

    目的:比较旋转容积调强(VMAT)与固定野动态调强(dIMRT)在直肠癌放疗计划中的剂量学差异.方法:8例直肠癌患者利用瓦里安计划系统(Eclipse 8.6)分别进行VMAT和dIMRT放射治疗计划设计.利用剂量体积直方图来比较两种计划中靶区和危及器官的剂量学差异.结果:与dIMRT相比,VMAT靶区适合度指数(CI)、靶区剂量均匀性指数(HI)均更接近1,Dmin为(43.403±0.486)Gy,更接近处方剂量,差异有统计学意义,P<0.05.在VMAT计划中小肠的D30%、D50%和Dmean分别为(25.918±1.216)、(22.340士3.784)和(23.547±2.863) Gy,低于dIMRT计划的(28.073±3.114)、(24.172±2.540)和(25.257±1.374) Gy,P值分别为0.00、0.01和0.00;膀胱的D30%为(35.380±2.734) Gy,较dIMRT的(30.123±2.209) Gy偏高,P=0.00,但仍远低于剂量限值;股骨头的D5%和Dmean分别为(31.344±3.556)和(20.179±3.017) Gy,显著高于dIMRT计划的(26.731±2.828)和(17.459±3.279) Gy,P值均为0.00.VMAT总MU减少52.7%,治疗时间仅为dIMRT的1/4.结论:VMAT计划可以达到或优于dIMRT计划的靶区剂量分布,能更好地降低部分危及器官的受照剂量,并且具有较少总MU、总治疗时间的优势,减少了治疗中不确定性因素的影响及患者不适感.%OBJECTIVE: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) and fixed-gantry dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy(dIMRT) for rectal cancer. METHODS: VMAT and dlM-RT treatment plans of 8 rectal cancer cases were generated by Vrian Eclipse ver8. 6 treatment planning systerm. Dose volume histograms were used to compare the target volume and organs at risks. RESULTS: Compared to dIMRT,conformity index(CI) and homogeneity index(HI) of VMAT closer to one. Dmin of VMAT was (43. 403 ± 0. 486) Gy,closer to prescription dose. There were significant differences in CI,HI and Dmin(P<0. 05). The small intestinal's D30% ,D50% and Dmean were larger in dIMRT than those in VAMT(P values were

  7. Comparison of dosimetric parameter and adverse reaction analysis in different radiation technology in the patients received modi-fied radical mastectomy for breast cancer%乳腺癌改良根治术后不同放疗技术的剂量学比较及不良反应观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王承伟; 许刚; 薛辉; 张良

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare dosimetric difference and acute adverse reactions between 3 different radiotherapy plan in pa⁃tients who received modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods:30 cases of modified radical mastectomy of breast cancer pa⁃tients were left after the design of volumetric modulated arc (VMAT), intensity-modulated (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiother⁃apy (3D-CRT), were randomly divided into VMAT, IMRT and 3D-CRT group, each group of 10 cases, radiotherapy according to the prescrip⁃tion dose of 50 Gy The dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis was used to evaluate the dose parameters of planning target volume (PTV) , the treatment time in each time. V5, V10, V20, Dmean in left lung, V30, V40, and Dmeanof heart were compared between 3 groups. Acute radiation skin reaction, lung injury was evaluated. The changes of cardiac TroponinI was used to evaluate cardiac injury.Results:All of the evaluation indexes except for HI of 3D-CRT PTVwere inferior to VMAT and IMRT (P2, 30.05).Conclusion:The dose distribution and uniformity in VMAT and IMRT were better than that in 3D-CRT, and VMAT has obvious advantage in target volume dose coverage and fraction treatment time than other 2 groups, VMAT and IMRT can effec⁃tively reduce the high dose area volume and average dose of OAR, reduce the incidence of acute adverse reactions such as skin damage, heart damage and so on.%目的:比较乳腺癌改良根治术后3种不同放疗计划的剂量学差异和急性不良反应。方法:将30例左侧乳腺癌改良根治术后患者分别设计容积旋转调强(VMAT)、固定野调强(IMRT)和三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)计划,随机分成VMAT、IMRT和3D-CRT组,各10例,按处方剂量50 Gy进行放射治疗。利用剂量体积直方图(DVH)分析评价PTV的剂量参数,比较患侧肺V5、V10、V20、Dmean,心脏V30、V40、Dmean。评价急性放射性皮肤反应、肺损伤。以心肌肌钙蛋白Ⅰ

  8. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kim, Kwang pyo [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kyung Hee University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  9. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Based Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy with Respiratory Guidance System: Analysis of Respiratory Signals and Dosimetric Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ae Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effectiveness of respiratory guidance system in 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT based respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT by comparing respiratory signals and dosimetric analysis of treatment plans. Methods. The respiratory amplitude and period of the free, the audio device-guided, and the complex system-guided breathing were evaluated in eleven patients with lung or liver cancers. The dosimetric parameters were assessed by comparing free breathing CT plan and 4DCT-based 30–70% maximal intensity projection (MIP plan. Results. The use of complex system-guided breathing showed significantly less variation in respiratory amplitude and period compared to the free or audio-guided breathing regarding the root mean square errors (RMSE of full inspiration (P=0.031, full expiration (P=0.007, and period (P=0.007. The dosimetric parameters including V5 Gy, V10 Gy, V20 Gy, V30 Gy, V40 Gy, and V50 Gy of normal liver or lung in 4DCT MIP plan were superior over free breathing CT plan. Conclusions. The reproducibility and regularity of respiratory amplitude and period were significantly improved with the complex system-guided breathing compared to the free or the audio-guided breathing. In addition, the treatment plan based on the 4D CT-based MIP images acquired with the complex system guided breathing showed better normal tissue sparing than that on the free breathing CT.

  10. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutaf, Yildirim D.; Yi, Byong Yong; Prado, Karl; D' Souza, Warren D.; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Zhang Jin [Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States); Yu, Cedric X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 and Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A dedicated stereotactic gamma irradiation device, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign from Xcision Medical Systems, was developed specifically to treat small breast cancers. This study presents the first evaluation of dosimetric and geometric characteristics from the initial prototype installed at University of Maryland Radiation Oncology Department. Methods: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign stereotactic radiotherapy device is an assembly of a hemi-spherical source carrier containing 36 {sup 60}Co sources, a tungsten collimator, a dynamically controlled patient support table, and the breast immobilization system which also functions as a stereotactic frame. The source carrier contains the sources in six columns spaced longitudinally at 60 Degree-Sign intervals and it rotates together with the variable-size collimator to form 36 noncoplanar, concentric arcs focused at the isocenter. The patient support table enables motion in three dimensions to position the patient tumor at the focal point of the irradiation. The table moves continuously in three cardinal dimensions during treatment to provide dynamic shaping of the dose distribution. The breast is immobilized using a breast cup applying a small negative pressure, where the immobilization cup is embedded with fiducials also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the breast. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of the system as well as a protocol for absorbed dose calibration are provided. Dosimetric verifications of dynamically delivered patient plans are performed for seven patients using radiochromic films in hypothetical preop, postop, and target-in-target treatment scenarios. Results: Loaded with 36 {sup 60}Co sources with cumulative activity of 4320 Ci, the prototype GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign unit delivers 5.31 Gy/min at the isocenter using the largest 2.5 cm diameter collimator. Due to the noncoplanar beam arrangement and dynamic dose shaping features, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign device is found to deliver

  11. Comparing the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes in photon, proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houweling, Antonetta C.; Crama, Koen; Visser, Jorrit; Fukata, Kyohei; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Ohno, Tatsuya; Bel, Arjan; van der Horst, Astrid

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy using charged particles is characterized by a low dose to the surrounding healthy organs, while delivering a high dose to the tumor. However, interfractional anatomical changes can greatly affect the robustness of particle therapy. Therefore, we compared the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes (i.e. body contour differences and gastrointestinal gas volume changes) in photon, proton and carbon ion therapy for pancreatic cancer patients. In this retrospective planning study, photon, proton and carbon ion treatment plans were created for 9 patients. Fraction dose calculations were performed using daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. To this end, the planning CT was deformably registered to each CBCT; gastrointestinal gas volumes were delineated on the CBCTs and copied to the deformed CT. Fraction doses were accumulated rigidly. To compare planned and accumulated dose, dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the planned and accumulated dose of the different radiotherapy modalities were determined for the internal gross tumor volume, internal clinical target volume (iCTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs; duodenum, stomach, kidneys, liver and spinal cord). Photon plans were highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. The difference between the planned and accumulated DVH parameters for the photon plans was less than 0.5% for the target and OARs. In both proton and carbon ion therapy, however, coverage of the iCTV was considerably reduced for the accumulated dose compared with the planned dose. The near-minimum dose ({{D}98 % } ) of the iCTV reduced with 8% for proton therapy and with 10% for carbon ion therapy. The DVH parameters of the OARs differed less than 3% for both particle modalities. Fractionated radiotherapy using photons is highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. In proton and carbon ion therapy, such changes can severely reduce the dose coverage of the target.

  12. SU-E-P-14: Dosimetric Effects of Magnetic Field in MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy Delivery for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G; Currey, A; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided radiation therapy (RT) delivery would be beneficial for breast irradiation. The electron return effect due to the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF) may cause dosimetric issues on dose on skin and at the lung-tissue interface. The purpose of this study is to investigate these issues. Methods: IMRT plans with tangential beams and VMAT plans with 200 degree arcs to cover ipsilateral breast were generated for 10 randomly selected breast cancer cases using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) utilizing Monte Carlo dose calculation with or without a TMF of 1.5 T. Plans were optimized to deliver uniform dose to the whole breast with an exclusion of 5 mm tissue under the skin (PTV-EVAL). All four plans for each patient were re-scaled to have the same PTV-EVAL volume to receive the same prescription dose. The skin is defined as the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions in the surrounding region. Results: The presence of 1.5 T TMF resulted in (1)increased skin dose, with the mean and maximum skin dose increase of 5% and 9%, respectively; (2) similar dose homogeneity within the PTV-EVAL; (3) the slightly improved (3%) dose homogeneity in the whole breast; (4) Averages of 9 and 16% increases in V5 and V20, respectively, for ipsilateral lung; and (5) increased the mean heart dose by 34%. VMAT plans don’t improve whole breast dose uniformity as compared that to the tangential plans. Conclusion: The presence of transverse magnetic field in MRI-guided RT delivery for whole breast irradiation can Result in slightly improved dose homogeneity in the whole breast, increased dose to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and skin. Plan optimization with additional specific dose volume constraints may eliminate/reduce these dose increases. This work is partially supported by Elekta Inc.

  13. SU-E-T-292: Dosimetric Advantage of Prone Breast Radiotherapy for Korean Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y; Shin, J; Yu, J; Park, W; Choi, D; Huh, S; Han, Y; Kim, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefit of prone breast radiotherapy for Korean left-sided early-stage breast cancer patients who have relatively small breast Methods: From April to June, 2014, 10 left-sided breast cancer patients received the whole breast irradiation in prone position after partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. All patients were pTmi-2N0-1mi. Each patient underwent two computed tomoradiography (CT) simulations in supine and prone positions. The whole breast, ipsilateral lung, heart, and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) were contoured on each simulation CT images, and then tangential-fields treatment plan in each position was designed for the whole breast irradiation with the total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Dose-volume histograms of two setups were compared for target coverage and radiation dose to normal organs with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: The median age of patients was 47 years (range, 37 to 53). The median chest size was 82.5 cm (range, 75 to 90) and bra cup size was A in 4, B in 4, and C in 2 patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was similar when comparing mean dose (Dmean) and dose covering 95% of the breast volume, but maximum dose (Dmax) of breast was higher in supine (median 52.3 vs. 52.7 Gy, p=0.013). Prone position reduced significantly the radiation dose in ipsilateral lung, heart, and LAD by median 5.7, 1.1, and 6.9 Gy of Dmean (p=0.005, 0.007, and 0.005) and 28.2, 18.8, and 35.0 Gy of Dmax (p=0.005, 0.005, and 0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Prone breast radiotherapy could be beneficial for Korean breast cancer patients since it substantially spared normal organs while achieving adequate coverage of the breast tissue. Further prospective study is required to validate the potential benefit of prone breast radiotherapy.

  14. Comparisons of dosimetric properties between GD-300 series of radiophotoluminescent glass detector: and GR-200 series of thermoluminescent detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Weihai; LIU Weiqi; HUANG Gang; ZHU Guoying; MA Guocai

    2007-01-01

    In order to compare the dosimetric properties of two kinds of solid state detectors used for monitoring external exposures,experiments Were performed for the GD-300 series of radiophotoluminescent glass detectors (RPLGD) and the GR-200 series of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD).X-rays and 137 Cs and 60 Co γ-rays were used to irradiate the RPLGDs and TLDs,their dose linearky,uniformity/reproducibility of signal,fading effect and energy dependence were compared.Both kinds of the detectors have generally good dosimetric properties.The dose linearity and energy dependence of the GD-351 dosimeters and the TLDs are nearly the same,but the RPLGD is much better than the TLD in terms of the uniformity and fading effect.

  15. Comparison of the dosimetric parameters in linear accelerators with flattening filter-free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Anderson S.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Carla D.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R.; Batista, Talita Q., E-mail: asorgatti@hotmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: edusantos_moura@ig.com.br, E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: dchristini2013@gmail.com, E-mail: rtiezzi@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: s, E-mail: emermelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: anderson.rogerio.c@hotmail.com, E-mail: ta_litterqbatista@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the main features associated with the dosimetric parameters between FFF and FF Linacs. A set of Varian TrueBeam Linac and Varian 23EX dosimetric measurements was acquired to perform the experimental measurements. The dose measurements were carried out in a water Blue phantom, with a waterproof ionization chambers: farmer ionization chamber (0.6 cm{sup 3}) and Exradin A1SL(0.053 cm{sup 3}) , for fields 5 x 5, 8 x 8, 10 x 10, 15 x 15, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}. The 6 MV FFF and FF was the energy used in this work. Percent Depth Dose (PDD) was the dosimetric parameters evaluated using a fixed Source Surface Distance of 100 cm. One depth were applied for the measurements, 10 cm (central axis) from the water surface. The 6 MV FFF showed less penetrating than the 6 MV FF. This is due to the removal flattening filter causes more lower energy photons on the central axis. The field sizes were equivalent for both FFF and FF. The main advantage in operate linear accelerators without flattening filter is due to the high doses rates delivered during the treatment. High doses rates could reduce the patient treatment time and may be beneficial for some treatment techniques such as IMRT and SRT. (author)

  16. Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery with an adapted linear accelerator vs. robotic radiosurgery. Comparison of dosimetric treatment plan quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treuer, Harald; Hoevels, Moritz; Luyken, Klaus; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Wirths, Jochen; Ruge, Maximilian [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Kocher, Martin [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Radiotherapy, Cologne (Germany)

    2014-11-22

    Stereotactic radiosurgery with an adapted linear accelerator (linac-SRS) is an established therapy option for brain metastases, benign brain tumors, and arteriovenous malformations. We intended to investigate whether the dosimetric quality of treatment plans achieved with a CyberKnife (CK) is at least equivalent to that for linac-SRS with circular or micromultileaf collimators (microMLC). A random sample of 16 patients with 23 target volumes, previously treated with linac-SRS, was replanned with CK. Planning constraints were identical dose prescription and clinical applicability. In all cases uniform optimization scripts and inverse planning objectives were used. Plans were compared with respect to coverage, minimal dose within target volume, conformity index, and volume of brain tissue irradiated with ≥ 10 Gy. Generating the CK plan was unproblematic with simple optimization scripts in all cases. With the CK plans, coverage, minimal target volume dosage, and conformity index were significantly better, while no significant improvement could be shown regarding the 10 Gy volume. Multiobjective comparison for the irradiated target volumes was superior in the CK plan in 20 out of 23 cases and equivalent in 3 out of 23 cases. Multiobjective comparison for the treated patients was superior in the CK plan in all 16 cases. The results clearly demonstrate the superiority of the irradiation plan for CK compared to classical linac-SRS with circular collimators and microMLC. In particular, the average minimal target volume dose per patient, increased by 1.9 Gy, and at the same time a 14 % better conformation index seems to be an improvement with clinical relevance. (orig.) [German] Stereotaktische Radiochirurgie mit einem adaptierten Linearbeschleuniger (Linac-SRS) ist eine erfolgreiche und etablierte Therapieoption fuer Hirnmetastasen, benigne Hirntumoren und arteriovenoese Malformationen. Ziel war es, zu untersuchen, ob die mit einem CyberKnife (CK) erreichbare

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of neutron capture therapy for local advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagie, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: yanagie@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kumada, H. [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakurai, Y. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan); Furuya, Y. [Department of Surgery, Satukidai Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Sugiyama, H. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ono, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Takamoto, S. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Eriguchi, M. [Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Microbiology, Syowa University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Cooperative Unit of Medicine and Engineering, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Local recurrence breast cancer is one of the most difficult conditions to cure and there is a need for new therapy. If sufficient boron compound can be targeted to the tumor, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be applied to local recurrent breast cancer. In this study, we performed a preliminary dosimetry with a phantom model of the mammary gland at Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), and a feasibility dosimetry with JAERI Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) at JRR4 reactor of Japan Atomic Research Institute. We performed preliminary dosimetry of a phantom model of the mammary gland with thermal neutron irradiation (OO-0011 mode) on LiF collimation at KUR. The thermal neutron flux was 5.16 E+08 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at the surface of phantom. The blood boron concentration is estimated to be 30 ppm; tumor boron concentration is also estimated to be 90 ppm according to tumor/blood ratio 3 and skin/blood ratio 1.2. Tumor RBE dose is estimated to be 47 Gy/h, and skin RBE dose is 12.4 Gy/h. In case of advanced breast cancer, we performed the feasibility estimation of 3D construction of tumor according to the MRI imaging of a patient with epithermal neutron mode at JRR4. The blood boron concentration (ppm) and tumor/normal tissue ratio are estimated to be 24 and 3.5, respectively. Skin RBE dose is restricted to 10 Gy/h, the maximum tumor RBE dose, minimum tumor RBE dose, and mean tumor RBE dose are 42.2, 11.3, and 28.9 Gy-Eq, respectively, in half hour irradiation. In this study, we showed the possibility to apply BNCT to local recurrent breast cancer. We can irradiate tumors selectively and as safely as possible, reducing the effects on neighboring healthy tissues.

  18. A feasibility dosimetric study on prostate cancer. Are we ready for a multicenter clinical trial on SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Carmelo; Bonanno, Elisa [Humanitas C.C.O., Catania (Italy); Villaggi, Elena [AUSL, Piacenza (Italy); Maggi, Giulia; Mancosu, Pietro [IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Research Center, Milan (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria Firenze (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy). Lab. of Medical Physics and Expert Systems; Borzi, Giusi R. [REM Radioterapia, Catania (Italy); Carbonini, Claudia [A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Consorti, Rita [ACO S. Filippo Neri, Rome (Italy); Fedele, David [Casa di Cura Privata San Rossore s.r.l., Pisa (Italy); Fiandra, Christian [Torino Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Unit; Ielo, Isidora [A.O.U. Policlinico G. Martino, Messina (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [' ' S. Giovanni Calibita' ' Fatebenefratelli, Rome (Italy); Malisan, Maria Rosa [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Udine (Italy); Martinotti, Anna [Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan (Italy); Moretti, Renzo [Az. Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia (Italy); Nardiello, Barbara [UPMC San Pietro FBF, Rome (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina; Clemente, Stefania [IRCCS CROB Rieonero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) started a working group dedicated to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment. In this work, we performed a multicenter planning study on patients who were candidates for SBRT in the treatment of prostate cancer with the aim of evaluating the dosimetric consistency among the different hospitals. Fourteen centers were provided the contours of 5 patients. Plans were performed following the dose prescription and constraints for organs at risk (OARs) of a reference paper. The dose prescription was 35 Gy in five fractions for the planning target volume (PTV). Different techniques were used (3D-CRT, fixed-Field IMRT, VMAT, CyberKnife). Plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Furthermore, the median DVH was calculated and one patient was re-planned. A total of 70 plans were compared. The maximum dose to the body was 107.9 ± 4.5 % (range 101.5-116.3 %). Dose at 98 % (D{sub 98} {sub %}) and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) were 102.0 ± 0.9 % (global range 101.1-102.9 %) and 105.1 ± 0.6 % (range 98.6-124.6 %). Similar trends were found for D{sub 95} {sub %} and mean dose to the PTV. Important differences were found in terms of the homogeneity index. Doses to OARs were heterogeneous. The subgroups with the same treatment planning system showed differences comparable to the differences of the whole group. In the re-optimized plans, DVH differences among institutes were reduced and OAR sparing improved. Important dosimetric differences with possible clinical implications, in particular related to OARs, were found. Replanning allowed a reduction in the OAR dose and decreased standard deviations. Multicenter clinical trials on SBRT should require a preplanning study to standardize the optimization procedure. (orig.) [German] Der italienische Verband der Medizinphysiker (AIFM) hat eine Arbeitsgruppe gegruendet, die sich mit der Koerperstammstereotaxie (SBRT) befasst. Im Rahmen

  19. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salmon, H; Thompson, M [Lake City Cancer Center, Lake City, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R.; St. James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-10-01

    2 mm. In an anthropomorphic phantom, the gamma index (dose tolerance  =  3%, distance-to-agreement  =  3 mm) was greater than 90% for six out of seven planes using the RS-MC, and three out seven for the RS-PBA. The RS-MC algorithm demonstrated improved dosimetric accuracy over the RS-PBA in the presence of homogenous, heterogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms. The computation performance of the RS-MC was similar to the RS-PBA algorithm. For complex disease sites like breast, head and neck, and lung cancer, the RS-MC algorithm will provide significantly more accurate treatment planning.

  1. A study of the plan dosimetric evaluation on the rectal cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyun Hak; An, Beom Seok; Kim, Dae Il; Lee, Yang Hoon; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In order to minimize the dose of femoral head as an appropriate treatment plan for rectal cancer radiation therapy, we compare and evaluate the usefulness of 3-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 3fCRT), which is a universal treatment method, and 5-field 3D conformal radiation therapy(below 5fCRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). The 10 cases of rectal cancer that treated with 21EX were enrolled. Those cases were planned by Eclipse(Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3(Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28) and AAA(Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28). 3fCRT and 5fCRT plan has 0 degrees, 270 degrees, 90 degrees and 0 degrees, 95 degrees, 45 degrees, 315 degrees, 265 degrees gantry angle, respectively. VMAT plan parameters consisted of 15MV coplanar 360 degrees 1 arac. Treatment prescription was employed delivering 54Gy to recum in 30 fractions. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, VMAT plans were optimized and calculated twice, and normalized to the target V100%=95%. The indexes of evaluation are D of Both femoral head and aceta fossa, total MU, H.I.(Homogeneity index) and C.I.(Conformity index) of the PTV. All VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with portal dosimetry using EPID. D of Rt. femoral head was 53.08 Gy, 50.27 Gy, and 30.92 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. D of Rt. aceta fossa was 54.86 Gy, 52.40 Gy, 30.37 Gy, respectively, in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. Likewise, Lt. Femoral head showed average 53.68 Gy, 51.01 Gy and 29.23 Gy in the same order. The maximum dose of both femoral head and aceta fossa was higher in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. C.I. showed the lowest VMAT treatment plan with an average of 1.64, 1.48, and 0.99 in the order of 3fCRT, 5fCRT, and VMAT treatment plan. There was no significant difference on H

  2. Small bowel protection in IMRT for rectal cancer. A dosimetric study on supine vs. prone position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Julia; Kromer, Katharina; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Mai, Sabine; Fleckenstein, Jens; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Unita Operativa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy); Baack, Tobias [GRN Clinic Weinheim, Department of Internal Medicine, Weinheim (Germany); Buettner, Sylvia [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    This treatment planning study analyzes dose coverage and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of rectal cancer and compares prone vs. supine positioning as well as the effect of dose optimization for the small bowel (SB) by additional dose constraints in the inverse planning process. Based on the CT datasets of ten male patients in both prone and supine position, a total of four different IMRT plans were created for each patient. OAR were defined as the SB, bladder, and femoral heads. In half of the plans, two additional SB cost functions were used in the inverse planning process. There was a statistically significant dose reduction for the SB in prone position of up to 41% in the high and intermediate dose region, compared with the supine position. Furthermore, the femoral heads showed a significant dose reduction in prone position in the low dose region. Regarding the additional active SB constraints, the dose in the high dose region of the SB was significantly reduced by up to 14% with the additional cost functions. There were no significant differences in the dose distribution of the planning target volume (PTV) and the bladder. Prone positioning can significantly reduce dose to the SB in IMRT for rectal cancer and therefore should not only be used in 3D conformal radiotherapy but also in IMRT of rectal cancer. Further protection of the SB can be achieved by additional dose constraints in inverse planning without jeopardizing the homogeneity of the PTV. (orig.) [German] Diese Planungsstudie analysiert die Dosisverteilung im Zielvolumen und in den Risikoorganen (''organs at risk'', OAR) bei der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (''intensity-modulated radiotherapy'', IMRT) des Rektumkarzinoms und vergleicht hierbei Bauch- und Rueckenlagerung sowie die Effekte der Dosisoptimierung fuer den Duenndarm (DD) durch zusaetzliche Dosiseinschraenkungen bei der inversen Planung. Anhand der

  3. Dosimetric characterization of the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector through comparison with an in-house developed scintillator system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    method, but differing primarily in the signal detection hardware. The two systems were compared with respect to essential dosimetric properties, with the purpose of testing their performance under conditions less well discussed in the literature. A Farmer ionization chamber was used as the primary...... is therefore advised if using either system for measurements in large fields or under circumstances where the fibre irradiation geometry is unfavourable. Measurements of reference dose to water yielded differences up to 1.5% when compared with the Farmer ionization chamber for all investigated beam qualities...

  4. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason, E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  5. Dosimetric model for intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer micrometastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, A M [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 412 Avadh Bhatia Physics Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); McQuarrie, S A [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, 3118 Dentistry/Pharmacy Centre, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2N8 (Canada); Middleton, J W [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Fallone, B G [Departments of Physics and Oncology, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2003-05-21

    A simple model has been developed to investigate the dosimetry of micrometastases in the peritoneal cavity during intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy. The model is applied to free-floating tumours with radii between 0.005 cm and 0.1 cm. Tumour dose is assumed to come from two sources: free liposomes in solution in the peritoneal cavity and liposomes bound to the surface of the micrometastases. It is assumed that liposomes do not penetrate beyond the surface of the tumours and that the total amount of surface antigen does not change over the course of treatment. Integrated tumour doses are expressed as a function of biological parameters that describe the rates at which liposomes bind to and unbind from the tumour surface, the rate at which liposomes escape from the peritoneal cavity and the tumour surface antigen density. Integrated doses are translated into time-dependent tumour control probabilities (TCPs). The results of the work are illustrated in the context of a therapy in which liposomes labelled with Re-188 are targeted at ovarian cancer cells that express the surface antigen CA-125. The time required to produce a TCP of 95% is used to investigate the importance of the various parameters. The relative contributions of surface-bound radioactivity and unbound radioactivity are used to assess the conditions required for a targeted approach to provide an improvement over a non-targeted approach during intraperitoneal radiation therapy. Using Re-188 as the radionuclide, the model suggests that, for microscopic tumours, the relative importance of the surface-bound radioactivity increases with tumour size. This is evidenced by the requirement for larger antigen densities on smaller tumours to affect an improvement in the time required to produce a TCP of 95%. This is because for the smallest tumours considered, the unbound radioactivity is often capable of exerting a tumouricidal effect before the targeting agent has time to accumulate

  6. A comparison of the dosimetric characteristics of a glass rod dosimeter and a thermoluminescent dosimeter for mailed dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ju-Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwe-Ya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Austin Caner Centers, Austin, TX (United States); Kim, Yon-Lae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr

    2009-01-15

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RPL-GRD) system has recently become commercially available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric characteristics (reproducibility, linearity, fading, energy dependence and angular dependence) of the RPL-GRD for a mailed dosimeter and to compare it with LiF-TLD powder. In this study, the model GD-301 GRD and TLD-700 were powder type used. All measurements with the exception of angular dependence were performed in a water phantom using a holder stand. The RPL-GRD has better reproducibility than the TLD for the Co-60 beam as well as for the clinical photon beam. The RPL-GRD signal was linear as a function of applied dose in the range of 0.5-3 Gy for the Co-60 gamma rays. The fading of the RPL-GRD after a received dose of 2 Gy was initially found to be within 1.7% for five months. The energy dependence of both dosimeters was found to be less than 1.6% for photon beams, but was less than 5.0% for electron beams, which was in agreement with published data. The angular dependence of the RPL-GRD was measured to be approximately 1.4% for angles ranging {+-}90 deg. from the beam axis using a spherical polystyrene phantom. The measurements comparing RPL-GRD and TLD dosimetric characteristics demonstrated that the RPL-GRD is suitable for mailed dosimetry in a quality assurance (QA) audit program.

  7. Impact of post-operative radiation on coronary arteries in patients of early breast cancer: A pilot dosimetric study from a tertiary cancer care center from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The significant impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT on cardiac morbidity in patients of early breast cancer (EBC undergoing breast-conserving surgery has been shown in different studies. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of surgery and the side of involvement on radiation dose to left anterior descending artery (LAD and Left circumflex coronary artery (LCx. Materials And Methods: Totally, 58 patients of EBC were randomly chosen for this dosimetric study and planned with tangential field technique without intensity modulation (IM. Heart, LAD, and LCx (n = 55 were contoured. Dose volume histograms were analyzed to determine the Dmax (maximum dose and Dmean (mean dose of LAD and LCx. Student's t-test was used for comparative analysis of the means. Results: The mean Dmax of LAD for left (L EBC was 3.17 Gray (Gy while for right (R EBC it was 0.86 Gy (P = 0.007; 95% C.I, 1.14–3.48. The mean Dmean of LAD for L-EBC and R-EBC were 1.97 Gy and 0.79 Gy, respectively (P = 0.029; 95% C.I, 0.77–1.60. The mean-Dmax of LCx for patients with L-EBC (2.9 Gy; range: 1.2–4.35 Gy was statistically higher than that for R-EBC (1.3 Gy; range: 0.7–3.2 Gy (P = 0.045. The mean-Dmean of LCx for L-EBC (2.1 Gy; range: 0.6–3.6 Gy was also significantly higher than that of L-EBC (0.9 Gy; range: 0.7–2.1 Gy (P = 0.03. There was no significant impact of the pattern of surgery on LAD dose, but significance was noted for LCx dose parameters (P = 0.04 and 0.08 for m-Dmax and m-Dmean of LCx. Conclusion: This pilot dosimetric study confirms the assumption that patients with left-sided EBC are at higher risk of developing long-term cardiac morbidity when treated with PORT due to increased dose to LAD.

  8. TU-CD-304-03: Dosimetric Verification and Preliminary Comparison of Dynamic Wave Arc for SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghelea, M [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Poels, K; Gevaert, T; Tournel, K; Dhont, J; De Ridder, M; Verellen, D [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); Hung, C [BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Eriksson, K [RAYSEARCH LABORATORIES AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Simon, V [Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits and verify the delivery accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc, a novel treatment delivery approach for the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) combines simultaneous movement of gantry/ring with inverse planning optimization, resulting in an uninterrupted non-coplanar arc delivery technique. Thirteen SBRT complex cases previously treated with 8–10 conformal static beams (CRT) were evaluated in this study. Eight primary centrally-located NSCLC (prescription dose 4×12Gy or 8×7.5Gy) and five oligometastatic cases (2×2 lesions, 10×5Gy) were selected. DWA and coplanar VMAT plans, partially with dual arcs, were generated for each patient using identical objective functions for target volumes and OARs on the same TPS (RayStation, RaySearch Laboratories). Dosimetric differences and delivery time among these three planning schemes were evaluated. The DWA delivery accuracy was assessed using the Delta4 diode array phantom (ScandiDos AB). The gamma analysis was performed with the 3%/3mm dose and distance-to-agreement criteria. Results: The target conformity for CRT, VMAT and DWA were 0.95±0.07, 0.96±0.04 and 0.97±0.04, while the low dose spillage gradient were 5.52±1.36, 5.44±1.11, and 5.09±0.98 respectively. Overall, the bronchus, esophagus and spinal cord maximum doses were similar between VMAT and DWA, but highly reduced compared with CRT. For the lung cases, the mean dose and V20Gy were lower for the arc techniques compares with CRT, while for the liver cases, the mean dose and the V30Gy presented slightly higher values. The average delivery time of VMAT and DWA were 2.46±1.10 min and 4.25±1.67 min, VMAT presenting shorter treatment time in all cases. The DWA dosimetric verification presented an average gamma index passing rate of 95.73±1.54% (range 94.2%–99.8%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicated that the DWA is deliverable with clinically acceptable accuracy and has the potential to

  9. Cytogenetic and dosimetric effects of {sup 131}I in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma: comparison between stimulation with rhTSH and thyroid hormone withdrawal treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcia Augusta da; Gomes Silva Valgode, Flavia; Carvalho Pinto Ribela, Maria Teresa; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), IPEN-CNEN/SP, Centro de Biotecnologia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Armiliato Gonzalez, Julia; Calil Cury Guimaraes, Maria Ines; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Yoriyaz, Helio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Centro de Engenharia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    A study directed to the cytogenetic and dosimetric aspects of radionuclides of medical interest is very valuable, both for an accurate evaluation of the dose received by the patients, and consequently of the genetic damage, and for the optimization of therapeutic strategies. Cytogenetic and dosimetric effects of {sup 131}I in lymphocytes of thyroidectomized differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients were evaluated through chromosome aberration (CA) technique: Euthyroid patients submitted to recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) therapy (group A) were compared with hypothyroid patients left without levothyroxine treatment (group B). CA analysis was carried out prior to and 24 h, 1 week, 1 month and 1 year after radioiodine administration (4995-7030 MBq) in both groups. An activity-response curve of {sup 131}I (0.074-0.740 MBq/mL) was elaborated, comparing dicentric chromosomes in vivo and in vitro in order to estimate the absorbed dose through Monte Carlo simulations. In general, radioiodine therapy induced a higher total CA rate in hypothyroid patients as compared to euthyroid patients. The frequencies of dicentrics obtained in DTC patients 24 h after treatment were equivalent to those induced in vitro (0.2903 ± 0.1005 MBq/mL in group A and 0.2391 ± 0.1019 MBq/mL in group B), corresponding to absorbed doses of 0.65 ± 0.23 Gy and 0.53 ± 0.23 Gy, respectively. The effect on lymphocytes of internal radiation induced by {sup 131}I therapy is minimal when based on the frequencies of CA 1 year after the treatment, maintaining a higher quality of life for DTC patients receiving rhTSH-aided therapy. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-J-58: Dosimetric Verification of Metal Artifact Effects: Comparison of Dose Distributions Affected by Patient Teeth and Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Kang, S; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Pediatrics and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford (United States); Park, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Daejeon Sun Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Implant-supported dentures seem particularly appropriate for the predicament of becoming edentulous and cancer patients are no exceptions. As the number of people having dental implants increased in different ages, critical dosimetric verification of metal artifact effects are required for the more accurate head and neck radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical analysis of the metal(streak and dark) artifact, and to evaluate dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of patients with the patient teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. Methods: The phantom comprises cylinder which is shaped to simulate the anatomical structures of a human head and neck. Through applying various clinical cases, made phantom which is closely allied to human. Developed phantom can verify two classes: (i)closed mouth (ii)opened mouth. RapidArc plans of 4 cases were created in the Eclipse planning system. Total dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions is prescribed to the whole planning target volume (PTV) using 6MV photon beams. Acuros XB (AXB) advanced dose calculation algorithm, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and progressive resolution optimizer were used in dose optimization and calculation. Results: In closed and opened mouth phantom, because dark artifacts formed extensively around the metal implants, dose variation was relatively higher than that of streak artifacts. As the PTV was delineated on the dark regions or large streak artifact regions, maximum 7.8% dose error and average 3.2% difference was observed. The averaged minimum dose to the PTV predicted by AAA was about 5.6% higher and OARs doses are also 5.2% higher compared to AXB. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that AXB dose calculation involving high-density materials is more accurate than AAA calculation, and AXB was superior to AAA in dose predictions beyond dark artifact/air cavity portion when compared against the measurements.

  11. SU-E-T-233: Cyberknife Versus Linac IMRT for Dose Comparision in Hypofractionated Hemi Larynx Irradiation of Early Stage True Vocal Cord Cancer: A Dosimetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, C; Lee, P; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric data of patients treated for early-stage larynx cancer on Cyberknife and Linac IMRT. Methods: Nine patients were treated with Cyberknife to a dose of 45 Gy in 10 fractions of the involved hemilarynx. The prescription dose provided at least 95% of PTV coverage. After Cyberknife treatment, the CT images and contours were sent to Pinnacle treatment planning system for IMRT planning on a regular SBRT linac with same dose prescription and constrains. Dose to target and normal tissue, including the arytenoids, cord, carotid arteries, thyroid, and skin, were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results: For Cyberknife plan, the conformity indices are within 1.11–1.33. The average dose to the contralateral arytenoids for Cyberknife plans was 28.9±6.5Gy), which is lower than the same mean dose for IMRT plans (34.0±5.2 Gy). The average maximum dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral carotid artery were 20.6 ±9.1 Gy and 10.2±6.0 Gy respectively for Cybeknife comparing with 22.1±8.0 Gy and 12.0±5.1 Gy for IMRT. The mean dose to the thyroid was 3.6±2.2 Gy for Cyberknife and 3.4±2.4 Gy for IMRT. As shown in DVH, the Cyberknife can deliver less dose to the normal tissue which is close to target area comparing with IMRT Plans. However, IMRT plan’s can give more sparing for the critical organs which is far away from the target area. Conclusion: We have compared the dosimetric parameters of Cyberknife and linac IMRT plans for patients with early-stage larynx cancer. Both Cyberknife and IMRT plans can achieve conformal dose distribution to the target area. Cyberknife was able to reduce normal tissue dose in high doses region while IMRT plans can reduce the dose of the normal tissue at the low dose region. These dosimetric parameters can be used to guide future prospective protocols using SBRT for larynx cancer.

  12. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in  125I and  103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as  125I and  103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for  103Pd and 10 cm for  125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for  192Ir and less than 1.2% for  137Cs between the three codes. PACS number(s): 87.56.bg.

  13. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  14. TU-F-17A-06: Motion Stability and Dosimetric Impact of Spirometer-Based DIBH-RT of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, E; Yang, W; Burnison, M; Mirhadi, A; Hakimian, B; Stephen, S; Robert, R; Yue, Y; Sandler, H; Fraass, B [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer have increased risk of coronary artery disease. Deep Inhalation Breath Hold assisted RT (DIBH-RT) is shown to increase the geometric separation of the target area and heart, reducing cardiac radiation dose. The purposes of this study are to use Cine MV portal images to determine the stability of spirometer-guided DIBH-RT and examine the dosimetric cardiopulmonary impact of this technique. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with left-sided breast cancer were recruited to the IRB-approved study. Free-breathing (FB) and DIBH-CT's were acquired at simulation. Rigid registration of the FB-CT and DIBH-CT was performed using primarily breast tissue. Treatment plans were created for each FB-CT and DIBH-CT using identical paired tangent fields with field-in-field or electronic compensation techniques. Dosimetric evaluation included mean and maximum (Dmax) doses for the left anterior descending artery (LAD), mean heart dose, and left lung V20. Cine MV portal images were acquired for medial and lateral fields during treatment. Analysis of Cine images involved chest wall segmentation using an algorithm developed in-house. Intra- and inter-fractional chest wall motion were determined through affine registration to the first frame of each Cine. Results: Dose to each cardiac structure evaluated was significantly (p<0.001) reduced with the DIBH plans. Mean heart dose decreased from 2.9(0.9–6.6) to 1.6(0.6–5.3) Gy; mean LAD dose from 16.6(3–43.6) to 7.4(1.7–32.7) Gy; and LAD Dmax from 35.4 (6.1–53) to 18.4(2.5–51.2) Gy. No statistically significant reduction was found for the left lung V20. Average AP and SI median chest wall motion (intrafractional) was 0.1 (SD=0.9) and 0.5 (SD=1.1) mm, respectively. Average AP inter-fractional chest wall motion was 2.0 (SD=1.4) mm. Conclusion: Spirometer-based DIBH treatments of the left breast are reproducible both inter- and intra-fractionally, and

  15. SU-E-T-10: A Dosimetric Comparison of Copper to Lead-Alloy Apertures for Electron Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusk, B; Hogstrom, K; Gibbons, J; Carver, R [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences of copper compared to conventional lead-alloy apertures for electron beam therapy. Methods: Copper apertures were manufactured by .decimal, Inc. and matching lead-alloy, Cerrobend, apertures were constructed for 32 square field sizes (2×2 – 20×20 cm{sup 2}) for five applicator sizes (6×6–25×25 cm{sup 2}). Percent depth-dose and off-axis-dose profiles were measured using an electron diode in water with copper and Cerrobend apertures for a subset of aperture sizes (6×6, 10×10, 25×25 cm{sup 2}) and energies (6, 12, 20 MeV). Dose outputs were measured for all field size-aperture combinations and available energies (6–20 MeV). Measurements were taken at 100 and 110 cm SSDs. Using this data, 2D planar absolute dose distributions were constructed and compared. Passing criteria were ±2% of maximum dose or 1-mm distance-to-agreement for 99% of points. Results: A gamma analysis of the beam dosimetry showed 93 of 96 aperture size, applicator, energy, and SSD combinations passed the 2%/1mm criteria. Failures were found for small field size-large applicator combinations at 20 MeV and 100-cm SSD. Copper apertures showed a decrease in bremsstrahlung production due to copper's lower atomic number compared to Cerrobend (greatest difference was 2.5% at 20 MeV). This effect was most prominent at the highest energies with large amounts of shielding material present (small field size-large applicator). Also, an increase in electrons scattered from the collimator edge of copper compared to Cerrobend resulted in an increased dose at the field edge for copper at shallow depths (greatest increase was 1% at 20 MeV). Conclusion: Apertures for field sizes ≥6×6 cm{sup 2} at any energy, or for small fields (≤4×4 cm{sup 2}) at energies <20 MeV, showed dosimetric differences less than 2%/1mm for more than 99% of points. All field size-applicator size-energy combinations passed 3%/1mm criteria for 100% of points. Work partially

  16. Review of the poster "Dosimetric comparison of gamma knife radiosurgery vs. 125I plaque brachytherapy in a cohort of choroidal melanomas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Kelly R

    2009-01-01

    Historically, treatment for choroidal melanomas was surgical enucleation. Currently, treatment methods such as stereotactic radiosurgery and brachytherapy are being used to spare the eye. The poster "Dosimetric Comparison of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery vs. I-125 Plaque Brachytherapy in a Cohort of Choroidal Melanomas" presented at ASTRO 2007 by Anderson et al. provides a comparison of these methods. The dose to disk, fovea and lens in 29 patients from a simulated I-125 treatment and a delivered Gamma Knife radiosurgery was compared. Thirty Gy was prescribed to the 50% Isodose line in the radiosurgery and 85 Gy was prescribed to the apex of the tumor in the I-125 simulation. It was found that the Gamma Knife spares the disk better in 59% of the tumors, including those >or=6.5 mm in height; spares the fovea better in 69% of the tumors, including those >or=5.5 mm; and spares lens better in only 30% of the tumors, with no distinction in size. Tumor location was not taken into account for this study, which could explain the variations in smaller tumors. For larger tumors, gamma knife will protect most organs at risk more effectively. This study shows how a tumor's parameters can be used in selecting treatment modality.

  17. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Geoffrey G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI, which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD. Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p Conclusion Besides the advantage of faster delivery times, VMAT plans demonstrated better conformity to target, sharper dose fall-off in normal tissues and lower dose to

  18. Dosimetric comparison between 3DCRT and IMRT using different multileaf collimators in the treatment of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Chen, Changhu; Stuhr, Kelly; Gaspar, Laurie E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the differences between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the impact of collimator leaf-width on IMRT plans for the treatment of nonspherical brain tumors. Eight patients treated by 3DCRT with Novalis were selected. We developed 3 IMRT plans with different multileaf collimators (Novalis m3, Varian MLC-120, and Varian MLC-80) with the same treatment margins, number of beams, and gantry positions as in the 3DCRT treatment plans. Treatment planning utilized the BrainLAB treatment planning system. For each patient, the dose constraints and optimization parameters remained identical for all plans. The heterogeneity index, the percentage target coverage, critical structures, and normal tissue volumes receiving 50% of the prescription dose were calculated to compare the dosimetric difference. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were also introduced to evaluate the radiobiological effect for different plans. We found that IMRT significantly improved the target dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT. However, IMRT showed the same radiobiological effect as 3DCRT. For the brain tumors adjacent to (or partially overlapping with) critical structures, IMRT dramatically spared the volume of the critical structures to be irradiated. In IMRT plans, the smaller collimator leaf width could reduce the volume of critical structures irradiated to the 50% level for those partially overlapping with the brain tumors. For relatively large and spherical brain tumors, the smaller collimator leaf widths give no significant benefit.

  19. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Cirio, R.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cornelius, I.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Gomola, I.; Marchetto, F.; Porzio, M.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Peroni, C.

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 × 3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 × 3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with γ parameter <=1 was 97.7% and 97

  20. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasi, M [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo and A.S.O. Ordine Maurizano, Torino (Italy); Giordanengo, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Cirio, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [and others

    2005-10-07

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 x 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 x 24 cm{sup 2} area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm{sup 3}. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 x 3 cm{sup 2}. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s{sup -1} and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min{sup -1}; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with {gamma

  1. SU-E-J-170: Dosimetric Consequences of Uncorrected Rotational Setup Errors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maso, L [Chicago, IL (United States); Forbang, R Teboh; Zhang, Y; Herman, J; Lee, J [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the dosimetric consequences of uncorrected rotational setup errors during SBRT for pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study utilizing data from ten (n=10) previously treated SBRT pancreas patients. For each original planning CT, we applied rotational transformations to derive additional CT images representative of possible rotational setup errors. This resulted in 6 different sets of rotational combinations, creating a total of 60 CT planning images. The patients’ clinical dosimetric plans were then applied to their corresponding rotated CT images. The 6 rotation sets encompassed a 3, 2 and 1-degree rotation in each rotational direction and a 3-degree in just the pitch, a 3-degree in just the yaw and a 3-degree in just the roll. After the dosimetric plan was applied to the rotated CT images, the resulting plan was then evaluated and compared with the clinical plan for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: PTV coverage, defined here by V33 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans, ranged from 92–98%. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range decreased to 68–87%, 85–92%, and 88– 94% for n=3, 2 and 1 respectively. Normal tissue sparing defined here by the proximal stomach V15 throughout all of the patients’ clinical plans ranged from 0–8.9 cc. After an n degree rotation in each rotational direction that range increased to 0–17 cc, 0–12 cc, and 0–10 cc for n=3, 2, and 1 respectively. Conclusion: For pancreatic SBRT, small rotational setup errors in the pitch, yaw and roll direction on average caused under dosage to PTV and over dosage to proximal normal tissue. The 1-degree rotation was on average the least detrimental to the normal tissue and the coverage of the PTV. The 3-degree yaw created on average the lowest increase in volume coverage to normal tissue. This research was sponsored by the AAPM Education Council through the AAPM Education and Research

  2. Non isocentric film-based intracavitary brachytherapy planning in cervical cancer: a retrospective dosimetric analysis with CT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kirti; Mukundan, Hari; Mukherjee, Deboleena; Semwal, Manoj; Sarin, Arti

    2012-09-01

    To compare intracavitary brachytherapy dose estimation for organs at risk (bladder and rectum) based on semi-orthogonal reconstruction of radiographs on non-isocentric X-ray unit and Computed Tomography (CT) - based volumetric planning in cervical cancer. Bladder and rectal points as per International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report 38, were retrospectively evaluated on 15 high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applications for cervical cancer cases. With the same source configuration as obtained during planning on radiographs performed on a non-isocentric X-ray unit, the mean doses to 2cc of most irradiated part of bladder and rectum were computed by CT planning and these estimates were compared with the doses at ICRU bladder and rectal points. The mean ICRU point dose for bladder was 3.08 Gy (1.9-5.9 Gy) and mean dose to 2 cc (D2cc) bladder was 6.91 Gy (2.9-12.2 Gy). ICRU rectal dose was 3.8 Gy (2.4-4.45 Gy) and was comparable with D2cc rectum dose 4.2 Gy (2.8-5.9 Gy). Comparison of mean total dose (ICRU point vs. D2cc) for each patient was found to be significantly different for bladder (p = 0.000), but not for rectum (p = 0.08). On comparison of ICRU point based planning with volumetric planning on CT, it was found that bladder doses were underestimated by the film based method. However, the rectal doses were found to be similar to the D2cc doses. The results with non isocentric film based treatment planning were similar to the existing literature on orthogonal film based simulator planning.

  3. A comparative dosimetric study of neoadjuvant 3D conformal radiotherapy for operable rectal cancer patients versus conventional 2D radiotherapy in NCI-airo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. EL-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Marwa A. EL Razek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare this multiple-field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues.Methods: We conducted a single institutional prospective comparative dosimetric analysis of 22 patients who received neoadjuvant radiation therapy for rectal cancer presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between June 2010 to September 2011 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique for each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an anteroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis.Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both ( 3D & 2D ) plans while it was demonstrates that this multiple field conformal technique produces superior distribution compared to 2D technique, with considerable sparing of bladder, ovaries and head of both femora.Conclusion: From the present study, it shows that it is recommended to use 3D planning for preoperative cases of cancer rectum so far it produces good coverage of the target as well as good sparing of the surrounding critical organs.

  4. Comparison of arc-modulated cone beam therapy and helical tomotherapy for three different types of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Silke; Sterzing, Florian; Nill, Simeon; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Debus, Juergen; Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT) is a fast treatment technique deliverable in a single rotation with a conventional C-arm shaped linac. In this planning study, the authors assess the dosimetric properties of single-arc therapy in comparison to helical tomotherapy for three different tumor types. Methods: Treatment plans for three patients with prostate carcinoma, three patients with anal cancer, and three patients with head and neck cancer were optimized for helical tomotherapy and AMCBT. The dosimetric comparison of the two techniques is based on physical quantities derived from dose-volume histograms. Results: For prostate cancer, the quality of dose distributions calculated for AMCBT was of equal quality as that generated for tomotherapy with the additional benefits of a faster delivery and a lower integral dose. For highly complex geometries, the plan quality achievable with helical tomotherapy could not be achieved with arc-modulated cone beam therapy. Conclusions: Rotation therapy with a conventional linac in a single arc is capable to deliver a high and homogeneous dose to the target and spare organs at risk. Advantages of this technique are a fast treatment time and a lower integral dose in comparison to helical tomotherapy. For highly complex cases, e.g., with several target regions, the dose shaping capabilities of AMCBT are inferior to those of tomotherapy. However, treatment plans for AMCBT were also clinically acceptable.

  5. Dosimetric feasibility of ablative dose escalated focal monotherapy with MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, Ali; Carlone, Marco; Rink, Alexandra; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Peter; Berlin, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    To determine the dosimetric feasibility of dose-escalated MRI-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) focal monotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa). In all patients, GTV was defined with mpMRI, and deformably registered onto post-catheter insertion planning MRI. PTV included the GTV plus 9mm craniocaudal and 5mm in every other direction. In discovery-cohort, plans were obtained for each PTV independently aiming to deliver ⩾16.5Gy/fraction (two fraction schedule) while respecting predefined organs-at-risk (OAR) constraints or halted when achieved equivalent single-dose plan (24Gy). Dosimetric results of original and focal HDR-BT plans were evaluated to develop a planning protocol for the validation-cohort. In discovery-cohort (20-patients, 32-GTVs): PTV D95% ⩾16.5Gy could not be reached in a single plan (3%) and was accomplished (range 16.5-23.8Gy) in 15 GTVs (47%). Single-dose schedule was feasible in 16 (50%) plans. In the validation-cohort (10-patients, 10-GTVs, two separate implants each): plans met acceptable and ideal criteria in 100% and 43-100% respectively. Migration to single-dose treatment schedule was feasible in 7 implants (35%), without relaxing OAR's constraints or increasing the dose (D100% and D35%) to mpMRI-normal prostate (p>0.05). Focal ablative dose-escalated radiation is feasible with the proposed protocol. Prospective studies are warranted to determine the clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  7. SU-E-T-26: A Dosimetric Comparison of Two Treatment Setups for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D; Wang, X; Gao, S; Nitsch, P; Pollard, J; Sadagopan, R; Balter, P [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of treating lung SBRT patients with the ipsilateral arm adducted beside the body instead of elevated above the head. Methods: Patients receiving lung SBRT at our institution are typically treated with both arms raised above their head. However, several patients had difficulty maintaining their arms in an elevated position. In this study, lung SBRT patients who underwent PET-CT imaging with an adducted ipsilateral arm were selected to investigate the dosimetric effects of this treatment setup. PET-CT datasets were fused with treatment planning CT images to simulate the adducted arm position. One VMAT treatment plan was created per patient using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Plans were optimized to achieve minimal dose to the ipsilateral arm while keeping the target coverage and critical structure doses within clinical limits. The target dose coverage, conformity index (CI) for the target, and DVHs of critical structures for the adducted arm plan were calculated. These parameters were compared with the clinical plan and reported along with the mean and maximum doses of the ipsilateral arm. Results: The target coverage, CI and DVHs for the adducted arm plans of two patients (one with peripheral lesion and one with central lesion) were comparable with the clinical plans. Dose constraints for the chest wall limited further reduction of ipsilateral arm doses for the peripheral lesion plan. The mean ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 0.33 Gy and 2.4 Gy, respectively. The maximum ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 1.0 Gy and 6.2 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggested patients with central lung SBRT tumors were more suitable for treatment with the adducted arm position. More patients with various lung tumor locations will be studied to find optimal tumor locations for treatment with this arm position.

  8. Dosimetric comparison of electron beam and 9{sup 0}Sr+{sup 90}Y applicator for keloids treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Talita S.; Tada, Ariane; Antonio, Patricia L.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: tasallesc@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marco@cetea.com.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Dermatologia e Radioterapia Rubiao Junior

    2009-07-01

    Studies have been shown that among several methods that have been used for the treatment of keloids the surgical excision followed by the adjuvant radiotherapy presents the lowest relapsed rate of the injury. In this work a comparative dosimetric study has been performed using a 4 MeV electron beam from a Varian Clinac 2100C linear accelerator at the radiotherapy service of the Hospital das Clinicas of UNESP-HC, Botucatu-SP and an Amershan {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y brachytherapy applicator with 1491 MBq of activity. Percentage depth dose curves from ionization chamber measurements and through Monte Carlo simulation have been obtained and compared. Dose measurements have been obtained using parallel plates ionization chamber (Esradin A12) and extrapolation mini-chamber developed at IPEN. The dose calculations have been obtained using the well-known Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. Maximum dose differences obtained between measured/calculated values for {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y applicator and for the electron beam were, respectively: 7.8 % and 8.0%. The profiles of the depth and superficial tissue dose distribution produced by the electron beam revealed themselves flatter and more homogeneous than those produced by the {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y applicator, especially to wider fields, which cannot be obtained with beta therapy applicators because of their geometric limitations. In conclusion this present work has shown that {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y applicators could be efficient for small and very superficial lesions but in most cases electron beam sources are more adequate especially for large and deeper lesions. (author)

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-Ding; Zhao, Yu-Tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50Gy/25Fx/5W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V30 of the ipsilateral lung and V10, V30, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and V5 of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Wuxi (China); Ma, Chang-Ming, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  11. Dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ); Dosimetrische Verifikation von IMRT-Gesamtplaenen am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhein, B.; Haering, P.; Debus, J.; Schlegel, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The present paper describes a method for the individual dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans. The German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum; DKFZ) has implemented the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) since 1997. So far, 246 patients with head and neck cancer, cancer of the prostate, breast, and vertebral column, as well as mesothelioma of the pleura have been treated. Every IMRT plan is transferred into a special IMRT verification phantom, recalculated, and dosimetrically verified. Absolute dose distributions are measured with Kodak EDR films and compared with the results of the dose calculation. After correction of the optical density in relationship to the dose, EDR films are able to measure the absolute dose with an accuracy of {+-}2% compared to an ionization chamber. A Visual C{sup ++} software tool has been developed to correlate and evaluate the film dose distributions with the corresponding slices of the 3D dose cube. Beside the overlay of absolute or relative isodoses and dose profiles, the median dose within correlated regions of interest (ROIs) is also included in the quantitative dose evaluation. The deviation between EDR film dosimetry and dose calculation is {delta}D=-0.3%{+-}2.3%. After introduction of the verification software, the total verification time (including handling, correlation, evaluation, and documentation of the data), could be reduced to less than 2 hours. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wird eine Methode zur individuellen dosimetrischen Ueberpruefung von IMRT-Bestrahlungsplaenen beschrieben. Am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) wird die intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT) seit 1997 durchgefuehrt. 246 Patienten mit Tumoren im Kopf-Hals Bereich, der Wirbelsaeule, der Prostata, der weiblichen Brust und Pleuramesotheliome wurden bisher bestrahlt. Jeder IMRT-Bestrahlungsplan wird in ein spezielles Verifikationsphantom uebertragen, dort neu berechnet und dosimetrisch verifiziert

  12. A dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated and volumetric arc radiation therapy for gastric cancer%静态调强与容积调强技术在胃癌术后放射治疗中的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾建霜; 肖江洪; 李志平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare radiotherapy plans for gastric cancer using IMRT and single and (or) double-arc VMAT techniques.Methods 29 patients were replanned by 5-filed IMRT,7-field IMRT,SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT.Dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics were analyzed to compare treatment plans.Results The DA-VMAT plans are better than the other methods in terms of PTV dose and OARs except for the liver.For the liver,5F-IMRT showed a slight advantage in V30 and mean dose to normal liver over that in DA-VMAT.Conclusions DA-VMAT provided better tumor coverage compared with 5F-IMRT,7F-IMRT and SA-VMAT but DA-VMAT had no advantage of liver protection over the 5F-IMRT.Further studies are needed to establish treatment outcome differences between the four technologies.%目的 比较胃癌患者手术后静态调强放射治疗(IMRT)与容积调强放射治疗(VMAT)的剂量学差异,为临床应用提供参考.方法 选取29例胃癌术后患者,每例患者分别制定5野IM-RT、7野IMRT、单弧VMAT和双弧VMAT四种治疗计划,评估靶区和危及器官的剂量分布情况.结果 DA-VMAT在靶区剂量均匀性、适形度和肾脏保护方面较优,但在肝脏保护上逊于5F-IMRT.结论 综合考虑靶区适形度、剂量均匀性、治疗效率和对肾脏的保护,DA-VMAT在胃癌放射治疗中具有放射物理的优势.

  13. 2种容积旋转调强技术在乳腺癌改良根治术后放疗剂量学中的应用比较%Dosimetric comparison between two volumetric modulated photon arc therapies for patients with breast cancer mastecomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹明; 王黎; 孙新臣; 穆庆霞; 裴忠玲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetry and treatment efficiency between a multi-ple partial volumetric-modulated arcs therapy (MP-VMAT)and double-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT)for patients with breast cancer mastecomy.Methods 19 patients with breast cancer treated by mastecomy and requiring postoperative radiotherapy were collected.MP-VMAT and DA-VMAT plans were applied for each patient respectively.Dosimetry parameters for target volume and organ of risks (OARs)were compared.Machine unite and delivery times were compared.Results MP-VMAT plans had a more uniform target dose distribution with average Conformation Index (CI )andHomogeneity Index (HI )of0 .5 6 and 1 .0 6 compared to 1 .0 6 and 1.14 of the DA-VMAT plans(P <0.05).MP-VMAT plans predicted a reduction of 5.53% in V20 of contralateral lung,3.74 Gy in mean dose,6.27% in V5 and 5.53% in V20 of ispleratal lung respectively (P <0.05).MP-VMAT plans predicted a reduction of 10.33% and 7.82% in V5 and V10 of heartrespectively (P <0.05),MP-VMAT plans predicted a reduction of 9.14%, 2.72% and 0.06% inV5,V10 and V15 of contralateral breast respectively (P <0.05)plans. However,MP-VMAT plans improved monitor units 7 4 5 .9 MU and treatment time 3 0 4 .6 s compared with DA-VMAT 524.4 MU and 196.7 s (P <0.05).Conclusion MP-VMAT plans generate more uniformity in the target dose and decreased the dose of most of organs of risk com-pared to the DA-VMAT,But improved monitor units and treatment time.In clinical application, different techniqies are chosen based on the situation of every patient.%目的:探讨双弧容积旋转调强(DA-VMAT)相比多个部分弧形容积旋转调强(MP-VMAT)在乳腺癌改良根治术后放疗中的剂量学特点及治疗效率。方法2012年8月-2013年8月江苏省人民医院放射治疗科收治的乳腺癌改良根治术后患者19例,采用相同剂量学限制条件分别制订 DA-VMAT 及 MP-VMAT 计划,通过其剂量学对比分析评估靶区

  14. SU-E-T-122: Dosimetric Comparison Between Cone, HDMLC and MicroMLC for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, N; Caussa, L; Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of three collimation systems, 5mm circular cone (Brainlab) and square fields of 5mm with HDMLC (Varian) and microMLC Moduleaf, Siemens) for trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Methods: A TPS Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB was used to do treatment plans for each collimations system in a square solid water phantom with isocenter at 5cm depth. Single field and treatment plan including 11 arcs with fix field and 100° gantry range was made for each collimation systems. EBT3 films were positioned at isocenter in a coronal plane to measured dose distribution for all geometries. Films were digitized with a Vidar DosimetryPro Red scanner with a resolution of 89dpi and RIT113v6.1 software was used for analysis. Penumbra region (80%–20%), FWHM and dose percentage at 5mm and 10mm from CAX were determined. All profiles were normalized at CAX. Results: For single beam the penumbra (FWHM) was 1.5mm (5.3mm) for the cone, 1.9mm (5.5mm) for HDMLC and 1.8mm (5.4mm) for the microMLC. Dose percentage at 5mm was 6.9% for cone, 12.5% for HDMLC and 8.7% for the microMLC. For treatment plan the penumbra (FWHM) was 2.58mm (5.47mm) for the cone, 2.8mm (5.84mm) for HDMLC and 2.58mm (6.09mm) for the microMLC. Dose perecentage at 5mm was 13.1% for cone, 16.1% for HDMLC, 15.2% for the microMLC. Conclusion: The cone has a dose falloff larger than the microMLC and HDMLC, by its reduced penumbra, this translates into better protection of surrounding healthy tissue, however, the microMLC and HDMLC have similar accuracy to cone.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy treatment plans for total marrow irradiation created using GPU and CPU dose calculation engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalichowski, Adrian; Burmeister, Jay

    2013-07-01

    To compare optimization characteristics, plan quality, and treatment delivery efficiency between total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans using the new TomoTherapy graphic processing unit (GPU) based dose engine and CPU/cluster based dose engine. Five TMI plans created on an anthropomorphic phantom were optimized and calculated with both dose engines. The planning treatment volume (PTV) included all the bones from head to mid femur except for upper extremities. Evaluated organs at risk (OAR) consisted of lung, liver, heart, kidneys, and brain. The following treatment parameters were used to generate the TMI plans: field widths of 2.5 and 5 cm, modulation factors of 2 and 2.5, and pitch of either 0.287 or 0.43. The optimization parameters were chosen based on the PTV and OAR priorities and the plans were optimized with a fixed number of iterations. The PTV constraint was selected to ensure that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The plans were evaluated based on D80 and D50 (dose to 80% and 50% of the OAR volume, respectively) and hotspot volumes within the PTVs. Gamma indices (Γ) were also used to compare planar dose distributions between the two modalities. The optimization and dose calculation times were compared between the two systems. The treatment delivery times were also evaluated. The results showed very good dosimetric agreement between the GPU and CPU calculated plans for any of the evaluated planning parameters indicating that both systems converge on nearly identical plans. All D80 and D50 parameters varied by less than 3% of the prescription dose with an average difference of 0.8%. A gamma analysis Γ(3%, 3 mm) CPU plan. The average number of voxels meeting the Γ CPU/cluster based system was 579 vs 26.8 min for the GPU based system. There was no difference in the calculated treatment delivery time per fraction. Beam-on time varied based on field width and pitch and ranged between 15 and 28 min. The TomoTherapy GPU based dose engine

  16. SU-E-P-58: Dosimetric Study of Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy for Postoperation of Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target can achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.

  17. Assessment of Monte Carlo algorithm for compliance with RTOG 0915 dosimetric criteria in peripheral lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; McClinton, Christopher; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Wang, Fen

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Monte Carlo-generated dose distributions with the X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of peripheral lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with non-protocol dose-volume normalization and to assess plan outcomes utilizing RTOG 0915 dosimetric compliance criteria. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) currently require radiation dose to be calculated using tissue density heterogeneity corrections. Dosimetric criteria of RTOG 0915 were established based on superposition/convolution or heterogeneities corrected pencil beam (PB-hete) algorithms for dose calculations. Clinically, more accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based algorithms are now routinely used for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) dose calculations. Hence, it is important to determine whether MC calculations in the delivery of lung SBRT can achieve RTOG standards. In this report, we evaluate iPlan generated MC plans for peripheral lung cancer patients treated with SBRT using dose-volume histogram (DVH) normalization to determine if the RTOG 0915 compliance criteria can be met. This study evaluated 20 Stage I-II NSCLC patients with peripherally located lung tumors, who underwent MC-based SBRT with heterogeneity correction using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm (Brainlab iPlan version 4.1.2). Total dose of 50 to 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions was delivered to the planning target vol-ume (PTV) with at least 95% of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100% ≥ 95%). The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of 4D CT scans. The PTV included the ITV plus 5 mm uniform margin applied to the ITV. The PTV ranged from 11.1 to 163.0 cc (mean = 46.1 ± 38.7 cc). Organs at risk (OARs) including ribs were delineated on mean intensity projection (MeanIP) images of 4D CT scans. Optimal clinical MC SBRT plans were

  18. SU-E-T-308: Dosimetric Comparison of SBRT VMAT Treatment Plans Generated for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D; Wang, B; Dunlap, N [Univ Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess differences in treatment plan quality between VMAT stereotactic body plans generated using the 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV FFF modalities available in our clinic. Plans for lung, spine, and other sites were compared to see if there is any advantage of one modality over the other. Methods: Treatment plans done for actual SBRT patients were selected. Groups of ten lung plans, five spine plans, and five plans from other sites were selected. New treatment plans were generated for each plan using the Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm. The constraints were kept the same as used in the actual plans, but the same version of software was used to generate plans for the three modalities. In addition, because there are natural variations in plans re-done with the same dose constraints, one of the lung plans was repeated ten times to assess those differences. Volumes of the 100%, 90%, 50%, 20% and 10% isodose surfaces were compared. Maximum dose two centimeters from the PTV were compared, as well as the volume of the 105% isodose surface outside of the PTV. In addition, the 20 Gray lung volume was compared for the lung plans. The values of these parameters were divided by the values for the 6 MV plans for comparison. Average and standard deviations were obtained for quantities in each group. The Student t test was done to determine if differences were seen at the 95% confidence level. Results: Comparison of the treatment plans showed no significant differences when assessing these volumes and doses. There were not any trends seen when comparing modalities as a function of PTV volume either. Conclusion: There is no obvious dosimetric advantage in selection of one modality over another for these types of SBRT plans.

  19. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy of the whole larynx, followed by a single affected vocal cord, for T1a glottic cancer: Dosimetric analysis of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) and endolaryngeal surgery are standard treatments for early-stage glottic cancer. They have closely matched oncological outcomes; however, it is debatable which method is superior in terms of functional outcomes. Several dosimetric studies have demonstrated that, compared with conventional RT, intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) reduces unnecessary radiation of the adjacent normal tissues, including the carotid artery and thyroid gland. However, RT targets the whole larynx, whereas endolaryngeal surgery is a highly focused treatment involving the en bloc resection of a tumor with safety margins. For T1a glottic cancer, in which the tumor is limited to one vocal cord, the technical feasibility of targeting IMRT on the single vocal cord affected has been investigated; however, the clinical feasibility and the possibility of inferior local control remain to be elucidated. In the present case study, IMRT was used to treat the whole larynx first, and then to treat a single vocal cord. The patient in the present study had T1a glottic cancer, and received volumetric modulated arc therapy with a total dose of 63 Gy/28 fractions. The first treatment phase (40.5 Gy/18 fractions) targeted the whole larynx to eliminate subclinical disease. The second treatment phase (22.5 Gy/10 fractions) targeted only the involved vocal cord. During this treatment phase, the exposure of the non-involved right vocal cord, the right carotid artery and the thyroid gland to the radiation was lower compared with the continuation of the initial treatment approach. These findings suggested that changing the target volume from the whole larynx to the affected vocal cord during the course of IMRT is feasible for T1a glottic cancer, and that it may reduce functional side effects while maintaining oncological outcomes.

  20. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Kumar Rout

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the continual diversity between flattening photon beam (FB and Flattening Filter Free (FFF photon beams for localized prostate cancer; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beam for this type of treatment.Methods: Eight prostate cases including seminal vesicles selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 78 Gy (56 Gy to PTVP and an additional 22 Gy to PTVB. For all cases, treatment plans using 6MV with FB and FFF beams with identical dose-volume constraints, arc angles and number of arcs were developed. The dose volume histograms for both techniques were compared for primary target volume and critical structures.Results: A low Sigma index (FFF: 1.65 + 0.361; FB: 1.725 + 0.39 indicating improved dose homogeneity in FFF beam. Conformity index (FFF: 0.994 + 0.01; FB: 0.993 + 0.01 is comparable for both techniques. Minimal difference of Organ at risk mean dose was observed. Normal tissue integral dose in FB plan resulted 1.5% lower than FFF plan. All the plans displayed significant increase (1.18 times for PTVP and 1.11 for PTBB in the average number of necessary MU with FFF beam.Conclusion: Diversity between FB and FFF beam plans were found. FFF beam accelerator has been utilized to develop clinically acceptable Rapid Arc treatment plans for prostate cancer with 6 MV.---------------------------------Cite this article as: Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6

  1. Dosimetric benefits of IMRT and VMAT in the treatment of middle thoracic esophageal cancer: is the conformal radiotherapy still an alternative option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqin; Xie, Congying; Hu, Meilong; Han, Ce; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yuan, Huawei; Jin, Xiance

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences among conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) in the treatment of middle thoracic esophageal cancer, and determine the most appropriate treatment modality. IMRT and one-arc VMAT plans were generated for eight middle thoracic esophageal cancer patients treated previous with CRT. The planning target volume (PTV) coverage and protections on organs at risk of three planning schemes were compared. All plans have sufficient PTV coverage and no significant differences were observed, except for the conformity and homogeneity. The lung V5, V10, and V13 in CRT were 47.9% ± 6.1%, 36.5% ± 4.6%, and 33.2% ± 4.2%, respectively, which were greatly increased to 78.2% ± 13.7% (p VMAT, respectively. The lung V20 (p = 0.03) in VMAT and the V30 (p = 0.04) in IMRT were lower than those in CRT. Both IMRT and VMAT achieved a better protection on heart. However, the volumes of the healthy tissue outside of PTV irradiated by a low dose were higher for IMRT and VMAT. IMRT and VMAT also had a higher MU, optimization time, and delivery time compared to CRT. In conclusion, all CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans are able to meet the prescription and there is no clear distinction on PTV coverage. IMRT and VMAT can only decrease the volume of lung and heart receiving a high dose, but at a cost of delivering low dose to more volume of lung and normal tissues. CRT is still a feasible option for middle thoracic esophageal cancer radiotherapy, especially for the cost-effective consideration.

  2. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy after therapeutic groin lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma: a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gerard; Foote, Matthew; Brown, Simon; Burmeister, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Radiotherapy after lymph node dissection is recommended in high-risk melanoma cases. The aim of this study is to assess whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers advantages over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the groin nodal basin. Fifteen consecutively treated patients (5 3DCRT and 10 IMRT) were selected. Optimized theoretical plans using the other modality were created - enabling direct comparisons of 3DCRT and IMRT. Target volume and organs at risk constraints were assessed as achieved or as having minor (≤5%) or major (>5%) deviations. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the dose received from each patient plan (3DCRT vs. IMRT), whereas the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare clinical plans with theoretical plans. Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical data. Target coverage was achievable in most patients (major deviations - 1 IMRT and 3 3DCRT). Conformity index improved with IMRT - median 0.65, range 0.48-0.81, versus median 0.44, range 0.29-0.60 for 3DCRT; P value less than 0.001. All 3DCRT plans had major deviations for femoral head/neck constraints. Twelve and 13 IMRT plans achieved the high (V42numbers used nor dosimetric endpoints measured when clinical plans were compared with theoretical plans. IMRT appears to allow superior conformity of dose to the target volume while relatively sparing the adjacent the bowel and femoral head/neck. This may reduce toxicity while maintaining control rates.

  3. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35

  4. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, Ozer; Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically "negated" the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 ± 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 ± 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 ± 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p 1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter for the surrounding normal tissue except for the dose received by the penile bulb and the right hip. Our dosimetric evaluation suggests significant underdosing with inaccurate target localization and emphasizes the importance of accurate patient setup and target localization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of intrafraction organ motion, rotation

  5. Comparison of dosimetric mapping of radiation induced skin ulcer animal model in Nud mice and Wistar rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Nelson M.; Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Ferreira, Danilo C.; Somessari, Elizabeth S.R.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Dornelles, Leonardo D.P.; Bueno, Carmem C.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: nelsonnininho@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Skin ulcer (SU) is the damage caused to the skin by ionizing radiation, becoming evident at the end or after the conclusion of radiotherapeutic treatments. Technological advances have enabled dose increases in radiotherapy protocols, augmenting SU cases. In order to investigate potential therapies for the SU, an animal model (AM) was devised for Wistar rats, based upon the AM of the Nud mice. The AM dose rate (DR) was measured with silicium diode in the gamma irradiator and lead blocks. Three animals were positioned into immobilizers with their dorsal region skin pinched and held up by a suture point fixed in the immobilizer and exposed to 85 Gy. The DR variation in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane was non-significant, thus establishing an average DR. Such shielding reduced the DR in the rat in more than 93%. The difference in the immobilizer's dimensions impaired the comparison between the DRs; nevertheless, the DR comparison in the immobilizer tangential point with the source median plane became the reference point for AM comparison. The appearance of SU symptoms and their maximum extensions were similar, notwithstanding the difference regarding their healing periods. The specified dose induced the SU emerging. Mass variation exerted no influence onto the healing, despite having age affected it. The animals, throughout and after the experiment, showed normal health with just the SU symptoms. This work granted us the AM for the Wistar rats, which shall reinforce the investigation of new therapies for SU treatment. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy of intensity modulated VS conformational in the treatment of carcinoma of the prostate. A dosimetric comparison; Radioterapia de intensidad modulada VS conformacional en el tratamiento de carcinoma de prostata. Una camparacion dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Martin, G.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Zapatero Laborda, A.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Roch Gonzalez, M.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy is a technique of high conformation which, by its nature, has as one of its main directions prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this work is presents results of the dosimetric indicators collected in our hospital a number of patients of carcinoma of the prostate with standard three-dimensional Conformal technique (3D-CRT) and IMRT. Aims to demonstrate and quantify with a statistical methodology that, establishing an adequate Protocol of IMRT, significant reductions in risk organ doses can be obtained by keeping the same prescription to the white volume. (Author)

  7. Dosimetric effect of intra-fractional and inter-fractional target motion in lung cancer radiotherapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerthraj Verma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of present study was to experimentally evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT, dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT, step-shoot (SS-IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT treatment delivery techniques due to intra- and inter-fractional target motion. Methods: A previously treated lung patient was selected for this study and was replanned for 60 Gy in 30 fractions using four techniques (3DCRT, D-IMRT, SS-IMRT, and VMAT. These plans were delivered in a clinical linear accelerator equipped with HexaPOD™ evo RT System. The target dose of static QUASAR phantom was calculated that served as reference dose to the target. The QUASAR respiratory body phantom along with patients breathing wave form and HexaPOD™ evo RT System was used to simulate the intra-fraction and inter-fraction motions. Dose measurements were done by applying the intra-fractional and inter-fractional motions in all the four treatment delivery techniques.Results: The maximum percentage deviation in a single field was -4.3%, 10.4%, and -12.2% for 3DCRT, D-IMRT and SS-IMRT deliveries, respectively. Similarly, the deviation for a single fraction was -1.51%, -1.88%, -2.22%, and -3.03% for 3DCRT, D-IMRT, SS-IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. Conclusion: The impact of inter-fractional and intra-fractional uncertainties calculated as deviation between dynamic and static condition dose was large in some fractions, however average deviation calculated for thirty fractions was well within 0.5% in all the four techniques. Therefore, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties could be concern in fewer fraction treatments such as stereotactic body radiation therapy, and should be used in conjunction with intra- and inter-fractional motion management techniques.

  8. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Roy, S [AMRI Cancer Centre, Kolkata, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, haryana (India); Pradhan, A [GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  9. Dosimetric Comparison and Potential for Improved Clinical Outcomes of Paediatric CNS Patients Treated with Protons or IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armoogum, Kris S., E-mail: kris.armoogum@nhs.net [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Uttoxeter Road, Derby DE22 3NE (United Kingdom); Thorp, Nicola [The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Clatterbridge Road, Bebington, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-28

    Background: We compare clinical outcomes of paediatric patients with CNS tumours treated with protons or IMRT. CNS tumours form the second most common group of cancers in children. Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment of many of these patients but also contributes to late side effects in long term survivors. Radiation dose inevitably deposited in healthy tissues outside the clinical target has been linked to detrimental late effects such as neurocognitive, behavioural and vascular effects in addition to endocrine abnormalities and second tumours. Methods: A literature search was performed using keywords: protons, IMRT, CNS and paediatric. Of 189 papers retrieved, 10 were deemed relevant based on title and abstract screening. All papers directly compared outcomes from protons with photons, five papers included medulloblastoma, four papers each included craniopharyngioma and low grade gliomas and three papers included ependymoma. Results: This review found that while proton beam therapy offered similar clinical target coverage, there was a demonstrable reduction in integral dose to normal structures. Conclusions: This in turn suggests the potential for superior long term outcomes for paediatric patients with CNS tumours both in terms of radiogenic second cancers and out-of-field adverse effects.

  10. Influence of jaw tracking in intensity-modulated and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for head and neck cancers: a dosimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Karthick Raj [Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Tamilnadu (India); Upadhayay, Sagar [Radiation Oncology, Kathmandu Cancer Center, Bhaktapur (Nepal); Das, K. J. Maria [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2017-03-15

    To Study the dosimetric advantage of the Jaw tracking technique in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for Head and Neck Cancers. We retrospectively selected 10 previously treated head and neck cancer patients stage (T1/T2, N1, M0) in this study. All the patients were planned for IMRT and VMAT with simultaneous integrated boost technique. IMRT and VMAT plans were performed with jaw tracking (JT) and with static jaw (SJ) technique by keeping the same constraints and priorities for a particular patient. Target conformity, dose to the critical structures and low dose volumes were recorded and analyzed for IMRT and VMAT plans with and without JT for all the patients. The conformity index average of all patients followed by standard deviation (x¯x¯ ± σx¯σx¯) of the JT-IMRT, SJ-IMRT, JT-VMAT, and SJ-VMAT were 1.72 ± 0.56, 1.67 ± 0.57, 1.83 ± 0.65, and 1.85 ± 0.64, and homogeneity index were 0.059 ± 0.05, 0.064 ± 0.05, 0.064 ± 0.04, and 0.064 ± 0.05. JT-IMRT shows significant mean reduction in right parotid and left parotid shows of 7.64% (p < 0.001) and 7.45% (p < 0.001) compare to SJ-IMRT. JT-IMRT plans also shows considerable dose reduction to thyroid, inferior constrictors, spinal cord and brainstem compared to the SJ-IMRT plans. Significant dose reductions were observed for critical structure in the JT-IMRT compared to SJ-IMRT technique. In JT-VMAT plans dose reduction to the critical structure were not significant compared to the SJ-IMRT due to relatively lesser monitor units.

  11. Predictors of urinary and rectal toxicity after external conformed radiation therapy in prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical, tumour and dosimetric parameters and radical and postoperative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arribas, C M; González-San Segundo, C; Cuesta-Álvaro, P; Calvo-Manuel, F A

    2017-06-15

    To determine rectal and urinary toxicity after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), assessing the results of patients who undergo radical or postoperative therapy for prostate cancer (pancreatic cancer) and their correlation with potential risk factors. A total of 333 patients were treated with EBRT. Of these, 285 underwent radical therapy and 48 underwent postoperative therapy (39 cases of rescue and 9 of adjuvant therapy). We collected clinical, tumour and dosimetric variable to correlate with toxicity parameters. We developed decision trees based on the degree of statistical significance. The rate of severe acute toxicity, both urinary and rectal, was 5.4% and 1.5%, respectively. The rate of chronic toxicity was 4.5% and 2.7%, respectively. Twenty-seven patients presented haematuria, and 9 presented haemorrhagic rectitis. Twenty-five patients (7.5%) presented permanent limiting sequela. The patients with lower urinary tract symptoms prior to the radiation therapy presented poorer tolerance, with greater acute bladder toxicity (P=0.041). In terms of acute rectal toxicity, 63% of the patients with mean rectal doses >45Gy and anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy developed mild toxicity compared with 37% of the patients with mean rectal doses <45 Gy and without anticoagulant therapy. We were unable to establish predictors of chronic toxicity in the multivariate analysis. The long-term sequelae were greater in the patients who underwent urological operations prior to the radiation therapy and who were undergoing anticoagulant therapy. The tolerance to EBRT was good, and severe toxicity was uncommon. Baseline urinary symptoms constitute the predictor that most influenced the acute urinary toxicity. Rectal toxicity is related to the mean rectal dose and with anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy. There were no significant differences in severe toxicity between radical versus postoperative radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  12. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological assessment among a nonstandard RapidArc, standard RapidArc, classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 3D brachytherapy for the treatment of the vaginal vault in patients affected by gynecologic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Califano, Giorgia [Service of Medical Physics, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Barbieri, Viviana; Sanpaolo, Piero; Castaldo, Giovanni [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumors of Romagna IRST, Meldola (Italy); Fusco, Vincenzo [U.O. of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Regional Cancer Hospital (C.R.O.B.), Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a nonstandard RapidArc (RA) modality as alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) or IMRT treatments of the vaginal vault in patients with gynecological cancer (GC). Nonstandard (with vaginal applicator) and standard (without vaginal applicator) RapidArc plans for 27 women with GC were developed to compare with HDR-BRT and IMRT. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison were performed by means of dose-volume histogram and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). In addition, the integral dose and the overall treatment times were evaluated. RA, as well as IMRT, results in a high uniform dose on PTV compared with HDR-BRT. However, the average of EUD for HDR-BRT was significantly higher than those with RA and IMRT. With respect to the OARs, standard RA was equivalent of IMRT but inferior to HDR-BRT. Furthermore, nonstandard RA was comparable with IMRT for bladder and sigmoid and better than HDR-BRT for the rectum because of a significant reduction of d{sub 2cc}, d{sub 1cc}, and d{sub max} (p < 0.01). Integral doses were always higher than HDR-BRT, although the values were very low. Delivery times were about the same and more than double for HDR-BRT compared with IMRT and RA, respectively. In conclusion, the boost of dose on vaginal vault in patients affected by GC delivered by a nonstandard RA technique was a reasonable alternative to the conventional HDR-BRT because of a reduction of delivery time and rectal dose at substantial comparable doses for the bladder and sigmoid. However HDR-BRT provides better performance in terms of PTV coverage as evidenced by a greater EUD.

  13. SU-E-T-301: Dosimetric Comparison Between Adaptive and Rectilinear Template-Based Prostate Seed Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugar, E Neubauer; Buzurovic, I; O’Farrell, D; Hansen, J; Devlin, P; Cormack, R; Nguyen, P [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of a standard rectilinear and an adaptive technique used in I125 prostate seed implants. Methods: To achieve favorable dosimetry in prostate implants we used adaptive needle updates to match actual positions in real-time. The seed locations were optimized based on actual needle locations. The seeds were delivered automatically with a robotic device seedSelectron™ (Elekta Brachytherapy). In this study, we evaluated the former approach against the standard rectilinear technique in which the needles have a parallel distribution. The treatment plans for 10 patients were analyzed. For comparison, the actual treatment plans were revised so each needle was repositioned to its original parallel location through the template. The analysis was performed by comparing the target coverage and dose to the organs at risk. The comparison was done using the following planning goals: the target D90> 90%, V100% > 90%, V50% <70% and V200% <30%; the urethra V125% < 1cm3 and V150%= 0cm3; and the Rectum V100%<1cm3 and V69% < 8cm3. The prescription dose to the target was 145Gy. Results: The average target volume and number of seeds were 44.39cm3(SD=11.14) and 74(SD=12), respectively. The D90 for adaptive and rectilinear plans was 159.9Gy(SD=2.99) and 155.53Gy(SD=4.04) resulting in a 2.74% difference for the average target coverage. A similar difference (1.75%) was noticed in the target V100[%]. No significant difference was noticed in the dose to the urethra and rectum. All planning goals were met with both the adaptive and rectilinear approach for each plan. Conclusion: The study reveals enhanced coverage of the target when using the adaptive needle adjustments as compared to the rectilinear approach for the analyzed cases. However, the differences in dosimetry did not translate to meaningful clinical outcomes.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of an automatic segmentation tool of pelvic structures from MRI images for prostate cancer radiotherapy; Evaluation dosimetrique d'un outil de delineation automatique des organes pelviens a partir d'images IRM pour la radiotherapie du cancer prostatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, D.; Lacornerie, T.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Pasquier, D. [Centre Galilee, Polyclinique de la Louviere, 59 - Lille (France); Pasquier, D.; Betrouni, N.; Vermandel, M.; Rousseau, J. [Lille-2 Univ., U703 Thiais, Inserm, Lab. de Biophysique EA 1049, Institut de Technologie Medicale, CHU de Lille, 59 (France)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: An automatic segmentation tool of pelvic structures from MRI images for prostate cancer radiotherapy was developed and dosimetric evaluation of differences of delineation (automatic versus human) is presented here. Materials and methods: C.T.V. (clinical target volume), rectum and bladder were defined automatically and by a physician in 20 patients. Treatment plans based on 'automatic' volumes were transferred on 'manual' volumes and reciprocally. Dosimetric characteristics of P.T.V. (V.95, minimal, maximal and mean doses), rectum (V.50, V.70, maximal and mean doses) and bladder (V.70, maximal and mean doses) were compared. Results: Automatic delineation of C.T.V. did not significantly influence dosimetric characteristics of 'manual' P.T.V. (projected target volume). Rectal V-50 and V.70 were not significantly different; mean rectal dose is slightly superior (43.2 versus 44.4 Gy, p = 0.02, Student test). Bladder V.70 was significantly superior too (19.3 versus 21.6, p = 0.004). Organ-at-risk (O.A.R.) automatic delineation had little influence on their dosimetric characteristics; rectal V.70 was slightly underestimated (20 versus 18.5 Gy, p = 0.001). Conclusion: C.T.V. and O.A.R. automatic delineation had little influence on dosimetric characteristics. Software developments are ongoing to enable routine use and interobserver evaluation is needed. (authors)

  15. SU-E-T-11: A Dosimetric Comparison of Robotic Prostatic Radiosugery Using Multi- Leaf Collimation Vs Circular Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J; Yang, J; Lamond, J; Lavere, N; Laciano, R; Ding, W; Arrigo, S; Brady, L [Philadelphia Cyberknife, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The study compared the dosimetry plans of Stereotatic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) prostate cancer patients using the M6 Cyberknife with Multi-leaf Collimation (MLC) compared with the plans using G4 Cyberknife with circular collimators. Methods: Eight previously treated prostate cancer patients' SBRT plans using circular collimators, designed with Multiplan v3.5.3, were used as a benchmark. The CT, contours and the optimization scripts were imported into Multiplan v5.0 system and replanned with MLC. The same planning objectives were used: more than 95% of PTV received 36.25Gy, 90% of prostate received 40Gy and maximum dose <45Gy, in five fractions. For organs at risk, less than 1cc of rectum received 36Gy and less than 10cc of bladder received 37Gy. Plans were evaluated on parameters derived from dose volume. The beam number, MU and delivery time were recorded to compare the treatment efficiency. Results: The mean CTV volume was 41.3cc (27.5∼57.6cc) and mean PTV volume was 76.77cc (59.1∼99.7cc). The mean PTV coverage was comparable between MLC (98.87%) and cone (98.74%). MLC plans had a slightly more favorable homogeneity index (1.22) and conformity index (1.17), than the cone (1.24 and 1.15). The mean rectum volume of 36 Gy (0.52cc) of MLC plans was slightly larger than cone (0.38cc) and the mean bladder volume of 37 Gy was smaller in MLC (1.82cc) than in cone plans (3.09cc). The mean number of nodes and beams were 65.9 and 80.5 in MLC vs 65.9 and 203.6 in cone. The mean MUs were significantly less for MLC plans (24,228MUs) than cone (32,347MUs). The total delivery time (which included 5 minutes for setup) was less, 29.6min (26∼32min) for MLC vs 45min (35∼55min) for cone. Conclusion: While the differences in the dosimetry between the MLC and circular collimator plans were rather minor, the MLC plans were much more efficient and required significantly less treatment time.

  16. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma: a dosimetric and delivery efficiency comparison with static-field IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofang; Zhao, Yingchao; Liang, Zhiwen; Dassarath, Meera; Wang, Lu; Jin, Lihui; Chen, Lili; Dong, James; Price, Robert A; Ma, C-M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment plan adequacy and delivery efficiency among volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with one or two arcs and the conventional static-field dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients undergoing oropharyngeal carcinoma. Fifteen patient cases were included in this investigation. Each of the cases was planned using step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT with a single arc (Arc1) and VMAT with double arcs (Arc2). A two-dose level prescription for planning target volumes (PTVs) was delivered with 70 Gy/56 Gy in 30 fractions. Comparisons were performed of the dose-volume histograms (DVH) for PTVs, the DVH for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. IMRT and Arc2 achieved similar target coverage, but superior to Arc1. Apart from the oral cavity, Arc1 showed no advantage in sparing of OARs compared with IMRT, while Arc2 obtained equivalent or better sparing of OARs among the three techniques. VMAT reduced MU/fx and shortened delivery time remarkably compared with IMRT. Our results demonstrated that for oropharyngeal cases, Arc2 can achieve superior target coverage and normal tissue sparing, as well as a significant reduction in treatment time. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  18. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  19. A dosimetric comparison between 3D-Conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy plans in the treatment of posterior fossa boost in children with high risk medulloblastom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saad El Din I; Abd El AAl H; Makaar W; Mashhour K; El Beih D; Hashem W

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The work is a comparative study between two modalities of radiation therapy, the aim of which is to compare 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treating posterior fossa boost in children with high risk medul oblastoma;dosimetrical y evaluating and comparing both techniques as regard target coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR). Methods:Twenty patients with high risk medul oblastoma were treated by 3D-CRT technique. A dosimetric comparison was done by performing two plans for the posterior fossa boost, 3D-CRT and IMRT plans, for the same patient using Eclipse planning system (version 8.6). Results:IMRT had a better conformity index compared to 3D-CRT plans (P value of 0.000). As for the dose homogeneity it was also better in the IMRT plans, yet it hasn’t reached the statistical significant value. Also, doses received by the cochleae, brainstem and spinal cord were significantly less in the IMRT plans than those of 3D-CRT (P value<0.05). Conclusion:IMRT technique was clearly able to improve conformity and homogeneity index, spare the cochleae, reduce dose to the brainstem and spinal cord in comparison to 3D-CRT technique.

  20. SU-F-BRB-14: Dosimetric Effects at Air- Tissue Boundary Due to Magnetic Field in MR-Guided IMRT/VMAT Delivery for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, P; Chen, X; Schultz, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of the MR-Linac enables real-time and high soft tissue contrast image guidance in radiation therapy (RT) delivery. Potential hot-spots at air-tissue interfaces, such as the sphenoid sinus, in RT for head and neck cancer (HNC), could potentially occur due to the electron return effect (ERE). In this study, we investigate the dosimetric effects of ERE on the dose distribution at air-tissues interfaces in HNC IMRT treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on planning CT’s acquired for HNC cases (nasopharynx, base of skull and paranasal sinus) using a research planning system (Monaco, v5.09.06, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculations with or without the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF). The dose in the air cavity was calculated in a 1 & 2 mm thick tissue layer, while the dose to the skin was calculated in a 1, 3 and 5 mm thick tissue layer. The maximum dose received in 1 cc volume, D1cc, were collected at different TMF strengths. Plan qualities generated with or without TMF or with increasing TMF were compared in terms of commonly-used dose-volume parameters (DVPs). Results: Variations in DVPs between plans with and without a TMF present were found to be within 5% of the planning CT. The presence of a TMF results in <5% changes in sinus air tissue interface. The largest skin dose differences with and without TMF were found within 1 mm of the skin surface Conclusion: The presence of a TMF results in practically insignificant changes in HNC IMRT plan quality, except for skin dose. Planning optimization with skin DV constraints could reduce the skin doses. This research was partially supported by Elekta Inc. (Crowley, U.K.)

  1. Dosimetric prospective study comparing 2D and 3D planning for irradiation of supraclavicular and infraclavicular regions in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Mohsen; Mostafa, Magda; El Hossieny, Hisham; Nasr, Azza; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Fouda, Sally

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare 2D plan and 3D plan regarding coverage of the target (supraclavicular and infraclavicular regions) and dose reaching the risk organs (using mean DVH). Depending on the results of this study, modifications can be made to the 2D conventional planning of supraclavicular and infraclavicular regions in order to achieve better coverage of the target tissues. This is a dosimetric study carried out at the radiation oncology department in NCI-Cairo University in the period from January 2012 to October 2012, on 15 patients with breast cancer who are eligible for supraclavicular and infraclavicular irradiation. For All patients, a 2D and a 3D plan were done. We found that the coverage of the supraclavicular and infraclavicular regions and the chest wall or breast together with levels I and II axilla (PTV) were significantly better with the 3D technique with less over dose than the 2D technique. That difference was highly significant and was most evident in MRM cases. Also we found that organs at risk received a dose in the 3D technique that was more than that received in the 2D technique, again that difference was highly significant and was also most evident in MRM cases but all doses were still within tolerance. From the present study we concluded that the coverage of the supraclavicular and infraclavicular PTV is significantly worse with the 2D technique using a single oblique field at a fixed depth of 3 cm for all patients despite their different builts. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Dosimetric advantages of a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy compared with a non-adaptive strategy in cervical cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, Agustinus J A J; de Boer, Peter; Visser, Jorrit; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Rasch, Coen R N; Bel, Arjan

    2017-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) using a daily plan selection adaptive strategy can be applied to account for interfraction organ motion while limiting organ at risk dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the dosimetric consequences of daily plan selection compared with non-adaptive RT in cervical cancer. Ten consecutive patients who received pelvic irradiation, planning CTs (full and empty bladder), weekly post-fraction CTs and pre-fraction CBCTs were included. Non-adaptive plans were generated based on the PTV defined using the full bladder planning CT. For the adaptive strategy, multiple PTVs were created based on both planning CTs by ITVs of the primary CTVs (i.e., GTV, cervix, corpus-uterus and upper part of the vagina) and corresponding library plans were generated. Daily CBCTs were rigidly aligned to the full bladder planning CT for plan selection. For daily plan recalculation, selected CTs based on initial similarity were deformably registered to CBCTs. Differences in daily target coverage (D98% > 95%) and in V0.5Gy, V1.5Gy, V2Gy, D50% and D2% for rectum, bladder and bowel were assessed. Non-adaptive RT showed inadequate primary CTV coverage in 17% of the daily fractions. Plan selection compensated for anatomical changes and improved primary CTV coverage significantly (p adaptive RT, plan selection decreased the fraction dose to rectum and bowel indicated by significant (p adaptive strategy led to inadequate target coverage for individual patients. Daily plan selection corrected for day-to-day anatomical variations and resulted in adequate target coverage in all fractions. The dose to bowel and rectum was decreased significantly when applying adaptive RT.

  3. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  4. SU-F-19A-03: Dosimetric Advantages in Critical Structure Dose Sparing by Using a Multichannel Cylinder in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy to Treat Vaginal Cuff Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Zhang, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder. The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.

  5. A dosimetric evaluation of flattening filter-free volumetric modulated arc therapy for postoperative treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Bo Yao; Jun Hou; Heliang He; Jianping Chen; Huayong Jiang; Weidong Xu; Yadi Wang; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Ping Wang; Na Lu; Diandian Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare flattening filter-free (FFF) beams and conventional flat-tening filter (FF) beams in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for cervical cancer after surgery, through a retrospective planning study. Methods VMAT plans of FFF beams and normal FF beams were designed for a cohort of 15 patients. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy to 1.8 Gy per fraction, and at least 95% of the planning target volume received this dose. Doses were computed with a commercial y available treatment planning system using a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of planning target volume homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI), as wel as organs at risk (OAR) dose and volume parameters. Results FFF-VMAT was similar to FF-VMAT in terms of CI, but inferior to FF-VMAT considering HI. No statistical y dif erences were observed between FFF-VMAT and FF-VMAT in fol owing organ at risks includ-ing pelvic bone marrow, smal bowel, bladder, rectum, and normal tissue (NT). . Conclusion For patients with cervical cancer after hysterectomy, the FFF beam achieved target and OAR dose distribution similar to that of the FF beam. Reduction of beam-on time in cervical cancer is beneficial.

  6. Clinical and dosimetric evaluation of RapidArc versus standard sliding window IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet, Stephanie; Lambrecht, Maarten; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-29

    Several planning studies have already proven the substantial dosimetric advantages of RapidArc (RA) over standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared RapidArc and standard sliding window IMRT (swIMRT) in locally advanced head and neck cancer, looking both at dosimetrics as well as toxicity and outcome. CT datasets of 78 patients treated with swIMRT and 79 patients treated with RA were included. To compare the resulting dose distributions, the dose-volume parameters were evaluated for the planning target volumes (PTVs), clinical target volumes (CTVs), and organs at risk (OARs), and the number of MU were calculated. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0. PTV coverage with the 95 % isodose was slightly better for RA. Dose distribution has proven to be significantly more homogenous with RA and led to a reduction of 62 % in MU with better OAR sparing. As for toxicity, more grade 3 mucositis and dysphagia was observed for swIMRT, though we observed more grade 3 dermatitis for RA. In our retrospective analysis, RA had better target coverage and better sparing of the OAR. Overall, the grade of acute toxicity was lower for RA than for swIMRT for the same types of tumor locations, except for the grade of dermatitis. (orig.) [German] Mehrere Studien haben die dosimetrische Ueberlegenheit der RapidArc (RA) gegenueber der intensitaetsmodulierten Standard-Radiotherapie (IMRT) bereits gezeigt. In unserer Studie verglichen wir retrospektiv die RapidArc und die dynamische (''standard sliding window'') IMRT (swIMRT) bei lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen sowohl hinsichtlich dosimetrischer Daten als auchEffektivitaet und Toxizitaet. Die CT-Datenanalysen von 78 Patienten, die mit swIMRT behandelt wurden, und von 79 Patienten, welche RA erhalten hatten, wurden in die Studie aufgenommen. Um die darauf resultierenden applizierten Dosen vergleichen zu koennen, wurden die Dosis-Volumen-Parameter fuer

  7. SU-C-210-05: Evaluation of Robustness: Dosimetric Effects of Anatomical Changes During Fractionated Radiation Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, A van der; Houweling, A C; Bijveld, M M C; Visser, J; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic tumors show large interfractional position variations. In addition, changes in gastrointestinal air volume and body contour take place during treatment. We aim to investigate the robustness of the clinical treatment plans by quantifying the dosimetric effects of these anatomical changes. Methods: Calculations were performed for up to now 3 pancreatic cancer patients who had intratumoral fiducials for daily CBCT-based positioning during their 3-week treatment. For each patient, deformable image registration of the planning CT was used to assign Hounsfield Units to each of the 13—15 CBCTs; air volumes and body contour were copied from CBCT. The clinical treatment plan was used (CTV-PTV margin = 10 mm; 36Gy; 10MV; 1 arc VMAT). Fraction dose distributions were calculated and accumulated. The V95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed, as well as the dose to stomach, duodenum and liver. Dose accumulation was done for patient positioning based on the fiducials (as clinically used) as well as for positioning based on bony anatomy. Results: For all three patients, the V95% of the CTV remained 100%, for both fiducial- and bony anatomy-based positioning. For fiducial-based positioning, dose to duodenum en stomach showed no discernable differences with planned dose. For bony anatomy-based positioning, the PTV V95% of the patient with the largest systematic difference in tumor position (patient 1) decreased to 85%; the liver Dmax increased from 33.5Gy (planned) to 35.5Gy. Conclusion: When using intratumoral fiducials, CTV dose coverage was only mildly affected by the daily anatomical changes. When using bony anatomy for patient positioning, we found a decline in PTV dose coverage due to the interfractional tumor position variations. Photon irradiation treatment plans for pancreatic tumors are robust to variations in body contour and gastrointestinal gas, but the use of fiducial-based daily position verification

  8. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of the use of deformable image registration in adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiland, R B; Maare, Christian; Sjöström, D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out geometric and dosimetric evaluation of the usefulness of a deformable image registration algorithm utilized for adaptive head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Data consisted of seven patients, each with a planning CT (pCT), a rescanning CT (Re...

  9. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Christina H; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P; Yang, T Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J; Deasy, Joseph O; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-07-01

    Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤-1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = -1) was vaginal dose was Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of using in-house BoS Frame Fixation Tool for the Head and Neck Cancer Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Suk; Jo, Kwang Hyun; Choi, Byeon Ki [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    BoS(Base of Skull) Frame, the fixation tool which is used for the proton of brain cancer increases the lateral penumbra by increasing the airgap (the distance between patient and beam jet), due to the collision of the beam of the posterior oblique direction. Thus, we manufactured the fixation tool per se for improving the limits of BoS frame, and we'd like to evaluate the utility of the manufactured fixation tool throughout this study. We've selected the 3 patients of brain cancer who have received the proton therapy from our hospital, and also selected the 6 beam angles; for this, we've selected the beam angle of the posterior oblique direction. We've measured the planned BoS frame and the distance of Snout for each beam which are planned for the treatment of the patient using the BoS frame. After this, we've proceeded with the set-up that is above the location which was recommended by the manufacturer of the BoS frame, at the same beam angle of the same patient, by using our in-house Bos frame fixation tool. The set-up was above 21 cm toward the superior direction, compared to the situation when the BoS frame was only used with the basic couch. After that, we've stacked the snout to the BoS frame as much as possible, and measured the distance of snout. We've also measured the airgap, based on the gap of that snout distance; and we've proceeded the normalization based on each dose (100% of each dose), after that, we've conducted the comparative analysis of lateral penumbra. Moreover, we've established the treatment plan according to the changed airgap which has been transformed to the Raystation 5.0 proton therapy planning system, and we've conducted the comparative analysis of DVH(Dose Volume Histogram). When comparing the result before using the in-house Bos frame fixation tool which was manufactured for each beam angle with the result after using the fixation tool, we could figure out that airgap than when

  11. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yang, T. Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Riedel, Elyn [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  12. Radiotherapy of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer. Principle considerations on the basis of dosimetric data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Hueltenschmidt, B.; Melcher, U. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Ulmer, H.U. [Dept. of Gynecology, Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of internal mammary lymph nodes (IMN) in breast cancer is discussed controversially due to its potential toxicity and debatable efficacy. Aim of the present study was to assess the cardiac and lung dose in 3-D planned radiotherapy and to discuss these results with regard to arguments pro and contra IMN irradiation. Patients and Methods: 32 patients underwent 3-D planning (Helax TMS) for irradiation of breast and IMN in three different techniques either using separate IMN fields (A, B) or a wide tangent (C). For each technique the respective doses to the heart (including the base of the aorta and the ostium of the coronary arteries) and lung were analyzed in dose volume histograms. Results: The mean dose to the heart (left side irradiation) was 6.4 Gy (A), 8.1 Gy (B) and 3.8 Gy (C). The mean dose to the lung was 11.7 Gy (A), 15.4 Gy (B) and 10.2 Gy (C). The 10-Gy isodose comprised 19.5% (A), 32.9% (B) and 5.6% (C) of the heart (left breast). The respective values for the 20-Gy isodose were 7.8, 11.5 and 4.4%. The irradiated volumes of the lung were 37.7% (A), 52.7% (B) and 20% (C) in the 10-Gy isodose. The 20-Gy isodose comprised 16.7% (A), 28.3% (B) and 17.8% (C). Conclusion: Whether radiotherapy of the IMN may improve treatment results in breast cancer is currently unresolved. However, the present data indicate that relevant cardiovascular side effects are unlikely to occur. Thus, the indication should be considered on the basis of individual risk factors. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Strahlentherapie der Mammaria-interna-Lymphknoten (IMN) wird kontrovers diskutiert, da ihre potenzielle Toxizitaet gefuerchtet und ihre Wirksamkeit angezweifelt werden. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war, die Herz- und Lungendosis bei 3-D-geplanter Strahlentherapie zu ermitteln und anhand dieser Resultate die Argumente fuer und wider eine IMN-Bestrahlung zu diskutieren. Patienten und Methoden: Bei 32 Patientinnen erfolgte die 3-D-Planung (Helax TMS) zur

  13. Dosimetric benefits of automation in the treatment of lower thoracic esophageal cancer: Is manual planning still an alternative option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiadong; Wang, Lu; Wang, Jiahao; Han, Xu; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Hu, Weigang

    2017-07-25

    This study aimed to design automated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans in Pinnacle auto-planning and compare it with manual plans for patients with lower thoracic esophageal cancer (EC). Thirty patients with lower thoracic EC were randomly selected for replanning VMAT plans using auto-planning in Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) version 9.10. Historical plans of these patients were then compared. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics, dose uniformity, and dose homogeneity were analyzed to evaluate treatment plans. Auto-planning was superior in terms of conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for planning target volume (PTV), significantly improving 8.2% (p = 0.013) and 25% (p = 0.007) compared with manual planning, respectively, and decreasing dose of heart and liver irradiated by 20 to 40 Gy and 5 to 30 Gy, respectively (p planning further reduced the maximum dose (Dmax) of spinal cord by 6.9 Gy compared with manual planning (p = 0.000). Additionally, manual planning showed the significantly lower low-dose volume (V5) for the lung (p = 0.005). For auto-planning, the V5 of the lung was significantly associated with the relative volume index (the volume ratio of PTV to the lung), and the correlation coefficient (R) and p-value were 0.994 and 0.000. Pinnacle auto-planning achieved superior target conformity and homogeneity and similar target coverage compared with historical manual planning. Most of organs at risk (OARs) sparing was significantly improved by auto-planning except for the V5 of the lung, and the low dose distribution was highly associated with PTV volume and lung volume in auto-planning. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dosimetric characterization of the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector through comparison with an in-house developed scintillator system. / Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, Claus Flensted; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    method, but differing primarily in the signal detection hardware. The two systems were compared with respect to essential dosimetric properties, with the purpose of testing their performance under conditions less well discussed in the literature. A Farmer ionization chamber was used as the primary...... is therefore advised if using either system for measurements in large fields or under circumstances where the fibre irradiation geometry is unfavourable. Measurements of reference dose to water yielded differences up to 1.5% when compared with the Farmer ionization chamber for all investigated beam qualities....

  15. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  16. FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussous, O., E-mail: o.moussous@crna.d [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon B.P. 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Medjadj, T. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon B.P. 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Benguerba, M. [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari-Boumediene USTHB, Alger (Algeria)

    2011-02-15

    We investigated the ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange (FBX) aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters such as the output factor, backscatter factor and lateral beam profiles for different square fields sizes for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. A water phantom was employed to measure these parameters. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. A comparison of the resulting measurements with an ionization chamber's measured parameters showed good agreement. We thus believe that the tissue equivalent FBX dosimetry system can measure the dosimetric parameters for {sup 60}Co with reasonable accuracy.

  17. A comparison of anatomical and dosimetric variations in the first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haihua; Tu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei; Ding, Weijun; Yu, Changhui; Zhou, Chao

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this study was to compare anatomical and dosimetric variations in first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled. Each patient had two repeat computed tomography (CT) scans before the 16th and 25th fraction. Hybrid IMRT plans were generated to evaluate the dosimetric changes. There was a significant decrease of the transverse diameter of nasopharyngeal and neck as well as gross tumor volume (GTV) in the primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (GTVnx) and involved lymph nodes (GTVnd) during the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p fractions treatment compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p fractions (p fraction 16 and 25. While the maximum dose to the spinal cord was significantly increased both in the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p fractions compared to that between fraction 16 and 25 (p fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of IMRT.

  18. Quality control of dosimetric systems using thermoluminescent crystals; Control de calidad de un sistema de planeacion dosimetrico utilizando cristales termoluminiscentes y su aplicacion en tratamientos de pacientes con cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahecha, L.; Plazas, M. C.; Machado, M.; Perea, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    To achieve an optimal tumoral control to prostate cancer in early and locally advanced stages, it is necessary to increase the dose with a low mobility probability at the vesicle an rectal level. This is achieved through conformal radiotherapy. The Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia uses this technique, but two questions arise from the medical-physicists and medical radio-oncologist: In accordance with clinical protocols, the conformal radiotherapy delivers a low dose to the adjacent healthy tissues. What experimental method exists that can prove with certainly the veracity of this affirmation?. And, Do the dosimetric simulation system calculate suitable the dose for each tissues?. Through thermoluminescent dosimetry and the use of a physical simulator,we measured the absorbed dose at the target volume and the adjacent tissues using conformal and conventional radiotherapy. We proved that organs such as the rectum and bladder, receiver a minor dose in conformal radiotherapy, hence reducing their mobility probability. In addition, the readings from the thermoluminescent dosimeters and the doses calculated by the ECLIPSE dosimetric system were compared, concluding that the patient's prescribed dose is effectively delivered as recommended by the quality control program in radiotherapy. (Author)

  19. Dosimetric calculation of I-131 activity for the treatment to patients having differentiated thyroid cancer. Benefits and limitations; Calculo dosimetrico de la actividad de I-131 para tratamiento de pacientes con cancer diferenciado de tiroides (CADT). Beneficios y limitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, R. C.; Chebel, G. M.; Fadel, A. M.; Rojo, A. M.; Deluca, G.; Degross, O. J.; Valdivieso, C. M.; Carbejas, M. L.

    2006-07-01

    Maximum safe activity calculation, that has to be administered for treatment to patients having Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (CADT). No important side effects should be produced. Post treatment evolution was analysed. 23 Dosimetric studies were performed determining blood and whole body uptake curves (CE)during 5 days. Using the MIRDOSE software, the maximum safe activity in the whole body (CE)was calculated. The retained activity in the body (AR), 48 hs. post tracer dose. Should have been less than 2.96 GBq so as to avoid lung fibrosis. 17 patients that received activities<11.1 GBq, had no side effects. Three patients presents special situations: high AR, users in the mouth, and plaque to and leucopenia. This methodology has benefits because AT can be estimated. This was possible for 85% of the patients. When AR was high at 48 hr, AT was diminished to avoid pulmonary lesions. Tumor absorbed dose estimation, will allow the administration of AT>11.1 GBq in the future. (Author)

  20. Dosimetric analysis and preliminary clinical result of image-guided brachytherapy with or without hybrid technique for cervical cancer using VariSource titanium ring applicator with "Siriraj Ring Cap".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankulchai, Pittaya; Lohasammakul, Suphalerk; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Nakkrasae, Pitchayut; Tuntipumiamorn, Lalida; Kakanaporn, Chumpot; Chansilpa, Yaowalak

    2017-08-11

    Titanium ring cap applicator (VariSource) was applied in treating cervical cancer patients by using image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT). However, its sizes appeared to be relatively large for most of our patients. Thus, we have developed a specific applicator "Siriraj Ring Cap," which is slightly smaller and more suitable for our patients. This study was to evaluate effectiveness of this equipment. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Siriraj Ring Cap was applied in all of the patients for at least one fraction. Dosimetric analysis was performed in each fraction of IGBT. Clinical outcomes of these patients were evaluated. Twenty-nine patients with 117 dosimetric planning were evaluated between January and December of 2014. Siriraj Ring Cap was fit to all patients in this study. By using this applicator, radiation doses to the targets (D90 high-risk clinical target volume and D90 intermediate-risk clinical target volume) were higher in each fraction. There were no statistically differences of radiation doses to the bladder, rectum, sigmoid colon, and small bowel. Within 2-year followup, 3 patients (10.3%) developed locoregional recurrence. Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival were 75.9% and 89.7%, respectively. According to RTOG/EORTC complication criteria, Grade 1, 2, and 3 gastrointestinal complications were developed in 2 (6.9%), 4 (13.8%), and 1 (3.4%) patients, respectively. For genitourinary complications, 3 patients (10.3%) and 1 patient (3.4%) had Grades 1 and 2, respectively. Siriraj Ring Cap is feasible for IGBT in cervical cancer patients with narrow vagina. Dosimetry and clinical outcomes were satisfactory by using our specific applicator. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14-18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1-102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50-60%. The PTV coverage was 95-99% for Novalis and 94-98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11-1.61 and 1.04-1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1-3.62 and 2.3-3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72-7.97 and 2.54-3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important.

  2. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanetti Eugenio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Materials and methods Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction. Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax20 Gy Results For PTVII minus PTVI, V90% was 97.8 ± 3.4% for RA and 94.0 ± 3.5% for IMRT (findings are reported as mean ± 1 standard deviation; D5%-D95% (homogeneity was 7.3 ± 1.4 Gy (RA and 11.0 ± 1.1 Gy (IMRT. Conformity index (V95%/VPTVII was 1.10 ± 0.06 (RA and 1.14 ± 0.09 (IMRT. MLD was 20 Gy was 9.7 ± 1.3% (RA and 12.8 ± 2.5% (IMRT on left lung, similar for right lung. Mean dose to heart was 6.0 ± 2.7 Gy (RA and 7.4 ± 2.5 Gy (IMRT. MU resulted in 796 ± 121 (RA and 1398 ± 301 (IMRT; the average measured treatment time was 3.0 ± 0.1 minutes (RA and 11.5 ± 2.0 (IMRT. From pre-treatment dosimetry, % of field area with γ Conclusion RapidArc showed dosimetric improvements with respect to IMRT, delivery parameters confirmed its logistical advantages, pre-treatment dosimetry proved its reliability.

  3. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  4. Dosimetric Predictors of Duodenal Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Treatment of the Para-aortic Nodes in Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sulman, Erik P.; Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rauch, Gaiane M. [Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints

  5. SU-E-T-596: Axillary Nodes Radiotherapy Boost Field Dosimetric Impact Study: Oblique Field and Field Optimization in 3D Conventional Breast Cancer Radiation Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, M [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Elmhurst, NY (United States); Sura, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of two axillary nodes (AX) boost techniques: (1) posterior-oblique optimized field boost (POB), (2) traditional posterior-anterior boost (PAB) with field optimization (O-PAB), for a postmastectomy breast patient with positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods: Five patients, 3 left and 2 right chest walls, were included in this study. All patients were simulated in 5mm CT slice thickness. Supraclavicular (SC) and level I/II/III AX were contoured based on the RTOG atlas guideline. Five treatment plans, (1) tangential chest wall, (2) oblique SC including AX, (3) PAB, O-PAB and POB, were created for each patient. Three plan sums (PS) were generated by sum one of (3) plan with plan (1) and (2). The field optimization was done through PS dose distribution, which included a field adjustment, a fractional dose, a calculation location and a gantry angle selection for POB. A dosimetric impact was evaluated by comparing a SC and AX coverage, a PS maximum dose, an irradiated area percentage volume received dose over 105% prescription dose (V105), an ipsi-laterial mean lung dose (MLD), an ipsi-laterial mean humeral head dose (MHHD), a mean heart dose (MHD) (for left case only) and their DVH amount these three technique. Results: O-PAB, POB and PAB dosimetric results showed that there was no significant different on SC and AX coverage (p>0.43) and MHD (p>0.16). The benefit of sparing lung irradiation from PAB to O-PAB to POB was significant (p<0.004). PAB showed a highest PS maximum dose (p<0.005), V105 (p<0.023) and MLD (compared with OPAB, p=0.055). MHHD showed very sensitive to the patient arm positioning and anatomy. O-PAB convinced a lower MHHD than PAB (p=0.03). Conclusion: 3D CT contouring plays main role in accuracy radiotherapy. Dosimetric advantage of POB and O-PAB was observed for a better normal tissue irradiation sparing.

  6. SU-D-204-04: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices and Follow-Up Data for Salivary Glands Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chera, B; Price, A; Kostich, M; Green, R; Das, S; Mavroidis, P [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Amdur, R; Mendenhall, W [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sheets, N [University of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Marks, L [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between different dosimetric indices of salivary glands (as separate or combined structures) to patient-reported dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy using the novel patient reported outcome version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. Dosimetric constraints were used for the salivary glands (e.g. mean dose to the contralateral-parotid < 26 Gy). We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the parotid and submandibular glands (as separate or combined structures) to their self-reported 6 month post-treatment dry mouth responses. Moderate dry mouth responses were most prevalent and were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The correlation of Dmean, Dmax and a range of dosevolume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratios (OR). Results: Patients reporting non/mild dry mouth response (N=22) had average Dmean = 19.6 ± 6.2Gy to the contralateral-parotid compared to an average Dmean = 28.0 ± 8.3Gy and an AUC = 0.758 for the patients reporting moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth (N=21). Analysis of the range of VD’s for patients who had reported dry mouth showed that for the contralateral-parotid the indices V18 through V22 had the highest area under the curves (AUC) (0.762 – 0.772) compared to a more traditional dosimetric index V30, which had an AUC = 0.732. The highest AUC was observed for the combination of contralateral parotid and contralateral submandibular glands, for which V16 through V28 had AUC = 0.801 – 0.834. Conclusion: Patients who report moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy had on average higher Dmean. The V16-V28 of the combination of the contralateral glands showed the highest

  7. Neuroticism and reactions to social comparison information among cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, K; Buunk, B; Sanderman, R

    1998-01-01

    In an experimental study neuroticism was examined as a moderator of breast cancer patients' affective reactions to social comparison information about a fellow patient. Fifty-seven women with breast cancer completed Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and received social comparison information about

  8. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Materials and methods Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction) and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction). Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax<107%; Mean lung dose MLD<15 Gy, V20 Gy<22%; heart involvement was to be minimised. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment dosimetry was performed using EPID and a 2D-array based methods. Results For PTVII minus PTVI, V90% was 97.8 ± 3.4% for RA and 94.0 ± 3.5% for IMRT (findings are reported as mean ± 1 standard deviation); D5%-D95% (homogeneity) was 7.3 ± 1.4 Gy (RA) and 11.0 ± 1.1 Gy (IMRT). Conformity index (V95%/VPTVII) was 1.10 ± 0.06 (RA) and 1.14 ± 0.09 (IMRT). MLD was <9.5 Gy for all cases on each lung, V20 Gy was 9.7 ± 1.3% (RA) and 12.8 ± 2.5% (IMRT) on left lung, similar for right lung. Mean dose to heart was 6.0 ± 2.7 Gy (RA) and 7.4 ± 2.5 Gy (IMRT). MU resulted in 796 ± 121 (RA) and 1398 ± 301 (IMRT); the average measured treatment time was 3.0 ± 0.1 minutes (RA) and 11.5 ± 2.0 (IMRT). From pre-treatment dosimetry, % of field area with γ <1 resulted 98.8 ± 1.3% and 99.1 ± 1.5% for RA and IMRT respectively with EPID and 99.1 ± 1.8% and 99.5 ± 1.3% with 2D-array (ΔD = 3% and DTA = 3 mm). Conclusion RapidArc showed dosimetric improvements with respect to IMRT, delivery parameters confirmed its logistical advantages, pre-treatment dosimetry proved its reliability. PMID:19630947

  9. Dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc with single arc and dual arc for malignant glioma involving the parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Lei, Mingjun; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Jun; Huo, Lei; Hong, Jidong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the difference in treatment plan quality, monitor units (MUs) per fraction and dosimetric parameters between IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) and RapidArc with single arc (RA1) and dual arc (RA2) for malignant glioma involving the parietal lobe. Treatment plans for IMRT and RA1 and RA2 were prepared for 10 patients with malignant gliomas involving the parietal lobe. The Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test was used to compare the plan quality, monitor units and dosimetric parameters between IMRT and RA1 and RA2 through dose-volume histograms. Dnear-max (D2%) to the left lens, right lens and left optical nerve in RA1 were less compared with those in IMRT; D2% to the right lens and right optic nerve in RA2 were less compared with those in IMRT. D2% to the optic chiasma in RA2 was small compared with that in RA1. The median dose (D50%) to the right lens and right optic nerve in RA1 and RA2 was less compared with the identical parameters in IMRT, and D50% to the brain stem in RA2 was less compared with that in RA1. The volume receiving at least 45 Gy (V45) or V50 in normal brain tissue (whole brain minus the planning target volume 2; B-P) in RA1 was less compared with that in IMRT. V30, V35, V40, V45, or V50 in B-P in RA2 was less compared with that in IMRT. The MUs per fraction in RA1 and RA2 were significantly less compared with those in IMRT. All differences with a P-value<0.05 were considered to be significantly different. In conclusion, RA1 and RA2 markedly reduced the MUs per fraction, and spared partial organs at risk and B-P compared with IMRT.

  10. [Dosimetric evaluation of conformal radiotherapy: conformity factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oozeer, R; Chauvet, B; Garcia, R; Berger, C; Felix-Faure, C; Reboul, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) is to treat the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the prescribed dose while reducing doses to normal tissues and critical structures, in order to increase local control and reduce toxicity. The evaluation tools used for optimizing treatment techniques are three-dimensional visualization of dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). These tools, however, do not fully quantify the conformity of dose distributions to the PTV. Specific tools were introduced to measure this conformity for a given dose level. We have extended those definitions to different dose levels, using a conformity index (CI). CI is based on the relative volumes of PTV and outside the PTV receiving more than a given dose. This parameter has been evaluated by a clinical study including 82 patients treated for lung cancer and 82 patients treated for prostate cancer. The CI was low for lung dosimetric studies (0.35 at the prescribed dose 66 Gy) due to build-up around the GTV and to spinal cord sparing. For prostate dosimetric studies, the CI was higher (0.57 at the prescribed dose 70 Gy). The CI has been used to compare treatment plans for lung 3DCRT (2 vs 3 beams) and prostate 3DCRT (4 vs 7 beams). The variation of CI with dose can be used to optimize dose prescription.

  11. Comparison between a silicon PIN diode and a CsI(Tl) coupled to a silicon PIN diode for dosimetric purpose in radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Lucia; Bontempi, Marco; Rossi, Pier Luca; Rignanese, Luigi Pio; Zuffa, Mirco; Baldazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    The use of amorphous Si-PIN diodes showed interesting applications in detector research. Due to their properties and cost effective value, these devices can be used as small dosimeters for fast and real time dose evaluation. The responses of two different detectors to the measurement of X-ray total air KERMA are compared and presented, with the goal to get a dosimetric parameter directly during the X-ray patients exposure. A bare Si-PIN diode and a Si-PIN diode+CsI(Tl) scintillator were tested and compared to radiologic dosimeters. Both detector outputs were calibrated using a secondary reference standard (CAPINTEC PM 30 dosimeter), in order to analyze and discuss the dose and the energy dependence of the detectors in the range of radiologic interest (tube voltage: 40-140 kVp and additional filtration: 0 mm Al to 4 mm Al). The bare Si-PIN diode shows a very coherent response independently from the X-ray beam quality and from the additional filtration. The Si-PIN+CsI(Tl) detector, on the other hand, shows a high spread of the calibration curves as a function of the tube high voltage and the additional filtration. The presented results could be used to calibrate an image detector in dose.

  12. Comparison between a silicon PIN diode and a CsI(Tl) coupled to a silicon PIN diode for dosimetric purpose in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.andreani4@unibo.it [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, Marco [Laboratorio NaBi, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rossi, Pier Luca [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rignanese, Luigi Pio [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Zuffa, Mirco [INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Baldazzi, Giuseppe [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    The use of amorphous Si-PIN diodes showed interesting applications in detector research. Due to their properties and cost effective value, these devices can be used as small dosimeters for fast and real time dose evaluation. The responses of two different detectors to the measurement of X-ray total air KERMA are compared and presented, with the goal to get a dosimetric parameter directly during the X-ray patients exposure. A bare Si-PIN diode and a Si-PIN diode+CsI(Tl) scintillator were tested and compared to radiologic dosimeters. Both detector outputs were calibrated using a secondary reference standard (CAPINTEC PM 30 dosimeter), in order to analyze and discuss the dose and the energy dependence of the detectors in the range of radiologic interest (tube voltage: 40–140 kVp and additional filtration: 0 mm Al to 4 mm Al). The bare Si-PIN diode shows a very coherent response independently from the X-ray beam quality and from the additional filtration. The Si-PIN+CsI(Tl) detector, on the other hand, shows a high spread of the calibration curves as a function of the tube high voltage and the additional filtration. The presented results could be used to calibrate an image detector in dose.

  13. Creation and application of voxelised dosimetric models, and a comparison with the current methodology as used for the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Reference Animals and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, K; Ruedig, E; Gomez-Fernandez, M; Caffrey, E; Jia, J; Comolli, M; Hess, C

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a comprehensive approach to environmental protection that includes the use of Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) to assess radiological impacts on the environment. For the purposes of calculating radiation dose, the RAPs are approximated as simple shapes that contain homogeneous distributions of radionuclides. As uncertainties in environmental dose effects are larger than uncertainties in radiation dose calculation, some have argued against more realistic dose calculation methodologies. However, due to the complexity of organism morphology, internal structure, and density, dose rates calculated via a homogenous model may be too simplistic. The purpose of this study is to examine the benefits of a voxelised phantom compared with simple shapes for organism modelling. Both methods typically use Monte Carlo methods to calculate absorbed dose, but voxelised modelling uses an exact three-dimensional replica of an organism with accurate tissue composition and radionuclide source distribution. It is a multi-stage procedure that couples imaging modalities and processing software with Monte Carlo N-Particle. These features increase dosimetric accuracy, and may reduce uncertainty in non-human biota dose-effect studies by providing mechanistic answers regarding where and how population-level dose effects arise.

  14. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of CyberKnife M6TM InCise multileaf collimator over IRISTM variable collimator in prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindu Kathriarachchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impetus behind our study was to establish a quantitative comparison between the IRIS collimator and the InCise multileaf collimator (MLC (Accuray Inc. Synnyvale, CA for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. Treatment plans for ten prostate cancer patients were performed on MultiPlan™ 5.1.2 treatment planning system utilizing MLC and IRIS for 36.25 Gy in five fractions. To reduce the magnitude of variations between cases, the planning tumor volume (PTV was defined and outlined for treating prostate gland only, assuming no seminal vesicle or ex-capsule involvement. Evaluation indices of each plan include PTV coverage, conformity index (CI, Paddick's new CI, homogeneity index, and gradient index. Organ at risk (OAR dose sparing was analyzed by the bladder wall Dmaxand V37Gy, rectum Dmaxand V36Gy. The radiobiological response was evaluated by tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability based on equivalent uniform dose. The dose delivery efficiency was evaluated on the basis of planned monitor units (MUs and the reported treatment time per fraction. Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The studies indicated that CyberKnife M6™ IRIS and InCise™ MLC produce equivalent SBRT prostate treatment plans in terms of dosimetry, radiobiology, and OAR sparing, except that the MLC plans offer improvement of the dose fall-off gradient by 29% over IRIS. The main advantage of replacing the IRIS collimator with MLC is the improved efficiency, determined from the reduction of MUs by 42%, and a 36% faster delivery time.

  15. VMAT和IMRT技术在乳腺癌根治术后放疗中的剂量学比较∗%Dosimetric Comparison between VMAT and IMRT for Postoperative Radiotherapy of Breast Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚正; 黎杰; 廖雄飞; 李厨荣; 孙春堂; 康盛伟; 王培

    2014-01-01

    patient. Targets prescription was set to 50Gy/25f. Planning evaluation included the conformity index(CI) and homogeneity index( HI) of PTV, dosimetric parameters of organs at risk, monitor units and treatment time. Results:The HI of VMAT was better than that of IMRT( decreased by 29. 9%) which were 0. 129 ± 0. 021,0. 184 ± 0. 04 respec-tively (P=0. 000). No significant difference was observed of CI between these two methods. The V5,V20,and mean dose of VMAT group were lower than that of IMRT. In addition, the isodose curve was more compact, smooth, uniform and reg-ular in the VMAT group with less low dose area comparing with that of IMRT. Meantime, the monitor units and treatment time were decreased by 28. 5% and 80% of VMAT in comparison with that of IMRT. Conclusion: Compared to IMRT, VMAT technology can significantly reduce the dose of ipsilateral lung and other organs ar risk in the treatment for postoperative breast cancer patients. At the same time, the VMAT technology can not only decrease the monitor units and treatment time, thus reduce the errors brought by the patient moving, but also can reduce the arrtition rate of accelerator and improve the work efficiency of the machine.

  16. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Jahnke, Anika; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Stieler, Florian; Mai, Sabine; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Jahnke, Lennart [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  17. Dosimetric comparison between 3DCRT/IMRT for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal carcinoma%颈段、胸上段食管癌3DCRT/IMRT剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠蓓娜; 张晓智; 王蕊华; 李毅

    2012-01-01

    IMRT可进一步降低肺和脊髓受照剂量.%Objective To select the optimal radiotherapy plan for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer through dosi-metric comparison between 3DCRT and IMRT plans. Methods Fourteen patients with cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer underwent CT simulation. GTV was contoured referring the esophagogram and endoscopy simultaneously, then CTV and PTV were de fined by the uniform standards. A 3DCRT plan and two five-fields IMRT plans consisting of conventional uniform bean angles and non uniform beam angles were designed respectively. Dose distribution of the PTV and OARs in different plans were compared under the premise that 95% of PTV volume received 100% prescription dose. Results All the IMRT plan could meet the requrements, but 4 of the 3DCRT plan (4/14) could not meet the requrements, so only 10 group of treatment pains in this study were feasible for further Do simetric comparison. For PTV 1, the dose parameters D,^, D^ , DM of 3 DCRT plans were 5725 ± 54. 96 cGy, 4703 ± 25. 26 cGy, 5203 ±71. 70 cGy, which were higher than those in IMRT-A(5348 ±27. 14 cGy,4158 ±27. 36 cGy,4996 ±54. 74cGy)and IMRT-B (5232±26.85 cGy,4286±12. 13 cGy,4979 ±31. 78 cGy),showing significant differences (P 0.05). For PTV2, there was no significant difference in Dmean, D100, D95, V105 and V95(P>0.05), but the size parameters V100 in IMRT-A and IMRT-B were 95. 21 ± 1. 78% and 96. 12 ±2. 55% , which was significantly higher than 3DCRT(88. 69 ± 1. 84% ), showing significant differences (P 0.05). But, MLD and the maximum dose of spinal cord could be re duced by the non-uniform beam angles IMRT plans(P <0. 05). Conclusion IMRT plan is better than 3DCRT plan for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer, non-uniform beam angles IMRT plans design according to the target can reduce the exposure dose of lung and spinal cord.

  18. Methodological issues in international comparison of interval breast cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Sasieni, Peter; Klabunde, Carrie; De Landtsheer, Jean-Pierre; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Fracheboud, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    International comparisons of interval cancers (IC) are important to better understand the relationship between programmes' performance and screening practices. In this respect, differences in (i) definition, (ii) identification and (iii) quantification of IC have received little attention. To examin

  19. SU-E-T-210: Comparison of Proton with Electron Boost in Breast Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y; Chang, A [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Liu, Y [INTEGRIS Cancer Institute of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electron beams are commonly used for boost radiation following whole breast irradiation (WBI) to improve the in-breast local control. Proton beams have a finite range and a sharper distal dose falloff compared to electron beams, thus potentially sparing more heart and lung in breast treatment. The purpose of the study is to compare protons with electrons for boost breast treatment in terms of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods: Six breast cancer patients were included in this study. All women received WBI to 45–50 Gy, followed by a 10–16.2 Gy boost with standard fractionation. If proton beams were used for the boost treatment, an electron plan was retrospectively generated for comparison using the same CT set and structures, and vice versa if electron beams were used for treatment. Proton plans were generated using the treatment planning system (TPS) with two to three uniform scanning proton beams. Electron plans were generated using the Pinnacle TPS with one single en face beam. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated and compared between proton and electron boost plans. Results: Proton plans show a similar boost target coverage, similar skin dose, and much better heart and lung sparing. For an example patient, V95% for PTV was 99.98% and skin (5 mm shell) received a max dose close to the prescription dose for both protons and electrons; however, V2 and V5 for the ipsilateral lung and heart were 37.5%, 17.9% and 19.9%, 4.9% respectively for electrons, but were essentially 0 for protons. Conclusions: This dosimetric comparison demonstrates that while both proton therapy and electron therapy provided similar coverage and skin dose, proton therapy could largely reduce the dose to lung and heart, thus leading to potential less side effects.

  20. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  1. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  2. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  3. Dosimetric study on the volumetric modulated arc therapy in the radiotherapy of esophageal cancer%容积调强技术在食管癌放疗中的剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余建荣; 古定标; 李珍; 郭纪慈

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究旋转容积调强VMAT与固定野调强IMRT在食管癌放疗中的剂量学差异。方法2014年6月~2015年8月入组食管癌患者30例。用瓦利安Eclipse10.0计划系统分别设计单弧VMAT(Arc1)、双弧VMAT(Arc2)、和9野IMRT计划。比较三组计划在平均剂量体积直方图、靶区剂量覆盖率、危及器官和正常组织保护等方面的剂量学差异,并比较三组计划的总机器跳数(MU)和治疗时间。结果 VMAT(Arc2)靶区剂量分布均匀性(HI)和矩形度(CI)较其他两种要好(P<0.05)。危及器官方面:VMAT(Arc1)与VMAT(Arc2)比较,VMAT(Arc2)对双肺、脊髓Dmax保护优于VMAT(Arc1);VMAT(Arc2)、与IMRT 9野比较,VMAT(Arc2)对心脏Dmean、脊髓Dmax保护优于IMRT 9野;治疗时间方面:VMAT(Arc1)时间最短,需时90s,VMAT(Arc2)所需时间190~200s,IMRT 9野平均所需时间680s。结论 VMAT(Arc1)、VMAT(Arc2)、与IMRT 9野三种计划都满足临床要求。对于瓦利安Eclipse10.0计划系统VMAT(Arc2)临床使用上较普遍。%ObjectiveTo explore the dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the radiotherapy of esophageal cancer. Methods30 patients with esophageal cancers during June 2014 and August 2015 were recruited. The single arc VMAT (Arc 1) plan, double arc VMAT (Arc2) plan, and IMRT 9 fields plan were designed by Varian Eclipse 10.0 planning system. The dosimetric differences of average dose volume histogram, target section dose distribution, organ damage, and normal tissue protections of the three plans were compared. The total monitor unit (MU) numbers and treatment time of the three plans were compared.ResultsThe homogeneity index (HI) and conformal index (CI) of VMAT (Arc2) plan were better than the other two plans (P<0.05). In terms of organ damage, the VMAT (Arc2) plan's Dmax protections of

  4. Dosimetric study of the protection level of the bone marrow in patients with cervical or endometrial cancer for three radiotherapy techniques - 3D CRT, IMRT and VMAT. Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodda, Agata; Urbański, Bartosz; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Malicki, Julian

    2016-03-01

    Background: The paper shows the methodology of an in-phantom study of the protection level of the bone marrow in patients with cervical or endometrial cancer for three radiotherapy techniques: three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy, preceded by the procedures of image guidance. Methods/Design: The dosimetric evaluation of the doses will be performed in an in-house multi-element anthropomorphic phantom of the female pelvic area created by three-dimensional printing technology. The volume and position of the structures will be regulated according to the guidelines from the Bayesian network. The input data for the learning procedure of the model will be obtained from the retrospective analysis of imaging data obtained for 96 patients with endometrial cancer or cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy in our centre in 2008-2013. Three anatomical representations of the phantom simulating three independent clinical cases will be chosen. Five alternative treatment plans (1 × three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 2 × intensity modulated radiotherapy and 2 × volumetric modulated arc therapy) will be created for each representation. To simulate image-guided radiotherapy, ten specific recombinations will be designated, for each anatomical representation separately, reflecting possible changes in the volume and position of the phantom components. Discussion: The comparative analysis of planned measurements will identify discrepancies between calculated doses and doses that were measured in the phantom. Finally, differences between the doses cumulated in the hip plates performed by different techniques simulating the gynaecological patients' irradiation of dose delivery will be established. The results of this study will form the basis of the prospective clinical trial that will be designed for the assessment of hematologic toxicity and its correlation with the doses cumulated in the hip plates

  5. Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Estilo, Cherry L. [Dental Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

  6. A study of the anatomic changes and dosimetric consequences in adaptive CRT of non-small-cell lung cancer using deformable CT and CBCT image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changsheng; Hou, Yong; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Dengwang; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Siye; Yin, Yong

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate anatomic lung tumor changes and dosimetric consequences utilizing the deformable daily kilovolt (KV) cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT) image registration. Five patients diagnosed with NSCLC were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and 10 daily KV CBCT image sets were acquired for each patient. Each CBCT image and plan CT were imported into the deformable image registration (DIR) system. The plan CT image was deformed by the DIR system and a new contour on CBCT was obtained by using the auto-contouring function of the DIR. These contours were individually marked as CBCT f1, CBCT f2,..., and CBCT f10, and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS). The daily CBCT plan was individually generated with the same planning criteria based on new contours. These plans were individually marked as CBCTp1, CBCTp2,..., and CBCTp10, followed by generating a dose accumulation plan (DA plan) in original pCT image contour sets by adding all CBCT plans using Varian Eclipse TPS. The maximum, minimum and mean doses to the plan target volume (PTV) in the 5 DA plans were the same with the CT plans. However, the volume of radiation 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 Gy of the total lungs in DA plans were less than those of the CT plans. The maximum dose of the spinal cord in the DA plans were average 27.96% less than the CT plans. The mean dose for the left, right, and total lungs in the DA plans were reduced by 13.80%, 23.65%, and 12.96%, respectively. The adaptive 3D CRT based on the deformable registration can reduce the dose to the lung and the spinal cord with the same PTV dose coverage. Moreover, it provides a method for further adaptive radiotherapy exploration.

  7. 食管癌两种旋转调强放疗技术剂量学对比研究%Dosimetric study of two intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy in esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张若辉; 樊晓妹; 白文文; 李润霄; 曹彦坤; 韩春; 迟子锋

    2014-01-01

    Objective Comparing the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and constant dose rate intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) in esophagus cancer to evaluate the performance of the two different arc therapy delivery techniques.Methods 22 cases of esophageal cancer patients were selected for the planning comparison study.All plans were done for IMAT and VMAT treatment plans on Oncentra 4.1 treatment planning system,prescription dose of 2 Gy in total 30 fractions.Planning objectives for PTV were at least 95% reached the prescription dose and V110 no more than 10%.The maximum dose of spinalcord below 45 Gy and double lung dose V20 ≤ 28%,V30 ≤ 18% were constrained.Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram.The dose homogeneity index (HI),radiation conformity index (CI),radiation delivery time,monitor units and γ pass rate were also compared.SPSS 19.0 software paired ttest analysis was carried out on the two sets of data.Results The results showed that the IMAT plans in terms of the PTV's CI (t =3.35,P=0.003),D2(t =-2.27,P=0.034) lung's V30(t =-2.46,P=0.023) were better than that of VMAT group.But the VMAT plans spinal's V40 (t =2.37,P =0.027),lung's V5 (t =2.43,P =0.024) were superior to that of IMAT plans.There were no significant differences between IMAT and VMAT plans in the average dose of PTV,CTV,GTV,heart,spinal cord,double lung and the γpass rate.Conclusion IMAT presents a slight improvement in the OAR sparing in high dose with shorter treatment time when compared to VMAT.While in terms of delivered MU and tissue of low dose irradiated area is higher than that of in VMAT.These two treatment methods all can meet the clinical demand,which should be selected according to the actual situation of the patient.%目的 通过比较食管癌容积旋转调强放疗(VMAT)与固定剂量率旋转调强放疗(IMAT)计划,分析VMAT与IMAT在剂量学方面的特点.方法 对入组的22例

  8. 解剖结构对直肠癌IMRT计划膀胱受量影响%Relationship between anatomical factors and dosimetric sparing of the bladder in IMRT plans for rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云; 丁生苟; 蒋春灵

    2016-01-01

    目的:建立基于解剖结构定量分析直肠癌静态IMRT计划膀胱受量的统计模型。方法选择2012—2013年100例直肠癌放疗患者,制定AP布野方式的7个野逆向IMRT计划。患者解剖结构信息用膀胱与PTV和PTV外扩0.5 cm重叠区域的大小来定量分析。利用DVH对膀胱受量分析,建立膀胱受量与解剖结构信息之间数学模型,并在20例新直肠癌计划上验证所建立的模型是否准确。结果膀胱V50与膀胱和PTV重叠区域占膀胱百分体积( x%)呈线性关系( V50=0.89x-0.99);V40与膀胱和PTV外扩0.5 cm重叠区域占膀胱的百分体积( y%)也近似存在线性关系;平均剂量取决于x%和y%。模型预测20例直肠癌膀胱V50与V40偏差绝对值范围分别为(-3.13%~3.78%)和(-5.30%~5.66%),平均剂量相对偏差范围(-3.94%~3.76%)。结论这个模型提供了一种定量预估直肠癌IMRT膀胱受量方法。%Objective To establish a statistical model that can quantitatively analyze the dosimetric sparing of the bladder based on individual patient’ s anatomy in the static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for rectal cancer.Methods Static IMRT plans (7 AP fields) for 100 rectal cancer patients were used to train the model from 2012 to 2013.The anatomical features were quantitatively analyzed by the sizes of overlap regions of bladder-planning target volume (PTV) and bladder-PTV+0.5(0.5 cm margin around the PTV) .The mathematic relationship between anatomical features and dosimetric sparing of the bladder was evaluated after the bladder sparing dose was analyzed using dose-volume histogram.The established model was verified in the IMRT plans for additional 20 rectal cancer patients.Results Bladder V50 was linearly correlated with the ratio of bladder-PTV overlap size to bladder volume ( denoted as x%) , with an equation of V50=0.89x-0.99.Bladder V40 showed an

  9. Dosimetric comparison of different treatment planning techniques with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report-83 recommendations in adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy of gynecological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Duman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: IMRT provided more protection than FIF plans at high dose volumes of the OAR; however, it did not show any superiority at low-dose volumes. The NTCP results supported IMRT for only small intestine protection. Because IMRT is increasingly used clinically, the comparison of NTCP will become more common in the near future. Therefore, new prospective studies with sufficient number of patients and appropriate NTCP models are needed for this treatment modality.

  10. Dosimetric advantages of IMPT over IMRT for laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, W; Li, J; Fourkal, E; Fan, J; Xu, X; Chen, Z; Jin, L; Price, R; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)], E-mail: wei.luo@duke.edu

    2008-12-21

    As a clinical application of an exciting scientific breakthrough, a compact and cost-efficient proton therapy unit using high-power laser acceleration is being developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The significance of this application depends on whether or not it can yield dosimetric superiority over intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The goal of this study is to show how laser-accelerated proton beams with broad energy spreads can be optimally used for proton therapy including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and achieve dosimetric superiority over IMRT for prostate cancer. Desired energies and spreads with a varying {delta}E/E were selected with the particle selection device and used to generate spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Proton plans were generated on an in-house Monte Carlo-based inverse-planning system. Fifteen prostate IMRT plans previously used for patient treatment have been included for comparison. Identical dose prescriptions, beam arrangement and consistent dose constrains were used for IMRT and IMPT plans to show the dosimetric differences that were caused only by the different physical characteristics of proton and photon beams. Different optimization constrains and beam arrangements were also used to find optimal IMPT. The results show that conventional proton therapy (CPT) plans without intensity modulation were not superior to IMRT, but IMPT can generate better proton plans if appropriate beam setup and optimization are used. Compared to IMRT, IMPT can reduce the target dose heterogeneity ((D{sub 5}-D{sub 95})/D{sub 95}) by up to 56%. The volume receiving 65 Gy and higher (V{sub 65}) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 45% and 88%, respectively, while the volume receiving 40 Gy and higher (V{sub 40}) for the bladder and the rectum can be reduced by up to 49% and 68%, respectively. IMPT can also reduce the whole body non-target tissue dose by up to 61% or a factor 2.5. This study has shown that the laser

  11. A Multi-institutional Clinical Trial of Rectal Dose Reduction via Injected Polyethylene-Glycol Hydrogel During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Dosimetric Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Danny Y., E-mail: dsong2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Herfarth, Klaus K.; Uhl, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Eble, Michael J.; Pinkawa, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Weber, Damien C.; Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ≥7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ≥25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ≥7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ≥25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum

  12. Comparison of Dosimetric Performance among Commercial Quality Assurance Systems for Verifying Pretreatment Plans of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Flattening-Filter-Free Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of different commercial quality assurance (QA) systems for the pretreatment verification plan of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique using a flattening-filter-free beam. The verification for 20 pretreatment cancer patients (seven lung, six spine, and seven prostate cancers) were tested using three QA systems (EBT3 film, I’mRT MatriXX array, and MapCHECK). All the SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized in the Eclipse (version 11.0.34) treatment planning system (TPS) using the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm and were delivered to the Varian TrueBeam® accelerator equipped with a high-definition multileaf collimator. Gamma agreement evaluation was analyzed with the criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement (2%/2 mm) or 3%/3 mm. The highest passing rate (99.1% for 3%/3 mm) was observed on the MapCHECK system while the lowest passing rate was obtained on the film. The pretreatment verification results depend on the QA systems, treatment sites, and delivery beam energies. However, the delivery QA results for all QA systems based on the TPS calculation showed a good agreement of more than 90% for both the criteria. It is concluded that the three 2D QA systems have sufficient potential for pretreatment verification of the SBRT-VMAT plan. PMID:27709851

  13. [Improved program maintenance of the CIRCIS dosimetric planning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevast'ianov, A I; Liutova, N A; Ratner, T G

    1983-03-01

    A special computer complex CIRCIS (Informatique, France) is used in the All-Union Cancer Research Center, USSR AMS, for the dosimetric planning of radiotherapy on 5 gamma-beam units and electron accelerator. Mathematical maintenance of the complex includes programs of the calculation of dose distribution for gamma-, inhibition and electron radiation but has no program of the calculation of the time of irradiation. The authors have devised and introduced into the complex such a program in the Fortran language that makes it possible to calculate within 2-3 min the time of irradiation for multifield rotation therapy using several units as a time, thus expediting the dosimetric planning for patients' irradiation.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of three techniques in treatment of accelerated partial breast irradiation%乳腺癌保乳术后部分乳腺三种放疗计划的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚晖; 邱健健; 王芸; 徐志勇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To dosimetrically compare three delivery techniques of VMAT,IMRT and 3D-CRT in the treatment of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI).Methods Twenty patients with T1/2N0M0breast cancer were treated with VMAT.These cases were subsequently re-planned using static gantry IMRT and 3D-CRT technology to evaluate dosimetric differences.Dosimetric parameters including dose conformity index (CI),dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis of normal tissue coverage,dose parameters of PTV and normal tissues were evaluated,the delivery parameters including MU and delivery time were also analyzed.Results The IMRT and VMAT plans provided lower maximum dose,better mean dose and more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (F =14.86,8.57,18.23,P <0.05).The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 Gy for VMAT technique was significantly less than that of3D-CRTor IMRT(F=5.83,P<0.05).The ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20),5 Gy(V5) and the 5% volume dose (D5) of IMRT were superior to those of 3D-CRT and VMAT(F =16.39,3.62,4.81,P < 0.05).The low volume dose distributions of D5 in contralateral lung for IMRT was better than that of VMAT and 3D-CRT(F =3.99,3.43,P < 0.05).The total mean MUs for VMAT,3D-CRT and IMRT were 621.0 ± 111.9,707.3 ± 130.9 and 1161.4 ± 315.6,respectively (F =31.30,P < 0.05).The average machine delivery time was(1.5 ± 0.2)min for the VMAT plans,(7.0 ± 1.6)min for the 3D-CRT plans and (11.5 ± 1.9)min for the IMRT plans.Conclusions VMAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral lung.In terms of MU and delivery time,VMAT is more efficient for APBI than conventional 3D-CRT and static beam IMRT.%目的 比较容积弧形调强(VMAT)、固定野动态调强(IMRT)及三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)技术对乳腺癌保乳术后采用部分乳腺放疗的剂量学差异.方法 选取20例临床分期为T1-2N0M0的早期乳腺癌保乳

  15. Dosimetric comparison of the simultaneous integrated boost in whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery: IMRT, IMRT plus an electron boost and VMAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangang Wu

    Full Text Available To compare the target volume coverage and doses to organs at risks (OARs using three techniques that simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in whole-breast irradiation (WBI after breast-conserving surgery, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, IMRT plus an electron boost (IMRT-EB, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT.A total of 10 patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery were included in this study. IMRT, IMRT-EB and VMAT plans were generated for each patient.The conformity index (CI of the planning target volumes evaluation (PTV-Eval of VMAT was significantly superior to those of IMRT and IMRT-EB (P 0.05.Considered the target volume coverage and radiation dose delivered to the OARs (especially the heart and lung, IMRT may be more suitable for the SIB in WBI than IMRT-EB and VMAT. Additional clinical studies with a larger sample size will be needed to assess the long-term feasibility and efficacy of SIB using different radiotherapy techniques.

  16. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation and gel dosimetry in nasopharynx phantom for high dose rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Fazli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For the treatment of nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC using brachytherapy methods and high-energy photon sources are common techniques. In the common three dimensional (3D treatments planning, all of the computed tomography images are assumed homogeneous. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations for non-homogeneous nasopharynx phantom, MAGICA normoxic gel dosimetry and 3D treatment planning system (TPS. Materials and Methods: The head phantom was designed with Plexiglas cylinder, head bone, and nasopharynx brachytherapy silicon applicator. For the simulations, version 5 of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5 was used. 3D treatment planning was performed in Flexiplan software. A normoxic radiosensitive polymer gel was fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and poured into test tubes (for calibration curve and the head phantom. In addition, the head phantom was irradiated with Flexitron afterloader brachytherapy machine with 192 Ir source. To obtain calibration curves, 11 dosimeters were irradiated with dose range of 0-2000 cGy. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on 1.5T scanner. Results: Two-dimensional iso-dose in coronal plan at distances of z = +0.3, –0.3 cm was calculated. There was a good accordance between 3D TPS and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 2.4% and 6.1%. There was a predictable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 5.7% and 7.4%. Moreover, there was an acceptable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 data and differences in various distances were between 5.2% and 9.4%. Conclusion: The sources of differences in this comparison are divided to calculations variation and practical errors that was added in experimental dosimetry. The result of quality assurance of nasopharynx high dose rate brachytherapy is consistent with international standards.

  17. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation and gel dosimetry in nasopharynx phantom for high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli, Zeynab; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Zahmatkesh, M H; Mahdavi, Seied Rabei; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    For the treatment of nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC) using brachytherapy methods and high-energy photon sources are common techniques. In the common three dimensional (3D) treatments planning, all of the computed tomography images are assumed homogeneous. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations for non-homogeneous nasopharynx phantom, MAGICA normoxic gel dosimetry and 3D treatment planning system (TPS). The head phantom was designed with Plexiglas cylinder, head bone, and nasopharynx brachytherapy silicon applicator. For the simulations, version 5 of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5) was used. 3D treatment planning was performed in Flexiplan software. A normoxic radiosensitive polymer gel was fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and poured into test tubes (for calibration curve) and the head phantom. In addition, the head phantom was irradiated with Flexitron afterloader brachytherapy machine with (192)Ir source. To obtain calibration curves, 11 dosimeters were irradiated with dose range of 0-2000 cGy. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on 1.5T scanner. Two-dimensional iso-dose in coronal plan at distances of z = +0.3, -0.3 cm was calculated. There was a good accordance between 3D TPS and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 2.4% and 6.1%. There was a predictable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 5.7% and 7.4%. Moreover, there was an acceptable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 data and differences in various distances were between 5.2% and 9.4%. The sources of differences in this comparison are divided to calculations variation and practical errors that was added in experimental dosimetry. The result of quality assurance of nasopharynx high dose rate brachytherapy is consistent with international standards.

  18. SU-E-T-338: Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Early Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I; Quinn, K; Seebach, A; Wang, H [OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center, Rockford, IL (United States); Yah, R [University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected for the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.

  19. A multicentre comparison of quantitative {sup 90}Y PET/CT for dosimetric purposes after radioembolization with resin microspheres. The QUEST phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willowson, Kathy P. [University of Sydney, Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Tapner, Michael [Sirtex, North Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bailey, Dale L. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Lidcombe (Australia); Collaboration: The QUEST Investigator Team

    2015-07-15

    Siemens (2i21s all-pass filter, RR + ToF) ToF systems, respectively. Over the range of activities investigated, comparable performance between GE Healthcare and Siemens ToF systems suggests suitability for quantitative analysis in a scenario analogous to that of postradioembolization imaging for treatment of liver cancer. (orig.)

  20. Intensity modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the treatment of high grade glioma: a dosimetric comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon M; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Kachris, Stefanos; Vogds, Betty J; DeRouen, Melissa; Gittleman, Alicia E; DeWyngaert, Keith; Vlachaki, Maria T

    2007-04-19

    The present study compared the dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) techniques in patients treated for high-grade glioma. A total of 20 patients underwent computed tomography treatment planning in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Prescription dose and normal-tissue constraints were identical for the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. The prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy delivered at 1.8 Gy per fraction using 4-10 MV photons. Normal-tissue dose constraints were 50-54 Gy for the optic chiasm and nerves, and 55-60 Gy for the brainstem. The IMRT plan yielded superior target coverage as compared with the 3D-CRT plan. Specifically, minimum and mean planning target volume cone down doses were 54.52 Gy and 61.74 Gy for IMRT and 50.56 Gy and 60.06 Gy for 3D-CRT (p < or = 0.01). The IMRT plan reduced the percent volume of brainstem receiving a dose greater than 45 Gy by 31% (p = 0.004) and the percent volume of brain receiving a dose greater than 18 Gy, 24 Gy, and 45 Gy by 10% (p = 0.059), 14% (p = 0.015), and 40% (p < or = 0.0001) respectively. With IMRT, the percent volume of optic chiasm receiving more than 45 Gy was also reduced by 30.40% (p = 0.047). As compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly increased the tumor control probability (p < or = 0.005) and lowered the normal-tissue complication probability for brain and brainstem (p < 0.033). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy improved target coverage and reduced radiation dose to the brain, brainstem, and optic chiasm. With the availability of new cancer imaging tools and more effective systemic agents, IMRT may be used to intensify tumor doses while minimizing toxicity, therefore potentially improving outcomes in patients with high-grade glioma.

  1. Lesion dose in differentiated thyroid carcinoma metastases after rhTSH or thyroid hormone withdrawal: {sup 124}I PET/CT dosimetric comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, Lutz Stefan; Jentzen, Walter; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas [University of Duisburg/Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Petrich, Thorsten; Knapp, Wolfram H. [Hanover University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Froemke, Cornelia [Hanover University School of Medicine, Institute of Biometry, Hanover (Germany); Marlowe, Robert J. [Spencer-Fontayne Corporation, Jersey City, NJ (United States); Heusner, Till [University of Duisburg/Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Renal radioiodine excretion is {proportional_to}50% faster during euthyroidism versus hypothyroidism. We therefore sought to assess lesion dose/GBq of administered {sup 131}I activity (LDpA) in iodine-avid metastases (IAM) of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in athyreotic patients after recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) versus after thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). We retrospectively compared mean LDpA between groups of consecutive patients (N = 63) receiving {sup 124}I positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 124}I PET/CT) aided by rhTSH (n = 27) or THW (n = 36); we prospectively compared LDpA after these stimulation methods within another individual. Data derived from serial PET scans and one CT scan performed 2-96 h post-{sup 124}I ingestion. A mixed model analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) calculated the treatment groups' mean LDpAs adjusting for statistically significant baseline intergroup differences: non-IAM were more prevalent, median IAM count/patient lower in cervical lymph nodes and higher in distant sites, median stimulated thyroglobulin higher, mean cumulative radioiodine activity greater and prior diagnostic scintigraphy more frequent in the rhTSH patients. Mean LDpAs were: rhTSH group (n = 71 IAM), 30.6 Gy/GBq; THW group (n = 66 IAM), 51.8 Gy/GBq. The difference in group means (rhTSH less THW), -21.2 Gy/GBq, was statistically non-significant (p = 0.1667). However, the 95% confidence interval of that difference (-51.4 to + 9 Gy/GBq) suggested a trend favouring THW. The within-patient comparison found 2.9- to 10-fold higher LDpAs under THW. We found some suggestions, but no statistically significant evidence, that rhTSH administration results in a lower radiation dose to DTC metastases than does THW. A large, well-controlled, prospective within-patient study should resolve this issue. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-T-382: Evaluation of Clinical Application and Dosimetric Comparison for Treatment Plans of Gamma Knife and CyberKnife for Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical Univer, New Taipei City, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze and compare the characteristics of dose distributions between Gamma Knife (GK) and CyberKnife (CK), in treating arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and evaluate the influences on their clinical applications. Methods: Twenty four patients with AVMs treated with CK of prescribed dose (PD) of 16–25 Gy in single fraction were selected. Each patient’s CT images used for CK treatment planning with contours of targets and critical organs were exported and then loaded into the GK planning system. GK treatment plan with the same PD used in CK was generated for each patient. The metrics for dose comparison between GK and CK included conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI) of 75%, 50% and 25% of the PD, heterogeneity index (HI), volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy, maximum dose to brainstem and beam-on time. Paired Samples t-test was used to analyze these metrics for significance (p value). Results: The CI were 0.744 ± 0.075 (GK) and 0.768 ± 0.086 (CK), p = 0.281. The GI75%, GI50%, and GI25% in GK and CK were 1.735 ± 0.100 and 2.439 ± 0.338 (p < 0.001), 3.169 ± 0.265 and 4.972 ± 0.852 (p < 0.001), and 8.650 ± 0.914 and 14.261 ± 2.476 (p < 0.001). The HI were 0.728 ± 0.072 (GK) and 0.313 ± 0.069 (CK), p < 0.001. There were significant differences both for volume of brain tissues covered by 10 Gy and 12 Gy in GK and CK (p < 0.001). GK had smaller maximum dose to brainstem. CK had shorter beam-on time. Conclusion: GK has similar dose conformity as CK, and has better normal tissue sparing but is less efficient than CK.

  3. SU-E-T-304: Dosimetric Comparison of Cavernous Sinus Tumors: Heterogeneity Corrected Pencil Beam (PB-Hete) Vs. X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Algorithms for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using PB-hete vs. XVMC algorithms for SRT treatments of cavernous sinus tumors. Methods: Using PB-hete SRT, five patients with cavernous sinus tumors received the prescription dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions for planning target volume PTV(V100%)=95%. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on T1/T2 MRI-CT-fused images. PTV (range 2.1–84.3cc, mean=21.7cc) was generated using a 5mm uniform-margin around GTV. PB-hete SRT plans included a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/static beams delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000 MU/min) beam. Plans were re-optimized using XVMC algorithm with identical beam geometry and MLC positions. Comparison of plan specific PTV(V99%), maximal, mean, isocenter doses, and total monitor units(MUs) were evaluated. Maximal dose to OARs such as brainstem, optic-pathway, spinal cord, and lenses as well as normal tissue volume receiving 12Gy(V12) were compared between two algorithms. All analysis was performed using two-tailed paired t-tests of an upper-bound p-value of <0.05. Results: Using either algorithm, no dosimetrically significant differences in PTV coverage (PTVV99%,maximal, mean, isocenter doses) and total number of MUs were observed (all p-values >0.05, mean ratios within 2%). However, maximal doses to optic-chiasm and nerves were significantly under-predicted using PB-hete (p=0.04). Maximal brainstem, spinal cord, lens dose and V12 were all comparable between two algorithms, with exception of one patient with the largest PTV who exhibited 11% higher V12 with XVMC. Conclusion: Unlike lung tumors, XVMC and PB-hete treatment plans provided similar PTV coverage for cavernous sinus tumors. Majority of OARs doses were comparable between two algorithms, except for small structures such as optic chiasm/nerves which could potentially receive higher doses when using XVMC algorithm. Special attention may need to be paid on a case

  4. SU-E-T-13: A Comparative Dosimetric Study On Radio-Dynamic Therapy for Pelvic Cancer Treatment: Strategies for Bone Marrow Dose and Volume Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China); Wang, B; Dong, Z; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ge, W; Xu, L [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radio-dynamic therapy (RDT) is a potentially effective modality for local and systemic cancer treatment. Using RDT, the administration of a radio-sensitizer enhances the biological effect of high-energy photons. Although the sensitizer uptake ratio of tumor to normal tissue is normally high, one cannot simply neglect its effect on critical structures. In this study, we aim to explore planning strategies to improve bone marrow sparing without compromising the plan quality for RDT treatment of pelvic cancers. Methods: Ten cervical and ten prostate cancer patients who previously received radiotherapy at our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, nine plans were created using the Varian Eclipse treatmentplanning-system (TPS) with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT delivery techniques containing various gantry angle combinations and optimization parameters (dose constraints to the bone marrow). To evaluate the plans for bone marrow sparing, the dose-volume parameters V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40 for bone marrow were examined. Effective doseenhancement factors for the sensitizer were used to weigh the dose-volume histograms for various tissues from individual fractions. Results: The planning strategies had different impacts on bone marrow sparing for the cervical and prostate cases. For the cervical cases, provided the bone marrow constraints were properly set during optimization, the dose to bone marrow sparing was found to be comparable between different IMRT and VMAT plans regardless of the gantry angle selection. For the prostate cases, however, careful selection of gantry angles could dramatically improve the bone marrow sparing, although the dose distribution in bone marrow was clinically acceptable for all prostate plans that we created. Conclusion: For intensity-modulated RDT planning for cervical cancer, planners should set bone marrow constraints properly to avoid any adverse damage, while for prostate cancer one can carefully select gantry

  5. Dosimetric comparing four kinds of radiation treatment planning for esophagus cancer%食管癌放射治疗计划的剂量学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊绮丽; 徐刚; 石勇; 倪千喜; 顾强

    2016-01-01

    比较食管癌患者应用螺旋断层(TomoHelical, TH)、径照断层(TomoDirect, TD)、容积旋转调强(Volumetric modulated arc therapy, VMAT)和固定野动态调强(Intensity modulated radiation therapy, IMRT)4种放疗计划的剂量学差异。选取18例食管癌患者,利用Pinnacle9.2计划系统设计单弧360°VMAT放疗计划和5野IMRT放疗计划。利用TomoHDTM2.0.7计划系统设计TH放疗计划和5野TD放疗计划。利用剂量体积直方图(Dose volume histogram, DVH)统计靶区剂量参数、适形性指数(Conformity index, CI)和均匀性指数(Heterogeneity index,HI),肺、心脏、脊髓剂量体积参数,出束时间和治疗跳数。TH计划靶区适形性和靶区均匀性略优于TD计划,VMAT计划靶区适形性和靶区均匀性略优于IMRT计划,且前两种计划明显优于后两种;TH计划和VMAT计划肺V20Gy、V30Gy,心脏V30Gy、V40Gy分别优于TD计划和IMRT计划;但是TD计划肺V5Gy具有其他计划都不具有的优势。TH计划优于TD计划优于VMAT计划优于IMRT计划。但如果考虑性价比,本研究认为对于食管癌 VMAT 计划是首选;如果考虑放射治疗计划的质量,TH 计划是首选;但如果靶区体积比较大,肺的低剂量无法达到临床要求时,可以考虑用TD计划解决这一难题。%Dose differences among TomoHelical (TH), TomoDirect (TD), Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophagus cancer were compared. Eighteen esophageal patients were chosen. The Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning system was used to generate the VMAT plan and the five field IMRT plan. For comparison, the TH plan and five field TD plan were generated by TomoHDTM  2.0.7 treatment planning system. It was available to adopt the dose volume histograms to investigate the dose parameters of target, the statistics of conformity index (CI), the heterogeneity index (HI) of planning target volume (PTV), the dose volumetric

  6. Intensity-modulated proton therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and 3D conformal radiotherapy in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. A dosimetric comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeberg, S.; Debus, J. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Harrabi, S.B.; Bougatf, N.; Rieber, J.; Koerber, S.A.; Herfarth, K.; Rieken, S. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bernhardt, D.; Syed, M.; Sprave, T.; Mohr, A. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, S.E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institut fuer Innovative Radiotherapie (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Neuherberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The prognosis for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients is poor; thus, treatment-related side effects need to be minimized to conserve quality of life and functionality. Advanced techniques such as proton radiation therapy (PRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may potentially further reduce the frequency and severity of radiogenic impairment. We retrospectively assessed 12 HGG patients who had undergone postoperative intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated and optimized for comparison after contouring crucial neuronal structures important for neurogenesis and neurocognitive function. Integral dose (ID), homogeneity index (HI), and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC) were calculated from dose statistics. Toxicity data were evaluated. Target volume coverage was comparable for all three modalities. Compared to 3D-CRT and VMAT, PRT showed statistically significant reductions (p < 0.05) in mean dose to whole brain (-20.2 %, -22.7 %); supratentorial (-14.2 %, -20,8 %) and infratentorial (-91.0 %, -77.0 %) regions; brainstem (-67.6 %, -28.1 %); pituitary gland (-52.9 %, -52.5 %); contralateral hippocampus (-98.9 %, -98.7 %); and contralateral subventricular zone (-62.7 %, -66.7 %, respectively). Fatigue (91.7 %), radiation dermatitis (75.0 %), focal alopecia (100.0 %), nausea (41.7 %), cephalgia (58.3 %), and transient cerebral edema (16.7 %) were the most common acute toxicities. Essential dose reduction while maintaining equal target volume coverage was observed using PRT, particularly in contralaterally located critical neuronal structures, areas of neurogenesis, and structures of neurocognitive functions. These findings were supported by preliminary clinical results confirming the safety and feasibility of PRT in HGG. (orig.) [German] Die Prognose bei ''High-grade''-Gliomen (HGG) ist infaust. Gerade bei diesen Patienten sollten therapieassoziierte Nebenwirkungen minimiert werden

  7. Dosimetric study and assessment of objective functions developed in IMRT; etude dosimetrique et evaluation de fonctions objectives developpees en RCMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servagi-Vernat, S.; Bosset, J.F. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU IFRC, Besancon (France); Ali, D.; Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris (France); Viard, R. [Aquilab SAS, Loos-lez-Lille (France); Fenoglietto, P. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Nantes (France); Lisbona, A.; Zetkin, S. [Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a prospective and comparative analysis of the main dosimetric, physical, biological and probabilistic parameters concerning tumour target volumes and organs at risk for three new types of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT): helical tomo-therapy, VMat-type dynamic arc-therapy (volumetric modulated ar therapy), and RapidArc-type dynamic arc-therapy. They also report the validation of new predictive dosimetric parameters in patients with ENT cancers. Short communication

  8. Neuroticism and responses to social comparison among cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Brakel, Thecla M.; Bennenbroek, Femke T. C.; Stiegelis, Heidi E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined how the effects of three audiotapes containig different types of social comparison information on the mood of cancer patients depended on the level of neuroticism. On the procedural tape, a man and woman discussed the process of radiation therapy, on the emotion tape, they

  9. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  10. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Sun K., E-mail: sun.yi@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mak, Walter [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Do, Ly [Cancer Care Institute, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  11. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pair, Matthew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rojas, Hector D.; Kanke, James E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan.

  12. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  13. The impact of body mass index on radiotherapy technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer: a single-center dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Celik, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of body mass index on radiotherapy (RT) technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Twenty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study and divided into 3 groups with respect to their body mass index (normal weight, 18.5-24.9 kg/m; overweight, 25-29.9 kg/m; obese, 30-39.9 kg/m). Treatment plans using field-in-field (FIF) and 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) were compared for the doses in the planning target volume (PTV), organs-at-risk (OAR) volumes, dose homogeneity index, and monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique was superior to 3D-CRT with respect to the maximum and mean doses received by OAR and dose homogeneity index values. The subgroup analyses revealed that the maximum dose received by the right femur and the mean doses received by the rectum and bladder were significantly reduced only in obese patients (Ps = 0.021, 0.008, and 0.008, respectively). The FIF technique significantly reduced the PTV volumes irradiated with greater than 105% of the prescribed dose (P endometrial cancer patients. This advantage is more prominent in obese patients. Therefore, FIF technique represents an effective pelvic RT treatment option for obese patients in clinics that do not have access to or prefer an alternative to intensity-modulated RT.

  14. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation of Dosimetric Parameters for HYBRID PdI Source in Brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A novel brachytherapy source model, ADVANTAGE HYBRID PdI, has been designed by CIAE For treatment of cancer. In this project, the purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of HYBRID PdI source. The Monte Carlo simulation

  16. Dosimetric analysis of tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with and without bone marrow sparing for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Jianping Chen; Heliang He; Weidong Xu; Huayong Jiang; Yadi Wang ; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Na Lu; Diandian Chen; Bo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare tomotherapy-based bone marrow-sparing intensity-mod-ulated radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) without entering the pelvic bone marrow as a planning constraint in the treatment of cervical cancer after hysterectomy. Methods BMS-IMRT and IMRT plans were designed for a cohort of nine patients. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions, and 95% of the planned target volume received this dose. The doses were computed using a commercial y available treatment planning system with the convolution/superposi-tion algorithm. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of planning target volume homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as wel as organ at risk dose and volume parameters. Results BMS-IMRT had advantages over IMRT in terms of CI, but was equivalent to the latter in HI. V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of pelvic bone marrow in BMS-IMRT decreased by 0.06%, 17.33%, 22.19%, 13.85%, and 16.46%, respectively, compared with IMRT. Except for V30 of the smal bowel and V30 and V40 of the bladder, no statistical y significant dif erences were found between BMS-IMRT and IMRT in the smal bowel, bladder, and rectum. Conclusion For cervical cancer patients receiving tomotherapy-based radiotherapy after hysterectomy, BMS-IMRT reduced pelvic bone marrow volume receiving low-dose radiation, and it may be conducive to preventing acute hematologic toxicity.

  17. 胰腺癌不同调强方式的剂量学比较%Dosimetric Comparison of Different Pattern of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟平; 杨波; 庞廷田; 刘楠; 胡克; 邱杰; 张福泉

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较胰腺癌术后患者固定野调强放疗( fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy, FF-IMRT)与容积调强放疗(volumetricmodulatedarctherapy,VMAT)的剂量学差异,为临床选择合适的照射技术提供参考。方法2011年6月至12月在北京协和医院行放疗的10例胰腺癌术后患者,分别根据其同一CT模拟定位图像设计FF-IMRT计划和VMAT计划,处方剂量50 Gy/25次。分析剂量体积直方图曲线,评估靶区、危及器官和正常组织的剂量分布,并比较二者机器跳数(monitor units, MU)和治疗时间的差别。结果 FF-IMRT计划和 VMAT 计划的靶区剂量分布差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。与FF-IMRT计划相比, VMAT计划中肝脏、胃、小肠、全身的V5明显升高(P均<0.05),而肝脏的V10和V20,胃的V10,小肠的V10、 V20、 V50,左肾的V20,右肾的V20、 V30、 Dmean、 Dmax,以及全身的V10、 V20有不同程度下降(P均<0.05),脊髓的 Dmax升高1.85 Gy (P=0.04)。 FF-IMRT计划与 VMAT计划的 MU 分别为619.60±117.18和492.70±51.56(t =3.18, P =0.01)。 VMAT 计划的 MU 较 FF-IMRT 计划减少了20.48%。结论胰腺癌患者选择VMAT计划,可以在不降低计划水平上的剂量分布的前提下,大大减少MU,缩短治疗时间。%Objective To analyze the dosimetric differences between fixed-field intensity-modulated ra-diotherapy ( FF-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) in treating pancreatic carcinoma , aiming to facilitate the clinical decision upon appropriate radiation technique .Methods From June to December 2011 , 10 postoperative patients of pancreatic carcinoma who received radiotherapy in Peking Union Medical College Hos -pital were selected for this comparison .FF-IMRT and VMAT plans were developed based on the same CT simula-tion image for each patient .The prescription dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions.The doses distributions in planning

  18. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  19. Dosimetric factors predictive of late toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy; Radiotherapie prostatique: prediction de la toxicite tardive a partir des donnees dosimetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevoisier, R. de [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Inserm, U 642, 35 - Rennes (France); Fiorino, C. [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Melghera, Milan (Italy); Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et de physique medicale, centre Henri-Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); EA 4108, UFR de medecine-pharmacie, QuantIF-LITIS, 76 - Rouen (France)

    2010-10-15

    Dose escalation in prostate cancer is made possible due to technological advances and to precise dose-volume constraints to limit normal tissue damage. This article is a literature review focusing on the correlations between exposure (doses and volumes) of organs at risk (OAR) and rectal, urinary, sexual and bone toxicity, as well as on mathematical models aiming at toxicity prediction. Dose-volume constraint recommendations are presented that have been shown to be associated with reduced rectal damage. Indeed, the clinical data is relatively strong for late rectal toxicity (bleeding), with constraints put on both the volume of the rectum receiving high doses ({>=}70 Gy) and the volume receiving intermediate doses (40 to 60 Gy). Predictive models of rectal toxicity (Normal Tissue Complication Probability) appear to accurately estimate toxicity risks. The correlations are much weaker for the bulb and the femoral heads, and nearly do not exist for the bladder. Further prospective studies are required, ideally taking into account patient-related risk factors (co-morbidities and their specific treatments), assays of normal tissue hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and mathematical models applied on 3D images acquired under the treatment machine (e.g. Cone Beam CT). (authors)

  20. Practical simplifications for radioimmunotherapy dosimetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S.; DeNardo, G.L.; O`Donnell, R.T.; Yuan, A.; DeNardo, D.A.; Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J. [Univ. of California, Sacramento, CA (United States). Davis Medical Center

    1999-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is potentially useful for assessment and prediction of efficacy and toxicity for radionuclide therapy. The usefulness of these dose estimates relies on the establishment of a dose-response model using accurate pharmacokinetic data and a radiation dosimetric model. Due to the complexity in radiation dose estimation, many practical simplifications have been introduced in the dosimetric modeling for clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy. Although research efforts are generally needed to improve the simplifications used at each stage of model development, practical simplifications are often possible for specific applications without significant consequences to the dose-response model. In the development of dosimetric methods for radioimmunotherapy, practical simplifications in the dosimetric models were introduced. This study evaluated the magnitude of uncertainty associated with practical simplifications for: (1) organ mass of the MIRD phantom; (2) radiation contribution from target alone; (3) interpolation of S value; (4) macroscopic tumor uniformity; and (5) fit of tumor pharmacokinetic data.

  1. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans and conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer involving seminal vesicles and pelvis lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Rout

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to (1 identify the continual diversity between conventional fixed field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT and RapidArc (RA for high-risk prostate cancer; and (2 determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using for this type of treatment.Methods: A cohort of 20 prostate cases including prostate, seminal vesicles and pelvic lymph nodes was selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 75.6 Gy (45 Gy to PTVP and an additional 21.6 Gy to PTVB. Two plans were generated for each PTV: multiple 7-fields for IMRT and two arcs for RA.Results: A Sigma index (IMRT: 2.75 ± 0.581; RA: 2.8 ± 0.738 for PTVP and (IMRT: 2.0 ± 0.484; RA: 2.1 ± 0.464 for PTVB indicated similar dose homogeneity inside the PTV. Conformity index (IMRT: 0.96 ± 0.047; RA: 0.95 ± 0.059 for PTVP and (IMRT: 0.97 ± 0.015; RA: 0.96 ± 0.014 for PTVB was comparable for both the techniques. IMRT offered lower mean dose to organ at risks (OARs compared to RA plans. Normal tissue integral dose in IMRT plan resulted 0.87% lower than RA plans. All the plans displayed significant increase (2.50 times for PTVP and 1.72 for PTBB in the average number of necessary monitor units (MUs with IMRT beam. Treatment delivery time of RA was 2 ‒ 6 minutes shorter than IMRT treatment.Conclusion: For PTV including pelvic lymph nodes, seminal vesicles and prostate, IMRT offered a greater degree of OARs sparing. For PTV including seminal vesicles and prostate, RA with two arcs provided comparable plan with IMRT. RA also improved the treatment efficiency due to smaller number of MUs required.

  2. Clinical and dosimetric analysis of 469 prostate cancer patients treated in France in 2005 by permanent implant brachytherapy using the Iodine 125 seeds IsoSeed Bebig: report to the French Economic committee of health products (C.E.P.S.); Analyse clinique et dosimetrique de 469 patients traites en France en 2005 par implantation prostatique de grains d'iode 125 IsoSeed Bebig: rapport pour le Comite economique des produits de sante (CEPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosset, J.M.; Gomme, S.; Henni, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Pontvert, B.; Asselain, D.; Chauveinca, L. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Chauveinca, L. [Clinique Hartmann, 92 - Neuilly-sur-Seine (France); Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France); Guerif, S. [CHU de Poitiers, 86 - Poitiers (France); Labib, A. [Centre Rene-Huguenin, 92 - Saint-Cloud (France); Hannoun-Levi, J.M. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Martin, P. [Polyclinique de Bourgogne, 59 - Lille (France); Quetin, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Nguyen, T.D. [Centre Jean-Godinot, 51 - Reims (France); Flam, T. [Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Thiounn, N. [Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France); Housset, M. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    A French decree of February 3. 2005, allowed the Iodine 125 seeds from several companies to be reimbursed after a permanent implantation brachytherapy for a prostate cancer. Within this frame, the French 'Comite economique des produits de sante' (C.E.P.S.; Economic committee for health products) made mandatory the annual writing and publication of a follow-up study with three main aims; make sure that the seeds were used for prostate cancer patients with criteria corresponding to the national recommendations, analyze the quality of the dosimetric data, and report all side effects, complications and possible accidents. We therefore report here a clinical and dosimetric analysis of 469 patient cases treated in France in nine centers in 2005 with the Iodine 125 IsoSeed Bebig. This analysis shows that: 1) The national recommendations for selecting patients for exclusive prostate brachytherapy have been taken into account in 97% of the cases; 2) The dosimetric quality criteria totally fulfilled the recommendations in a large majority of cases; the intra-operative D90 was found to be superior to 145 Gy in 98% of the patients, and the intra-operative V100 was superior to 95% in 96% of the cases; 3) The early toxicity (mainly urinary) was found to be at the lower range of what is reported in the literature, with in particular a retention rate of 2.4%. (autho0008.

  3. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  4. Design, development of water tank-type lung phantom and dosimetric verification in institutions participating in a phase I study of stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients with T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Shirato, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Masayori; Miyabe, Yuki; Kito, Satoshi; Narita, Yuichirou; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikura, Satoshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    A domestic multicenter phase I study of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer in inoperable patients or elderly patients who refused surgery was initiated as the Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702) in Japan. Prior to the clinical study, the accuracy of dose calculation in radiation treatment-planning systems was surveyed in participating institutions, and differences in the irradiating dose between the institutions were investigated. We developed a water tank-type lung phantom appropriate for verification of the exposure dose in lung SBRT. Using this water tank-type lung phantom, the dose calculated in the radiation treatment-planning system and the measured dose using a free air ionization chamber and dosimetric film were compared in a visiting survey of the seven institutions participating in the clinical study. In all participating institutions, differences between the calculated and the measured dose in the irradiation plan were as follows: the accuracy of the absolute dose in the center of the simulated tumor measured using a free air ionization chamber was within 2%, the mean gamma value was ≤ 0.47 on gamma analysis following the local dose criteria, and the pass rate was >87% for 3%/3 mm from measurement of dose distribution with dosimetric film. These findings confirmed the accuracy of delivery doses in the institutions participating in the clinical study, so that a study with integration of the institutions could be initiated.

  5. Cancer Drugs: An International Comparison of Postlicensing Price Inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Philip; Mahmoud, Sarah; Patel, Yogin; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2017-06-01

    The cost of cancer drugs forms a rising proportion of health care budgets worldwide. A number of studies have examined international comparisons of initial cost, but there is little work on postlicensing price increases. To examine this, we compared cancer drug prices at initial sale and subsequent price inflation in the United States and United Kingdom and also reviewed relevant price control mechanisms. The 10 top-selling cancer drugs were selected, and their prices at initial launch and in 2015 were compared. Standard nondiscounted prices were obtained from the relevant annual copies of the RED BOOK and the British National Formulary. At initial marketing, prices were on average 42% higher in the United States than in the United Kingdom. After licensing in the United States, all 10 drugs had price rises averaging an overall annual 8.8% (range, 1.4% to 24.1%) increase. In comparison, in the United Kingdom, six drugs had unchanged prices, two had decreased prices, and two had modest price increases. The overall annual increase in the United Kingdom was 0.24%. Cancer drug prices are rising substantially, both at their initial marketing price and, in the United States, at postlicensing prices. In the United Kingdom, the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme, an agreement between the government and the pharmaceutical industry, controls health care costs while allowing a return on investment and funds for research. The increasing costs of cancer drugs are approaching the limits of sustainability, and a similar government-industry agreement may allow stability for both health care provision and the pharmaceutical industry in the United States.

  6. Multiclass cancer classification based on gene expression comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sitan; Naiman, Daniel Q.

    2016-01-01

    As the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer is being increasingly appreciated through genomic analyses, microarray-based cancer classification comprising multiple discriminatory molecular markers is an emerging trend. Such multiclass classification problems pose new methodological and computational challenges for developing novel and effective statistical approaches. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for classifying multiple disease states associated with cancer based on gene expression profiles. Our method focuses on detecting small sets of genes in which the relative comparison of their expression values leads to class discrimination. For an m-class problem, the classification rule typically depends on a small number of m-gene sets, which provide transparent decision boundaries and allow for potential biological interpretations. We first test our approach on seven common gene expression datasets and compare it with popular classification methods including support vector machines and random forests. We then consider an extremely large cohort of leukemia cancer to further assess its effectiveness. In both experiments, our method yields comparable or even better results to benchmark classifiers. In addition, we demonstrate that our approach can integrate pathway analysis of gene expression to provide accurate and biological meaningful classification. PMID:24918456

  7. Comparison of three intravenous bisphosphonates in cancer-associated hypercalcaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, S H; Gallacher, S J; Patel, U; Dryburgh, F J; Fraser, W D; Cowan, R A; Boyle, I T

    1989-11-18

    Three intravenous bisphosphonates were compared in the treatment of cancer-associated hypercalcaemia. 48 patients were randomly allocated to one of three treatment groups (each with 16 subjects)--30 mg pamidronate or 600 mg clodronate, both as single intravenous infusions; or etidronate as three infusions of 7.5 mg/kg per day for three consecutive days. Patients were rehydrated with normal saline before bisphosphonate treatment. All three bisphosphonates lowered serum calcium by inhibiting bone resorption; pamidronate was the most potent in this respect. By comparison with the other groups, more patients in the pamidronate group became normocalcaemic, and the effect on serum calcium was apparent sooner and lasted longer.

  8. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    The treatment regimen for breast cancer patients typically involves Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI). The coverage and extent of the radiation treatment is dictated by location of tumor mass, breast tissue distribution, involvement of lymph nodes, and other factors. The current standard treatment approach used at our institution is a 3D tangential beam geometry, which involves two fields irradiating the breast, or a four field beam arrangement covering the whole breast and involved nodes, while decreasing the dose to organs as risk (OARs) such as the lung and heart. The coverage of these targets can be difficult to achieve in patients with unfavorable thoracic geometries, especially in those cases in which the planning target volume (PTV) is extended to the chest wall. It is a well-known fact that exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation has been proved to increase the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. In these cases, inverse planned treatments have become a proven alternative to the 3D approach. The goal of this research project is to evaluate the factors that affect our current techniques as well as to adapt the development of inverse modulated techniques for our clinic, in which breast cancer patients are one of the largest populations treated. For this purpose, a dosimetric comparison along with the evaluation of immobilization devices was necessary. Radiation treatment plans were designed and dosimetrically compared for 5 patients in both, supine and prone positions. For 8 patients, VMAT and IMRT plans were created and evaluated in the supine position. Skin flash incorporation for inverse modulated plans required measurement of the surface dose as well as an evaluation of breast volume changes during a treatment course. It was found that prone 3D conformal plans as well as the VMAT and IMRT plans are generally superior in sparing OARs to supine plans with comparable PTV coverage. Prone setup leads to larger shifts in breast volume as well as in

  9. Measurement of linear energy transfer distribution at CERN-EU high- energy reference field facility with real-time radiation monitoring device III and its comparison with dosimetric telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Doke, T; Hara, K; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Suzuki, S; Terasawa, K

    2004-01-01

    The distributions of linear energy transfer for LET (LET/sub water/) in front of the 80-cm-thick concrete side shield at the CERN-EU high- energy reference field (CERF) facility were measured with a Si detector telescope named real-time radiation monitoring device-III (RRMD-III) covered with and without a 1 cm-thick acrylic plate. In these measurements, a difference of about 20% in the absorbed dose between the two LET/sub water/ distributions was observed as a result of protons, deuterons and tritons recoiled by neutrons. The LET/sub water/ distribution obtained using RRMD-III without the 1-cm-thick acrylic plate is compared with lineal energy distributions obtained using the dosimetric telescope (DOSTEL) detector under the same conditions. These dose equivalents are also compared with that obtained using HANDI TEPC which is used as the standard at the CERF facility. (26 refs).

  10. A generalized definition of dosimetric quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, A M; Rossi, H H

    1990-04-01

    The current definitions of microdosimetric and dosimetric quantities use the notion of 'ionizing radiation'. However, this notion is not rigorously defined, and its definition would require the somewhat arbitrary choice of specified energy cut-off values for different types of particles. Instead of choosing fixed cut-off values one can extend the system of definitions by admitting the free selection of a category of types and energies of particles that are taken to be part of the field. In this way one extends the system of dosimetric quantities. Kerma and absorbed dose appear then as special cases of a more general dosimetric quantity, and an analogue to kerma can be obtained for charged particle fields; it is termed cema. A modification that is suitable for electron fields is termed reduced cema.

  11. Biokinetic and dosimetric modelling in the estimation of radiation risks from internal emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, John

    2009-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed biokinetic and dosimetric models that enable the calculation of organ and tissue doses for a wide range of radionuclides. These are used to calculate equivalent and effective dose coefficients (dose in Sv Bq(-1) intake), considering occupational and environmental exposures. Dose coefficients have also been given for a range of radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic medicine. Using equivalent and effective dose, exposures from external sources and from different radionuclides can be summed for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to risks from whole-body radiation exposure. Risk estimates are derived largely from follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. New dose coefficients will be required following the publication in 2007 of new ICRP recommendations. ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models are subject to continuing review and improvement, although it is arguable that the degree of sophistication of some of the most recent models is greater than required for the calculation of effective dose to a reference person for the purposes of regulatory control. However, the models are also used in the calculation of best estimates of doses and risks to individuals, in epidemiological studies and to determine probability of cancer causation. Models are then adjusted to best fit the characteristics of the individuals and population under consideration. For example, doses resulting from massive discharges of strontium-90 and other radionuclides to the Techa River from the Russian Mayak plutonium plant in the early years of its operation are being estimated using models adapted to take account of measurements on local residents and other population-specific data. Best estimates of doses to haemopoietic bone marrow, in utero and postnatally, are being used in epidemiological studies of radiation-induced leukaemia

  12. Dosimetric results in implant and post-implant and low rate in brachytherapy prostate cancer with loose seeds and attached; Resultados dosimetricos en el implante y post-impante en braquiterapia de baja tasa en cancer de prostata con semillas sueltas y unidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan-Senabre, X. J.; Albert Antequera, M.; Lopez-Tarjuelo, J.; Santos Serra, A.; Perez-Mestre, M.; Sanchez Iglesias, A. L.; Conde Moreno, A. J.; Gonzalez Vidal, V.; Beltran Persiva, J.; Muelas Soria, R.; Ferrer Albiach, C.

    2015-07-01

    The objective is determine differences dosimetry statistics on the dosimetry of the implant and post-implant in brachytherapy of low rate with implants permanent in prostate using seed of 125-I loose and attached Both in lives and in the post-prostatic plans dosimetric coverage is good and restrictions in urethra and rectum for both groups of patients are met. Not migrating with joined is evident, as well as better dosimetric homogeneity. (Author)

  13. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Joo Kim, Jin-hong Park, In-Ha Yun, Young Seok KimDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Republic of KoreaPurpose: To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP and small field (SF intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings.Methods: Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50 and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy.Results: Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF and were not relevant to the irradiated doses.Conclusion: Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages.Keywords: prostate cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, intestinal toxicity, citrulline

  14. Dosimetric implications associated to heterogeneity dose correction in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer; Implicaciones dosimetricas asociadas al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad en radioterapia estereotaxica extracraneal (SBRT) de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of lung lesions using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires algorithms with corrections that adequately model the behavior of narrow beams in the presence of tissue heterogeneities, although protocols such as RTOG 0236 excluded these kind of corrections. 100 cases were evaluated retrospectively following the RTOG 0813 and RTOG 0915 guidelines, by obtaining the deviations of the relevant dosimetric indicators from Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB), maintaining the same configuration and monitor units (MU). Deviations between MC and PB have been classified according to the volume and density of the lesion. The greatest variations (up to 45% difference in D50%) are found for cases with lower volume and density, where the lesion is almost equivalent to lung tissue, given the higher proportion of air surrounding the periphery of the tumor, and the reduction of the radiation fields, resulting in a lack of electronic equilibrium that must be properly considered in the treatment planning system. These deviations involve dosimetric implications which are observable in clinical outcomes, determining how to proceed in treatment planning, to ensure that the actual dose delivered is performed accordingly to the prescription dose, while requiring the use of algorithms with a proper heterogeneity correction. (Author)

  15. Do technological advances in linear accelerators improve dosimetric outcomes in stereotaxy? A head-on comparison of seven linear accelerators using volumetric modulated arc therapy-based stereotactic planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Linear accelerator (Linac based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has been used for treating small intracranial lesions. Recent development in the Linacs such as inbuilt micro multileaf collimator (MLC and flattening filter free (FFF beam are intended to provide a better dose conformity and faster delivery when using VMAT technique. This study was aimed to compare the dosimetric outcomes and monitor units (MUs of the stereotactic treatment plans for different commercially available MLC models and beam profiles. Materials and Methods: Ten patients having 12 planning target volume (PTV/gross target volume's (GTVs who received the SRS/SRT treatment in our clinic using Axesse Linac (considered reference arm gold standard were considered for this study. The test arms comprised of plans using Elekta Agility with FFF, Elekta Agility with the plane beam, Elekta APEX, Varian Millennium 120, Varian Millennium 120HD, and Elekta Synergy in Monaco treatment planning system. Planning constraints and calculation grid spacing were not altered in the test plans. To objectively evaluate the efficacy of MLC-beam model, the resultant dosimetric outcomes were subtracted from the reference arm parameters. Results: V95%, V100%, V105%, D1%, maximum dose, and mean dose of PTV/GTV showed a maximum inter MLC - beam model variation of 1.5% and 2% for PTV and GTV, respectively. Average PTV conformity index and heterogeneity index shows a variation in the range 0.56–0.63 and 1.08–1.11, respectively. Mean dose difference (excluding Axesse for all organs varied between 1.1 cGy and 74.8 cGy (mean dose = 6.1 cGy standard deviation [SD] = 26.9 cGy and 1.7 cGy–194.5 cGy (mean dose 16.1 cGy SD = 57.2 cGy for single and multiple fraction, respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetry of VMAT-based SRS/SRT treatment plan had minimal dependence on MLC and beam model variations. All tested MLC

  16. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; George, S. P.; Guatelli, S.; Bucci, J. A.; Enari, K. E.; Miller, S.; Siegele, R.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences. Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors

  17. Thermoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer: comparison to histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, S. K.; Griep, S. K.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.; Hull, D.

    2014-03-01

    Ex vivo imaging of fresh prostate specimens was performed to test the hypothesis that the thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism generated with very high frequency electromagnetic (EM) irradiation is sensitive to prostate cancer. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after radical prostatectomy, performed as part of normal care. Irradiation pulsewidth was 700 ns and duty cycle was extremely low. Typical specific absorption rate (SAR) throughout the prostate was 70-90 kW/kg during pulsing, but time-averaged SAR was below 2 W/kg. TA pressure pulses generated by rapid heating due to EM energy deposition were detected using single element transducers. 15g/L glycine powder mixed into DI water served as acoustic couplant, which was chilled to prevent autolysis. Spatial encoding was performed by scanning in tomographic "step-and-shoot" mode, with 3 mm translation between slices and 1.8-degree rotation between tomographic views. Histology slides for 3 cases scanned with 2.25 MHz transducers were marked for comparison to TA reconstructions. These three cases showed little, moderate, and severe involvement in the histology levels surrounding the verumontanum. TA signal strength decreased with percent cancerous involvement. When VHF is used for tissue heating, the TA contrast mechanism is driven by ionic content and we observed suppressed TA signal from diseased prostate tissue in the peripheral zone. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity.

  18. A treatment planning comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator–based stereotactic body radiotherapy for central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merna, Catherine; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kishan, Amar U.; Michailian, Argin; Lamb, James; Sheng, Ke; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of planning stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer with a tri-cobalt-60 (tri-{sup 60}Co) system equipped with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, as compared to linear accelerator (LINAC)–based SBRT. In all, 20 patients with large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer who were treated between 2010 and 2015 with LINAC-based SBRT were replanned using a tri-{sup 60}Co system for a prescription dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Doses to organs at risk were evaluated based on established MD Anderson constraints for central lung SBRT. R{sub 100} values were calculated as the total tissue volume receiving 100% of the dose (V{sub 100}) divided by the planning target volume and compared to assess dose conformity. Dosimetric comparisons between LINAC-based and tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were performed using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon Ranks test. Blinded reviews by radiation oncologists were performed to assess the suitability of both plans for clinical delivery. The mean planning target volume was 48.3 cc (range: 12.1 to 139.4 cc). Of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans, a mean 97.4% of dosimetric parameters per patient met MD Anderson dose constraints, whereas a mean 98.8% of dosimetric parameters per patient were met with LINAC-based SBRT planning (p = 0.056). R{sub 100} values were similar between both plans (1.20 vs 1.21, p = 0.79). Upon blinded review by 4 radiation oncologists, an average of 90% of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were considered acceptable for clinical delivery compared with 100% of the corresponding LINAC-based SBRT plans (p = 0.17). SBRT planning using the tri-{sup 60}Co system with built-in MRI is feasible and achieves clinically acceptable plans for most central lung patients, with similar target dose conformity and organ at risk dosimetry. The added benefit of real-time MRI-guided therapy may further optimize tumor targeting while

  19. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  20. Follow-up effects of social comparison information on the quality of life of cancer patients: The moderating role of social comparison orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, A.P.; Bennenbroek, F.T.C.; Stiegelis, H.E.; Bergh, A.C.M. van den; Sanderman, R.; Hagedoorn, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine how social comparison orientation (SCO) moderates the effects of three types of social comparison information on the global quality of life of cancer patients 2 weeks and 3 months later. Design: Cancer patients (n = 226) were provided with social comparison information just pri

  1. Follow-up effects of social comparison information on the quality of life of cancer patients : The moderating role of social comparison orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Bennenbroek, Femke T. C.; Stiegelis, Heidi E.; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine how social comparison orientation (SCO) moderates the effects of three types of social comparison information on the global quality of life of cancer patients 2 weeks and 3 months later. Design: Cancer patients (n=226) were provided with social comparison information just prior

  2. Implications for dosimetric changes when introducing MR-guided brachytherapy for small volume cervix cancer: a comparison of CT and MR-based treatments in a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Claire; Govindarajulu, Geetha; Sridharan, Swetha; Capp, Anne; O'Brien, Peter

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate cervix brachytherapy dosimetry with the introduction of magnetic resonance (MR) based treatment planning and volumetric prescriptions and propose a method for plan evaluation in the transition period. The treatment records of 69 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Forty one patients were treated using computed tomography (CT)-based, Point A-based prescriptions and 28 patients were treated using magnetic resonance (MR)-based, volumetric prescriptions. Plans were assessed for dose to Point A and organs at risk (OAR) with additional high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) dose assessment for MR-based brachytherapy plans. ICRU-38 point doses and GEC-ESTRO recommended volumetric doses (D2cc for OAR and D100, D98 and D90 for HR-CTV) were also considered. For patients with small HR-CTV sizes, introduction of MR-based volumetric brachytherapy produced a change in dose delivered to Point A and OAR. Point A doses fell by 4.8 Gy (p = 0.0002) and ICRU and D2cc doses for OAR also reduced (p D100 for volumes less than 20 cm(3) and HR-CTV D98 for volumes between 20 and 35 cm(3), with a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between Point A and HR-CTV D90 doses in these ranges. In order to maintain brachytherapy dose consistency across varying HR-CTV sizes there must be a relationship between the volume of the HR-CTV and the prescription dose. Rather than adopting a 'one size fits all' approach during the transition to volume-based prescriptions, this audit has shown that separating prescription volumes into HR-CTV size categories of less than 20 cm(3), between 20 and 35 cm(3), and more than 35 cm(3) the HR-CTV can provide dose uniformity across all volumes and can be directly linked to traditional Point A prescriptions.

  3. Development of a dosimetric system for the quality control of breast cancer treatments; Desenvolvimento de um sistema dosimetrico para o controle de qualidade nos tratamentos de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Roberio C.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: rchaves@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/lUFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Nuclear; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: Irosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Delano B.V., E-mail: delano@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA/MS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    A system for evaluating the values of absorbed dose in breast teletherapy was developed, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), to compare them to those provided by Therapy planning system. A breast phantom was made to distribute the dosimeters TL shaped chip in breast volume and irradiate it under the same conditions of planning. Three different techniques of teletherapy were considered: one with irradiation from a therapy unit of {sup 60}Co and two with an X-ray beam coming from a 6 MV linear accelerator. Doses measures allowed checking that the performance of the quality control system used in breast cancer treatment is appropriate, since the planned doses differed about 1.5% of the responses provided by TL dosimeters.

  4. Quality control for cervical cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarino B, G.; Cogollo P, R.; Paez M, M., E-mail: lvarinog@hotmail.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Physics and Electronics Department, Carrera 6 No. 76-103, Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2013-10-01

    This work, developed at the National Cancer Institute in partnership with Universidad Nacional de Colombia located in Bogota, Colombia, presents the results of simulations of cervical cancer treatments, on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192, using as a physical simulator a natural female pelvis bone with soft tissue elaborated with the experimental material JJT. The doses were measured experimentally, prior to dosimetric characterization, with crystal thermoluminescence 100 LiF: Mg, Ti, located in the organs at risk: rectum and bladder. On the other hand, these treatments were planned and calculated theoretically by the system Micro-Selectron Hdr, with Plato brachytherapy software V 14.1 from the Netherlands Nucletron, and doses obtained in the same organs were compared with experimental results using dosimeters. The comparison of these results shows the correlation degree between the planning of dosimetric treatments and the experimental results, making the process in a form of quality control in vivo, of this type of procedure. (Author)

  5. RAPIDARC (RA) in the uterine cervical cancer; dosimetric gain vs 3D-Crt; RAPIDARC (RA) en el cancer de cervix uterino; ganancia dosimetrica vs 3D-CRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, J.; Garcia, B.; Quispe, K.; Gonzales, A.; Marquina, J., E-mail: jose.ramirez@aliada.com.pe [Clinica Aliada, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    This work aims to quantitatively assess RAPIDARC (RA) treatments versus three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy with field to field technique (3D-Crt-Fin F). 11 patients with cervical cancer treated at our institution radically or adjuvant clinical stages I-III B were evaluated. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy (2 Gy / Fr). The RA plans consisted of two isocentric complete arcs and conformational plans of 4 isocentric fields (previous, subsequent, right side and left side) with 3D-Crt-Fin F technique; both cases carried out ??in the Eclipse version 10 planner with calculation algorithm analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and volumetric optimization software (for VMAT plans). Homogeneity indices (Hi), conformity indices (CI) Sigma indices (S-Index), monitor units (MU) and the time required for each treatment were compared. The mean age was 52 years (32-65) of the 11 patients 9 were clinical stages I-II B. The Hi varied from 0.052 for RA to 0.163 for 3D-Crt-Fin F (p = 0.009), and the CI between 1.005 and 1.35 (p = 0.26), the S-index from 1.2 to 3.7 (p = 0.001) and the H-index of 1.08 to 1.15 (p = 0.24). All dose limits in risk organs were met with a significant difference in the RA plans versus 3D-Crt-Fin F. In patients with cervical cancer the treatment plans quality with the indices aforementioned seems to be better with the RA technique, being observed a significant reduction of radiation to surrounding organs. (author)

  6. Dosimetric parameters of palladium-103 brachytherapy source with Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JianHua; LIU Wei; XU XunJiang; GU JiaHui; CAI Jun; HUA ZhengDong; XU JiaQiang

    2008-01-01

    Before clinical application of a new source, the dosimetric parameters of the source should be accu-rately determined. This work is dedicated to the Monte Carlo method to calculate dosimetric parameters as recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-43 guidelines for model ADVANTAGETM palladium-103 source and, through comparison with data from another published report for the same source, presents a suggested dataset for clinical applications. From these calcula-tions, tables are presented for the radial dose function and the anisotropy function of palladium-103 brachytherapy source. The dose rate constants are found to be 0.671 (cGyh-1U-1) in liquid water and 0.673 (cGyh-1U-1) in Solid WaterTM. And the anisotropy constants in liquid water and Solid WaterTM are found to be 0.864 and 0.865 respectively. Comparison with the previous study shows that our results of dosimetric parameters are in good agreement with those measured and calculated by Meigooni et al. (2006) both in Water and Solid WaterTM.

  7. SU-E-T-212: Comparison of TG-43 Dosimetric Parameters of Low and High Energy Brachytherapy Sources Obtained by MCNP Code Versions of 4C, X and 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehtabian, M; Zaker, N; Sina, S [Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Different versions of MCNP code are widely used for dosimetry purposes. The purpose of this study is to compare different versions of the MCNP codes in dosimetric evaluation of different brachytherapy sources. Methods: The TG-43 parameters such as dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function of different brachytherapy sources, i.e. Pd-103, I-125, Ir-192, and Cs-137 were calculated in water phantom. The results obtained by three versions of Monte Carlo codes (MCNP4C, MCNPX, MCNP5) were compared for low and high energy brachytherapy sources. Then the cross section library of MCNP4C code was changed to ENDF/B-VI release 8 which is used in MCNP5 and MCNPX codes. Finally, the TG-43 parameters obtained using the MCNP4C-revised code, were compared with other codes. Results: The results of these investigations indicate that for high energy sources, the differences in TG-43 parameters between the codes are less than 1% for Ir-192 and less than 0.5% for Cs-137. However for low energy sources like I-125 and Pd-103, large discrepancies are observed in the g(r) values obtained by MCNP4C and the two other codes. The differences between g(r) values calculated using MCNP4C and MCNP5 at the distance of 6cm were found to be about 17% and 28% for I-125 and Pd-103 respectively. The results obtained with MCNP4C-revised and MCNPX were similar. However, the maximum difference between the results obtained with the MCNP5 and MCNP4C-revised codes was 2% at 6cm. Conclusion: The results indicate that using MCNP4C code for dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy sources can cause large errors in the results. Therefore it is recommended not to use this code for low energy sources, unless its cross section library is changed. Since the results obtained with MCNP4C-revised and MCNPX were similar, it is concluded that the difference between MCNP4C and MCNPX is their cross section libraries.

  8. Validation of dosimetric field matching accuracy from proton therapy using a robotic patient positioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Jonathan B; O'Ryan-Blair, Avril; Jesseph, Frederick; Hsi, Wen-Chien; Allgower, Chris E; Mascia, Anthony E; Thornton, Allan F; Schreuder, Andreas N

    2010-04-12

    Large area, shallow fields are well suited to proton therapy. However, due to beam production limitations, such volumes typically require multiple matched fields. This is problematic due to the relatively narrow beam penumbra at shallow depths compared to electron and photon beams. Therefore, highly accurate dose planning and delivery is required. As the dose delivery includes shifting the patient for matched fields, accuracy at the 1-2 millimeter level in patient positioning is also required. This study investigates the dosimetric accuracy of such proton field matching by an innovative robotic patient positioner system (RPPS). The dosimetric comparisons were made between treatment planning system calculations, radiographic film and ionization chamber measurements. The results indicated good agreement amongst the methods and suggest that proton field matching by a RPPS is accurate and efficient.

  9. Dosimetric study of a new polymer encapsulated palladium-103 seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S; Vynckier, S [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Radiotherapy and Oncology Department, Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-04-07

    The use of low-energy photon emitters for brachytherapy applications, as in the treatment of prostate or ocular tumours, has increased significantly over the last few years. Several new seed models utilizing {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I have recently been introduced. Following the TG43U1 recommendations of the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633), dose distributions around these low-energy photon emitters are characterized by the dose rate constant, the radial dose function and the anisotropy function in water. These functions and constants can be measured for each new seed in a solid phantom (i.e. solid water such as WT1) using high spatial resolution detectors such as very small thermoluminescent detectors. These experimental results in solid water must then be converted into liquid water by using Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents the dosimetric parameters of a new palladium seed, OptiSeed{sup TM} (produced by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium), made with a biocompatible polymeric shell and with a design that differs from the hollow titanium encapsulated seed, InterSource{sup 103}, produced by the same company. A polymer encapsulation was chosen by the company IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate, and to improve the symmetry of the radiation field around the seed. The necessary experimental data were obtained by measurements with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm{sup 3}) in a solid water phantom (WT1) and then converted to values in liquid water using Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP-4C). Comparison of the results with a previous study by Reniers et al (2002 Appl. Radiat. Isot. 57 805) shows very good agreement for the dose rate constant and for the radial dose function. In addition, the results also indicate an improvement in isotropy compared to a conventional titanium encapsulated seed. The relative dose (anisotropy value

  10. Comparison of dosimetric parameters of re-irradiation in patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma%局部复发鼻咽癌患者再程放疗技术的剂量学参数比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张矛; 苏清秀; 杨金磊; 金海国; 董莹; 吴丹; 王福香

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric parameters of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT),fixed field intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3D-CRT)in the radiotherapy for the patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and to analyze their characteristics. Methods Twelve patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with VMAT, IMRT and 3D-CRT plan designed by Pinnacle 9.2 and Preciseplan 2.03 treatment planning system.The dosimetric parameters of targeted volumes and organs at risk were compared between three groups. Results The conformation indexes (CI)of VMAT and IMRT plans were similar,and they were both better than 3D-CRT plan,the difference was significant(P0.05).The monitor units(MU)and beam time in 3D-CRT group were better than those in other two groups,and VMRT group was better than IMRT group,the statistical differences were observed between three groups (P0.05).The doses of the spinal cord,optic nerve,optic chiasm and temporal lobe of brain in VMAT and IMRT groups were better than those in 3D-CRT group,there were statistical differences between them(P0.05).Conclusion There are differences of the targeted dose distribution between the three kinds of radiation technology, while VMAT and IMRT plans can cover the targeted areas and reduce the received doses of organs at risk.The CI,MU and beam time of VMAT plan are better than those of IMRT plan. 3D-CRT plan only has advantage in the MU and beam time.%目的:比较容积旋转调强(VMAT)、固定野调强(IMRT)和三维适形(3D-CRT)放疗技术在局部复发鼻咽癌患者治疗中的剂量学参数,分析3种治疗计划的剂量学特性。方法:选择12例局部复发的鼻咽癌患者,采用Pinnacle 9.2和Preciseplan 2.03治疗计划系统,每例患者均设计VMAT"IMRT和3D-CRT ,比较3组计划的剂量分布及危及器官受量等。结果:VMAT及 IMRT组适形度指

  11. Dosimetric comparison of three intensity-modulate radiation therapy treatment modules for nasopharyngeal carcinoma%鼻咽癌三种调强放疗计划剂量学对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奇欣; 岳麒; 柏朋刚; 陈开强; 张秀春; 林少俊; 瞿宜艳

    2014-01-01

    目的 对比鼻咽癌常规固定野调强(IMRT)、容积旋转调强(VMAT)以及断层调强(HT)3种不同调强放疗计划的剂量学差异.方法 选择18例接受VMAT治疗的鼻咽癌患者,以相同处方剂量和目标条件分别重新进行IMRT和HT计划设计.比较3种计划靶区的均匀度(HI)、适形度(CI)、最大剂量以及平均剂量.危及器官的最大量和平均量以及感兴趣区的剂量体积、计划执行时间和机器跳数(MU).结果 3种计划在靶区的覆盖率满足临床要求.IMRT计划在靶区的HI和CI方面结果最差,HT计划结果最优.危及器官方面,IMRT计划受量最高,HT计划的脊髓、脑干和腮腺受量最低;但对于视神经、晶状体以及视交叉HT计划的受量最高而VMAT计划的受量最低.IMRT的治疗时间(8.0±0.5)min高于VMAT(3.9±0.1)min和HT(7.4±0.9) min.与VMAT相比,IMRT每次治疗为(711.4 ±78.7) MU,高于VMAT的(596.4±33.7) MU.结论 鼻咽癌IMRT、VMAT以及HT计划在靶区覆盖和危及器官保护上都可以达到临床要求,在靶区的适形度和均匀性上HT计划优于VMAT和IMRT,但在治疗时间和加速器的机器跳数上VMAT较有优势.%Objective To compare the dosimetric differences of fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT),volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients.Methods Eighteen NPC patients previously treated with VMAT were retrospectively included and re-planned using HT and IMRT (7 fields) techniques utilizing the same dose prescription and optimization objectives.The following parameters were compared across the three types of plans:homogeneity index (HI),conformity index (CI),maximum dose (Dmax) and mean dose (Dmean) of targets ; the Dmax and Dmean of organs at risk (OARs) ; the doses and volumes of volume of interest; the treatment delivery time and monitor units (MU).Results Clinically acceptable target coverage could be achieved by IMRT,VMAT and

  12. A comprehensive comparison of IMRT and VMAT plan quality for prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Enzhuo M; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yupeng; Wang, Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kuban, Deborah A; Lee, Andrew K; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-07-15

    We performed a comprehensive comparative study of the plan quality between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer. Eleven patients with prostate cancer treated at our institution were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, a VMAT plan and a series of IMRT plans using an increasing number of beams (8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 beams) were examined. All plans were generated using our in-house-developed automatic inverse planning (AIP) algorithm. An existing eight-beam clinical IMRT plan, which was used to treat the patient, was used as the reference plan. For each patient, all AIP-generated plans were optimized to achieve the same level of planning target volume (PTV) coverage as the reference plan. Plan quality was evaluated by measuring mean dose to and dose-volume statistics of the organs at risk, especially the rectum, from each type of plan. For the same PTV coverage, the AIP-generated VMAT plans had significantly better plan quality in terms of rectum sparing than the eight-beam clinical and AIP-generated IMRT plans (p plans in all the dosimetric indices decreased as the number of beams used in IMRT increased. IMRT plan quality was similar or superior to that of VMAT when the number of beams in IMRT was increased to a certain number, which ranged from 12 to 24 for the set of patients studied. The superior VMAT plan quality resulted in approximately 30% more monitor units than the eight-beam IMRT plans, but the delivery time was still less than 3 min. Considering the superior plan quality as well as the delivery efficiency of VMAT compared with that of IMRT, VMAT may be the preferred modality for treating prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shwetha, Bondel [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Ravikumar, Manickam, E-mail: drravikumarm@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Lokesh, Vishwanath [Department of Radiotherapy, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Keshava, Subbarao L. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India)

    2012-04-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetha, Bondel; Ravikumar, Manickam; Supe, Sanjay S; Sathiyan, Saminathan; Lokesh, Vishwanath; Keshava, Subbarao L

    2012-01-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of Novalis shaped beam surgery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhu, Jingeng; Yan, Hui; Gaun, Haiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Ryu, Samuel; Kim, Jae H

    2002-08-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of a new dedicated radiosurgical treatment unit are systematically measured in terms of its percent depth dose, beam profile, and relative scatter factor. High-resolution diode detector, mini-ion-chamber detector, and conventional Kodak XV films are used to measure dosimetric data for a range of field sizes from 6x6 mm to 100x100 mm. The effects of collimator size, micro-multileaf collimator shape, and detector type on the dosimetric data are investigated. Results indicate that, with careful design, accurate dosimetric data could be acquired using either a dedicated diode detector or a mini-ion-chamber detector, and film detector. Special attention is required when measuring dosimetric data for small field sizes such as 6x6 mm.

  16. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); iMinds-KU Leuven Medical IT Department, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven and iMinds, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  17. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States) and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karalinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm 17176 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering Offenbach Clinic, Offenbach 63069 (Germany) and Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens (Greece); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  18. Dosimetric characteristics of novalis Tx system with high definition multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Wu, Q Jackie; Yan, Hui; Bowsher, Jim; Zhang, Junan; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-10-01

    A new Novalis Tx system equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC) recently became available to perform both image-guided radiosurgery and conventional radiotherapy. It is capable of delivering a highly conformal radiation dose with three energy modes: 6 MV photon energy, 15 MV photon energy, and 6 MV photon energy in a stereotactic radiosurgery mode with 1000 MU/min dose rate. Dosimetric characteristics of the new Novalis Tx treatment unit with the HDMLC are systematically measured for commissioning. A high resolution diode detector and miniion-chamber detector are used to measure dosimetric data for a range of field sizes from 4 x 4 mm to 400 x 400 mm. The commissioned Novalis Tx system has passed the RPC stereotactic radiosurgery head phantom irradiation test. The Novalis Tx system not only expands its capabilities with three energy modes, but also achieves better beam conformity and sharer beam penumbra with HDMLC. Since there is little beam data information available for the new Novalis Tx system, we present in this work the dosimetric data of the new modality for reference and comparison.

  19. Dosimetric characteristics of Novalis Tx system with high definition multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Zheng; Wang Zhiheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yan Hui; Bowsher, Jim; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Box 3295, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    A new Novalis Tx system equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC) recently became available to perform both image-guided radiosurgery and conventional radiotherapy. It is capable of delivering a highly conformal radiation dose with three energy modes: 6 MV photon energy, 15 MV photon energy, and 6 MV photon energy in a stereotactic radiosurgery mode with 1000 MU/min dose rate. Dosimetric characteristics of the new Novalis Tx treatment unit with the HDMLC are systematically measured for commissioning. A high resolution diode detector and miniion-chamber detector are used to measure dosimetric data for a range of field sizes from 4x4 mm to 400x400 mm. The commissioned Novalis Tx system has passed the RPC stereotactic radiosurgery head phantom irradiation test. The Novalis Tx system not only expands its capabilities with three energy modes, but also achieves better beam conformity and sharer beam penumbra with HDMLC. Since there is little beam data information available for the new Novalis Tx system, we present in this work the dosimetric data of the new modality for reference and comparison.

  20. SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Vikraman, S; Maragathaveni, S; Dhivya, N; Kataria, Tejinder [Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Nambiraj, N Arunai; Sigamani, Ashokkumar [VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Sinha, Sujit Nath [Nayati Healathcare and Research Pvt Ltd, Mathura, Uttar pradesh (India); Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery using dynamic thorax phantom. Methods: Three patients with mobile target (2 lung, 1liver) were chosen. Retrospective 4DCT image sets were acquired for using Varian RPM system. An in-house MATLAB program was designed for MIP, MinIP and AvgIP generation. ITV was contoured on MIP image set for lung patients and on MinIP for liver patient. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated on selected phase bin image set in Eclipse (v10.0) planning system. CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was used to perform the dosimetric quality assurance. Patient breathing pattern file from RPM system was converted to phantom compatible file by an in-house MATLAB program. This respiratory pattern fed to the CIRS dynamic thorax phantom. 4DCT image set was acquired for this phantom using patient breathing pattern. Verification plans were generated using patient gating window and delivered on the phantom. Measurements were carried out using with ion chamber and EBT2 film. Exposed films were analyzed and evaluated in FilmQA software. Results: The stability of gated output in comparison with un-gated output was within 0.5%. The Ion chamber measured and TPS calculated dose compared for all the patients. The difference observed was 0.45%, −0.52% and −0.54 for Patient 1, Patient2 and Patient 3 respectively.Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows pass rates from 92.41% to 99.93% for 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. Conclusion: Dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated SBRT delivery for lung and liver was dosimetrically acceptable. The Ion chamber measured dose was within 0.203±0.5659% of the expected dose. Gamma pass rates were within 96.63±3.84% of the expected dose.

  1. The Impact of Adjustment for Socioeconomic Status on Comparisons of Cancer Incidence between Two European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Donnelly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer incidence rates vary considerably between countries and by socioeconomic status (SES. We investigate the impact of SES upon the relative cancer risk in two neighbouring countries. Methods. Data on 229,824 cases for 16 cancers diagnosed in 1995–2007 were extracted from the cancer registries in Northern Ireland (NI and Republic of Ireland (RoI. Cancers in the two countries were compared using incidence rate ratios (IRRs adjusted for age and age plus area-based SES. Results. Adjusting for SES in addition to age had a considerable impact on NI/RoI comparisons for cancers strongly related to SES. Before SES adjustment, lung cancer incidence rates were 11% higher for males and 7% higher for females in NI, while after adjustment, the IRR was not statistically significant. Cervical cancer rates were lower in NI than in RoI after adjustment for age (IRR: 0.90 (0.84–0.97, with this difference increasing after adjustment for SES (IRR: 0.85 (0.79–0.92. For cancers with a weak or nonexistent relationship to SES, adjustment for SES made little difference to the IRR. Conclusion. Socioeconomic factors explain some international variations but also obscure other crucial differences; thus, adjustment for these factors should not become part of international comparisons.

  2. Adaptive optimization by 6 DOF robotic couch in prostate volumetric IMRT treatment: rototranslational shift and dosimetric consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Silvia; Placidi, Lorenzo; Azario, Luigi; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Greco, Francesca; Damiani, Andrea; Mantini, Giovanna; Frascino, Vincenzo; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Balducci, Mario

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnitude and dosimetric relevance of translational and rotational shifts on IGRT prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using Protura six degrees of freedom (DOF) Robotic Patient Positioning System. Patients with cT3aN0M0 prostate cancer, treated with VMAT simultaneous integrated boost (VMAT-SIB), were enrolled. PTV2 was obtained adding 0.7 cm margin to seminal vesicles base (CTV2), while PTV1 adding to prostate (CTV1) 0.7 cm margin in all directions, except 1.2 cm, as caudal margin. A daily CBCT was acquired before dose delivery. The translational and rotational displacements were corrected through Protura Robotic Couch, collected and applied to the simulation CT to obtain a translated CT (tCT) and a rototranslated CT (rtCT) on which we recalculated the initial treatment plan (TP). We analyzed the correlation between dosimetric coverage, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and translational or rotational displacements. The dosimetric impact of a rototranslational correction was calculated. From October 2012 to September 2013, a total of 263 CBCT scans from 12 patients were collected. Translational shifts were errors are of dosimetric significance in sparing OAR and in target coverage. This is relevant for femoral heads and rectum because of major distance from isocenter, and for seminal vesicles because of irregular shape. No correlation was observed between translational and rotational errors. A study considering the intrafractional error and the deformable registration is ongoing.

  3. [Trends in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology in Slovakia - an International Comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrušová, M; Ondruš, D

    According to worldwide estimates, Slovakia is classed as a country with a medium-high incidence of prostate cancer. Current predictions indicate that in the near future prostate cancer will become the most frequent cancer among males in Slovakia. The aims of the study presented in this paper were to analyse trends in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer in Slovakia and compare these trends with those in other countries and regions of the world, predict epidemiological indicators of prostate cancer in Slovakia, and provide relevant and updated data for the purposes of further analyses and evaluation of the impacts of interventions. National data were analysed for the period 1968-2009. Trends in prostate cancer incidence and mortality were extracted using the joinpoint regression model and are presented with correspoding 95% CI and p values. Predictions of incidence and prevalence were calculated for the years 2014 and 2015, resp. A significant increase in standardized incidence was observed in Slovakia (from 14.5/100,000 in 1980 to 49.0/100,000 in 2009), representing as much as a 6.7% annual percentage change in recent years. The mortality values showed a slower rate of increase, from 9.4/100,000 in 1980 to 13.3/100,000 in 2009, while national mortality of prostate cancer decreased in recent years. These facts have made prostate cancer the most prevalent malignant tumor in males in Slovakia. Unlike in other countries, in Slovakia, no peak in prostate cancer incidence with a subsequent drop is observed. Mortality values reveal a favorable trend in the current national data.Key words: prostate cancer - incidence - mortality - prevalence - clinical stages The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 14. 12. 2016Accepted: 25. 1. 2017.

  4. Dosimetric trade-offs in breast treatment with VMAT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Seppälä, Jan; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca; Palumbo, Valentina; De Rose, Fiorenza; Franceschini, Davide; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Breast planning with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been explored, especially for left-sided breast treatments, with the primary intent of lowering the heart dose and improving target dose homogeneity. As a trade-off, larger healthy tissue volumes would receive low dose levels, with the potential risk of increasing late toxicities and secondary cancer induction, although no clinical data are available today to confirm the risk level. The scope of this work is to explore the dosimetric trade-offs using two different VMAT plans. Two planning strategies for dual-partial-arc VMAT, RA_avoid and RA_full, with and without avoidance sectors, were explored in a cohort of 20 patients, for whole left breast irradiation for 40.05 Gy to the mean target dose in 15 fractions. Common dose objectives included a stringent dose homogeneity, mean dose to the heart <5 Gy, ipsilateral lung (Ilung) <8 Gy, contralateral lung (Clung) <2 Gy and contralateral breast (Cbreast) <3 Gy. RA_full showed a better dose conformity, lower high-dose spillage in the healthy tissue and lower skin dose. RA_avoid presented a reduction of the mean doses for all critical structures: 51% to the heart, 12% to the Ilung, 81% to the Clung and 73% to the Cbreast. All differences were significant with p < 0.0001. The adaptation of VMAT options to planning objectives reduced significantly the healthy tissue dose levels at the price of some high-dose spillage. Evaluation of the trade-offs for application to the different critical structures should drive in improving the usage of the VMAT technique for breast cancer treatment. Advances in knowledge: Different planning strategies in the same VMAT technique could give significant variations in dose distributions. The choice of the trade-offs would affect the possible future late toxicity and secondary cancer induction risk.

  5. SU-E-T-217: Comprehensive Dosimetric Evaluation On 3D-CRT, IMRT and Non-Coplanar Arc Treatment for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Yan, Y; Ramirez, E; Lee, P; Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an effective treatment for early stage breast-cancer. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate breast motion and spare heart and lung. In this study, a comprehensive study is performed to evaluate various treatment techniques for prone APBI treatment including: 3D-CRT, IMRT, co-planar and non-coplanar partial arcs treatment. Methods: In this treatment planning study, a left breast patient treated in prone position in our clinic was imported into Varian Eclipse TPS. Six beams tangential to chest wall were used in both 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. These six beams were coplanar in a transactional plane achieved by both gantry and couch rotation. A 60-beam IMRT plan was also created to explore the maximum benefit of co-planar IMRT. Within deliverable couch rotation range (±30°), partial arc treatment plans with one and up to ten couch positions were generated for comparison. For each plan, 30Gy in 6 fractions was prescribed to 95% PTV volume. Critical dosimetric parameters, such as conformity index, mean, maximum, and volume dose of organ at risk, are evaluated. Results: The conformity indexes (CI) are 3.53, 3.17, 2.21 and 1.08 respectively to 3D-CRT, 6-beam IMRT, 60-beam IMRT, and two-partial-arcs coplanar plans. However, arc plans increase heart dose. CI for non-coplanar arc plans decreases from 1.19 to 1.10 when increases couch positions. Maximum dose in ipsilateral lung (1.98 to 1.13 Gy), and heart (0.62 to 0.43 Gy) are steadily decreased with the increased number of non-coplanar arcs. Conclusions: The dosimetric evaluation results show that partial arc plans have improved CIs compared to conventional 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Increasing number of partial arcs decreases lung and heart dose. The dosimetric benefit obtained from non-coplanar arcs should be considered with treatment delivery time.

  6. Tin-117m-APDDMP for Osteosarcoma Treatment: Biodistribution and Dosimetric Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, M.F.; Caramelo, F.; Gomes, C. [IBILI - Faculdade de Medicina de Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Zeevaart, J.R.; Louw, W.K.A. [Radiochemistry, NECSA, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (Saudi Arabia); Dormehl, I.C. [Institute for Life Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001 (Saudi Arabia); Kolar, Z.I.; Krijger, G.C. [Department of Radiochemistry, Delft University of Technology, Mekelveg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Milner, R.J. [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Florida (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Physical characteristics of tin-117m (13.6 d half-life, conversion electrons) make it an excellent agent for primary or secondary bone cancer treatment. In this work we present the results obtained with a biphosphonate, APDDMP labeled with tin-117m, which is a bone seeking agent. The results obtained indicate that the proposed radiopharmaceutical presents some problems as bone seeking agent, because the biodistribution data demonstrate that kidney and bladder together with the urine have a noticeable uptake, which, in a dosimetric context, means that the bladder becomes the target organ, which is undesirable. (author)

  7. Dosimetric- and Geometric Evaluation of Adaptive H&N IMRT Using Deformable Image Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiland, R.B.; Behrens, C. F.; Sjöström, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Anatomical changes can occur during RT treatment of H&N cancer patients. This can lead to a difference between planned- and delivered dose. Adaptive RT has the potential to overcome this, utilizing deformable image registration (DIR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate...... to the ReCT in four of seven patients with regard to the target. Larger geometrical variations were observed for organs at risk (OAR). OAR contours obtained with the DIR were for nearly all patients estimated smaller than in the ReCT whereas target contours were estimated larger. The dosimetric results...

  8. Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Karlsson, M. [Division of Radiological Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE 581 85 (Sweden); Lundell, M. [Department of Medical Physics and Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm SE 171 76 (Sweden); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Tedgren, Å. Carlsson [Division of Radiological Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE 581 85, Sweden and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm SE 171 16 (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, {sup 226}Ra was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two {sup 226}Ra sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose–effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg {sup 226}Ra tube and a 10 mg {sup 226}Ra needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a {sup 226}Ra point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), Λ, and s{sub K}] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that

  9. Dosimetric investigations on Mars-96 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkova, J; Dachev, T s; Matviichuk, Y u; Koleva, R; Tomov, B; Baynov, P; Petrov, V; Nguyen, V; Siegrist, M; Chene, J; d'Uston, C; Cotin, F

    1994-10-01

    The dosimetric experiments Dose-M and Liulin as part of the more complex French-German-Bulgarian-Russian experiments for the investigation of the radiation environment for Mars-96 mission are described. The experiments will be realized with dosemeter-radiometer instruments, measuring absorbed dose in semiconductor detectors and the particle flux. Two detectors will be mounted on board the Mars-96 orbiter. Another detector will be on the guiderope of the Mars-96 Aerostate station. The scientific aims of Dose-M and Liulin experiments are: Analysis of the absorbed dose and the flux on the path and around Mars behind different shielding. Study of the shielding characteristics of the Martian atmosphere from galactic and solar cosmic rays including solar proton events. Together with the French gamma-spectrometer and the German neutron detectors the investigation of the radiation environment on the surface of Mars and in the atmosphere up to 4000 m altitude will be conducted.

  10. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  11. ARDENT to develop advanced dosimetric techniques

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Earlier this week, the EU-supported Marie Curie training network ARDENT kicked off at a meeting held at CERN. The overall aim of the project is the development of advanced instrumentation for radiation dosimetry. The applications range from radiation measurements around particle accelerators, onboard commercial flights and in space, to the characterization of radioactive waste and medicine, where accurate dosimetry is of vital importance.   The ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) project is both a research and a training programme, which aims at developing new dosimetric techniques while providing 15 Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) with state-of-the-art training. The project, coordinated by CERN, is funded by the European Union with a contribution of about 3.9 million euros over four years. The ARDENT initiative will focus on three main technologies: gas detectors, in particular Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) and Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC); solid stat...

  12. Nanotechnology Method Comparison for Early Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wamakshi Bhati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999, cancer has been the leading cause of death under the age of 85 years and the eradication of this disease has been the long sought-after goal of scientists and physicians. Cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells divide uncontrollably. These abnormal cells have the ability to invade and destroy normal body cells, which is life threatening. One of the most important factors in effective cancer treatment is the detection of cancerous tumour cells in an early stage. Nanotechnology brings new hope to the arena of cancer detection research, owing to nanoparticles’ unique physical and chemical properties, giving them the potential to be used in the detection and monitoring of cancer. One such approach is quantum dots based detection which is rapid, easy and economical enabling quick point-of-care screening of cancer markers. QDs have got unique properties which make them ideal for detecting tumours. On the other hand, Gold nanoparticles have been in the bio-imaging spotlight due to their special optical properties. Au-NPs with strong surface-plasmon-enhanced absorption and scattering have allowed them to emerge as powerful imaging labels and contrast agents. This paper includes the comparative study of both the methods. Compared with quantum dots, the gold-nanoparticles are more than 200 times brighter on a particle-to-particle basis, although they are about 60 times larger by volume. Thus, Gold nanoparticles in suspension, offers advantages compared with quantum dots in that the gold appears to be non-toxic and the particles produce a brighter, sharper signal.

  13. Comparison of Uncinate Process Cancer and Non-Uncinate Process Pancreatic Head Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Gao, Hongqiao; Zhuang, Yan; Yang, Yinmo

    2016-01-01

    The special anatomical position accounts for unusual clinicopathological features of uncinate process cancer. This study aimed to compare clinicopathological features of patients with uncinate process cancer to patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. Total 160 patients with pancreatic head cancer were enrolled and classified into two groups: uncinate process cancer and non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. We found that the ratio of vascular invasion was significantly higher in patients with uncinate process cancer than in patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. In addition, the rate of R1 resection was significantly higher in patients with uncinate process cancer. Furthermore, the median disease-free survival (11 months vs. 15 months, p=0.043) and overall survival (15 months vs. 19 months, p=0.036) after R0 resection were lower for uncinate process cancer. Locoregional recurrence was more frequent (p=0.017) and earlier (12 months vs. 36 months; p=0.002) in patients with uncinate process cancer than in patients with non-uncinate process pancreatic head cancer. In conclusion, uncinate process cancer is more likely to invade blood vessel and has worse prognosis due to the earlier and more frequent locoregional recurrence.

  14. 光子束和电子束在早期乳腺癌患者放疗瘤床加量计划的剂量学研究%Dosimetric study comparing photon and electron beams for boosting the tumor bed in early-stage breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Soha Ahmed; Ehab M. Attalla; Hassan S. Abouelenein; Shaimaa Shoier; Mohsen Barsoum

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to assess and compare the potential dosimetric advantages and drawbacks of photon beams and electron beams as a boost for the tumor bed in superficial and deep seated early-stage breast cancer. Methods: We planned CTs of 10 women with early breast cancer underwent breast conservative surgery were selected. Tumor bed was defined as superficial and deep with a cut of point 4 cm, those with less than 4 cm were defined as superficial tumors representing 4 patients and those with depth of 4 cm or more were classified as deep tumors representing 6 patients. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the area of architectural distortion surrounded by surgical clips. The planning target volume (PTV) was the CTV plus margin 1 cm. A dose of 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was given concurrently at the last week of treatment. Organs at risk (OARs) were heart, lungs, contra-lateral breast and a 5 mm thick skin segment of the breast surface. Dose volume histograms were defined to quantify the quality of concurrent treatment plans assessing target coverage and sparing OARs. The following treatment techniques were assessed: photon beam with 3D-conformal technique and a single electron beam. Results: For superficial tumors better coverage for CTV and PTV with good homogeneity with better CI was found for the 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) but with no significant planning objectives over electron beam. For deep tumors, the 3DCRT met the planning objectives for CTV, PTV with better coverage and fewer hot spots with better homogeneity and CI. For superficial tumors, OARs were spared by both techniques with better sparing for the electron beam where as for deep tumors also OARs were well spared by both techniques. Conclusion: Boosting the tumor bed in earlystage breast cancer with optimized photon may be preferred to electron beam for both superficial and deep tumors. The OARs dose sparing effect may allow for a potential long-term toxicity risk

  15. Feasibility of PET-CT based hypofractionated accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers: Final dosimetric results of the VORTIGERN study. (Secondary endpoint of UK NCRI portfolio: MREC No: 08/H0907/127, UKCRN ID 7341

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Hypofractionated, slightly accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers is likely to be safe and the chance of trismus is not any higher than when standard dose radiotherapy is used. Active measures to reduce dose to the MA achieves acceptable dose volume parameters even at escalated doses.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  18. Targeting cancer patients' quality of life through social comparison : A randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakel, Thecla M.; Dijkstra, Arie; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Former cancer patients' quality of life can be improved by offering social comparison information. Whether patients, however, benefit from the information may depend on how negative they perceive their present and their future. Design: We conducted a randomised experimental field study wi

  19. A comparative dosimetric study of 3-dimensional conformal radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer patients versus conventional 2-dimensional radical radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo, Egypt%埃及开罗国家癌症研究所膀胱癌患者的三维适形根治性放疗与传统的二维根治性放疗的比较剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. El-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Marwa A. El Razek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare this multiple-field conformal technique to the 2-dimensional (2D) conventional technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Methods: We conducted a single institutional prospective comparative dosimetric analysis of 15 patients who received radical radiation therapy for bladder cancer presented to Radiotherapy Department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo (Egypt), in period between November 2011 to July 2012 using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy technique for each patient, a second 2D conventional radiotherapy treatment plan was done, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D & 2D) plans while it was demonstrated that this multiple field conformal technique produced superior distribution compared to 2D technique, with considerable sparing of rectum and to lesser extent for the head of both femora. Conclusion: From the present study, it is recommended to use 3D planning for cases of bladder cancer especially in elderly patients as it produces good coverage of the target volume as well as good sparing of the surrounding critical organs.

  20. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Boughorbel

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM, GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Random Forests (RF, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis.

  1. Comparison of Different Promoter Methylation Assays in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karijn P. M. Suijkerbuijk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promoter hypermethylation has emerged as a promising cancer biomarker. Currently, a large variety of quantitative and non-quantitative techniques is used to measure methylation in clinical specimens. Here we directly compared three commonly used methylation assays and assessed the influence of tissue fixation, target sequence location and the amount of DNA on their performance.

  2. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  3. Radiation dose escalation based on FDG-PET driven dose painting by numbers in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a dosimetric comparison between TomoTherapy-HA and RapidArc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differding, Sarah; Sterpin, Edmond; Hermand, Nicolas; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra; de Patoul, Nathalie; Denis, Jean-Marc; Lee, John Aldo; Grégoire, Vincent

    2017-03-23

    Validation of dose escalation through FDG-PET dose painting (DP) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) requires randomized clinical trials with large sample size, potentially involving different treatment planning and delivery systems. As a first step of a joint clinical study of DP, a planning comparison was performed between Tomotherapy HiArt® (HT) and Varian RapidArc® (RA). The planning study was conducted on five patients with oropharyngeal SCC. Elective and therapeutic CTVs were delineated based on anatomic information, and the respective PTVs (CTVs + 4 mm) were prescribed a dose of 56 (PTV56) and 70 Gy (PTV70). A gradient-based method was used to delineate automatically the external contours of the FDG-PET volume (GTVPET). Variation of the FDG uptake within the GTVPET was linearly converted into a prescription between 70 and 86 Gy. A dilation of the voxel-by-voxel prescription of 2.5 mm was applied to account for geometric errors in dose delivery (PTVPET). The study was divided in two planning phases aiming at maximizing target coverage (phase I) and lowering doses to OAR (phase II). A Quality-Volume Histogram (QVH) assessed conformity with the DP prescription inside the PTVPET. In phase I, for both HT and RA, all plans achieved comparable target coverage for PTV56 and PTV70, respecting the planning objectives. A median value of 99.9 and 97.2% of all voxels in the PTVPET received at least 95% of the prescribed dose for RA and HT, respectively. A median value of 0.0% and 3.7% of the voxels in the PTVPET received 105% or more of prescribed dose for RA and HT, respectively. In phase II, no significant differences were found in OAR sparing. Median treatment times were 13.7 min for HT and 5 min for RA. Both HT and RA can generate similar dose distributions for FDG-PET based dose escalation and dose painting in oropharyngeal SCC patients.

  4. PET/CT对非小细胞肺癌三维适形放疗中治疗计划参数的影响%Impact of PET/CT on dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王天禄; 李光; 宋颖秋; 党军; 陈延治; 白露

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察PET/CT对非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)中治疗计划参数的影响.方法:对83例在PET/CT定位下拟行根治性3D-CRT的NSCLC患者,分别以CT图像和PET/CT融合图像勾画大体肿瘤靶区(GTVCT和GTVPET/CT),分别制定放疗计划,并对两者进行比较.结果:PET/CT明显改变44例(53.01%)患者GTV或PTV,31例PTV和(或)GTV减小,13例PTV和(或)GTV增加.根据PET/CT和CT分别制定的放疗计划在VGTV、VE50、SCM和ESM的差异有统计学意义,P值分别为0.001、0.001、0.000和0.002.结论:应用PET/CT制定NSCLC3D-CRT治疗计划可降低食管和脊髓的受照射剂量,从而有利于放疗剂量的提升.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning of non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). METHODS: PET/CT scanning was performed in 83 pathologically proven NSCLC patients for radical radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume(GTV) was delineated on the CT images (GTVct) alone and then coregestered CT and 18F-FDG-PET data(GTVpET/cT). For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were made: one with a CT-based target volume and one with a PET/CT-based target volume. From the dose-volume histograms and dose distributions on each plan, the dosimetric factors were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: PET/CT clearly altered the radiation therapy volume in 44 (53. 01% ,44/83) cases, while 31 with the reduction of planning target volume (PTV) and/or GTV, and 13 with the enlargement. Between the PET/CT and CT radiotherapy planning, the difference of volume of GTV (VCTv) and dosimetric parameters including esophageal volume receiving at least 50 Gy (Ve50), the maximum dose of spinal cord receiving(SCM) and the maximum dose of esophagus re-ceiving(ESM) were statistically significant (P were 0. 001, 0. 001, 0. 000 and 0. 002). CONCLUSION: The incorporation of 18 F-FDG-PET information in CT-based radiotherapy planning reduced th