WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer crc patients

  1. Attitudes towards colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening tests among elderly Malay patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A; Al-Kubaisy, Waqar; Yap, Bee W; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Osman, Muhamed T

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in Malaysia, where data are limited regarding knowledge and barriers in regard to CRC and screening tests. The aim of the study was to assess these parameters among Malaysians. The questionnaires were distributed in the Umra Private Hospital in Selangor. The questionnaire had four parts and covered social-demographic questions, respondent knowledge about CRC and colorectal tests, attitude towards CRC and respondentaction regarding CRC. More than half of Malay participants (total n=187) were female (57.2%) and 36.9% of them were working as professionals. The majority of the participants (93.6%) never had a CRC screening test. The study found that only 10.2% of the study participants did not consider that their chances of getting CRC were high. A high percentage of the participants (43.3%) believed that they would have good chance of survival if the cancer would be found early. About one third of the respondents did not want to do screening because of fear of cancer, and concerns of embarrassment during the procedure adversely affected attitude to CRC screening as well. Age, gender, income, family history of CRC, vegetable intake and physical activity were found to be significant determinants of knowledge on CRC. The major barriers identified towards CRC screening identified in our study were fear of pain and embarrassment. The findings have implications for understanding of similarities and differences in attitude to CRC amongst elderly patients in other cultural/ geographic regions.

  2. Assessment of Jordanian Patient's Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Preferences towards CRC Screening: Are Jordanians Ready to Embrace CRC Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Suha; Barakat, Husam; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Bashaireh, Ibrahim; Batiha, Abdul-Moni'm

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC is increasingly becoming a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in Jordan. However the population's level of awareness about CRC, CRC screening test preferences and willingness to embrace screening are not known. The aim of this study was to assess the level of CRC awareness and screening preferences among Jordanian patients. A survey assessing the CRC knowledge levels was distributed among patients attending outpatient gastroenterology clinics in public hospitals throughout Jordan. A total of 800 surveys were distributed and of these 713 (89.1%) were returned. Only 22% of the participants correctly judged CRC among the choices provided as the commonest cause of cancer related deaths. The majority of participants (68.3%) underestimated their risk for CRC. Only 26.8% correctly judged their life time risk while 5% overestimated their risk. Two thirds of participants (66%) were willing to pay 500 Jordanian Dinars (equivalent to 706 US$) in order to get a prompt colonoscopy if recommended by their physician, while 25.5% reported that they would rather wait for 6 months in order to get a free colonoscopy. Although the participants tended to underestimate their risk for CRC, they were mostly aware of CRC as a major cause of mortality and were willing to embrace the concept of CRC screening and bear the related financial costs. These findings about CRC awareness and propensity for screening provide a good foundation as the Jordanian health system moves forward with initiatives to promote CRC screening and prevention.

  3. CRC-113 gene expression signature for predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Nam; Choi, Tae Gyu; Nguyen, Dinh Truong; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Jo, Yong Hwa; Shahid, Muhammad; Akter, Salima; Aryal, Saurav Nath; Yoo, Ji Youn; Ahn, Yong-Joo; Cho, Kyoung Min; Lee, Ju-Seog; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Kim, Sung Soo

    2015-10-13

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of global cancer mortality. Recent studies have proposed several gene signatures to predict CRC prognosis, but none of those have proven reliable for predicting prognosis in clinical practice yet due to poor reproducibility and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we have established a prognostic signature of 113 probe sets (CRC-113) that include potential biomarkers and reflect the biological and clinical characteristics. Robustness and accuracy were significantly validated in external data sets from 19 centers in five countries. In multivariate analysis, CRC-113 gene signature showed a stronger prognostic value for survival and disease recurrence in CRC patients than current clinicopathological risk factors and molecular alterations. We also demonstrated that the CRC-113 gene signature reflected both genetic and epigenetic molecular heterogeneity in CRC patients. Furthermore, incorporation of the CRC-113 gene signature into a clinical context and molecular markers further refined the selection of the CRC patients who might benefit from postoperative chemotherapy. Conclusively, CRC-113 gene signature provides new possibilities for improving prognostic models and personalized therapeutic strategies.

  4. Experience with S-1 in older Caucasian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Zubcevic, Kanita; Qvortrup, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An aging population will increase the number of older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, there is limited knowledge about treatment in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 is associated with a lower rate...... of adverse events than capecitabine and may therefore be a suitable drug for elderly. However, data on the use of S-1 in Caucasian mCRC patients are lacking/scarce. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study we evaluated safety and the efficacy of S-1 alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (SOx......) or irinotecan (IRIS) in older mCRC patients. Patients who received at least one cycle of S-1 (first-line therapy), SOx (mainly first-line therapy) or IRIS (second-line therapy) were included. RESULTS: From June 2012 to December 2014, 71 older patients received ≥1 cycle of either S-1 (n = 9), SOx (n = 44...

  5. The requirement for freshly isolated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in isolating CRC stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, F; Bellister, S; Lu, J; Ye, X; Boulbes, D R; Tozzi, F; Sceusi, E; Kopetz, S; Tian, F; Xia, L; Zhou, Y; Bhattacharya, R; Ellis, L M

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell populations enriched for cancer stem cells (CSCs) may facilitate target identification. There is no consensus regarding the best methods for isolating CRC stem cells (CRC-SCs). We determined the suitability of various cellular models and various stem cell markers for the isolation of CRC-SCs. Established human CRC cell lines, established CRC cell lines passaged through mice, patient-derived xenograft (PDX)-derived cells, early passage/newly established cell lines, and cells directly from clinical specimens were studied. Cells were FAC-sorted for the CRC-SC markers CD44, CD133, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenicity studies were used to validate CRC-SC enrichment. None of the markers studied in established cell lines, grown either in vitro or in vivo, consistently enriched for CRC-SCs. In the three other cellular models, CD44 and CD133 did not reliably enrich for stemness. In contrast, freshly isolated PDX-derived cells or early passage/newly established CRC cell lines with high ALDH activity formed spheres in vitro and enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas cells with low ALDH activity did not. PDX-derived cells, early passages/newly established CRC cell lines and cells from clinical specimen with high ALDH activity can be used to identify CRC-SC-enriched populations. Established CRC cell lines should not be used to isolate CSCs.

  6. DEAD-box helicase 27 promotes colorectal cancer growth and metastasis and predicts poor survival in CRC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jieting; Chen, Huarong; Wong, Chi-Chun; Liu, Dabin; Li, Tong; Wang, Xiaohong; Ji, Jiafu; Sung, Joseph Jy; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Yu, Jun

    2018-03-14

    Copy number alterations (CNAs) are crucial for colorectal cancer (CRC) development. In this study, DEAD box polypeptide 27 (DDX27) was identified to be highly amplified in both TCGA CRC (474/615) and primary CRC (47/103), which was positively correlated with its mRNA overexpression. High DDX27 mRNA (N = 199) and protein expression (N = 260) predicted poor survival in CRC patients. Ectopic expression of DDX27 increased CRC cells proliferation, migration and invasion, but suppressed apoptosis. Conversely, silencing of DDX27 exerted opposite effects in vitro and significantly inhibited murine xenograft tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Up-regulation of DDX27 enhanced and prolonged TNF-α-mediated NF-κB signaling. Nucleophosmin (NPM1) was identified as a binding partner of DDX27. DDX27 increased nuclear NPM1 and NF-κB-p65 interaction to enhance DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Silencing NPM1 abrogated DDX27-activating NF-κB signaling and its tumor-promoting function. Together, DDX27 is overexpressed and plays a pivotal oncogenic role in CRC.

  7. Pre-45s rRNA promotes colon cancer and is associated with poor survival of CRC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, H; Lam, K C; Dong, Y; Zhang, X; Lee, C K; Zhang, J; Ng, S C; Ng, S S M; Zheng, S; Chen, Y; Fang, J; Yu, J

    2017-11-02

    One characteristic of cancer cells is the abnormally high rate of cell metabolism to sustain their enhanced proliferation. However, the behind mechanism of this phenomenon is still elusive. Here we find that enhanced precursor 45s ribosomal RNA (pre-45s rRNA) is one of the core mechanisms in promoting the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pre-45s rRNA expression is significantly higher in primary CRC tumor tissues samples and cancer cell lines compared with the non-tumorous colon tissues, and is associated with tumor sizes. Knockdown of pre-45s rRNA inhibits G1/S cell-cycle transition by stabilizing p53 through inducing murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and ribosomal protein L11 (RpL11) interaction. In addition, we revealed that high rate of cancer cell metabolism triggers the passive release of calcium ion from endoplasmic reticulum to the cytoplasm. The elevated calcium ion in the cytoplasm activates the signaling cascade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K) and ribosomal S6K (CaMKII-S6K-UBF). The activated UBF promotes the transcription of rDNA, which therefore increases pre-45s rRNA. Disruption of CaMKII-S6K-UBF axis by either RNAi or pharmaceutical approaches leads to reduction of pre-45s rRNA expression, which subsequently suppresses cell proliferation in colon cancer cells by causing cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of APC activates CaMKII-S6K-UBF cascade and thus enhances pre-45s rRNA expression. Moreover, the high expression level of pre-45s rRNA is associated with poor survival of CRC patients in two independent cohorts. Our study identifies a novel mechanism in CRC pathogenesis mediated by pre-45s rRNA and a prognostic factor of pre-45s rRNA in CRC patients.

  8. Conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRC) methodology does not allow the in vitro expansion of patient-derived primary and metastatic lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Giovanni; Salvati, Valentina; Giordani, Ilenia; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Quacquarini, Denise; Duranti, Enrico; De Nicola, Francesca; Pallocca, Matteo; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Falchi, Mario; Pallini, Roberto; De Maria, Ruggero; Eramo, Adriana

    2018-07-01

    Availability of tumor and non-tumor patient-derived models would promote the development of more effective therapeutics for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRC) methodology demonstrated exceptional potential for the expansion of epithelial cells from patient tissues. However, the possibility to expand patient-derived lung cancer cells using CRC protocols is controversial. Here, we used CRC approach to expand cells from non-tumoral and tumor biopsies of patients with primary or metastatic NSCLC as well as pulmonary metastases of colorectal or breast cancers. CRC cultures were obtained from both tumor and non-malignant tissues with extraordinary high efficiency. Tumor cells were tracked in vitro through tumorigenicity assay, monitoring of tumor-specific genetic alterations and marker expression. Cultures were composed of EpCAM+ lung epithelial cells lacking tumorigenic potential. NSCLC biopsies-derived cultures rapidly lost patient-specific genetic mutations or tumor antigens. Similarly, pulmonary metastases of colon or breast cancer generated CRC cultures of lung epithelial cells. All CRC cultures examined displayed epithelial lung stem cell phenotype and function. In contrast, brain metastatic lung cancer biopsies failed to generate CRC cultures. In conclusion, patient-derived primary and metastatic lung cancer cells were negatively selected under CRC conditions, limiting the expansion to non-malignant lung epithelial stem cells from either tumor or non-tumor tissue sources. Thus, CRC approach cannot be applied for direct therapeutic testing of patient lung tumor cells, as the tumor-derived CRC cultures are composed of (non-tumoral) airway basal cells. © 2018 UICC.

  9. The KRAS Strip Assay for detection of KRAS mutation in Egyptian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC): A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Kader, Y.; Safwat, E.; Kassem, H.A.; Kassem, N.M.; Emera, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream factors KRAS and BRAF are mutated in several types of cancer, affecting the clinical response to EGFR inhibitors. Mutations in the EGFR kinase domain predict sensitivity to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefltinib and erlotinib in lung adenocarcinoma, while activating point mutations in KRAS and BRAF confer resistance to the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab in colorectal cancer. The development of new generation methods for systematic mutation screening of these genes will allow more appropriate therapeutic choices. Purpose: Detection of KRAS mutation in Egyptian colorectal cancer (CRC) patients by the KRAS Strip Assay. Methods: Examination of 20 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is done to detect KRAS mutations by KRAS Strip Assay. For the Strip Assay, a mutant-enriched PCR was followed by hybridization to KRAS-specific probes bound to a nitrocellulose strip. Results: Among 20 patients, KRAS mutations were identified in 80% of patients by the KRAS Strip Assay. Conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that KRAS Strip Assay is an alternative to protocols currently in use for KRAS mutation detection

  10. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  11. Colorectal cancer diagnosis in 2012: A new focus for CRC prevention--more serration, less inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    East, James E.; Dekker, Evelien

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of colorectal cancer (CRC) risks has been rebalanced in 2012. The 'serrated pathway' to CRC, exemplified by serrated polyposis syndrome, emphasizes the importance of serrated lesions. The dogma that patients with IBD are at high risk of CRC, however, might be overstated; optimizing CRC

  12. BRAFV600E mutation analysis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in daily clinical practice: correlations with clinical characteristics, and its impact on patients' outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharenia Saridaki

    Full Text Available To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the BRAFV600E mutation detection in daily clinical practice in patients with metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC.504 mCRC patients treated with systemic chemotherapy ± biologics were analyzed.A statistically significant higher incidence of the BRAF mutation was observed in patients with ECOG-PS 2 (p=0.001, multiple metastatic sites (p=0.002,> 65 years old (p=0.004, primary tumors located in the colon (p<0.001, high-grade tumors (p=0.001 and in those with mucinous features (p=0.037. Patients with BRAFV600E mutated tumors had a statistically significantly reduced progression-free survival (PFS compared to wild-type (wt ones (4.1 and 11.6 months, respectively; p<0.001 and overall survival (OS (14.0 vs. 34.6 months, respectively; p<0.001. In the multivariate analysis the BRAFV600E mutation emerged as an independent factor associated with reduced PFS (HR: 4.1, 95% CI 2.7-6.2; p<0.001 and OS (HR: 5.9, 95% CI 3.7-9.5; p<0.001. Among the 273 patients treated with salvage cetuximab or panitumumab, the BRAFV600E mutation was correlated with reduced PFS (2.2 vs. 6.0 months; p<0.0001 and OS (4.3 vs. 17.4 months; p<0.0001.The presence of BRAFV600E-mutation in mCRC characterizes a subgroup of patients with distinct biologic, clinical and pathological features and is associated with very poor patients' prognosis.

  13. Mining, Validation, and Clinical Significance of Colorectal Cancer (CRC)-Associated lncRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangwei; Hu, Yingying; Zhang, Liang; Hu, Changyuan; Guo, Gangqiang; Mao, Chenchen; Xu, Jianfeng; Ye, Sisi; Huang, Guanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Guo, Aizhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the deadliest tumours, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. The involvement of differentially expressed long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in CRC tumorigenesis makes them suitable tumour biomarkers. Here, we screened 150 cases of CRC and 85 cases of paracancerous tissues in the GEO database for differentially expressed lncRNAs. The levels of lncRNA candidates in 84 CRC and paracancerous tissue samples were validated by qRT-PCR and their clinical significance was analyzed. We identified 15 lncRNAs with differential expression in CRC tumours; among them, AK098081 was significantly up-regulated, whereas AK025209, BC040303, BC037331, AK026659, and CR749831 were down-regulated in CRC. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve for the six lncRNAs was 0.914. High expression of AK098081 and low expression of BC040303, CR749831, and BC037331 indicated poor CRC differentiation. CRC patients with lymph node metastasis had lower expression of BC037331. In addition, the group with high AK098081 expression presented significantly lower overall survival and disease-free survival rates than the low-expression group, confirming AK098081 as an independent risk factor for CRC patients. In conclusion, we have identified multiple CRC-associated lncRNAs from microarray expression profiles that can serve as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of CRC.

  14. Genetic diagnosis of high-penetrance susceptibility for colorectal cancer (CRC) is achievable for a high proportion of familial CRC by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Daniel; Broderick, Peter; Frampton, Matthew; Kinnersley, Ben; Sherborne, Amy; Penegar, Steven; Lloyd, Amy; Ma, Yussanne P; Dobbins, Sara E; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-02-10

    Knowledge of the contribution of high-penetrance susceptibility to familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is relevant to the counseling, treatment, and surveillance of CRC patients and families. To quantify the impact of germline mutation to familial CRC, we sequenced the mismatch repair genes (MMR) APC, MUTYH, and SMAD4/BMPR1A in 626 early-onset familial CRC cases ascertained through a population-based United Kingdom national registry. In addition, we evaluated the contribution of mutations in the exonuclease domain (exodom) of POLE and POLD1 genes that have recently been reported to confer CRC risk. Overall mutations (pathogenic, likely pathogenic) in MMR genes make the highest contribution to familial CRC (10.9%). Mutations in the other established CRC genes account for 3.3% of cases. POLE/POLD1 exodom mutations were identified in three patients with family histories consistent with dominant transmission of CRC. Collectively, mutations in the known genes account for 14.2% of familial CRC (89 of 626 cases; 95% CI = 11.5, 17.2). A genetic diagnosis is feasible in a high proportion of familial CRC. Mainstreaming such analysis in clinical practice should enable the medical management of patients and their families to be optimized. Findings suggest CRC screening of POLE and POLD1 mutation carriers should be comparable to that afforded to those at risk of HNPCC. Although the risk of CRC associated with unexplained familial CRC is in general moderate, in some families the risk is substantive and likely to be the consequence of unidentified genes, as exemplified by POLE and POLD1. Our findings have utility in the design of genetic analyses to identify such novel CRC risk genes. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. The Impact of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Mississippi, and the need for Mississippi to Eliminate its CRC Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhé, Roy J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), while highly preventable and highly treatable, is a major public health problem in Mississippi. This article reviews solutions to this problem, beginning with the relationship between modifiable behavioral risk factors and CRC incidence. It then describes the impact of CRC screening on national downward trends in CRC incidence and mortality and summarizes recent data on the burden of CRC in Mississippi. While other states have created Comprehensive Colorectal Cancer Control Programs in an organized effort to manage this public health problem, Mississippi has not. Responding to Mississippi's situation, the 70x2020 Colorectal Cancer Screening Initiative arose as an unconventional approach to increase CRC screening rates throughout the state. This article concludes by considering the current limits of CRC treatment success and proposes that improved clinical outcomes should result from research to translate recently-identified colorectal cancer subtype information into novel clinical paradigms for the treatment of early-stage colorectal cancer.

  16. Detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) by urinary volatile organic compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; McFarlane, Michael J; Ryan-Fisher, Courtenay; Westenbrink, Erik; Hodges, Phoebe; Hodges, Paula; Thomas, Matthew G; Chambers, Samantha; O'Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Harmston, Christopher; Nwokolo, Chuka U; Bardhan, Karna D; Covington, James A

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer related death in Europe and the USA. There is no universally accepted effective non-invasive screening test for CRC. Guaiac based faecal occult blood (gFOB) testing has largely been superseded by Faecal Immunochemical testing (FIT), but sensitivity still remains poor. The uptake of population based FOBt testing in the UK is also low at around 50%. The detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) signature(s) for many cancer subtypes is receiving increasing interest using a variety of gas phase analytical instruments. One such example is FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometer). FAIMS is able to identify Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) patients by analysing shifts in VOCs patterns in both urine and faeces. This study extends this concept to determine whether CRC patients can be identified through non-invasive analysis of urine, using FAIMS. 133 patients were recruited; 83 CRC patients and 50 healthy controls. Urine was collected at the time of CRC diagnosis and headspace analysis undertaken using a FAIMS instrument (Owlstone, Lonestar, UK). Data was processed using Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA) after feature extraction from the raw data. FAIMS analyses demonstrated that the VOC profiles of CRC patients were tightly clustered and could be distinguished from healthy controls. Sensitivity and specificity for CRC detection with FAIMS were 88% and 60% respectively. This study suggests that VOC signatures emanating from urine can be detected in patients with CRC using ion mobility spectroscopy technology (FAIMS) with potential as a novel screening tool.

  17. Profiles of circulating inflammatory cytokines in colorectal cancer (CRC), high cancer risk conditions, and health are distinct. Possible implications for CRC screening and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Diakowska, Dorota; Kapturkiewicz, Bartosz; Bębenek, Marek; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-08-28

    Alternate colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and surveillance strategies are needed to pre-select candidates for invasive methods. We compared systemic inflammatory profiles in CRC (n=99), health (n=98), high CRC-risk conditions (n=48) and overt inflammation (n=69) by multiplexed analysis of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, FGF-2, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-1α, TNF-α, VEGF-A, and PDGF-B and CEA. Cytokines corresponded with CRC advancement. FGF2, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-6, MIP-1α, PDGF-BB, TNF-α, and VEGF-A were higher than in controls already in stage I CRC with FGF2, IL1-β, and MIP-1α higher than in high CRC-risk individuals as well. Cytokine panels devised to differentiate early CRC from controls, adenomas, or inflammatory bowel disease patients (IBD) had good accuracy but only IBD panel had promising specificity at 95% sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of colorectal cancer (CRC by urinary volatile organic compound analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh P Arasaradnam

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a leading cause of cancer related death in Europe and the USA. There is no universally accepted effective non-invasive screening test for CRC. Guaiac based faecal occult blood (gFOB testing has largely been superseded by Faecal Immunochemical testing (FIT, but sensitivity still remains poor. The uptake of population based FOBt testing in the UK is also low at around 50%. The detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs signature(s for many cancer subtypes is receiving increasing interest using a variety of gas phase analytical instruments. One such example is FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometer. FAIMS is able to identify Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD patients by analysing shifts in VOCs patterns in both urine and faeces. This study extends this concept to determine whether CRC patients can be identified through non-invasive analysis of urine, using FAIMS. 133 patients were recruited; 83 CRC patients and 50 healthy controls. Urine was collected at the time of CRC diagnosis and headspace analysis undertaken using a FAIMS instrument (Owlstone, Lonestar, UK. Data was processed using Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA after feature extraction from the raw data. FAIMS analyses demonstrated that the VOC profiles of CRC patients were tightly clustered and could be distinguished from healthy controls. Sensitivity and specificity for CRC detection with FAIMS were 88% and 60% respectively. This study suggests that VOC signatures emanating from urine can be detected in patients with CRC using ion mobility spectroscopy technology (FAIMS with potential as a novel screening tool.

  19. Expressions of IGF-1, ERK, GLUT4, IRS-1 in metabolic syndrome complicated with colorectal cancer and their associations with the clinical characteristics of CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianxia; Liu, Xiaoyi; Chi, Jingwei; Che, Kui; Feng, Yan; Zhao, Shihua; Wang, Zhongchao; Wang, Yangang

    2018-01-01

    Epidemiological data have revealed that colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is increased in patients with Metabolic syndrome. To explore the expressions of IGF-1, ERK, GLUT4, IRS-1 in MS patients with CRC and their associations with the clinical characteristics of CRC. We investigated the expressions of IGF-1, ERK, GLUT4 and IRS-1 in greater omental adipose tissues of 168 MS patients with/without CRC, 85 CRC patients without MS and 98 healthy controls by RT-PCR, and analyzed the relationships between their expressions and clinical characteristics of CRC. The expression levels of IGF-1 and ERK in MS patients with/without CRC were higher while the expression levels of GLUT4 were lower compared with CRC patients without MS and healthy controls (PCRC were higher while expression levels of GLUT4 were lower compared to MS patients without CRC (PCRC, including tumor size, distant metastasis and advanced stages (III/IV) (PCRC.

  20. Upregulated STAT3 and RhoA signaling in colorectal cancer (CRC) regulate the invasion and migration of CRC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, W-H; Chen, Z

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to reveal the expression and activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) and RhoA/Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase 1 (ROCK1) signaling in CRC tissues, and to investigate the regulatory role of STAT3 and RhoA signaling in the invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells. We examined the expression of STAT3, RhoA and ROCK1 in CRC tissues with real-time PCR and Western blotting methods. And then we examined the interaction between STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 signaling in CRC HT-29 cells with gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies. In addition, we determined the regulation by STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 on the invasion and migration of CRC HT-29 cells. Our study demonstrated a significant upregulation of RhoA and ROCK1 expression and STAT3-Y705 phosphorylation in 32 CRC specimens, compared to the 17 normal CRC tissues. Further study demonstrated there was a coordination between STAT3 and RhoA/Rock signaling in the HT-29 cells. Moreover, STAT3 knockdown or RhoA knockdown significantly repressed the migration and invasion in HT-29 cells and vice versa. STAT3 and RhoA signaling regulate the invasion and migration of CRC cells, implying the orchestrated and oncogenic roles of STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 signaling in CRC.

  1. IRRIGATION PRACTICES IN LONG-TERM SURVIVORS OF COLORECTAL CANCER (CRC) WITH COLOSTOMIES

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Creation of a colostomy in colorectal (CRC) cancer patients results in a loss of control over bowel evacuation. The only way to re-establish some control is through irrigation, a procedure that involves instilling fluid into the bowel to allow for gas and fecal output. This article reports on irrigation practices of participants in a large, multi-site, multi-investigator study of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in long term CRC survivors. Questions about irrigation practices were iden...

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Regorafenib With 2/1 Schedule for Patients ≥ 75 Years With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC) After Failure of 2 Lines of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrioli, Roberto; Chirra, Martina; Messuti, Luciana; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Savelli, Vinno; Martellucci, Ignazio; Francini, Edoardo

    2018-02-21

    In the CORRECT (patients with metastatic COloRectal Cancer treated with REgorafenib or plaCebo after failure of standard Therapy) trial, regorafenib was proven to extend survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that progressed after all available therapies. Grade 3 to 4 toxicity occurred in 54% of patients, and data on the activity and tolerability of regorafenib in elderly patients were scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an alternative schedule, 2-week-on treatment and 1 week-off (2/1 schedule), of regorafenib for elderly patients with mCRC. Patients ≥ 75 years with mCRC who progressed after oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy received regorafenib on a 2/1 schedule. Potentially frail subjects were identified by G8 screening tool and excluded. The 2-month disease-control rate was the primary endpoint, and the secondary endpoints included safety, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and objective response rate. Between February 2014 and May 2017, 23 patients with mCRC were recruited at our institution. No partial or complete responses were observed, and the stable disease and disease-control rate were 52.2%. The median PFS was 4.8 months (95% confidence interval, 3.8-6.3 months), and the median OS was 8.9 months (95% confidence interval, 6.9-10.6 months). Adverse events were uncommon, and the most frequent grade 3 toxicity adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction (9%) and fatigue (9%). Toxicity-related dose reductions and discontinuations occurred in 5 and 2 patients, respectively. Regorafenib administered with a modified 2/1 schedule to patients who were aged ≥ 75 years and non-frail with treatment-refractory mCRC seems to be tolerable and achieve encouraging results in terms of PFS and OS. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab for initially unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (NAVIGATE-CRC-01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Oya, Masatoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative chemotherapy combined with surgery for liver metastases is considered an active strategy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its impact on initially unresectable, previously untreated advanced CRC, regardless of concurrent metastases, remains to be clarified. A Phase II study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab for initially unresectable advanced CRC. Patients with previously untreated advanced colon or rectal cancer initially diagnosed as unresectable advanced CRC (TNM stage IIIb, IIIc, or IV) but potentially resectable after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) were studied. Preoperatively, patients received six cycles of NAC (five cycles of neoadjuvant FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab followed by one cycle of FOLFOX4 alone). The interval between the last dose of bevacizumab and surgery was at least 5 weeks. Six cycles of adjuvant FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab were given after surgery. The completion rate of NAC and feasibility of curative surgery were the primary endpoints. An interim analysis was performed at the end of NAC in the 12th patient to assess the completion rate of NAC. The median follow-up time was 56 months. The characteristics of the patients were as follows: sex, eight males and four females; tumor location, sigmoid colon in three, ascending colon in one, and rectum (above the peritoneal reflection) in eight; stage, III in eight and IV in four (liver or lymph nodes). All patients completed six cycles of NAC. There were no treatment-related severe adverse events or deaths. An objective response to NAC was achieved in nine patients (75%), and no disease progression was observed. Eleven patients underwent curative tumor resection, including metastatic lesions. In December 2012, this Phase II study was terminated because of slow registration. Perioperative FOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab is well tolerated and has a promising response rate leading to curative surgery, which offers a survival

  4. Mucin Expression in Colorectal Cancer (CRC): Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Rokkas, Theodore

    2018-05-18

    A body of evidence has suggested that mucins play an important role in adhesion, invasion, and cancer metastasis. However, this evidence is scarce and sometimes confusing. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available studies to better define the role of mucins in the behavior of colorectal cancer (CRC). Medical literature was searched through November 30, 2017, using suitable keywords. Pooled estimates, that is, odd ratios (ORs), were obtained using fixed or random-effects models, as appropriate. Heterogeneity between studies was evaluated with the Cochran Q test and I values, whereas the likelihood of publication bias was assessed by constructing funnel plots. Their symmetry was estimated by the Begg and Mazumdar adjusted rank correlation test and by the Egger regression test. A total of 2234 CRC patients were included in 12 studies, eligible for meta-analysis. There was a significant difference concerning total mucin expression between CRC patients and controls [pooled ORs (95% confidence interval)=8.156 (2.624-25.354), test for overall effect Z=3.627, PCRC, that is advanced stage versus localized disease [ORs (95% confidence interval)=2.724 (1.211-6.127), Z= 2.423, P=0.015], as opposed to MUC2 and MUC4. MUC1 is overexpressed in CRC tissue comparing with healthy mucosa, and may have a role in the neoplastic transformation and metastatic process. MUC2 has probably no role in carcinogenesis.

  5. Improving diagnosis, prognosis and prediction by using biomarkers in CRC patients (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolouzakis, Taxiarchis Konstantinos; Vassilopoulou, Loukia; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Mariolis Sapsakos, Theodoros; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Tsiaoussis, John

    2018-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most common cancers. In fact, it is placed in the third place among the most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and in the second one for the most diagnosed cancer in women, following breast cancer. Moreover, its high mortality rates classifies it among the leading causes of cancer‑related death worldwide. Thus, in order to help clinicians to optimize their practice, it is crucial to introduce more effective tools that will improve not only early diagnosis, but also prediction of the most likely progression of the disease and response to chemotherapy. In that way, they will be able to decrease both morbidity and mortality of their patients. In accordance with that, colon cancer research has described numerous biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and predictive purposes that either alone or as part of a panel would help improve patient's clinical management. This review aims to describe the most accepted biomarkers among those proposed for use in CRC divided based on the clinical specimen that is examined (tissue, faeces or blood) along with their restrictions. Lastly, new insight in CRC monitoring will be discussed presenting promising emerging biomarkers (telomerase activity, telomere length and micronuclei frequency).

  6. Association between hMLH1 hypermethylation and JC virus (JCV) infection in human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2011-04-01

    Incorporation of viral DNA may interfere with the normal sequence of human DNA bases on the genetic level or cause secondary epigenetic changes such as gene promoter methylation or histone acetylation. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. Chromosomal instability (CIN) was established as the key mechanism in cancer development. Later, it was found that CRC results not only from the progressive accumulation of genetic alterations but also from epigenetic changes. JC virus (JCV) is a candidate etiologic factor in sporadic CRC. It may act by stabilizing β-catenin, facilitating its entrance to the cell nucleus, initialing proliferation and cancer development. Diploid CRC cell lines transfected with JCV-containing plasmids developed CIN. This result provides direct experimental evidence for the ability of JCV T-Ag to induce CIN in the genome of colonic epithelial cells. The association of CRC hMLH1 methylation and tumor positivity for JCV was recently documented. JC virus T-Ag DNA sequences were found in 77% of CRCs and are associated with promoter methylation of multiple genes. hMLH1 was methylated in 25 out of 80 CRC patients positive for T-Ag (31%) in comparison with only one out of 11 T-Ag negative cases (9%). Thus, JCV can mediate both CIN and aberrant methylation in CRC. Like other viruses, chronic infection with JCV may induce CRC by different mechanisms which should be further investigated. Thus, gene promoter methylation induced by JCV may be an important process in CRC and the polyp-carcinoma sequence.

  7. Whole Gene Capture Analysis of 15 CRC Susceptibility Genes in Suspected Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anne M L; Geilenkirchen, Marije A; van Wezel, Tom; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C; Ruano, Dina; van der Klift, Heleen M; van den Akker, Brendy E W M; Laros, Jeroen F J; van Galen, Michiel; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom G W; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Tops, Carli M J; Vasen, Hans F; Devilee, Peter; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by pathogenic germline variants in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. However, up to 60% of MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cases are categorized as suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) because no pathogenic MMR germline variant can be identified, which leads to difficulties in clinical management. We therefore analyzed the genomic regions of 15 CRC susceptibility genes in leukocyte DNA of 34 unrelated sLS patients and 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors with a clear family history. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the entire non-repetitive genomic sequence, including intronic and regulatory sequences, of 15 CRC susceptibility genes. In addition, tumor DNA from 28 sLS patients was analyzed for somatic MMR variants. Of 1979 germline variants found in the leukocyte DNA of 34 sLS patients, one was a pathogenic variant (MLH1 c.1667+1delG). Leukocyte DNA of 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors was negative for pathogenic germline variants in the tested CRC susceptibility genes and for germline MLH1 hypermethylation. Somatic DNA analysis of 28 sLS tumors identified eight (29%) cases with two pathogenic somatic variants, one with a VUS predicted to pathogenic and LOH, and nine cases (32%) with one pathogenic somatic variant (n = 8) or one VUS predicted to be pathogenic (n = 1). This is the first study in sLS patients to include the entire genomic sequence of CRC susceptibility genes. An underlying somatic or germline MMR gene defect was identified in ten of 34 sLS patients (29%). In the remaining sLS patients, the underlying genetic defect explaining the MMRdeficiency in their tumors might be found outside the genomic regions harboring the MMR and other known CRC susceptibility genes.

  8. Probiotics in colorectal cancer (CRC) with emphasis on mechanisms of action and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouli, Imen; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2013-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer. Diverse therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radiation have shown beneficial effects, but are limited because of their safety and toxicity. Probiotic formulations have shown great promise in CRC as preventive and early stage therapeutics. This review highlights the importance of a balanced intestinal microbiota and summarizes the recent developments in probiotics for treating CRC. Specifically, this report describes evidence of the role of probiotics in modulating the microbiota, in improving the physico-chemical conditions of the gut and in reducing oxidative stress. It also discusses the mechanisms of probiotics in inhibiting tumour progression, in producing anticancer compounds and in modulating the host immune response. Even though some of these effects were observed in several clinical trials, when probiotic formulations were used as a supplement to CRC therapies, the application of probiotics as biotherapeutics against CRC still needs further investigation.

  9. Multicenter retrospective analysis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J; Tran, B; Ensor, J; Gibbs, P; Wong, H L; Wong, S F; Vilar, E; Tie, J; Broaddus, R; Kopetz, S; Desai, J; Overman, M J

    2014-05-01

    The microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) phenotype, present in 15% of early colorectal cancer (CRC), confers good prognosis. MSI-H metastatic CRC is rare and its impact on outcomes is unknown. We describe survival outcomes and the impact of chemotherapy, metastatectomy, and BRAF V600E mutation status in the largest reported cohort of MSI-H metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A retrospective review of 55 MSI-H metastatic CRC patients from two institutions, Royal Melbourne Hospital (Australia) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States), was conducted. Statistical analyses utilized Kaplan-Meier method, Log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards models. Median age was 67 years (20-90), 58% had poor differentiation, and 45% had stage IV disease at presentation. Median overall survival (OS) from metastatic disease was 15.4 months. Thirteen patients underwent R0/R1 metastatectomies, with median OS from metastatectomy 33.8 months. Thirty-one patients received first-line systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease with median OS from the start of chemotherapy 11.5 months. No statistically significant difference in progression-free survival or OS was seen between fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, or irinotecan based chemotherapy. BRAF V600E mutation was present in 14 of 47 patients (30%). BRAF V600E patients demonstrated significantly worse median OS; 10.1 versus 17.3 months, P = 0.03. In multivariate analyses, BRAF V600E mutants had worse OS (HR 4.04; P = 0.005), while patients undergoing metastatectomy (HR 0.11; P = CRC do not appear to have improved outcomes. BRAF V600E mutation is a poor prognostic factor in MSI-H metastatic CRC.

  10. Potential role of TRIM3 as a novel tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Hai-Long; He, Na-Na; Xu, Meng-Que; Dong, Wen-Xiao; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Bang-Mao; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Recent cancer genome-sequencing efforts and complementary functional studies have led to the identification of a collection of candidate 'driver' genes involved in CRC tumorigenesis. Tripartite motif (TRIM3) is recently identified as a tumour suppressor in glioblastoma but this tumour-suppressive function has not been investigated in CRC. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TRIM3 as a tumour suppressor in CRC development by manipulating the expression of TRIM3 in two authentic CRC cell lines, HCT116 and DLD1, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, colony formation, scratch wound healing, soft agar, and invasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour-suppressive properties of TRIM3. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated knockdown of TRIM3 conferred growth advantage in CRC cells. In contrast, overexpression of TRIM3 affected cell survival, cell migration, anchorage independent growth and invasive potential in CRC cells. In addition, TRIM3 was found to be down-regulated in human colon cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Overexpression of TRIM3 significantly inhibited tumour growth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that TRIM3 can regulate p53 protein level through its stabilisation. TRIM3 functions as a tumour suppressor in CRC progression. This tumour-suppressive function is exerted partially through regulation of p53 protein. Therefore, this protein may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of CRC.

  11. Increased risk for CRC in diabetic patients with the nonrisk allele of SNPs at 8q24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Shinya; Mimori, Koshi; Yamamoto, Ken; Inoue, Hiroshi; Imoto, Seiya; Kawano, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Rui; Sato, Tetsuya; Toh, Hiroyuki; Iinuma, Hisae; Maeda, Toyoki; Ishii, Hideshi; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan; Watanabe, Masahiko; Tanaka, Jun-ichi; Kudo, Shin-ei; Sugihara, Ken-ichi; Hase, Kazuo; Mochizuki, Hidetaka; Kusunoki, Masato; Yamada, Kazutaka; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Barnard, Graham F; Miyano, Satoru; Mori, Masaki

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) oncogenesis was considered to be determined by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Specific interacting factors that influence CRC morbidity have yet to be fully investigated. A multi-institutional collaborative study with 1511 CRC patients and 2098 control subjects was used to compare the odds ratios for the occurrence of polymorphisms at 11 known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). TaqMan PCR and questionnaires were used to evaluate the effects of environmental exposures. Variants of rs6983267 on 8q24 were the most significant markers of risk for CRC (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.27, P = 0.0015). Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM), a higher body mass index at age 20, and meat consumption were environmental risk factors, whereas a tuna-rich diet and vitamin intake were protective factors. The cohort of rs6983267 SNP major (T) allele at 8q24 and DM had a 1.66-fold higher risk ratio than the cohort of major allele patients without DM. We confirmed that interactions between the genetic background and environmental factors are associated with increased risk for CRC. There is a robust risk of the minor G allele at the 8q24 rs6983267 SNP; however, a major T allele SNP could more clearly reveal a correlation with CRC specifically when DM is present.

  12. Advances in CRC prevention: screening and surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Evelien; Rex, Douglas K.

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is amongst the most commonly diagnosed cancers and causes of death from cancer across the world. CRC can, however, be detected in asymptomatic patients at a curable stage, and several studies have shown lower mortality among patients who undergo screening compared to those

  13. Family history assessment for colorectal cancer (CRC) risk analysis - comparison of diagram- and questionnaire-based web interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael; Seo, Steven Bohwan; Holt, Alec; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2015-11-18

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a high incidence, especially in New Zealand. The reasons for this are unknown. While most cancers develop sporadically, a positive family history, determined by the number and age at diagnosis of affected first and second degree relatives with CRC is one of the major factors, which may increase an individual's lifetime risk. Before a patient can be enrolled in a surveillance program a detailed assessment and documentation of the family history is important but time consuming and often inaccurate. The documentation is usually paper-based. Our aim was therefore to develop and validate the usability and efficacy of a web-based family history assessment tool for CRC suitable for the general population. The tool was also to calculate the risk and make a recommendation for surveillance. Two versions of an electronic assessment tool, diagram-based and questionnaire-based, were developed with the risk analysis and recommendations for surveillance based on the New Zealand Guidelines Group recommendations. Accuracy of our tool was tested prior to the study by comparing risk calculations based on family history by experienced gastroenterologists with the electronic assessment. The general public, visiting a local science fair were asked to use and comment on the usability of the two interfaces. Ninety people assessed and commented on the two interfaces. Both interfaces were effective in assessing the risk to develop CRC through their familial history for CRC. However, the questionnaire-based interface performed with significantly better satisfaction (p = 0.001) than the diagram-based interface. There was no difference in efficacy though. We conclude that a web-based questionnaire tool can assist in the accurate documentation and analysis of the family history relevant to determine the individual risk of CRC based on local guidelines. The calculator is now implemented and assessable through the web-page of a local charity for colorectal cancer

  14. MicroRNA-466 (miR-466) functions as a tumor suppressor and prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Feng; Ying, Youhua; Pan, Haihua; Zhao, Wei; Li, Hongchen; Zhan, Xiaoli

    2018-01-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have an important role in the regulation of tumor development and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the clinical and prognostic value as well as biological function of miR-466 in colorectal cancer (CRC). Tumor and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from 100 patients diagnosed with CRC. miR-466 expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). mRNA and protein levels of cyclin D1, apoptosis regulator BAX (BAX), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, in SW-620 CRC cells transfected with miR-466 mimics or negative control miRNA. Effects of miR-466 on SW-620 cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis, and invasion were investigated using CCK-8 assay, flow cytometry and Transwell assay, respectively. miR-466 expression was significantly downregulated in tumor tissues compared to matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. Low expression of miR-466 was significantly correlated with the tumor size, Tumor Node Metastasis stage, lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis. The overall survival of CRC patients with low miR-466 expression was significantly shorter compared to high-miR-466 expression group (log-rank test: p = 0.0103). Multivariate analysis revealed that low miR-466 expression was associated with poor prognosis in CRC patients. The ectopic expression of miR-466 suppressed cell proliferation and migration/invasion, as well as induced G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in SW-620 cells. Moreover, the ectopic expression of miR-466 decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP-2, but increased BAX expression in SW-620 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that miR-466 functions as a suppressor miRNA in CRC and may be used as a prognostic factor in these patients.

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis of paired colorectal cancer and non-tumorigenic tissues reveals signature proteins and perturbed pathways involved in CRC progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Manveen K; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Kim, Hoguen; Park, Cheol Keun; Baker, Mark S; Packer, Nicolle H; Paik, Young-Ki; Hancock, William S; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Modern proteomics has proven instrumental in our understanding of the molecular deregulations associated with the development and progression of cancer. Herein, we profile membrane-enriched proteome of tumor and adjacent normal tissues from eight CRC patients using label-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics and advanced pathway analysis. Of the 948 identified proteins, 184 proteins were differentially expressed (P1.5) between the tumor and non-tumor tissue (69 up-regulated and 115 down-regulated in tumor tissues). The CRC tumor and non-tumor tissues clustered tightly in separate groups using hierarchical cluster analysis of the differentially expressed proteins, indicating a strong CRC-association of this proteome subset. Specifically, cancer associated proteins such as FN1, TNC, DEFA1, ITGB2, MLEC, CDH17, EZR and pathways including actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling were deregulated. Stage-specific proteome signatures were identified including up-regulated ribosomal proteins and down-regulated annexin proteins in early stage CRC. Finally, EGFR(+) CRC tissues showed an EGFR-dependent down-regulation of cell adhesion molecules, relative to EGFR(-) tissues. Taken together, this study provides a detailed map of the altered proteome and associated protein pathways in CRC, which enhances our mechanistic understanding of CRC biology and opens avenues for a knowledge-driven search for candidate CRC protein markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IRRIGATION PRACTICES IN LONG-TERM SURVIVORS OF COLORECTAL CANCER (CRC) WITH COLOSTOMIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of a colostomy in colorectal (CRC) cancer patients results in a loss of control over bowel evacuation. The only way to re-establish some control is through irrigation, a procedure that involves instilling fluid into the bowel to allow for gas and fecal output. This article reports on irrigation practices of participants in a large, multi-site, multi-investigator study of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in long term CRC survivors. Questions about irrigation practices were identified in open-ended questions within a large HR-QOL survey and in focus groups of men and women with high and low HR-QOL. Descriptive data on survivors were combined with content analysis of irrigation knowledge and practices. Patient education and use of irrigation in the United States has decreased over the years, with no clear identification of why this change in practice has occurred. Those respondents who used irrigation had their surgery longer ago, and spent more time in colostomy care than those that did not irrigate. Reasons for the decrease in colostomy irrigation are unreported and present priorities for needed research. PMID:23022935

  17. Intra-tumoral Heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF Mutation Status in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer (aCRC and Cost-Effectiveness of Multiple Sample Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D. Richman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available KRAS mutation status is established as a predictive biomarker of benefit from anti-EGFr therapies. Mutations are normally assessed using DNA extracted from one formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor block. We assessed heterogeneity of KRAS and BRAF mutation status intra-tumorally (multiple blocks from the same primary tumor. We also investigated the utility and efficiency of genotyping a ‘DNA cocktail’ prepared from multiple blocks. We studied 68 consenting patients in two randomized clinical trials. DNA was extracted, from ≥2 primary tumor FFPE blocks per patient. DNA was genotyped by pyrosequencing for KRAS codons 12, 13 and 61 and BRAF codon 600. In patients with heterogeneous mutation status, DNA cocktails were prepared and genotyped. Among 69 primary tumors in 68 patients, 7 (10.1% showed intratumoral heterogeneity; 5 (7.2% at KRAS codons 12, 13 and 2 (2.9% at BRAF codon 600. In patients displaying heterogeneity, the relevant KRAS or BRAF mutation was also identified in ‘DNA cocktail’ samples when including DNA from mutant and wild-type blocks. Heterogeneity is uncommon but not insignificant. Testing DNA from a single block will wrongly assign wild-type status to 10% patients. Testing more than one block, or preferably preparation of a ‘DNA cocktail’ from two or more tumor blocks, improves mutation detection at minimal extra cost.

  18. The "Interval Walking in Colorectal Cancer" (I-WALK-CRC) study: Design, methods and recruitment results of a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banck-Petersen, Anna; Olsen, Cecilie K; Djurhuus, Sissal S; Herrstedt, Anita; Thorsen-Streit, Sarah; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Østerlind, Kell; Osterkamp, Jens; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Vistisen, Kirsten; Mosgaard, Camilla S; Pedersen, Bente K; Højman, Pernille; Christensen, Jesper F

    2018-03-01

    Low physical activity level is associated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). To increase physical activity, technology-based platforms are emerging and provide intriguing opportunities to prescribe and monitor active lifestyle interventions. The "Interval Walking in Colorectal Cancer"(I-WALK-CRC) study explores the feasibility and efficacy a home-based interval-walking intervention delivered by a smart-phone application in order to improve cardio-metabolic health profile among CRC survivors. The aim of the present report is to describe the design, methods and recruitment results of the I-WALK-CRC study.Methods/Results: The I-WALK-CRC study is a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a home-based interval walking intervention compared to a waiting-list control group for physiological and patient-reported outcomes. Patients who had completed surgery for local stage disease and patients who had completed surgery and any adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced stage disease were eligible for inclusion. Between October 1st , 2015, and February 1st , 2017, 136 inquiries were recorded; 83 patients were eligible for enrollment, and 42 patients accepted participation. Age and employment status were associated with participation, as participants were significantly younger (60.5 vs 70.8 years, P CRC survivors was feasible but we aim to better the recruitment rate in future studies. Further, the study clearly favored younger participants. The I-WALK-CRC study will provide important information regarding feasibility and efficacy of a home-based walking exercise program in CRC survivors.

  19. Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Sporadic CRC and Hereditary Nonpolyosis Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Sun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Extent neuroendocrine differentiation can be encountered in many human neoplasm derived from different organs and systems using immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural techniques. The tumor cells' behaviors resemble those of neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The presence of neuroendocrine differentiation reputedly appears to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the adenocarcinoma counterparts in sporadic human neoplasm. In this review the neuroendocrine carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation of colon and rectum both in sporadic colorectal carcinoma and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, the relationship of neuroendocrine differentiation and some possible molecular pathways in tumorogenesis of colorectal cancer will be discussed. Possible treatment strategy will also be addressed.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Primary Cancers of Other Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients often neglect the possibility of secondary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. It is important to be aware of the clinical characteristics of double cancer in CRC patients for early diagnosis and treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 1,031 CRC patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2004. Among these patients, CRC was accompanied by cancer of other organs in 17 patients (1.65%, either synchronously or metachronously. Therefore, we describe our experience regarding the location of CRC, the clinical symptoms and signs of these patients, the TNM stage, histology, phase, association with other malignancies, interval between cancers and clinical outcomes. Of the 17 patients in whom CRC was accompanied by primary cancer of other organs, there were four synchronous and 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients. Our patient group comprised six men and 11 women with ages ranging from 47 to 88 years (median age, 66 years. The most common location of CRC was the sigmoid colon. Six gastric cancers (35.2% and six breast cancers (35.2% were associated with primary CRC. The remaining six second primary cancers were one lung cancer, one thyroid cancer, one cervical cancer, one ovarian cancer, one skin cancer, and one urinary bladder cancer. Of the 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients, eight patients developed subsequent CRC after primary cancers of other organs, whereas two patients developed a subsequent second primary cancer after CRC. The intervals between the development of metachronous multiple cancers ranged from 2 to 19 years. In this retrospective analysis, breast and gastric cancer patients were at increased risk of developing subsequent secondary CRC. Careful attention should always be paid to the possibility of secondary CRC in treating these cancer patients. Cancer

  1. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  2. Precision Medicine for CRC Patients in the Veteran Population: State-of-the-Art, Challenges and Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Shyam S; Batra, Surinder K; Bharadwaj, Srinivas; Bouvet, Michael; Cosman, Bard; Goel, Ajay; Jogunoori, Wilma; Kelley, Michael J; Mishra, Lopa; Mishra, Bibhuti; Mohapatra, Subhra; Patel, Bhaumik; Pisegna, Joseph R; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Rao, Shuyun; Roy, Hemant; Scheuner, Maren; Singh, Satish; Vidyarthi, Gitanjali; White, Jon

    2018-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for ~9% of all cancers in the Veteran population, a fact which has focused a great deal of the attention of the VA's research and development efforts. A field-based meeting of CRC experts was convened to discuss both challenges and opportunities in precision medicine for CRC. This group, designated as the VA Colorectal Cancer Cell-genomics Consortium (VA4C), discussed advances in CRC biology, biomarkers, and imaging for early detection and prevention. There was also a discussion of precision treatment involving fluorescence-guided surgery, targeted chemotherapies and immunotherapies, and personalized cancer treatment approaches. The overarching goal was to identify modalities that might ultimately lead to personalized cancer diagnosis and treatment. This review summarizes the findings of this VA field-based meeting, in which much of the current knowledge on CRC prescreening and treatment was discussed. It was concluded that there is a need and an opportunity to identify new targets for both the prevention of CRC and the development of effective therapies for advanced disease. Also, developing methods integrating genomic testing with tumoroid-based clinical drug response might lead to more accurate diagnosis and prognostication and more effective personalized treatment of CRC.

  3. Advances in CRC Prevention: Screening and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Evelien; Rex, Douglas K

    2018-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most commonly diagnosed cancers and causes of death from cancer across the world. CRC can, however, be detected in asymptomatic patients at a curable stage, and several studies have shown lower mortality among patients who undergo screening compared with those who do not. Using colonoscopy in CRC screening also results in the detection of precancerous polyps that can be directly removed during the procedure, thereby reducing the incidence of cancer. In the past decade, convincing evidence has appeared that the effectiveness of colonoscopy as CRC prevention tool is associated with the quality of the procedure. This review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of recent efforts to improve colonoscopy effectiveness by enhancing detection and improving the completeness and safety of resection of colorectal lesions. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An examination of the psychosocial factors influencing colorectal cancer patients' communication of colorectal cancer patient risk with their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawsin, Catalina; Duhamel, Katherine; Itzkowitz, Steven; Brown, Karen; Lim, Helen; Jandorf, Lina

    2009-11-01

    This study examined psychosocial factors influencing colorectal cancer (CRC) patients' communication with their first-degree relatives regarding their CRC risk. Among a sample of CRC patients who were members of a colon registry in New York (n = 127), 60% reported discussing CRC risk with their siblings. These discussions were related to the CRC patients' age of diagnosis, such that those diagnosed before age 45 years were more likely to communicate with their siblings about CRC risk. Despite advances made in CRC prevention, compliance with screening recommendations among individuals who may be at familial risk for the disease is low. Perhaps this underrepresentation reflects how CRC patients communicate with their first-degree relatives about their potential risk for the disease. This study examined the psychosocial factors influencing whether CRC patients communicate with their siblings about CRC risk. The sample included CRC patients with siblings who enrolled in a colon disease registry at a NYC metropolitan hospital. Participants completed questionnaires regarding their current psychosocial functioning, perceived risk of sibling's development of CRC, and communication of CRC risk with their siblings. Patients were predominantly Caucasian, with a mean age of 60.4 years. Of the 127 patients, 60% engaged in discussions with their siblings regarding their CRC risk. Patients diagnosed with CRC before the age of 45 years were more likely to discuss the risk of CRC with their siblings (P siblings.

  5. Colorectal cancer (CRC) monitoring by 6-monthly 18FDG-PET/CT: an open-label multicentre randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, I; Itti, E; Luciani, A; Baumgaertner, I; Layese, R; André, T; Ducreux, M; Gornet, J-M; Goujon, G; Aparicio, T; Taieb, J; Bachet, J-B; Hemery, F; Retbi, A; Mons, M; Flicoteaux, R; Rhein, B; Baron, S; Cherrak, I; Rufat, P; Le Corvoisier, P; de'Angelis, N; Natella, P-A; Maoulida, H; Tournigand, C; Durand Zaleski, I; Bastuji-Garin, S

    2018-04-01

    [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) has high sensitivity for detecting recurrences of colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to determine whether adding routine 6-monthly 18FDG-PET/CT to our usual monitoring strategy improved patient outcomes and to assess the effect on costs. In this open-label multicentre trial, patients in remission of CRC (stage II perforated, stage III, or stage IV) after curative surgery were randomly assigned (1 : 1) to usual monitoring alone (3-monthly physical and tumour marker assays, 6-monthly liver ultrasound and chest radiograph, and 6-monthly whole-body computed tomography) or with 6-monthly 18FDG-PET/CT, for 3 years. A multidisciplinary committee reviewed each patient's data every 3 months and classified the recurrence status as yes/no/doubtful. Recurrences were treated with curative surgery alone if feasible and with chemotherapy otherwise. The primary end point was treatment failure defined as unresectable recurrence or death. Relative risks were estimated, and survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox models. Direct costs were compared. Of the 239 enrolled patients, 120 were in the intervention arm and 119 in the control arm. The failure rate was 29.2% (31 unresectable recurrences and 4 deaths) in the intervention group and 23.7% (27 unresectable recurrences and 1 death) in the control group (relative risk = 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.88; P = 0.34). The multivariate analysis also showed no significant difference (hazards ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-2.19; P = 0.27). Median time to diagnosis of unresectable recurrence (months) was significantly shorter in the intervention group [7 (3-20) versus 14.3 (7.3-27), P = 0.016]. Mean cost/patient was higher in the intervention group (18 192 ± 27 679 € versus 11 131 ± 13  €, P CRC. The control group had very close follow

  6. Survivin -31 G/C polymorphism might contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Linhua; Hu, Yi; Deng, Zhongmin; Li, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Published data has shown inconsistent findings about the association of survivin -31 G/C polymorphism with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). This meta-analysis quantitatively assesses the results from published studies to provide a more precise estimate of the association between survivin -31 G/C polymorphism as a possible predictor of the risk of CRC. We conducted a literature search in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases. Stata 12 software was used to calculate the pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on the available data from each article. Six studies including 1840 cases with CRC and 1804 controls were included in this study. Survivin -31 G/C polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.53-2.07; I(2) = 0%). In the race subgroup analysis, both Asians (OR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.44-2.05; I(2) = 0%) and Caucasians (OR = 1.93; 95% CI, 1.46-2.55; I(2) = 0%) with survivin -31 G/C polymorphism had increased CRC risk. In the subgroup analysis according to site of CRC, survivin -31 G/C polymorphism was not associated with colon cancer risk (OR = 2.02; 95% CI, 0.79-5.22; I(2) = 82%). However, this polymorphism was significantly associated with rectum cancer risk (OR = 1.98; 95% CI, 1.42-2.74; I(2) = 0%). In the subgroup analysis by clinical stage, both early stage (I+II) and advanced stage (III+IV) were associated with survivin -31 G/C polymorphism (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.20-2.16; I(2) = 0% and OR = 2.30; 95% CI, 1.70-3.13; I(2) = 0%, respectively). In the subgroup analysis by smoke status, both smokers and non-smokers with survivin -31 G/C polymorphism showed increased CRC risk (OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.01-2.13; I(2) = 60% and OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.28-2.30; I(2) = 0%, respectively). In the subgroup analysis by drink status, both drinkers and non-drinkers with survivin -31 G/C polymorphism showed increased CRC risk (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.06-2.37; I(2) = 8% and OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1

  7. Anti-VEGF agents in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC: are they all alike?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif MW

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif Saif GI Oncology Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, a key player in the angiogenesis pathway. Despite benefits of bevacizumab in cancer therapy, it is clear that the VEGF pathway is complex, involving multiple isoforms, receptors, and alternative ligands such as VEGF-B, and placental growth factor, which could enable escape from VEGF-A-targeted angiogenesis inhibition. Recently developed therapies have targeted other ligands in the VEGF pathway (eg, aflibercept, known as ziv-aflibercept in the United States, VEGF receptors (eg, ramucirumab, and their tyrosine kinase signaling (ie, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The goal of the current review was to identify comparative preclinical data for the currently available VEGF-targeted therapies. Sources were compiled using PubMed searches (2007 to 2012, using search terms including, but not limited to: “bevacizumab,” “aflibercept,” “ramucirumab,” and “IMC-18F1.” Two preclinical studies were identified that compared bevacizumab and the newer agent, aflibercept. These studies identified some important differences in binding and pharmacodynamic activity, although the potential clinical relevance of these findings is not known. Newer antiangiogenesis therapies should help further expand treatment options for colorectal and other cancers. Comparative preclinical data on these agents is currently lacking. Keywords: aflibercept, antiangiogenesis, metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF

  8. Combination epigenetic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with subcutaneous 5-azacitidine and entinostat: a phase 2 consortium/stand up 2 cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Nilofer S; El-Khoueiry, Anthony; Yin, Jun; Oberg, Ann L; Flynn, Patrick; Adkins, Douglas; Sharma, Anup; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Brown, Thomas; Medvari, Prakriti; Jones, Peter A; Easwaran, Hariharan; Kamel, Ihab; Bahary, Nathan; Kim, George; Picus, Joel; Pitot, Henry C; Erlichman, Charles; Donehower, Ross; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W; Piekarz, Richard; Baylin, Stephen; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-05-23

    Therapy with demethylating agent 5-azacitidine and histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat shows synergistic re-expression of tumor-suppressor genes and growth inhibition in colorectal (CRC) cell lines and in vivo studies. We conducted a phase II, multi-institutional study of the combination in metastatic CRC patients. Subcutaneous azacitidine was administered at 40 mg/m2 days 1-5 and 8-10 and entinostat was given 7 mg orally on days 3 and 10. An interim analysis indicated toxicity crossed the pre-specified safety boundary but was secondary to disease. A 2nd cohort with added eligibility restrictions was accrued: prior therapies were limited to no more than 2 or 3 (KRAS-mutated and KRAS-wildtype cancers, respectively) and <30% of liver involvement. The primary endpoint was RECIST response. Serial biopsies were performed at baseline and after 2 cycles of therapy. Forty-seven patients were enrolled (24:Cohort 1, 23:Cohort 2). Patients were heavily pre-treated (median prior therapies 4: Cohort 1 and 2.5: cohort 2). No responses were observed. Median progression-free survival was 1.9 months; overall survival was 5.6 and 8.3 months in Cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Toxicity was tolerable and as expected. Unsupervised cluster analysis of serial tumor biopsies suggested greater DNA demethylation in patients with PFS above the median. In this first trial of CRC patients with combination epigenetic therapy, we show tolerable therapy without significant clinical activity as determined by RECIST responses. Reversal of hypermethylation was seen in a subset of patients and correlated with improved PFS.

  9. Combination epigenetic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with subcutaneous 5-azacitidine and entinostat: a phase 2 consortium/stand Up 2 cancer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Nilofer S.; el-Khoueiry, Anthony; Yin, Jun; Oberg, Ann L.; Flynn, Patrick; Adkins, Douglas; Sharma, Anup; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Brown, Thomas; Medvari, Prakriti; Jones, Peter A.; Easwaran, Hariharan; Kamel, Ihab; Bahary, Nathan; Kim, George; Picus, Joel; Pitot, Henry C.; Erlichman, Charles; Donehower, Ross; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W.; Piekarz, Richard; Baylin, Stephen; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Therapy with demethylating agent 5-azacitidine and histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat shows synergistic re-expression of tumor-suppressor genes and growth inhibition in colorectal (CRC) cell lines and in vivo studies. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II, multi-institutional study of the combination in metastatic CRC patients. Subcutaneous azacitidine was administered at 40 mg/m2 days 1-5 and 8-10 and entinostat was given 7 mg orally on days 3 and 10. An interim analysis indicated toxicity crossed the pre-specified safety boundary but was secondary to disease. A 2nd cohort with added eligibility restrictions was accrued: prior therapies were limited to no more than 2 or 3 (KRAS-mutated and KRAS-wildtype cancers, respectively) and <30% of liver involvement. The primary endpoint was RECIST response. Serial biopsies were performed at baseline and after 2 cycles of therapy. Results Forty-seven patients were enrolled (24:Cohort 1, 23:Cohort 2). Patients were heavily pre-treated (median prior therapies 4: Cohort 1 and 2.5: cohort 2). No responses were observed. Median progression-free survival was 1.9 months; overall survival was 5.6 and 8.3 months in Cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Toxicity was tolerable and as expected. Unsupervised cluster analysis of serial tumor biopsies suggested greater DNA demethylation in patients with PFS above the median. Conclusion In this first trial of CRC patients with combination epigenetic therapy, we show tolerable therapy without significant clinical activity as determined by RECIST responses. Reversal of hypermethylation was seen in a subset of patients and correlated with improved PFS. PMID:28186961

  10. A Quality Improvement Initiative to Increase Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening: Collaboration between a Primary Care Clinic and Research Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Beverly B; Fuller, Sharon; Anderson, Melissa L; Mahoney, Christine; Mendy, Peter; Powell, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that mailed fecal testing programs are effective in increasing colorectal cancer screening participation. However, few healthcare organization in the US have Implemented such programs. Stakeholders from one clinic in an integrated healthcare system in Washington State initiated collaboration with researchers with expertise in CRC screening, aiming to increase screening rates at their clinic. Age-eligible individuals who were overdue for CRC screening and had previously completed a fecal test were randomized to receive mailed fecal immunochemical test kits (FIT) at the start of the project (Early) or 6 months later (Late). Outcomes included comparing FIT completion at 6 months by randomization group, and overall CRC screening rates at 12 months. We also assessed implementation facilitators and challenges. Overall 2,421 FIT tests were mailed at a cost of $10,739. At 6 months, FIT completion was significantly higher among the Early compared to the Late group (62% vs.47%, p CRC screening rate was 75.1% at baseline and 78.0% 12 months later. Key constructs associated with successful program implementation included strong stakeholder involvement, use of evidence-based strategies, simplicity, and low cost. Challenges included lack of a plan for maintaining the program. Collaboration between clinic stakeholders and researchers led to a successful project that rapidly increased CRC screening rates. However, institutional normalization of the program would be required to maintain it.

  11. Predicting Outcome and Therapy Response in mCRC Patients Using an Indirect Method for CTCs Detection by a Multigene Expression Panel: A Multicentric Prospective Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Vidal Insua

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths. Early detection of tumor relapse is crucial for determining the most appropriate therapeutic management. In clinical practice, computed tomography (CT is routinely used, but small tumor changes are difficult to visualize, and reliable blood-based prognostic and monitoring biomarkers are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to prospectively validate a gene expression panel (composed of GAPDH, VIL1, CLU, TIMP1, TLN1, LOXL3 and ZEB2 for detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs as prognostic and predictive tool in blood samples from 94 metastatic CRC (mCRC patients. Patients with higher gene panel expression before treatment had a reduced progression-free survival (PFS and overall-survival (OS rates compared with patients with low expression (p = 0.003 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively. Patients with increased expression of CTCs markers during treatment presented PFS and OS times of 8.95 and 11.74 months, respectively, compared with 14.41 and 24.7 for patients presenting decreased expression (PFS; p = 0.020; OS; p ≤ 0.001. Patients classified as non-responders by CTCs with treatment, but classified as responders by CT scan, showed significantly shorter survival times (PFS: 8.53 vs. 11.70; OS: 10.37 vs. 24.13; months. In conclusion, our CTCs detection panel demonstrated efficacy for early treatment response assessment in mCRC patients, and with increased reliability compared to CT scan.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shao, Yan; Tang, Shenhua; Cheng, Xianyong; Lian, Haifeng; Qin, Chengyong

    2015-01-01

    The association between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk was inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism and CRC risk. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 17 case-control studies with 12635 and 15803 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was associated with CRC risk (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.75-0.94, P = 0.003, I(2) = 35%). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was found among Caucasians (OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.96, P = 0.007, I(2) = 38%) but not among Asians (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.51-1.12, P = 0.17, I(2) = 28%). In the subgroup analysis by CRC site, a significant association was found among colon cancer (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.66-0.98, P = 0.03, I(2) = 16%) but not among rectal cancer (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.57-1.21, P = 0.34, I(2) = 63%). The sensitivity analysis did not influence the result by omitting low-quality studies (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.63-0.93, P = 0.006, I(2) = 51%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was significant associated with CRC risk.

  13. Expression Analysis of Previously Verified Fecal and Plasma Dow-regulated MicroRNAs (miR-4478, 1295-3p, 142-3p and 26a-5p), in FFPE Tissue Samples of CRC Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Reza; Rezasoltani, Sama; Hashemi, Javad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Tahmasebifar, Arash; Arefian, Ehsan; Mobarra, Naser; Asadi, Jahanbakhsh; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Knuutila, Sakari; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of this neoplasm is critical and may reduce patients' mortality. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules whose expression pattern can be altered in various diseases such as CRC. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of miR-142-3p, miR-26a-5p (their reduced expression in plasma samples of CRC patients was previously confirmed), miR-4478 and miR-1295-3p (their reduced expression in stool samples of CRC patients was previously confirmed) in tissue samples of CRC patients in comparison to healthy subjects. To achieve this purpose, total RNA including small RNA was extracted from 53 CRC and 35 normal subjects' Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples using the miRNeasy FFPE Mini Kit. The expression levels of these four selected miRNAs were measured using quantitative Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). We found that the expression levels of miR-4478 and miR-1295b-3p (two previously down-regulated fecal miRNAs) were significantly decreased in FFPE samples of CRC patients compared to healthy controls. On the other hand, no significant differences were seen in expression levels of miR-142-3p and miR-26a-5p (two previously down-regulated circulating miRNAs) in FFPE samples between these two groups. Regarding current findings, it may be concluded that to diagnose CRC patients based on the miRNAs approach, stool samples are more likely preferable to plasma samples; nevertheless, additional studies with more samples are needed to confirm the results.

  14. Protein kinase C zeta suppresses low- or high-grade colorectal cancer (CRC) phenotypes by interphase centrosome anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Ravi Kiran; Javadi, Arman; McClements, Jane; Vohhodina, Jekaterina; Savage, Kienan; Loughrey, Maurice Bernard; Evergren, Emma; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2018-04-01

    Histological grading provides prognostic stratification of colorectal cancer (CRC) by scoring heterogeneous phenotypes. Features of aggressiveness include aberrant mitotic spindle configurations, chromosomal breakage, and bizarre multicellular morphology, but pathobiology is poorly understood. Protein kinase C zeta (PKCz) controls mitotic spindle dynamics, chromosome segregation, and multicellular patterns, but its role in CRC phenotype evolution remains unclear. Here, we show that PKCz couples genome segregation to multicellular morphology through control of interphase centrosome anchoring. PKCz regulates interdependent processes that control centrosome positioning. Among these, interaction between the cytoskeletal linker protein ezrin and its binding partner NHERF1 promotes the formation of a localized cue for anchoring interphase centrosomes to the cell cortex. Perturbation of these phenomena induced different outcomes in cells with single or extra centrosomes. Defective anchoring of a single centrosome promoted bipolar spindle misorientation, multi-lumen formation, and aberrant epithelial stratification. Collectively, these disturbances induce cribriform multicellular morphology that is typical of some categories of low-grade CRC. By contrast, defective anchoring of extra centrosomes promoted multipolar spindle formation, chromosomal instability (CIN), disruption of glandular morphology, and cell outgrowth across the extracellular matrix interface characteristic of aggressive, high-grade CRC. Because PKCz enhances apical NHERF1 intensity in 3D epithelial cultures, we used an immunohistochemical (IHC) assay of apical NHERF1 intensity as an indirect readout of PKCz activity in translational studies. We show that apical NHERF1 IHC intensity is inversely associated with multipolar spindle frequency and high-grade morphology in formalin-fixed human CRC samples. To conclude, defective PKCz control of interphase centrosome anchoring may underlie distinct categories of

  15. More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening associated with higher screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosen, David M; Feldstein, Adrianne C; Perrin, Nancy A; Rosales, A Gabriella; Smith, David H; Liles, Elizabeth G; Schneider, Jennifer L; Meyers, Ronald E; Elston-Lafata, Jennifer

    2013-04-01

    Examine association of comprehensiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening discussion by primary care physicians (PCPs) with completion of CRC screening. Observational study in Kaiser Permanente Northwest, a group-model health maintenance organization. A total of 883 participants overdue for CRC screening received an automated telephone call (ATC) between April and June 2009 encouraging CRC screening. Between January and March 2010, participants completed a survey on PCPs' discussion of CRC screening and patient beliefs regarding screening. receipt of CRC screening (assessed by electronic medical record [EMR], 9 months after ATC). Primary independent variable: comprehensiveness of CRC screening discussion by PCPs (7-item scale). Secondary independent variables: perceived benefits of screening (4-item scale assessing respondents' agreement with benefits of timely screening) and primary care utilization (EMR; 9 months after ATC). The independent association of variables with CRC screening was assessed with logistic regression. Average scores for comprehensiveness of CRC discussion and perceived benefits were 0.4 (range 0-1) and 4.0 (range 1-5), respectively. A total of 28.2% (n = 249) completed screening, 84% of whom had survey assessments after their screening date. Of screeners, 95.2% completed the fecal immunochemical test. More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening was associated with increased screening (odds ratio [OR] = 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-2.21). Higher perceived benefits (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.13-1.90) and 1 or more PCP visits (OR = 5.82, 95% CI = 3.87-8.74) were also associated with increased screening. More comprehensive discussion of CRC screening was independently associated with increased CRC screening. Primary care utilization was even more strongly associated with CRC screening, irrespective of discussion of CRC screening.

  16. Factors influencing choice of chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Luigi; Vakiarou, Foteini; Zoratto, Federica; Bianchi, Loredana; Papa, Anselmo; Basso, Enrico; Verrico, Monica; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Evangelista, Salvatore; Rinaldi, Guilia; Perrone-Congedi, Francesca; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Stati, Valeria; Caruso, Davide; Prete, Alessandra; Tomao, Silverio

    2013-01-01

    Management of metastatic colorectal cancer requires a multimodal approach and must be performed by an experienced, multidisciplinary expert team. The optimal choice of the individual treatment modality, according to disease localization and extent, tumor biology, and patient clinical characteristics, will be one that can maintain quality of life and long-term survival, and even cure selected patients. This review is an overview of the different therapeutic approaches available in metastatic colorectal cancer, for the purpose of defining personalized therapeutic algorithms according to tumor biology and patient clinical features

  17. Factors influencing choice of chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Rossi, Foteini Vakiarou, Federica Zoratto, Loredana Bianchi, Anselmo Papa, Enrico Basso, Monica Verrico, Giuseppe Lo Russo, Salvatore Evangelista, Guilia Rinaldi, Francesca Perrone-Congedi, Gian Paolo Spinelli, Valeria Stati, Davide Caruso, Alessandra Prete, Silverio TomaoDepartment of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Oncology Unit, ICOT, Latina, ItalyAbstract: Management of metastatic colorectal cancer requires a multimodal approach and must be performed by an experienced, multidisciplinary expert team. The optimal choice of the individual treatment modality, according to disease localization and extent, tumor biology, and patient clinical characteristics, will be one that can maintain quality of life and long-term survival, and even cure selected patients. This review is an overview of the different therapeutic approaches available in metastatic colorectal cancer, for the purpose of defining personalized therapeutic algorithms according to tumor biology and patient clinical features.Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer, patient clinical features, tumor biology, multidisciplinary approach

  18. Pickled meat consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC): a case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Josh; Roebothan, Barbara; Buehler, Sharon; Sun, Zhuoyu; Cotterchio, Michelle; Younghusband, Ban; Dicks, Elizabeth; Mclaughlin, John R; Parfrey, Patrick S; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2010-09-01

    Although a large body of epidemiological research suggests that red meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer, little is known regarding how such an association varies across populations and types of red meat. The objective of this study was to assess whether an association exists between the intakes of total red meat and pickled red meat and the risk of colorectal cancer in study subjects residing in Newfoundland and Labrador. This case-control study of 1,204 residents of Newfoundland and Labrador was part of a larger study on colorectal cancer. Personal history food frequency questionnaires were used to collect retrospective data from 518 individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 686 controls. Intakes were ranked and divided into tertiles. Logistic regression was used to examine the possible association between meat intakes and colorectal cancer diagnosis while controlling for possible confounding factors. A positive, but non-statistically significant, association between total red meat intake and CRC was observed in this study. Pickled red meat consumption was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of CRC (men, OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.37-3.15; women, OR = 2.51, 95% CI 1.45-4.32), the odds ratios increasing with each tertile of consumption, suggesting a dose-response effect. Intake of pickled red meat appears to increase the risk of colorectal cancer in Newfoundland and Labrador.

  19. High Rab27A expression indicates favorable prognosis in CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuanbing; Yang, Xiaojun; Ni, Yijiang; Hou, Ning; Xu, Li; Zhan, Feng; Zhu, Huijun; Xiong, Lin; Chen, Pingsheng

    2015-06-13

    Rab27A is a peculiar member in Rab family and has been suggested to play essential roles in the development of human cancers. However, the association between Rab27A expression and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been elucidated yet. One-step quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test with 18 fresh-frozen CRC samples and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis in 112 CRC cases were executed to evaluate the relationship between Rab27A expression and the clinicopathological features of CRC. Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed to identify the prognostic factors for 112 CRC patients. The results specified that the expression levels of Rab27A mRNA and protein were significantly higher in CRC tissues than that in matched non-cancerous tissues, in both qPCR test (p = 0.029) and IHC analysis (p = 0.020). The IHC data indicated that the Rab27A protein expression in CRC was statistically correlated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.022) and TNM stage (p = 0.026). Cox multi-factor analysis and Kaplan-Meier method suggested Rab27A protein expression (p = 0.012) and tumor differentiation (p = 0.004) were significantly associated with the overall survival of CRC patients. The data indicated the differentiate expression of Rab27A in CRC tissues and matched non-cancerous tissues. Rab27A may be used as a valuable prognostic biomarker for CRC patients.

  20. Deterministic Role of CEA and MSI Status in Predicting Outcome of CRC Patients: a Perspective Study Amongst Hospital Attending Eastern Indian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyel, Banerjee; Priyabrata, Das; Rittwika, Bhattacharya; Swati, Dasgupta; Soma, Mukhopadhyay; Jayasri, Basak; Ashis, Mukhopadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an important deterministic factor in predicting colorectal carcinoma (CRC) progression. It is also evident that microsatellite instability (MSI) which results in a hypermutable phenotype of genomic DNA is common in CRC. Owing to the scarcity of reports from India, our aim of this study was to understand the clinicopathological correlations of CEA status with surgery and chemotherapy, correlate the same with socio-demographic status of the patients, determine the MSI status amongst them and understand the prognostic implications of CEA and MSI as CRC progression marker amongst patients. The serum CEA level was estimated by chemiluminescence assay (CLIA). Serum liver enzyme assay was carried out following the manufacturer's instructions using auto-analysers (E. Merck and Sera mol. Health Care, India). MSI analysis was carried out by PCR-SSCP. From our study, most frequently detected colorectal cancer was in 40-49 years age group (25.26%) with 61.05% male and 38.95% females. CEA showed a significant association with higher TNM staging, tumour size, smoking habit and MSI status ( p   0.05). After surgery and chemotherapy, CEA and WBCs were decreased significantly ( p   0.05). Overall, microsatellite instability was observed in approximately 40% of the populations. From our study, it was also evident that for both, MSI and abnormal CEA level predicted poor prognosis for the patient (by using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis; p  = 0.04). Thus, CEA and initial MSI status can be used as prognostic markers of CRC.

  1. Expression of the MAP kinase phosphatase DUSP4 is associated with microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer (CRC) and causes increased cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschl, Benedikt; Bettstetter, Marcus; Giedl, Christian; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Edmonston, Tina; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Dietmaier, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    DUSP4 (MKP-2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) family and potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulates the MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) ERK, p38 and JNK. MAPKs play a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Previously, using microarray analyses we found a conspicuously frequent overexpression of DUSP4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) with high frequent microsatellite instability (MSI-H) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. Here we studied DUSP4 expression on mRNA level in 38 CRC (19 MSI-H and 19 MSS) compared to matched normal tissue as well as in CRC cell lines by RT-qPCR. DUSP4 was overexpressed in all 19 MSI-H tumors and in 14 MSS tumors. Median expression levels in MSI-H tumors were significantly higher than in MSS-tumors (p CRC cell lines showed 6.8-fold higher DUSP4 mRNA levels than MSS cell lines. DUSP4 expression was not regulated by promoter methylation since no methylation was found by quantitative methylation analysis of DUSP4 promoter in CRC cell lines neither in tumor samples. Furthermore, no DUSP4 mutation was found on genomic DNA level in four CRC cell lines. DUSP4 overexpression in CRC cell lines through DUSP4 transfection caused upregulated expression of MAPK targets CDC25A, CCND1, EGR1, FOS, MYC and CDKN1A in HCT116 as well as downregulation of mismatch repair gene MSH2 in SW480. Furthermore, DUSP4 overexpression led to increased proliferation in CRC cell lines. Our findings suggest that DUSP4 acts as an important regulator of cell growth within the MAPK pathway and causes enhanced cell growth in MSI-H CRC. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. Two variants on T2DM susceptible gene HHEX are associated with CRC risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Liu, Jian-Ping; Gao, Chang; Xiong, Ying-Ying; Li, Min; Wang, Ya-Ping; Su, Yan-Wei; Lin, Mei; Jiang, An-Li; Xiong, Ling-Fan; Xie, Yan; Feng, Jue-Ping

    2016-05-17

    Increasing amounts of evidence has demonstrated that T2DM (Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) patients have increased susceptibility to CRC (colorectal cancer). As HHEX is a recognized susceptibility gene in T2DM, this work was focused on two SNPs in HHEX, rs1111875 and rs7923837, to study their association with CRC. T2DM patients without CRC (T2DM-only, n=300), T2DM with CRC (T2DM/CRC, n=135), cancer-free controls (Control, n=570), and CRC without T2DM (CRC-only, n=642) cases were enrolled. DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood leukocytes of the patients and sequenced by direct sequencing. The χ2 test was used to compare categorical data. We found that in T2DM patients, rs1111875 but not the rs7923837 in HHEX gene was associated with the occurrence of CRC (p= 0.006). for rs1111875, TC/CC patients had an increased risk of CRC (p=0.019, OR=1.592, 95%CI=1.046-2.423). Moreover, our results also indicated that the two variants of HEEX gene could be risk factors for CRC in general population, independent on T2DM (pCRC was observed in TC or TC/CC than CC individuals (pCRC risk was observed in AG, GG, and AG/GG than AA individuals (pCRC susceptibility. Risk effects and the functional impact of these polymorphisms need further validation.

  3. Clinical and Radiological Discrimination of Solitary Pulmonary Lesions in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Yoichi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Obayashi, Kai; Azuma, Yoko; Iijima, Misaki; Kosaka, Takayuki; Yajima, Toshiki; Ogawa, Hiroomi; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Arai, Motohiro; Mogi, Akira; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2018-04-01

    The lung is one of the most common organs of metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC), and we have encountered lung cancer patients with a history of CRC. There have been few studies regarding methods used to discriminate between primary lung cancer (PLC) and pulmonary metastasis from CRC (PM-CRC) based only on preoperative findings. We retrospectively investigated predictive factors discriminating between these lesions in patients with a history of CRC. Between 2006 and 2015, 117 patients with a history of CRC (44 patients with 47 PLC and 73 patients with 102 PM-CRC) underwent subsequent or concurrent resection of pulmonary lesions. We compared the clinical and radiological characteristics of 100 patients with solitary lesions (43 PLC and 57 PM-CRC). Using univariate and multivariate analyses, we examined predictive factors for discrimination of these two lesions. All tumors with findings of ground-glass opacity (GGO) were PLC (n = 19). In a multivariate analysis of 81 radiologically solid tumors, two factors were found to be significant independent predictors of PLC: a history of stage I CRC and presence of pleural indentation. All tumors in 26 patients with either GGO or both a stage I CRC history and pleural indentation were PLC, while most tumors in patients without all three factors were PM-CRC (43/44; 97.7%). The presence or absence of GGO, pathological CRC stage, and pleural indentation could be useful factors to distinguish between PLC and PM-CRC.

  4. New insights into frequency and contents of fear of cancer progression/recurrence (FOP/FCR) in outpatients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) receiving oral capecitabine: a pilot study at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jochen; Berberich, Sara; Lanvers, Elena; Sanning, Maria; Steimer, Ann-Kathrin; Kunzmann, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Fear of cancer progression/recurrence (FOP/FCR) is considered one of the most prevalent sources of distress in cancer survivors and associated with lower quality of life and functional impairment. Detailed measures of FOP/FCR are needed because little is known about the knowledge of FOP/FCR, its associations with the patient-doctor relationship, and the rate of adequate therapy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancer entities, and oral capecitabine is widely prescribed as treatment. Therefore, we initiated a pilot study to expand the literature on FOP/FCR in CRC outpatients receiving capecitabine and to generate hypotheses for future investigations. This study included 58 patients treated at a comprehensive cancer center. FOP/FCR was assessed with the Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FOP-Q-SF). Satisfaction with the relationships with doctors was assessed with the Patient-Doctor Relationship Questionnaire-9 (PRDQ-9). Levels of side effects were rated by the patients on a visual analog scale. Clinical data were extracted from the charts. A total of 19 out of 58 patients (36%) suffered from FOP/FCR according to our assessment. Levels of FOP/FCR seemed to be mostly moderate to high. Only four out of the 19 distressed patients (21%) were treated accordingly. Typical side effects of oncological treatment were associated with higher FOP/FCR. Satisfaction with doctor-patient relationships was not associated with FOP/FCR. Regarding single items of FOP/FCR, three out of the five most prevalent fears were associated with close relatives. FOP/FCR occurred frequently in more than one in three patients, but was mostly untreated in this sample of consecutive outpatients with CRC receiving oral capecitabine. In detail, most fears were related to family and friends. In addition to an unmet need of patients, our data indicate sources of distress not considered thus far. If replicated in larger studies, results may help to inform intervention development and

  5. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, Erik; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Kremer, Willemijn; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies (interval CRC). We

  6. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, Erik; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Kremer, Willemijn; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies (interval CRC).

  7. Colorectal Cancer Risk in Patients With Lynch Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Smits, L.J.T.; Lent-van Vliet, S. van; Dekker, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Kouwen, M.C.A. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Hoentjen, F.

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is not clear whether the risk of CRC is even higher for patients with a combination of Lynch syndrome and IBD. We investigated the risk for CRC in this subgroup by

  8. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  9. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugen, N.; Brown, G.; Glynne-Jones, R.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long

  10. Why Wait Until Our Community Gets Cancer?: Exploring CRC Screening Barriers and Facilitators in the Spanish-Speaking Community in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Christa E; Crutchfield, Trisha M; Laping, Jane L; Perreras, Lexie; Reuland, Daniel S; Cubillos, Laura; Pignone, Michael P; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of death among Hispanics in the United States. Despite the benefits of CRC screening, many Hispanics are not being screened. Using a combined methodology of focus groups and discrete choice experiment (DCE) surveys, the objectives for this research were as follows: (1) to improve understanding of preferences regarding potential CRC screening program characteristics, and (2) to improve understanding of the barriers and facilitators around CRC screening with the Hispanic, immigrant community in North Carolina. Four gender-stratified focus groups were conducted and DCE surveys were administered to 38 Spanish-speaking individuals across four counties in North Carolina. In-depth content analysis was used to examine the focus group data; descriptive analyses and mean attribute importance scores for cost of screening and follow-up care, travel time, and test options were calculated from DCE data. Data analyses showed that this population has a strong interest in CRC screening but experience barriers such as lack of access to resources, cost uncertainty, and stigma. Some of these barriers are unique to their cultural experiences in the United States, such as an expressed lack of tailored CRC information. Based on the DCE, cost variables were more important than testing options or travel time. This study suggests that Hispanics may have a general awareness of and interest in CRC screening, but multiple barriers prevent them from getting screened. Special attention should be given to designing culturally and linguistically appropriate programs to improve access to healthcare resources, insurance, and associated costs among Hispanics.

  11. Screening colonoscopy participation in Turkish colorectal cancer patients and their first degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickap, Saadettin; Arslan, Cagatay; Rama, Dorina; Yalcin, Suayib

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to research the awareness of screening colonoscopy (SC) among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and their relatives. A questionnaire form including information and behavior about colonoscopic screening for CRCs of patients and their first-degree relatives (FDRs) was prepared. A total of 406 CRC patients were enrolled into the study, with 1534 FDRs (siblings n: 1381 and parents n: 153) . Positive family history for CRC was found in 12% of the study population. Previous SC was performed in 11% of patients with CRC. Mean age of the patients whose FDRs underwent SC was lower than the patients whose FDRs did not (52 vs 57 years; peducational level and income had SC more frequently. When screening for CRC is planned, elderly subjects, those with family history for CRC, and those with low educational and lower income should be given especial attention in order that they be convinced to undergo screening for CRC.

  12. Considering culture in physician-- patient communication during colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Gao; Burke, Nancy; Somkin, Carol P; Pasick, Rena

    2009-06-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and stage detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that cultural practices (i.e., communication norms and expectations) influence patients' and their physicians' understanding and talk about CRC screening. We examined 44 videotaped observations of clinic visits that included a CRC screening recommendation and transcripts from semistructured interviews that doctors and patients separately completed following the visit. We found that interpersonal relationship themes such as power distance, trust, directness/ indirectness, and an ability to listen, as well as personal health beliefs, emerged as affecting patients' definitions of provider-patient effective communication. In addition, we found that in discordant physician-patient interactions (when each is from a different ethnic group), physicians did not solicit or address cultural barriers to CRC screening and patients did not volunteer culture-related concerns regarding CRC screening.

  13. Clinical trial enrollment, patient characteristics, and survival differences in prospectively registered metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Pfeiffer, Per; Cavalli-Björkman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trial accrual patterns were examined to determine whether metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients enrolled in trials are representative of a general cancer population concerning patient characteristics and survival. METHODS: A total of 760 mCRC patients referred for their first...... oncological consideration at 3 hospitals in Scandinavia covering defined populations were registered consecutively during 2003 to 2006. Clinical trial enrollment, patient characteristics, and treatment were recorded prospectively, and the follow-up was complete. RESULTS: Palliative chemotherapy was initiated...

  14. Increased Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Ulcerative Colitis Patients Diagnosed after 40 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine J Karvellas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between ulcerative colitis (UC and colorectal cancer (CRC is well established. Retrospective data show a 5.4% CRC incidence rate among patients with pancolitis and suggest that cancer surveillance should be provided to patients following eight to 10 years of extensive UC.

  15. A genetic variant in Rassf1a predicts outcome in mCRC patients treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy: results from FIRE-3 and JACCRO 05 and 06 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebio, A; Stintzing, S; Heinemann, V; Sunakawa, Y; Zhang, W; Ichikawa, W; Tsuji, A; Takahashi, T; Parek, A; Yang, D; Cao, S; Ning, Y; Stremitzer, S; Matsusaka, S; Okazaki, S; Barzi, A; Berger, M D; Lenz, H-J

    2018-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression. The Hippo regulator Rassf1a is also involved in the Ras signaling cascade. In this work, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms within Hippo components and their association with outcome in CRC patients treated with cetuximab. Two cohorts treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy were evaluated (198 RAS wild-type (WT) patients treated with first-line FOLFIRI plus Cetuximab within the FIRE-3 trial and 67 Ras WT patients treated either with first-line mFOLFOX6 or SOX plus Cetuximab). In these two populations, Rassf1a rs2236947 was associated with overall survival (OS), as patients with a CC genotype had significantly longer OS compared with those with CA or AA genotypes. This association was stronger in patients with left-side CRC (hazard ratio (HR): 1.79 (1.01-3.14); P=0.044 and HR: 2.83 (1.14-7.03); P=0.025, for Fire 3 and JACCRO cohorts, respectively). Rassf1a rs2236947 is a promising biomarker for patients treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy.

  16. Considering Culture in Physician– Patient Communication During Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Burke, Nancy; Somkin, Carol P.; Pasick, Rena

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and stage detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that cultural practices (i.e., communication norms and expectations) influence patients’ and their physicians’ understanding and talk about CRC screening. We examined 44 videotaped observations of clinic visits that included a CRC screening recommendation and transcripts from semistructured interviews that doctors and patients separately completed following the visit. We found that interpersonal relationship themes such as power distance, trust, directness/indirectness, and an ability to listen, as well as personal health beliefs, emerged as affecting patients’ definitions of provider–patient effective communication. In addition, we found that in discordant physician–patient interactions (when each is from a different ethnic group), physicians did not solicit or address cultural barriers to CRC screening and patients did not volunteer culture-related concerns regarding CRC screening. PMID:19363141

  17. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Do recent epidemiologic observations impact who and how we should screen for CRC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortniker, Ethan; Anderson, Joseph C

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is recommended to begin at age 50 for those patients with no significant family history of CRC. However, even within this group of average-risk patients, there is data to suggest that there may be variation in CRC risk. These observations suggest that perhaps CRC screening should be tailored to target those patients at higher risk for earlier or more invasive screening as compared to those individuals at lower risk. The strategy of how to identify those higher-risk patients may not be straightforward. One method might be to use single risk factors such as smoking or elevated BMI as has been suggested in the recent American College of Gastroenterology CRC screening guidelines. Another paradigm involves the use of models which incorporate several risk factors to stratify patients by risk. This article will highlight recent large studies that examine recognized CRC risk factors as well as review recently developed CRC risk models. There will also be a discussion of the application of these factors and models in an effort to make CRC screening more efficient.

  19. Significant Overexpression of DVL1 in Taiwanese Colorectal Cancer Patients with Liver Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ru Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Undetected micrometastasis plays a key role in the metastasis of cancer in colorectal cancer (CRC patients. The aim of this study is to identify a biomarker of CRC patients with liver metastasis through the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis of 10 CRC cancer tissue specimens compared with normal adjacent tissues revealed that 31 genes were up-regulated (gene expression ratio of cancer tissue to paired normal tissue > 2 in the cancer patients. We used a weighted enzymatic chip array (WEnCA including 31 prognosis-related genes to investigate CTCs in 214 postoperative stage I–III CRC patients and to analyze the correlation between gene expression and clinico-pathological parameters. We employed the immunohistochemistry (IHC method with polyclonal mouse antibody against DVL1 to detect DVL1 expression in 60 CRC patients. CRC liver metastasis occurred in 19.16% (41/214 of the patients. Using univariate analysis and multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis, we found that DVL1 mRNA overexpression had a significant, independent predictive value for liver metastasis in CRC patients (OR: 5.764; 95% CI: 2.588–12.837; p < 0.0001 on univariate analysis; OR: 3.768; 95% CI: 1.469–9.665; p = 0.006 on multivariate analysis. IHC staining of the immunoreactivity of DVL1 showed that DVL1 was localized in the cytoplasm of CRC cells. High expression of DVL1 was observed in 55% (33/60 of CRC tumor specimens and was associated significantly with tumor depth, perineural invasion and liver metastasis status (all p < 0.05. Our experimental results demonstrated that DVL1 is significantly overexpressed in CRC patients with liver metastasis, leading us to conclude that DVL1 could be a potential prognostic and predictive marker for CRC patients.

  20. Systemic therapy for patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent modalities and strategies have increased the complexity of treatment choice in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and therefore all cases should be assessed at a multidisciplinary conference. Adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months increases the chance of cure by absolutely 5 % in stage II...

  1. Slender CRC Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Bendt; Jensen, Lars Rom; Ellegaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    CRC is a high-performance steel fibre reinforced concrete with a typical compressive strength of 150 MPa. Design methods for a number of structural elements have been developed since CRC was invented in 1986, but the current project set out to further investigate the range of columns for which...

  2. The Norwegian dietary guidelines and colorectal cancer survival (CRC-NORDIET) study: a food-based multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Hege Berg; Ræder, Hanna; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Paur, Ingvild; Kværner, Ane Sørlie; Billington, Siv Åshild; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Wiedsvang, Gro; Erlund, Iris; Færden, Arne; Veierød, Marit Bragelien; Zucknick, Manuela; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Blomhoff, Rune

    2017-01-30

    Colorectal cancer survivors are not only at risk for recurrent disease but also at increased risk of comorbidities such as other cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and functional decline. In this trial, we aim at investigating whether a diet in accordance with the Norwegian food-based dietary guidelines and focusing at dampening inflammation and oxidative stress will improve long-term disease outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer patients. This paper presents the study protocol of the Norwegian Dietary Guidelines and Colorectal Cancer Survival study. Men and women aged 50-80 years diagnosed with primary invasive colorectal cancer (Stage I-III) are invited to this randomized controlled, parallel two-arm trial 2-9 months after curative surgery. The intervention group (n = 250) receives an intensive dietary intervention lasting for 12 months and a subsequent maintenance intervention for 14 years. The control group (n = 250) receives no dietary intervention other than standard clinical care. Both groups are offered equal general advice of physical activity. Patients are followed-up at 6 months and 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years after baseline. The study center is located at the Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, and patients are recruited from two hospitals within the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority. Primary outcomes are disease-free survival and overall survival. Secondary outcomes are time to recurrence, cardiovascular disease-free survival, compliance to the dietary recommendations and the effects of the intervention on new comorbidities, intermediate biomarkers, nutrition status, physical activity, physical function and quality of life. The current study is designed to gain a better understanding of the role of a healthy diet aimed at dampening inflammation and oxidative stress on long-term disease outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer patients. Since previous research on the role of diet for

  3. Catastrophic Health Expenditure Among Colorectal Cancer Patients and Families: A Case of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzani, Meram; Yahya, Abqariyah; Roslani, April Camilla; Su, Tin Tin

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to estimate the cost of colorectal cancer (CRC) management and to explore the prevalence and determinants of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) among CRC patients and their families arising from the costs of CRC management. Data were collected prospectively from 138 CRC patients. Patients were interviewed by using a structured questionnaire at the time of the diagnosis, then at 6 months and 12 months following diagnosis. Simple descriptive methods and multivariate binary logistic regression were used in the analysis. The mean cost of managing CRC was RM8306.9 (US$2595.9), and 47.8% of patients' families experienced CHE. The main determinants of CHE were the economic status of the family and the likelihood of the patient undergoing surgery. The results of this study strongly suggest that stakeholders and policy makers should provide individuals with financial protection against the consequences of cancer, a costly illness that often requires prolonged treatment.

  4. Prevalence of colorectal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis: A retrospective, monocenter study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer (UC-CRC is a serious complication of UC. Data on the clinical characteristics of patients in China are scarce. Aims: We aimed to study the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of CRC patients with a history of UC. Materials and Methods: We identified patients with UC and followed them until the first occurrence of cancer, death, or emigration in a single study center in China. Results: A total of 4 UC-associated CRC patients were identified among the 642 cases recorded from January 2000 to December 2012. The overall risk of cancer was 0.64%. The overall median duration of UC was 15.5 years (range 6-21 years in patients with UC-associated CRC. Of these patients, 75% (3/4 were at an advanced stage when they were diagnosed. Longer disease duration and extensive colitis were identified as risk factors for developing CRC, and 5-aminosalicylic acid and steroid therapies were not identified as protective factors against UC-associated CRC. Conclusions: Patients with UC are at an increased risk for CRC. However, the prevalence of CRC in China remains lower than that in the West.

  5. Main: CRC101 [AT Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CRC101 CRC1 Establishment of Chemical Library and Development of Protein Regulation... Technology Chemical library Tetsuo Nagano Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University CRC101.csml ...

  6. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.; Maulen- de Jong, A.E. van der; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Woude, C.J. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Jansen, J.M.; Mahmmod, N.; Kremer, W.; Siersema, P.D.; Oldenburg, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies

  7. Colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Halfvarson, Jonas; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed C...... preventive strategies in order to avoid CRC in IBD patients. The achieved knowledge may also be relevant for other inflammation-associated cancers.......The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed CRC...... during 30 years of observation. The overall risk of CRC among patients with UC and CD was comparable with that of the general population. However, patients diagnosed with UC during childhood or as adolescents, patients with long duration of disease and those with concomitant primary sclerosing...

  8. Plasma serotonin level is a predictor for recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Zhihao; Pang, Li

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of plasma serotonin levels in colorectal cancer (CRC). Preoperative plasma serotonin levels of 150 healthy control (HC) cases, 150 benign colorectal polyp (BCP) cases, and 176 CRC cases were determined using radioimmunoassay assay. Serotonin levels were compared between HC, BCP, and CRC cases, and those in CRC patients were related to 5-year outcome. Plasma serotonin levels were markedly higher in CRC patients than in either HCs or BCP cases. An elevated serotonin level was significantly associated with advanced tumor node metastasis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the level of serotonin had a high predictive value for disease recurrence and mortality. Multivariate analysis revealed that high serotonin level was significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that a high peri-operative plasma serotonin level is useful as a prognostic biomarker for CRC recurrence and poor survival. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Prevalence of JC virus in Chinese patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhou Mou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: JCV is a DNA polyomavirus very well adapted to humans. Although JCV DNA has been detected in colorectal cancers (CRC, the association between JCV and CRC remains controversial. In China, the presence of JCV infection in CRC patients has not been reported. Here, we investigated JCV infection and viral DNA load in Chinese CRC patients and to determine whether the JCV DNA in peripheral blood (PB can be used as a diagnostic marker for JCV-related CRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tumor tissues, non-cancerous tumor-adjacent tissues and PB samples were collected from 137 CRC patients. In addition, 80 normal colorectal tissue samples from patients without CRC and PB samples from 100 healthy volunteers were also harvested as controls. JCV DNA was detected by nested PCR and glass slide-based dot blotting. Viral DNA load of positive samples were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. JCV DNA was detected in 40.9% (56/137 of CRC tissues at a viral load of 49.1 to 10.3×10(4 copies/µg DNA. Thirty-four (24.5% non-cancerous colorectal tissues (192.9 to 4.4×10(3 copies/µg DNA and 25 (18.2% PB samples (81.3 to 4.9×10(3 copies/µg DNA from CRC patients were positive for JCV. Tumor tissues had higher levels of JCV than non-cancerous tissues (P = 0.003 or PB samples (P<0.001. No correlation between the presence of JCV and demographic or medical characteristics was observed. The JCV prevalence in PB samples was significantly associated with the JCV status in tissue samples (P<0.001. Eleven (13.8% normal colorectal tissues and seven (7.0% PB samples from healthy donors were positive for JCV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: JCV infection is frequently present in colorectal tumor tissues of CRC patients. Although the association between JCV presence in PB samples and JCV status in tissue samples was identified in this study, whether PB JCV detection can serve as a marker for JCV status of CRC requires further study.

  10. Risk factors for colorectal cancer in patients with multiple serrated polyps: a cross-sectional case series from genetics clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Buchanan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with multiple serrated polyps are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Recent reports have linked cigarette smoking with the subset of CRC that develops from serrated polyps. The aim of this work therefore was to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of CRC in high-risk genetics clinic patients presenting with multiple serrated polyps.We identified 151 Caucasian individuals with multiple serrated polyps including at least 5 outside the rectum, and classified patients into non-smokers, current or former smokers at the time of initial diagnosis of polyposis. Cases were individuals with multiple serrated polyps who presented with CRC. Controls were individuals with multiple serrated polyps and no CRC. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to estimate associations between smoking and CRC with adjustment for age at first presentation, sex and co-existing traditional adenomas, a feature that has been consistently linked with CRC risk in patients with multiple serrated polyps. CRC was present in 56 (37% individuals at presentation. Patients with at least one adenoma were 4 times more likely to present with CRC compared with patients without adenomas (OR = 4.09; 95%CI 1.27 to 13.14; P = 0.02. For females, the odds of CRC decreased by 90% in current smokers as compared to never smokers (OR = 0.10; 95%CI 0.02 to 0.47; P = 0.004 after adjusting for age and adenomas. For males, there was no relationship between current smoking and CRC. There was no statistical evidence of an association between former smoking and CRC for both sexes.A decreased odds for CRC was identified in females with multiple serrated polyps who currently smoke, independent of age and the presence of a traditional adenoma. Investigations into the biological basis for these observations could lead to non-smoking-related therapies being developed to decrease the risk of CRC and colectomy in these patients.

  11. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  12. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A.; Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I.; Chaudri, M.S.; Shakoori, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients

  13. Clinicopathological features and outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients with synchronous vs metachronous metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekenkamp, L. J. M.; Koopman, M.; Teerenstra, S.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Mol, L.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Punt, C. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are considered to be of worse prognostic value compared with metachronous metastases, but only few and conflicting data have been reported on this issue. We retrospectively investigated patient demographics, primary tumour characteristics and overall

  14. Disease severity does not affect the interval between IBD diagnosis and the development of CRC: results from two large, Dutch case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooiweer, Erik; Baars, Judith E; Lutgens, Maurice W M D; Vleggaar, Frank; van Oijen, Martijn; Siersema, Peter D; Kuipers, Ernst J; van der Woude, C Janneke; Oldenburg, Bas

    2012-05-01

    The increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well established. The incidence of IBD-related CRC however, differs markedly between cohorts from referral centers and population-based studies. In the present study we aimed to identify characteristics potentially explaining these differences in two cohorts of patients with IBD-related CRC. PALGA, a nationwide pathology network and registry in The Netherlands, was used to search for patients with IBD-associated CRC between 1990 and 2006. Patients from 7 referral hospitals and 78 general hospitals were included. Demographic and disease specific parameters were collected retrospectively using patient charts. A total of 281 patients with IBD-associated CRC were identified. Patients from referral hospitals had a lower median age at IBD diagnosis (26 years vs. 28 years (p=0.02)), while having more IBD-relapses before CRC diagnosis than patients from general hospitals (3.8 vs. 1.5 (pCRC was diagnosed at a younger age (47 years vs. 51 years (p=0.01)). However, the median interval between IBD diagnosis and diagnosis of CRC was similar in both cohorts (19 years in referral hospitals vs. 17 years in general hospitals (p=0.13)). IBD patients diagnosed with CRC treated in referral hospitals in The Netherlands are younger at both the diagnosis of IBD and CRC than IBD patients with CRC treated in general hospitals. Although patients from referral centers appeared to have a more severe course of IBD, the interval between IBD and CRC diagnosis was similar. Copyright © 2011 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Loss of Muscle Mass During Chemotherapy Is Predictive for Poor Survival of Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauwhoff-Buskermolen, Susanne; Versteeg, Kathelijn S.; de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.; den Braver, Nicole R.; Berkhof, Johannes; Langius, Jacqueline A. E.; Verheul, Henk M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Low muscle mass is present in approximately 40% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and may be associated with poor outcome. We studied change in skeletal muscle during palliative chemotherapy in patients with mCRC and its association with treatment modifications and overall

  16. The impact on clinical outcome of high prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ching-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both colorectal cancer (CRC and diabetes mellitus (DM are important public health problems worldwide. As there are controversies about survival impact on CRC patients with preexisting DM, the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the incidence and the survival impact of preexisting DM on the long-term outcomes of patients with CRC in Taiwan. Methods From January 2002 to December 2008, 1,197 consecutive patients with histologically proven primary CRC, who received surgical treatment at a single institution, were enrolled. The clinicopathologic features between these patients with and without DM were retrospectively investigated. Moreover, we intended to analyze the impact of DM on overall survival (OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS rates. Results Of 1,197 CRC patients, 23.6% of patients had either a reported history of DM or were currently taking one or more diabetes-controlling medications. CRC patients with DM were significantly older than those without DM (P P vs 6.01%, P = 0.040. Conclusions A considerably high prevalence of DM in CRC patients but no significant impact of DM on survival was observed in the single-institution retrospective study, regardless of cancer stages and tumor locations. Therefore, treatment strategies for CRC patients with DM should be the same as patients without DM.

  17. Long-term follow-up reveals high incidence of colorectal cancer in Indian patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopanna, Sawan; Kedia, Saurabh; Das, Prasenjit; Dattagupta, S; Sreenivas, V; Mouli, V Pratap; Dhingra, Rajan; Pradhan, Rajesh; Kumar, N Suraj; Yadav, Dawesh P; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-08-01

    As the magnitude of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) in India is low, magnitude of CRC in ulcerative colitis (UC) is also considered low. As a result, screening for CRC in UC although advocated may not be followed everywhere. We report our data of UC-related CRC from a low-incidence area of sporadic CRC. A total of 1012 patients with left-sided colitis/pancolitis having more than one full-length colonoscopy performed at least a year after the onset of symptoms were included in retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained case records. In addition, 136 patients with duration of disease >10 years underwent surveillance white-light colonoscopy prospectively during the study period. A total of 1012 individuals were finally included (6542 person-years of follow-up, 68.5% males, disease duration: 6.4 ± 6.8 years). Twenty (1.97%) patients developed CRC. Two (10%) patients developed CRC during the first decade, 10/20 (50%) during the second and 8/20 (40%) after the second decade of disease. The cumulative risk of developing CRC was 1.5%, 7.2% and 23.6% in the first, second and third decade, respectively. Of 136 high-risk UC cases, five (3.6%) had CRC on screening colonoscopy. Disease duration and increasing age of onset were associated with higher risk of CRC. Cumulative risk of CRC in Indian UC patients is as high as 23.6% at 30 years. The risk of CRC increases with increasing age of onset and increasing duration of disease. A low risk of sporadic CRC does not confer a low risk of UC-related CRC, and regular screening is warranted.

  18. Quality colonoscopy and risk of interval cancer in Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J. F.; Vasen, H. F. A.; Sanduleanu, S.; van der Wouden, E. J.; Koornstra, J. J.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Cappel, W. H. de Vos Tot Nederveen

    2013-01-01

    Despite colonoscopic surveillance, Lynch syndrome patients develop colorectal cancer (CRC). Identification of modifiable factors has the potential to improve outcome of surveillance. The aims of this study were to determine (1) characteristics of patients with CRC, (2) endoscopic and histological

  19. Novel and differential accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in Swedish and vietnamese patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Jan; Hong, Thai Trinh; Skarstedt, Marita; Löfgren, Sture; Zar, Niklas; Matussek, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis and aging. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion is one of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations in human tissues and may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in CRC tissues and its association with clinical factors. We determined the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion in cancer and normal paired tissue samples from 105 Swedish and 88 Vietnamese patients with CRC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion was shown to be significantly more frequent in normal tissues in comparison with paired cancer tissues in both Swedish and Vietnamese patients. The 4977 bp common deletion was significantly more frequent in cancer tissues of the Vietnamese patients compared to the Swedish patients, and in Vietnamese cancer tissues, the 4977 bp deletion was significantly over represented in those with localized disease compared to those with disseminated disease. Moreover, we detected nine novel mtDNA deletions and found a significantly higher rate of these in CRC tissues in Swedish in comparison to Vietnamese patients. The mtDNA 4977 bp deletion seems to have an impact on the clinical outcome of CRC in Vietnamese patients, that the Swedish patients accumulate more of the detected novel deletions in CRC tissue compared to Vietnamese patients probably indicates divergent mechanisms in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  20. Colorectal Cancer Risk in Patients With Lynch Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Smits, Lisa J T; van Vliet, Shannon; Dekker, Evelien; Aalfs, Cora M; van Kouwen, Mariëtte C A; Nagengast, Fokko M; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Hoentjen, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is not clear whether the risk of CRC is even higher for patients with a combination of Lynch syndrome and IBD. We investigated the risk for CRC in this subgroup by establishing a Lynch syndrome cohort from the Radboud University Medical Center (Nijmegen, The Netherlands) and the Academic Medical Center (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Patients with heterozygous germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2 (and EPCAM deletion-mediated MSH2 methylation), MSH6, or PMS2 who were tested and/or treated from 1998 through 2014 were included. Patients who developed IBD were identified by linkage of this cohort to the Dutch nationwide Pathology Registry (PALGA). Subsequently, we compared the risk of CRC between Lynch syndrome patients with IBD and without IBD. Of 1046 patients with Lynch syndrome, 15 developed IBD (1.4%). Patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD were significantly younger (median age, 38.0 y) than patients with Lynch syndrome without IBD (median age, 52.0 y; P = .001). Nevertheless, a similar proportion of patients in each group developed CRC: 4 of the 15 patients (26.7%) with Lynch syndrome and IBD compared with 311 of the 1031 patients (30.2%) with Lynch syndrome without IBD. Patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD developed CRC at a younger age (median age, 36.0 y) than patients with Lynch syndrome without IBD (median age, 46.0 y; P = .045). However, the cumulative incidence of CRC was similar between groups (P = .121). All patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD who developed CRC had ulcerative colitis, producing a higher cumulative incidence of CRC for this IBD subgroup (P Lynch syndrome and IBD develop CRC risk at a younger age than patients without IBD; patients with ulcerative colitis are at especially high risk. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and prognosis of synchronous colorectal cancer: a Dutch population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.F.; Kranse, R.; Damhuis, R.A.; Wilt, J.H. de; Ouwendijk, R.J.; Kuipers, E.J.; Leerdam, M.E. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A noticeable proportion of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are diagnosed with synchronous CRC. Large population-based studies on the incidence, risk factors and prognosis of synchronous CRC are, however, scarce, and are needed for better determination of risks of synchronous CRC in

  2. Faecal immunochemical tests to triage patients with lower abdominal symptoms for suspected colorectal cancer referrals in primary care: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); I. Corro Ramos (Isaac); Lang, S. (Shona); M. Luyendijk (Marianne); Zaim, R. (Remziye); Stirk, L. (Lisa); M.J. Al (Maiwenn); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the UK. Presenting symptoms that can be associated with CRC usually have another explanation. Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) detect blood that is not visible to the naked eye and may help to select patients who

  3. Identification of patients at risk for colorectal cancer in primary care: an explorative study with routine healthcare data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, N.R; Moons, L.N.G; Büchner, F.L.; Helsper, C.W.; ten Teije, A.C.M.; Numans, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is likely to reduce burden of disease and improve treatment success. Estimation of the individual patient risk for CRC diagnostic determinants in a primary care setting has not been very successful as yet. The aim of our study is to improve

  4. Prognostic value of primary tumour resection in synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer: Individual patient data analysis of first-line randomised trials from the ARCAD database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, K. L.; Shi, Q.; Goey, K. K. H.; Meyers, J.; Heinemann, V.; Diaz-Rubio, E.; Aranda, E.; Falcone, A.; Green, E.; de Gramont, A.; Sargent, D. J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.

    2018-01-01

    Indication for primary tumour resection (PTR) in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is unclear. Previous retrospective analyses suggest a survival benefit for patients who underwent PTR. The aim was to evaluate the prognostic value of PTR in patients with synchronous mCRC by

  5. EPHB2 germline variants in patients with colorectal cancer or hyperplastic polyposis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokko, Antti; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Laiho, Päivi; Lehtonen, Rainer; Korja, Sanna; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Eng, Charis; Schleutker, Johanna

    2006-01-01

    Ephrin receptor B2 (EPHB2) has recently been proposed as a novel tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer (CRC). Inactivation of the gene has been shown to correlate with progression of colorectal tumorigenesis, and somatic mutations have been reported in both colorectal and prostate tumors. Here we have analyzed the EPHB2 gene for germline alterations in 101 individuals either with 1) CRC and a personal or family history of prostate cancer (PC), or 2) intestinal hyperplastic polyposis (HPP), a condition associated with malignant degeneration such as serrated adenoma and CRC. Four previously unknown missense alterations were observed, which may be associated with the disease phenotype. Two of the changes, I361V and R568W, were identified in Finnish CRC patients, but not in over 300 Finnish familial CRC or PC patients or more than 200 population-matched healthy controls. The third change, D861N, was observed in a UK HPP patient, but not in additional 40 UK HPP patients or in 200 UK healthy controls. The fourth change R80H, originally identified in a Finnish CRC patient, was also found in 1/106 familial CRC patients and in 9/281 healthy controls and is likely to be a neutral polymorphism. We detected novel germline EPHB2 alterations in patients with colorectal tumors. The results suggest a limited role for these EPHB2 variants in colon tumor predisposition. Further studies including functional analyses are needed to confirm this

  6. DcR3 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activation of the TGF-β3/SMAD signaling pathway in CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Ping; Zhu, Hui-Fang; Liu, Ding-Li; Hu, Zhi-Yan; Li, Sheng-Nan; Kan, He-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Zu-Guo

    2016-11-22

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), a novel member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family, was recently reported to be associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. However, the role of DcR3 in human colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that DcR3 expression was significantly higher in human colorectal cancer tissues than in paired normal tissues, and that DcR3 expression was strongly correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastases and poor prognoses. Moreover, DcR3 overexpression significantly enhanced CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Conversely, DcR3 knockdown significantly repressed CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and DcR3 deficiency also attenuated CRC tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Functionally, DcR3 was essential for TGF-β3/SMAD-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CRC cells. Importantly, cooperation between DcR3 and TGF-β3/SMAD-EMT signaling-related protein expression was correlated with survival and survival time in CRC patients. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that DcR3 may be a prognostic biomarker for CRC and that this receptor facilitates CRC development and metastasis by participating in TGF-β3/SMAD-mediated EMT of CRC cells.

  7. HLA-G 3'UTR Polymorphisms Impact the Prognosis of Stage II-III CRC Patients in Fluoropyrimidine-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garziera, Marica; Bidoli, Ettore; Cecchin, Erika; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Buonadonna, Angela; Errante, Domenico; Pella, Nicoletta; D'Andrea, Mario; De Marchi, Francesco; De Paoli, Antonino; Zanusso, Chiara; De Mattia, Elena; Tassi, Renato; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An important hallmark of CRC is the evasion of immune surveillance. HLA-G is a negative regulator of host's immune response. Overexpression of HLA-G protein in primary tumour CRC tissues has already been associated to worse prognosis; however a definition of the role of immunogenetic host background is still lacking. Germline polymorphisms in the 3'UTR region of HLA-G influence the magnitude of the protein by modulating HLA-G mRNA stability. Soluble HLA-G has been associated to 3'UTR +2960 Ins/Ins and +3035 C/T (lower levels) and +3187 G/G (high levels) genotypes. HLA-G 3'UTR SNPs have never been explored in CRC outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate if common HLA-G 3'UTR polymorphisms have an impact on DFS and OS of 253 stage II-III CRC patients, after primary surgery and ADJ-CT based on FL. The 3'UTR was sequenced and SNPs were analyzed for their association with survival by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox models; results underwent internal validation using a resampling method (bootstrap analysis). In a multivariate analysis, we estimated an association with improved DFS in Ins allele (Ins/Del +Ins/Ins) carriers (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.93, P = 0.023) and in patients with +3035 C/T genotype (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26-0.99, P = 0.045). The +3187 G/G mutated carriers (G/G vs A/A+A/G) were associated to a worst prognosis in both DFS (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.19-5.05, P = 0.015) and OS (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.16-6.63, P = 0.022). Our study shows a prognostic and independent role of 3 HLA-G 3'UTR SNPs, +2960 14-bp INDEL, +3035 C>T, and +3187 A>G.

  8. Evaluating the impact of an educational intervention to increase CRC screening rates in the African American community: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Errol J; DuHamel, Katherine; Jandorf, Lina

    2010-10-01

    Despite the acknowledged importance of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and its proven prognostic benefit, African American men and women simultaneously possess the highest rates of CRC-related incidence and mortality (Swan et al. in Cancer 97(6):1528-1540, 2003) and lowest screening rates in the United States (Polite et al. in Med Clin N Am 89(4):771-793, 2005). Effective, targeted interventions that promote CRC screening for this community are therefore critical. The current study evaluated the impact of a print-based educational intervention on screening behavior and associated patient-based factors, including cancer-related knowledge, fatalism, worry, and decisional balance (pros-cons). One hundred and eighteen individuals (mean age = 56.08, SD = 5.58) who had not undergone screening were recruited from two health clinics in New York City. Each participant received educational print materials regarding the need for screening, the process of undergoing screening, and the benefits of regular CRC screening. One in four individuals had undergone post-intervention screening at a three-month follow-up. Whereas all participants reported a decrease in cancer-related worry (p benefits and barriers of screening may be critical in the decision to undergo CRC screening. Future interventions to increase CRC-screening rates for this community may be improved by focusing on these patient-based factors.

  9. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  10. Review of epidemiological and clinical characteristics and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Eisenhardt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Colorectal cancer (CRC has high incidence, is often treatable and curable if diagnosed early. This study aimed to identify the epidemiological characteristic and assess overall survival in patients with CRC treated at a center specializing in oncology. Methods: Medical records of 127 patients with CRC were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics, in addition to treatment protocols and adverse reactions presented by patients were reviewed. The association of significance was assessed by chi-square and Fisher exact tests. The survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The confidence interval was of 95% (p

  11. Intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase receptor enhance discrimination of cancer from non-malignant conditions in patients presenting with symptoms related to colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, A F; Høyer-Hansen, G; Nielsen, H J

    2009-01-01

    plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was proposed as a marker in CRC patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the individual molecular forms of suPAR as discriminators in a group of patients undergoing endoscopical examination following symptoms related to colorectal cancer. METHODS: In a case......-control study comprising 308 patients undergoing endoscopical examination following CRC-related symptoms, 77 CRC patients with adenocarcinoma were age and gender matched to: 77 patients with adenomas; 77 with other non-malignant findings, and 77 with no findings. The different uPAR forms were measured...

  12. Up-regulation of 91H promotes tumor metastasis and predicts poor prognosis for patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwen Deng

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play widespread roles in gene regulation and cellular processes. However, the functional roles of lncRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC are not yet well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to measure the levels of lncRNA 91H expression in CRC and evaluate its clinical significance and biological roles in the development and progression of CRC.91H expression and copy number variation (CNV were measured in 72 CRC tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues by real-time PCR. The biological roles of 91H were evaluated by MTT, scratch wound assay, migration and invasion assays, and flow cytometry.91H was significantly overexpressed in cancerous tissue and CRC cell lines compared with adjacent normal tissue and a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line. Moreover, 91H overexpression was closely associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis in patients with CRC, except for CNV of 91H. Multivariate analysis indicated that 91H expression was an independent prognostic indicator, as well as distant metastasis. Our in vitro data indicated that knockdown of 91H inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of CRC cells.91H played an important role in the molecular etiology of CRC and might be regarded as a novel prognosis indicator in patients with CRC.

  13. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  14. Age at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease influences early development of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease patients: A nationwide, long-term survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. van Haastert (M.); J.J. Nicolai (Jan); A.C. Poen (Alexander); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data on clinical characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related colorectal cancer (CRC) are scarce and mainly originate from tertiary referral centres. We studied patient and disease characteristics of IBD-related CRC in a nationwide IBD cohort in

  15. Preliminary Comparison of Oral and Intestinal Human Microbiota in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda Russo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS was used to analyze and compare human microbiota from three different compartments, i.e., saliva, feces, and cancer tissue (CT, of a selected cohort of 10 Italian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC vs. 10 healthy controls (saliva and feces. Furthermore, the Fusobacterium nucleatum abundance in the same body site was investigated through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the association with CRC. Differences in bacterial composition, F. nucleatum abundance in healthy controls vs. CRC patients, and the association of F. nucleatum with clinical parameters were observed. Taxonomic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, revealed the presence of three main bacterial phyla, which includes about 80% of reads: Firmicutes (39.18%, Bacteroidetes (30.36%, and Proteobacteria (10.65%. The results highlighted the presence of different bacterial compositions; in particular, the fecal samples of CRC patients seemed to be enriched with Bacteroidetes, whereas in the fecal samples of healthy controls Firmicutes were one of the major phyla detected though these differences were not statistically significant. The CT samples showed the highest alpha diversity values. These results emphasize a different taxonomic composition of feces from CRC compared to healthy controls. Despite the low number of samples included in the study, these results suggest the importance of microbiota in the CRC progression and could pave the way to the development of therapeutic interventions and novel microbial-related diagnostic tools in CRC patients.

  16. Many unexpected abdominal findings on staging computed tomography in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsted, Kim; Nørring, Keld; Laustrup, Lene Collatz

    2011-01-01

    ; an issue that was previously studied in relation to CT colonography, but not in relation to staging CT with intravenous contrast in CRC patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number and significance of such unexpected findings on staging CTs in CRC patients.......Computed tomography (CT) was proven to be superior to preoperative abdominal ultrasound in the preoperative setting for detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The higher sensitivity of CT has resulted in a number of unexpected abdominal findings of varying importance...

  17. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  18. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No severe toxicity ...

  19. Patients with colorectal cancer associated with Lynch syndrome and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation have similar prognoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Wu, Christina; Weng, Daniel Y; Shields, Peter G; Frankel, Wendy L; Pan, Xueliang; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goldberg, Richard M; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-09-01

    Mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by Lynch syndrome (LS) in 3% and sporadic inactivation of MLH1 by hypermethylation (MLH1-hm) in 12% of cases. It is not clear whether outcomes between LS-associated and MLH1-hm CRC differ. The objective of this study was to explore differences in clinical factors and outcomes in these two groups. Patients with dMMR CRC identified by immunohistochemistry staining and treated at a single institution from 1998 to 2012 were included. MLH1-hm was established with BRAF mutational analysis or hypermethylation testing. Patients' charts were accessed for information on pathology, germ-line MMR mutation testing, and clinical course. A total of 143 patients had CRC associated with LS (37 patients, 26%) or MLH1-hm (106 patients, 74%). Patients with LS were younger, more often male, presented more often with stage III disease, and had more metachronous disease than patients with MLH1-hm tumors. There was no difference in cancer-specific survival (CSS) between the groups; overall survival was longer in patients with LS, but this difference was minimal after adjusting for age and stage at diagnosis. CSS did not differ in LS-associated CRC compared with MLH1-hm CRC, suggesting that they carry a similar prognosis.Genet Med 18 9, 863-868.

  20. Efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Nielsen, D; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC) are less frequently treated with adjuvant chemotherapy than younger patients due to concerns regarding toxicity and efficiency. We investigated how age, performance status (PS) and comorbidity influence treatment outcomes. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: A retrospective single-centre study of 529 patients with stages II-III CRC treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/capecitabine+/÷oxaliplatin) from 2001 to 2011 at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. Baseline characteristics, chemotherapy and outcome were analysed with respect to age after......-dependent difference in 3-year disease-free survival (DFS; HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.47, p=0.59), in grade 3-5 toxicity (29% vs 28%, p=0.86) or in 10-year CRC mortality (28%, HR 1.07, p=0.71). In elderly patients, a reduction in chemotherapy dose intensity compared with full dose had no impact on DFS or CRC mortality...

  1. G9a stimulates CRC growth by inducing p53 Lys373 dimethylation-dependent activation of Plk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yafang; Shen, Yanyan; He, Pengxing; Ding, Jian; Chen, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Rationale: G9a is genetically deregulated in various tumor types and is important for cell proliferation; however, the mechanism underlying G9a-induced carcinogenesis, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC), is unclear. Here, we investigated if G9a exerts oncogenic effects in CRC by increasing polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) expression. Thus, we further characterized the detailed molecular mechanisms. Methods: The role of Plk1 in G9a aberrant CRC was determined by performing different in vitro and in vivo assays, including assessment of cell growth by performing cell viability assay and assessment of signaling transduction profiles by performing immunoblotting, in the cases of pharmacological inhibition or short RNA interference-mediated suppression of G9a. Detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of G9a on Plk1 expression were determined by performing point mutation analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, and luciferase reporter assay. Correlation between G9a and Plk1 expression was determined by analyzing clinical samples of patients with CRC by performing immunohistochemistry. Results: Our study is the first to report a significant positive correlation between G9a and Plk1 levels in 89 clinical samples of patients with CRC. Moreover, G9a depletion decreased Plk1 expression and suppressed CRC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo , thus confirming the significant correlation between G9a and Plk1 levels. Further, we observed that G9a-induced Plk1 regulation depended on p53 inhibition. G9a dimethylated p53 at lysine 373, which in turn increased Plk1 expression and promoted CRC cell growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that G9a-induced and p53-dependent epigenetic programing stimulates the growth of colon cancer, which also suggests that G9a inhibitors that restore p53 activity are promising therapeutic agents for treating colon cancer, especially for CRC expressing wild-type p53.

  2. TIMP-1 and CEA as biomarkers in third-line treatment with irinotecan and cetuximab for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical value of TIMP-1 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. Patients with chemotherapy-resistant mCRC referred to third-line treatment with cetuximab (initial 400 mg/m(2...

  3. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cutsem, E; Cervantes, A; Adam, R

    2016-01-01

    for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team...... based on the current available evidence to provide a series of evidence-based recommendations to assist in the treatment and management of patients with mCRC in this rapidly evolving treatment setting.......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred...

  4. MEG3 is a prognostic factor for CRC and promotes chemosensitivity by enhancing oxaliplatin-induced cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Shang, Jian; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Shi; Peng, Yanan; Zhou, Zhou; Pan, Huaqing; Wang, Xiaobing; Chen, Lipng; Zhao, Qiu

    2017-09-01

    A major reason for the failure of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment is the occurrence of chemoresistance to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Recently, studies have shown that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in drug resistance. Using HiSeq sequencing methods, we identified that lncRNAs show differential expression levels in oxaliplatin-resistant (OxR) and non-resistant CRC patients. RT-qPCR was then performed in tissues and serum samples, and lncRNA MEG3 was verified to be downregulated in non-responding patients and to have considerable discriminating potential to identify responding patients from non-responding patients. Moreover, decreased serum MEG3 expression was associated with poor chemoresponse and low survival rate in CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin treatment. Subsequently, OxR cell lines were established, and MEG3 was significantly downregulated in HT29 OxR and SW480 OxR cells. In addition, overexpression of MEG3 with pMEG3 reversed oxaliplatin resistance in both CRC cell lines. Flow cytometric apoptosis analysis indicated that MEG3 promoted CRC cell apoptosis. More importantly, MEG3 enhanced oxaliplatin‑induced cell cytotoxicity in CRC. In conclusion, our integrated approach demonstrated that decreased expression of lncRNA MEG3 in CRC confers potent poor therapeutic efficacy, and that MEG3 promotes chemosensitivity by enhancing oxaliplatin-induced cell apoptosis. Thus, overexpression of MEG3 may be a future direction by which to develop a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome oxaliplatin resistance of CRC patients.

  5. CD38+ M-MDSC expansion characterizes a subset of advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasheva, Tatiana A; Dominguez, George A; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Lin, Eric W; Chiu, Christopher; Sasser, Kate; Lee, Jae W; Beatty, Gregory L; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Rustgi, Anil K

    2018-03-22

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a population of immature immune cells with several protumorigenic functions. CD38 is a transmembrane receptor-ectoenzyme expressed by MDSCs in murine models of esophageal cancer. We hypothesized that CD38 could be expressed on MDSCs in human colorectal cancer (CRC), which might allow for a new perspective on therapeutic targeting of human MDSCs with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies in this cancer. Blood samples were collected from 41 CRC patients and 8 healthy donors, followed by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) separation. Polymorphonuclear (PMN-) and monocytic (M-) MDSCs and CD38 expression levels were quantified by flow cytometry. The immunosuppressive capacity of M-MDSCs from 10 CRC patients was validated in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. A significant expansion of CD38+ M-MDSCs and a trend of expansion of CD38+ PMN-MDSCs (accompanied by a trend of increased CD38 expression on both M- and PMN-MDSCs) were observed in PBMCs of CRC patients when compared with healthy donors. The CD38+ M-MDSCs from CRC patients were found to be immunosuppressive when compared with mature monocytes. CD38+ M- and PMN-MDSC frequencies were significantly higher in CRC patients who previously received treatment when compared with treatment-naive patients. This study provides a rationale for an attempt to target M-MDSCs with an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody in metastatic CRC patients. NCI P01-CA14305603, the American Cancer Society, Scott and Suzi Lustgarten Family Colon Cancer Research Fund, Hansen Foundation, and Janssen Research and Development.

  6. Relationship of circulating tumor cells to tumor response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Steven J.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Iannotti, Nicholas; Saidman, Bruce H.; Sabbath, Kert D.; Gabrail, Nashat Y.; Picus, Joel; Morse, Michael; Mitchell, Edith; Miller, M. Craig; Doyle, Gerald V.; Tissing, Henk; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2008-01-01

    As treatment options expand for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), a blood marker with a prognostic and predictive role could guide treatment. We tested the hypothesis that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could predict clinical outcome in patients with mCRC. In a prospective multicenter study, CTCs

  7. Colorectal cancer outcomes and treatment patterns in patients too young for average-risk screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Wong, Sandra L; Regenbogen, Scott E; Jomaa, Diana M; Hardiman, Karin M; Hendren, Samantha

    2016-03-15

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines recommend initiating screening at age 50 years, the percentage of cancer cases in younger patients is increasing. To the authors' knowledge, the national treatment patterns and outcomes of these patients are largely unknown. The current study was a population-based, retrospective cohort study of the nationally representative Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry for patients diagnosed with CRC from 1998 through 2011. Patients were categorized as being younger or older than the recommended screening age. Differences with regard to stage of disease at diagnosis, patterns of therapy, and disease-specific survival were compared between age groups using multinomial regression, multiple regression, Cox proportional hazards regression, and Weibull survival analysis. Of 258,024 patients with CRC, 37,847 (15%) were aged Cancer Society.

  8. The prognostic values of EGFR expression and KRAS mutation in patients with synchronous or metachronous metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Chen, Yi-Ting; Huang, Chun-Ming; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK pathway is an important pathway in the carcinogenesis, invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancers (CRCs). We conducted a retrospective study to determine the prognostic values of EGFR expression and KRAS mutation in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) based on synchronous or metachronous status. From October 2002 to March 2012, 205 patients with mCRC were retrospectively analyzed; 98 were found to have metachronous mCRC while 107 were found to have synchronous mCRC. The EGFR expressions were determinate by IHC (immunohistochemistry) analysis and categorized 1+ (weak intensity), 2+ (moderate intensity), and 3+ (strong intensity). Genomic DNA was isolated from frozen primary CRC tissues and direct sequencing of KRAS was performed. The clinicopathological features of these mCRC patients were retrospectively investigated according to EGFR expression and KRAS mutation status. Moreover, we analyzed the prognostic values of EGFR expression and KRAS mutation among these patients. Of the 205 patients with mCRC, EGFR expression was analyzed in 167 patients, and positive EGFR expression was noted in 140 of those patients (83.8%). KRAS mutation was investigated in 205 patients and mutations were noted in 88 of those patients (42.9%). In patients with metachronous mCRC, positive EGFR expression was significantly correlated with well-and moderately-differentiated tumors (P = 0.028), poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001), and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive EGFR expression was a significant independent prognostic factor of DFS (P = 0.006, HR: 4.012, 95% CI: 1.130–8.445) and OS (P = 0.028, HR: 3.090, 95% CI: 1.477–10.900) in metachronous mCRC patients. KRAS mutation status was not significantly related to DFS and OS of patients with metachronous mCRC; likewise, KRAS mutation status was not significantly different in the progression-free survival (PFS) and OS of patients with

  9. The identification of Lynch syndrome in Congolese colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poaty, Henriette; Aba Gandzion, Chandra; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Gassaye, Déby; Peko, Jean Félix; Nkoua Bon, Jean Bernard; Gombé Mbalawa, Charles

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence of Lynch syndrome as one of hereditary causes of colorectal cancer (CRC) among young Congolese individuals affected by the CRC, and to define methods for diagnosis in Congo Brazzaville. We conducted a transversal cohort study of 34 patients having a CRC with a family history for a period of eight years. They were selected among 89 CRCs of any type from the Bethesda guidelines criteria combined with pedigrees. Mismatch repair (MMR) genes alterations were researched by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We identified with the Bethesda criteria a total of 38.2% (34/89) patients having familial CRC with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%=[0.34-0.41]. Only 14.7% (5/34) 95% CI=[0.34-2.32] patients showed MMR immunodeficiency involving firstly MLH1 protein then MSH2 protein. These data account for 5.6% (5/89) 95% CI=[0.15-0.33] of patients affected by Lynch syndrome with an earlier median age of 35 years (range 20 to 47 years). The prevalence of Lynch syndrome found in Brazzaville is comparable to that is found in northern countries. The combined Bethesda guidelines, pedigree and IHC is an accessible and good alternative method for the positive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in current practice in Congo. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Metabolomic NMR fingerprinting to identify and predict survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertini, Ivano; Cacciatore, Stefano; Jensen, Benny V

    2012-01-01

    Earlier detection of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) might improve their treatment and survival outcomes. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) to profile the serum metabolome in patients with mCRC and determine whether a disease signature may exist...... survival (HR, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-5.50; P = 1.33 × 10(-6)). A number of metabolites concurred with the (1)H-NMR fingerprint of mCRC, offering insights into mCRC metabolic pathways. Our findings establish that (1)H-NMR profiling of patient serum can provide a strong metabolomic signature of m...

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of primary healthcare patients regarding population-based screening for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrent Maties

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the extent of knowledge of primary health care (PHC patients about colorectal cancer (CRC, their attitudes toward population-based screening for this disease and gender differences in these respects. Methods A questionnaire-based survey of PHC patients in the Balearic Islands and some districts of the metropolitan area of Barcelona was conducted. Individuals between 50 and 69 years of age with no history of CRC were interviewed at their PHC centers. Results We analyzed the results of 625 questionnaires, 58% of which were completed by women. Most patients believed that cancer diagnosis before symptom onset improved the chance of survival. More women than men knew the main symptoms of CRC. A total of 88.8% of patients reported that they would perform the fecal occult blood test (FOBT for CRC screening if so requested by PHC doctors or nurses. If the FOBT was positive and a colonoscopy was offered, 84.9% of participants indicated that they would undergo the procedure, and no significant difference by gender was apparent. Fear of having cancer was the main reason for performance of an FOBT, and also for not performing the FOBT, especially in women. Fear of pain was the main reason for not wishing to undergo colonoscopy. Factors associated with reluctance to perform the FOBT were: (i the idea that that many forms of cancer can be prevented by exercise and, (ii a reluctance to undergo colonoscopy if an FOBT was positive. Factors associated with reluctance to undergo colonoscopy were: (i residence in Barcelona, (ii ignorance of the fact that early diagnosis of CRC is associated with better prognosis, (iii no previous history of colonoscopy, and (iv no intention to perform the FOBT for CRC screening. Conclusion We identified gaps in knowledge about CRC and prevention thereof in PHC patients from the Balearic Islands and the Barcelona region of Spain. If fears about CRC screening, and CRC per se

  12. Knowledge and attitudes of primary healthcare patients regarding population-based screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria; Llagostera, Maria; Esteva, Magdalena; Cabeza, Elena; Cantero, Xavier; Segarra, Manel; Martín-Rabadán, Maria; Artigues, Guillem; Torrent, Maties; Taltavull, Joana Maria; Vanrell, Joana Maria; Marzo, Mercè; Llobera, Joan

    2011-09-25

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the extent of knowledge of primary health care (PHC) patients about colorectal cancer (CRC), their attitudes toward population-based screening for this disease and gender differences in these respects. METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey of PHC patients in the Balearic Islands and some districts of the metropolitan area of Barcelona was conducted. Individuals between 50 and 69 years of age with no history of CRC were interviewed at their PHC centers. RESULTS: We analyzed the results of 625 questionnaires, 58% of which were completed by women. Most patients believed that cancer diagnosis before symptom onset improved the chance of survival. More women than men knew the main symptoms of CRC. A total of 88.8% of patients reported that they would perform the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for CRC screening if so requested by PHC doctors or nurses. If the FOBT was positive and a colonoscopy was offered, 84.9% of participants indicated that they would undergo the procedure, and no significant difference by gender was apparent. Fear of having cancer was the main reason for performance of an FOBT, and also for not performing the FOBT, especially in women. Fear of pain was the main reason for not wishing to undergo colonoscopy. Factors associated with reluctance to perform the FOBT were: (i) the idea that that many forms of cancer can be prevented by exercise and, (ii) a reluctance to undergo colonoscopy if an FOBT was positive. Factors associated with reluctance to undergo colonoscopy were: (i) residence in Barcelona, (ii) ignorance of the fact that early diagnosis of CRC is associated with better prognosis, (iii) no previous history of colonoscopy, and (iv) no intention to perform the FOBT for CRC screening. CONCLUSION: We identified gaps in knowledge about CRC and prevention thereof in PHC patients from the Balearic Islands and the Barcelona region of Spain. If fears about CRC screening, and CRC per se, are

  13. Factors that influence treatment delay in patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcos-Pedrinaci, Irene; Fernández-López, Alberto; Téllez, Teresa; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Rueda A, Antonio; Suarez-Varela, María Manuela Morales; Briones, Eduardo; Baré, Marisa; Escobar, Antonio; Sarasqueta, Cristina; de Larrea, Nerea Fernández; Aguirre, Urko; Quintana, José María; Redondo, Maximino

    2017-01-01

    A prospective study was performed of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC), distinguishing between colonic and rectal location, to determine the factors that may provoke a delay in the first treatment (DFT) provided. 2749 patients diagnosed with CRC were studied. The study population was recruited between June 2010 and December 2012. DFT is defined as time elapsed between diagnosis and first treatment exceeding 30 days. Excessive treatment delay was recorded in 65.5% of the cases, and was more prevalent among rectal cancer patients. Independent predictor variables of DFT in colon cancer patients were a low level of education, small tumour, ex-smoker, asymptomatic at diagnosis and following the application of screening. Among rectal cancer patients, the corresponding factors were primary school education and being asymptomatic. We conclude that treatment delay in CRC patients is affected not only by clinicopathological factors, but also by sociocultural ones. Greater attention should be paid by the healthcare provider to social groups with less formal education, in order to optimise treatment attention. PMID:27888636

  14. Does delay in diagnosing colorectal cancer in symptomatic patients affect tumor stage and survival? A population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Otto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing colorectal cancer (CRC at an early stage improves survival. To what extent any delay affects outcome once patients are symptomatic is still unclear. Our objectives were to evaluate the association between diagnostic delay and survival in symptomatic patients with early stage CRC and late stage CRC. Methods Prospective population-based observational study evaluating daily clinical practice in Northern Holland. Diagnostic delay was determined through questionnaire-interviews. Dukes' stage was classified into two groups: early stage (Dukes A or B and late stage (Dukes C or D cancer. Patients were followed up for 3.5 years after diagnosis. Results In total, 272 patients were available for analysis. Early stage CRC was present in 136 patients while 136 patients had late stage CRC. The mean total diagnostic delay (SE was 31 (1.5 weeks in all CRC patients. No significant difference was observed in the mean total diagnostic delay in early versus late stage CRC (p = 0.27. In early stage CRC, no difference in survival was observed between patients with total diagnostic delay shorter and longer than the median (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank p = 0.93. In late stage CRC, patients with a diagnostic delay shorter than the median had a shorter survival than patients with a diagnostic delay longer than the median (log-rank p = 0.01. In the multivariate Cox regression model with survival as dependent variable and median delay, age, open access endoscopy, number and type of symptoms as independent variables, the odd's ratio for survival in patients with long delay (>median versus short delay (≤median was 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.1 to 3.0; p = 0.01. Tumor-site was not associated with patient survival. When separating late stage CRC in Dukes C and Dukes D tumors, a shorter delay was associated with a shorter survival in Dukes D tumors only and not in Dukes C tumors. Conclusion In symptomatic CRC patients, a longer diagnostic and

  15. Patients with computed tomography-proven acute diverticulitis require follow-up to exclude colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Zaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Traditionally, patients with acute diverticulitis undergo follow-up endoscopy to exclude colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its usefulness has been debated in this era of high-resolution computed tomography (CT diagnosis. We assessed the frequency and outcome of endoscopic follow-up for patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, according to the confidence in the CT diagnosis.Methods: Records of patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis between October 2007 and March 2014 at Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust were retrieved. The National Cancer Registry confirmed the cases of CRC. Endoscopy quality indicators were compared between these patients and other patients undergoing the same endoscopic examination over the same period.Results: We identified 235 patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, of which, 187 were managed conservatively. The CT report was confident of the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in 75% cases. Five of the 235 patients were subsequently diagnosed with CRC (2.1%. Three cases of CRC were detected in the 187 patients managed conservatively (1.6%. Forty-eight percent of the conservatively managed patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; one case of CRC was identified. Endoscopies were often incomplete and caused more discomfort for patients with diverticulitis compared with controls.Conclusions: CRC was diagnosed in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis at a higher rate than in screened asymptomatic populations, necessitating follow-up. CT reports contained statements regarding diagnostic uncertainty in 25% cases, associated with an increased risk of CRC. Follow-up endoscopy in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis is associated with increased discomfort and high rates of incompletion. The use of other follow-up modalities should be considered.

  16. New trend in colorectal cancer in Germany: are young patients at increased risk for advanced colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Peter C; Jansen, Stefan; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2017-08-23

    The role of colonoscopy in the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been unequivocally established. In Germany, screening colonoscopy with full insurance reimbursement is available for individuals aged 55 and above, and/or for persons with well-known risk factors for CRC. However, advanced CRC is not uncommon in individuals below 55 years. This study was designed to investigate the incidence of advanced CRC in patients < 55 years. A retrospective analysis of data from a prospectively maintained CRC database of a university hospital in Germany was performed. Using the recommended age for screening colonoscopy as cutoff, the study population was divided into two groups: < 55 years (study group) and ≥ 55 years (control group). Both groups were compared with regard to the extent of CRC using the UICC stages. Only surgically managed patients were included for analysis. Advanced CRC was defined as UICC stage III or IV. Complete follow-up data was available for 609 patients treated between 2009 and 2013. The study group included 83 patients, 42 females and 41 males with a median age of 48.0 ± 10 years, while the control group was made up of 526 patients, 230 females and 296 males with a median age of 75.5 ± 8.3 years. Both groups were comparable with regard to gender distribution, p = 0.24. Significantly more patients from the study group were diagnosed with advanced CRC in comparison to the control group, 56.6 vs. 43.9%, p = 0.03. There was no statistically significant difference amongst both groups with respect to cancer-related mortality, 10.8 vs. 12.5%, p = 0.66. Patients below the recommended age for screening colonoscopy might be at increased risk for advanced CRC. There is need to decrease the recommended age for screening colonoscopy to prevent CRC or enable an early diagnosis in patients below 55 years.

  17. Prognostic and survival analysis of 837 Chinese colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Li, Mo-Dan; Hu, Han-Guang; Dong, Cai-Xia; Chen, Jia-Qi; Li, Xiao-Fen; Li, Jing-Jing; Shen, Hong

    2013-05-07

    To develop a prognostic model to predict survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Survival data of 837 CRC patients undergoing surgery between 1996 and 2006 were collected and analyzed by univariate analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression model to reveal the prognostic factors for CRC. All data were recorded using a standard data form and analyzed using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, United States). Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log rank test was used to assess differences in survival. Univariate hazard ratios and significant and independent predictors of disease-specific survival and were identified by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The stepwise procedure was set to a threshold of 0.05. Statistical significance was defined as P analysis suggested age, preoperative obstruction, serum carcinoembryonic antigen level at diagnosis, status of resection, tumor size, histological grade, pathological type, lymphovascular invasion, invasion of adjacent organs, and tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging were positive prognostic factors (P analysis showed a significant statistical difference in 3-year survival among these groups: LNR1, 73%; LNR2, 55%; and LNR3, 42% (P analysis results showed that histological grade, depth of bowel wall invasion, and number of metastatic lymph nodes were the most important prognostic factors for CRC if we did not consider the interaction of the TNM staging system (P < 0.05). When the TNM staging was taken into account, histological grade lost its statistical significance, while the specific TNM staging system showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001). The overall survival of CRC patients has improved between 1996 and 2006. LNR is a powerful factor for estimating the survival of stage III CRC patients.

  18. High-resolution bacterial 16S rRNA gene profile meta-analysis and biofilm status reveal common colorectal cancer consortia

    OpenAIRE

    Drewes, Julia L.; White, James R.; Dejea, Christine M.; Fathi, Payam; Iyadorai, Thevambiga; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Roslani, April C.; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Loke, Mun Fai; Thulasi, Kumar; Gan, Han Ming; Goh, Khean Lee; Chong, Hoong Yin; Kumar, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer worldwide, with a growing incidence among young adults. Multiple studies have presented associations between the gut microbiome and CRC, suggesting a link with cancer risk. Although CRC microbiome studies continue to profile larger patient cohorts with increasingly economical and rapid DNA sequencing platforms, few common associations with CRC have been identified, in part due to limitations in taxonomic resolution and differences i...

  19. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...

  20. The longitudinal impact of patient navigation on equity in colorectal cancer screening in a large primary care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percac-Lima, Sanja; López, Lenny; Ashburner, Jeffrey M; Green, Alexander R; Atlas, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The long-term effects of interventions to improve colorectal (CRC) screening in vulnerable populations are uncertain. The authors evaluated the impact of patient navigation (PN) on the equity of CRC prevention over a 5-year period. A culturally tailored CRC screening PN program was implemented in 1 community health center (CHC) in 2007. In a primary care network, CRC screening rates from 2006 to 2010 among eligible patients from the CHC with PN were compared with the rates from other practices without PN. Multivariable logistic regression models for repeated measures were used to assess differences over time. Differences in CRC screening rates diminished among patients at the CHC with PN and at other practices between 2006 (49.2% vs 62.5%, respectively; P practices (5% vs 3.4% per year; P practices, lower CRC screening rates in 2006 (47.5% vs 52.1%, respectively; P = .02) were higher by 2010 (73.5% vs 67.3%, respectively; P practices in 2006 (44.3% vs 44.7%, respectively; P = .79) were higher at the CHC by 2010 (70.6% vs 58.6%, respectively; P practices (both P < .001). A PN program increased CRC screening rates in a CHC and improved equity in vulnerable patients. Long-term funding of PN programs has the potential to reduce cancer screening disparities. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  1. Evaluation of a patient navigation program to promote colorectal cancer screening in rural Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Sally; Green, Rhonda; Ballard, Denise; Hermstad, April; Brueder, Alex; Haardörfer, Regine; Yam, Jennifer; Arriola, Kimberly J

    2013-08-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Early detection through recommended screening has been shown to have favorable treatment outcomes, yet screening rates among the medically underserved and uninsured are low, particularly for rural and minority populations. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a patient navigation program that addresses individual and systemic barriers to CRC screening for patients at rural, federally qualified community health centers. This quasi-experimental evaluation compared low-income patients at average risk for CRC (n = 809) from 4 intervention clinics and 9 comparison clinics. We abstracted medical chart data on patient demographics, CRC history and risk factors, and CRC screening referrals and examinations. Outcomes of interest were colonoscopy referral and examination during the study period and being compliant with recommended screening guidelines at the end of the study period. We conducted multilevel logistic analyses to evaluate the program's effectiveness. Patients at intervention clinics were significantly more likely than patients at comparison clinics to undergo colonoscopy screening (35% versus 7%, odds ratio = 7.9, P screening test (43% versus 11%, odds ratio = 5.9, P Screening Program, can be an effective approach to ensure that lifesaving, preventive health screenings are provided to low-income adults in a rural setting. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. Predictive biomarkers with potential of converting conventional chemotherapy to targeted therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Smith, David Hersi; Nygård, Sune Boris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The availability of systemic chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is based on the results from large prospective, randomized studies. The main chemotherapeutic drugs used in treatment of mCRC are the fluoropyrimidines (5-fluorouracil......, a number of preclinical and clinical studies have indicated lack of full cross resistance between oxaliplatin based and irinotecan based treatment. Therefore, it is possible that certain mCRC patient subpopulations would benefit more from one drug combination rather than the other. To address this clinical...

  3. Lung, Breast, and Prostate Cancer Patients with Unknown Ethnicity in US Department of Defense Cancer Registry Data: Comparisons to Patients with Known Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Kamamia, Christine; Shao, Stephanie; Brown, Derek; Rockswold, Paul D; Butts, Elizabeth; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death for both men and women in the United States. Several factors can increase one’s risk of CRC, including a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of a hereditary colon cancer syndrome, or a diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The purpose of this project was to create a colorectal cancer registry (Co-Care) for individuals with a personal or family history of CRC, and those with disorders of the colon or rectum that are associated with an increased risk for developing CRC. METHODS: To be eligible for the registry, patients either had a personal or family history of CRC, a diagnosis or family history of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or a diagnosis of Crohn’s colitis or ulcerative colitis with dysplasia. Participants were recruited after seeing their gastroenterologist or genetic counselor, or after undergoing a full or partial colectomy at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Eligible patients who agreed to participate were interviewed by a member of the research staff and asked a wide range of questions pertaining to CRC risk. RESULTS: A total of 224 patients were enrolled in the registry. Participants are mostly white, born in the United States, and married, with a bachelor’s or graduate degree, reporting an annual household income of $100,000 or more. The largest portion have a family history of CRC (27.2%), and almost half of participants are of Jewish descent (46.2%) and have undergone full or partial colectomy (48.2%). More than half of participants have neither received genetic counseling (54.5%) nor undergone genetic testing (59.7%). Only 3.6% report that they currently smoke cigarettes, and 41.1% consume alcohol at least once per week. Lastly, 18.3%, 10.3%, and 27.7% of participants report that they currently take aspirin, folic acid/folate pills or tablets, or calcium pills/tablets, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This

  4. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  5. Patient-provider language concordance and colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Amy; McIntosh, Nathalie; Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis E

    2011-02-01

    Patient-provider language barriers may play a role in health-care disparities, including obtaining colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Professional interpreters and language-concordant providers may mitigate these disparities. DESIGN, SUBJECTS, AND MAIN MEASURES: We performed a retrospective cohort study of individuals age 50 years and older who were categorized as English-Concordant (spoke English at home, n = 21,594); Other Language-Concordant (did not speak English at home but someone at their provider's office spoke their language, n = 1,463); or Other Language-Discordant (did not speak English at home and no one at their provider's spoke their language, n = 240). Multivariate logistic regression assessed the association of language concordance with colorectal cancer screening. Compared to English speakers, non-English speakers had lower use of colorectal cancer screening (30.7% vs 50.8%; OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51-0.76). Compared to the English-Concordant group, the Language-Discordant group had similar screening (adjusted OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.58-1.21), while the Language-Concordant group had lower screening (adjusted OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.46-0.71). Rates of CRC screening are lower in individuals who do not speak English at home compared to those who do. However, the Language-Discordant cohort had similar rates to those with English concordance, while the Language-Concordant cohort had lower rates of CRC screening. This may be due to unmeasured differences among the cohorts in patient, provider, and health care system characteristics. These results suggest that providers should especially promote the importance of CRC screening to non-English speaking patients, but that language barriers do not fully account for CRC screening rate disparities in these populations.

  6. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Sanoff, Hanna K.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Baron, John A.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age < 50) populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics...

  7. Epidemiological, clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer in patients treated at the Clinical Center of Tuzla University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Čičkušić

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate hospital morbidity and incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in the Tuzla Canton between 2000 and 2004, as well as mortality incidence and degree of disease progression. Methods A total of 383 patients were enrolled in this study, all of them with CRC. Pathohistological analyses were performed in all patients after colonoscopy. Afterwards, the patients underwent surgery and obtained material was also pathohistologically analyzed in order to perform the Astler-Coller classification and the classification of the location of CRC. Results In the period 2000-2004 in the Tuzla Canton there were 383 newly diagnosed patients with CRC. The average age of the patients was 62±12 years, and the incidence was equally distributed per genders. Rectal tumour was noted in 145 (37.9% patients, and in 238 (62.1% tumor was found elsewhere in the colon. Average incidence of the CRC was 15.73/100,000, with a dramaticincrease in incidence in 2003 of 27.40/100,000. The average mortality incidence during the study was 6.89/100,000, and the largest number of the patients (339, 88.6% was in an advanced stage of the disease. Conclusion There has been a significant increase in the number of newly detected cases of CRC in the Tuzla Canton during 2000- 2004, which implies the need for initiating a National Early CRC Detection Programme.

  8. RGC32 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition by activating the Smad/Sip1 signaling pathway in CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Sheng-Nan; Zhu, Hui-Fang; Hu, Zhi-Yan; Zhong, Yan; Gu, Chuan-Sha; Chen, Shi-You; Liu, Teng-Fei; Li, Zu-Guo

    2017-05-04

    Response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in cell growth, viability and tissue-specific differentiation. However, the role of RGC32 in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been fully elucidated. Here, we showed that the expression of RGC32 was significantly up-regulated in human CRC tissues versus adjacent normal tissues. RGC32 expression was significantly correlated with invasive and aggressive characteristics of tumor cells, as well as poor survival of CRC patients. We also demonstrated that RGC32 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and tumorigenic growth of human CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Functionally, RGC32 facilitated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CRC via the Smad/Sip1 signaling pathway, as shown by decreasing E-cadherin expression and increasing vimentin expression. In conclusion, our findings suggested that overexpression of RGC32 facilitates EMT of CRC cells by activating Smad/Sip1 signaling.

  9. Agreement between hospital discharge diagnosis codes and medical records to identify metastatic colorectal cancer and associated comorbidities in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouverneur, A; Dolatkhani, D; Rouyer, M; Grelaud, A; Francis, F; Gilleron, V; Fourrier-Réglat, A; Noize, P

    2017-08-01

    Quality of coding to identify cancers and comorbidities through the French hospital diagnosis database (Programme de médicalisation des systèmes d'information, PMSI) has been little investigated. Agreement between medical records and PMSI database was evaluated regarding metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and comorbidities. From 01/01/2013 to 06/30/2014, 74 patients aged≥65years at mCRC diagnosis were identified in Bordeaux teaching hospital. Data on mCRC and comorbidities were collected from medical records. All diagnosis codes (main, related and associated) registered into the PMSI were extracted. Agreement between sources was evaluated using the percent agreement for mCRC and the kappa (κ) statistic for comorbidities. Agreement for primary CRC and mCRC was higher using all types of diagnosis codes instead of the main one exclusively (respectively 95% vs. 53% for primary CRC and 91% vs. 24% for mCRC). Agreement was substantial (κ 0.65) for cardiovascular diseases, notably atrial fibrillation (κ 0.77) and hypertension (κ 0.68). It was moderate for psychiatric disorders (κ 0.49) and respiratory diseases (κ 0.48), although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had a good agreement (κ 0.75). Within the class of endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (κ 0.55), agreement was substantial for diabetes (κ 0.91), obesity (κ 0.82) and hypothyroidism (κ 0.72) and moderate for hypercholesterolemia (κ 0.51) and malnutrition (κ 0.42). These results are reassuring with regard to detection through PMSI of mCRC if all types of diagnosis codes are considered and useful to better choose comorbidities in elderly mCRC patients that could be well identified through hospital diagnosis codes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of capecitabine in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feng Wang,* Feng-Hua Wang,* Long Bai, Rui-Hua XuDepartment of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of capecitabine in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in 2004. This paper reviews the available information of capecitabine in Chinese patients with mCRC, focusing on its effectiveness and safety against mCRC. Identification of all eligible studies was made by searching the PubMed and Wanfang database from 2000 to 2013. Published data examining various aspects of clinical response and tolerability with capecitabine alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic or biological agents for first- and second-line mCRC were examined. Capecitabine and its combination displayed high efficacy in Chinese patients with mCRC. Toxicities are generally manageable, and elderly patients can tolerate capecitabine well.Keywords: capecitabine, metastatic colorectal cancer, Chinese

  11. Challenging a dogma: five-year survival does not equal cure in all colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2018-02-01

    The current study tried to evaluate the factors affecting 10- to 20- years' survival among long term survivors (>5 years) of colorectal cancer (CRC). Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database (1988-2008) was queried through SEER*Stat program.Univariate probability of overall and cancer-specific survival was determined and the difference between groups was examined. Multivariate analysis for factors affecting overall and cancer-specific survival was also conducted. Among node positive patients (Dukes C), 34% of the deaths beyond 5 years can be attributed to CRC; while among M1 patients, 63% of the deaths beyond 5 years can be attributed to CRC. The following factors were predictors of better overall survival in multivariate analysis: younger age, white race (versus black race), female gender, Right colon location (versus rectal location), earlier stage and surgery (P <0.0001 for all parameters). Similarly, the following factors were predictors of better cancer-specific survival in multivariate analysis: younger age, white race (versus black race), female gender, Right colon location (versus left colon and rectal locations), earlier stage and surgery (P <0.0001 for all parameters). Among node positive long-term CRC survivors, more than one third of all deaths can be attributed to CRC.

  12. NR2F2 inhibits Smad7 expression and promotes TGF-β-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CRC via transactivation of miR-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Nie, Lei; Wu, Lei; Liu, Qiufang; Guo, Xueyan

    2017-03-25

    Metastasis is one of the most decisive factors influencing CRC patient prognosis and current studies suggest that a molecular mechanism known as EMT broadly regulates cancer metastasis. NR2F2 is a key molecule in the development of CRC, but the roles and underlying mechanisms of NR2F2 in TGF-β induced EMT in CRC remain largely unknown. In the current study, we were interested to examine the role of NR2F2 in the TGF-β-induced EMT in CRC. Here, we found NR2F2 was upregulated in CRC cells and promotes TGF-β-induced EMT in CRC. Using comparative miRNA profiling TGF-β pre-treated CRC cells in which NR2F2 had been knocked down with that of control cells, we identified miR-21 as a commonly downregulated miRNA in HT29 cells treated with TGF-β and NR2F2 siRNA, and its downregulation inhibiting migration and invasion of CRC cells. Moreover, we found NR2F2 could transcriptional activated miR-21 expression by binding to miR-21 promoter in HT29 by ChIP and luciferase assay. In the last, our data demonstrated that Smad7 was the direct target of miR-21 in CRC cells. Thus, NR2F2 could promote TGF-β-induced EMT and inhibit Smad7 expression via transactivation of miR-21, and NR2F2 may be a new common therapeutic target for CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Colorectal cancer patients' preferences for type of caregiver during survivorship care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieldraaijer, T.; Duineveld, L. A. M.; Donkervoort, S. C.; Busschers, W. B.; van Weert, H. C. P. M.; Wind, J.

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors are currently included in a secondary care-led survivorship care programme. Efforts are underway to transfer this survivorship care to primary care, but met with some reluctance by patients and caregivers. This study assesses (1) what caregiver patients prefer to

  14. Aberrant gene methylation in non-neoplastic mucosa as a predictive marker of ulcerative colitis-associated CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Marco; Scarpa, Melania; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Erroi, Francesca; Kotsafti, Andromachi; Basato, Silvia; Brun, Paola; D'Incà, Renata; Rugge, Massimo; Angriman, Imerio; Castoro, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND PROMOTER: hypermethylation plays a major role in cancer through transcriptional silencing of critical genes. The aim of our study is to evaluate the methylation status of these genes in the colonic mucosa without dysplasia or adenocarcinoma at the different steps of sporadic and UC-related carcinogenesis and to investigate the possible role of genomic methylation as a marker of CRC. The expression of Dnmts 1 and 3A was significantly increased in UC-related carcinogenesis compared to non inflammatory colorectal carcinogenesis. In non-neoplastic colonic mucosa, the number of methylated genes resulted significantly higher in patients with CRC and in those with UC-related CRC compared to the HC and UC patients and patients with dysplastic lesion of the colon. The number of methylated genes in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa predicted the presence of CRC with good accuracy either in non inflammatory and inflammatory related CRC. Colonic mucosal samples were collected from healthy subjects (HC) (n = 30) and from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 29), UC and dysplasia (n = 14), UC and cancer (n = 10), dysplastic adenoma (n = 14), and colon adenocarcinoma (n = 10). DNA methyltransferases-1, -3a, -3b, mRNA expression were quantified by real time qRT-PCR. The methylation status of CDH13, APC, MLH1, MGMT1 and RUNX3 gene promoters was assessed by methylation-specific PCR. Methylation status of APC, CDH13, MGMT, MLH1 and RUNX3 in the non-neoplastic mucosa may be used as a marker of CRC: these preliminary results could allow for the adjustment of a patient's surveillance interval and to select UC patients who should undergo intensive surveillance.

  15. Microbiota Composition, HSP70 and Caspase-3 Expression as Marker for Colorectal Cancer Patients in Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the relationship between microbiota composition with HSP70 and Caspase-3 expressions in colon tissue as an initial study to develop the candidate for early detection of colorectal cancer for Indonesian patients. Methods: this is a cross-sectional study on 32 patients undergoing colonoscopy; 16 patients of colorectal cancer (CRC while the other 16 patients are not (colitis and internal hemorrhoid. The composition of microbiota in stool samples was examined using 16S rRNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DDGE while expression of HSP70 was examined by immunohistochemistry and Caspase-3 by using Haematoxylin-Eosin(HE staining to determine the morphological changes in colon tissue. Results: analysis of PCR-DDGE shows a different composition of microbiota between patients with CRC and non-CRC. All CRC patients showed disappearance of dominant band from Bifidobacterium groups. Histological observation based on Inter Class Correlation (ICC test from all slide showed a high scores (5.2-9.2 in CRC patients and low scores (1.7-2.4 in non-CRC patients. HSP70 expression was increased significantly in CRC patients with the highest percentage of 84%, while expression of caspase-3 decreased with the highest percentage of 21%. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of colorectal cancer was associated with the expression of HSP 70 (p<0.001, and Caspase 3 (p<0.001. Conclusion: bifidobacterium is an important indicator for colorectal cancer patients that show disappearance of dominant band, while expression of HSP70 increased and the Caspase-3 expression decreased significantly.

  16. Implications of ABCG2 Expression on Irinotecan Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Bruenner, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the main chemotherapeutic drugs used on a routine basis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer ((m)CRC) is the topoisomerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. However, its usefulness is limited by the pre-existing or inevitable development of resistance. The ATP-binding cassette...... to irinotecan treatment in CRC patients. Results: Few studies have evaluated the association between ABCG2 gene or protein expression and prognosis in CRC patients. Discordant results were reported. The discrepancies might be explained by the use of different criteria for interpretation of results...... (ABC) transporter ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BRCP) through its function in xenobiotic clearance might play an important role in irinotecan resistance. With a goal to evaluate the clinical significance of ABCG2 measurements, we here review the current literature on ABCG2 in relation...

  17. Human papillomavirus infection correlates with inflammatory Stat3 signaling activity and IL-17 level in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xin Li

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major burden of public health and healthcare worldwide. Microbiota has been suggested in promoting chronic inflammation in the intestine which, in turn, promotes tumor development. This study focuses on possible correlations of human papillomavirus (HPV infection with proinflammatory Stat3 signaling activities and the resulting levels of its downstream proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 in CRC patients.HPV was examined using HPV Genotyping Chip technology and constitutively active Stat3 (p-Stat3 and IL-17 levels were tested using immunohistochemistry (IHC in paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent normal tissues (ANT from a cohort of 95 CRC patients. Correlation analyses were performed between HPV infection and clinicopathological characteristics, Stat3 activities and IL-17 levels among these CRC patients.Three major findings were observed: (1 HPV infection existed in a high rate of CRC cases (48.4%, 46/95, of which 45 cases (45/46, 97.8% were high-risk HPV16-positive and only one case was HPV53-positive. (2 HPV infection correlated with poorer clinical stages (III+IV of CRC. (3 HPV infection strongly correlated with both constitutively higher Stat3 activities (P<0.01 and higher IL-17 levels (P<0.01 only in CRC tissues but not in ANT tissues.HPV infection is common in CRC patients suggesting potentially preventive effectiveness of HPV vaccination among high-risk young individuals. We have for the first time revealed a tri-lateral relationship among HPV infection, constitutive Stat3 activity and IL-17 level, whose collaborative act may orchestrate a proinflammatory microenvironment in the colorectum that, in turn, may promote carcinogenesis and possibly facilitate progression of CRC.

  18. Tape Storage and CRC Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 Petabytes of data is stored on several kind of physical support, namely disks and tapes. Data on any physical support or traveling on a data link (network, fibre channel...) can be subject to silent data corruption. A possible improvement is introducing end-to-end data integrity from the filesystem down to the tape layer. For the tape back-end it can be done by using Logical Block Protection, which computes and compares CRC checksum of every single block of data. During my work, I improved on-the-fly CRC calculation for the tape storage system, which was achieved by introducing a multithreaded implementation - a technique applicable to arbitrary CRC algorithm. Finally, I per...

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 2 in the diagnosis of colorectal adenoma and cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Groblewska

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the importance of the measurement of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2 in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC in relation to clinicopathologicalfeatures of tumor and patients' survival. Additionally, we determined serum MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in colorectaladenoma (CA patients and healthy controls and compared them with tumor markers, CEA and CA 19-9. The serum levelsof MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in 91 CRC patients, 28 CA subjects and 91 healthy controls were determined by ELISA method, butconcentrations of CEA and CA 19-9 using MEIA method. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used. Serum levels ofMMP-2 and TIMP-2 were significantly lower in CRC patients than in healthy subjects and decreased with tumor stage.Additionally, MMP-2 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with CRC than in CA group. Diagnostic sensitivityof TIMP-2 (59% was the highest among biomarkers tested and increased in combined use with CEA (79%. Moreover,the area under ROC curve (AUC of TIMP-2 was larger than AUC of MMP-2 in differentiation between CRC and healthysubjects, but lower than AUC of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in differentiation between colorectal cancer and adenoma. Ourfindings suggest clinical usefulness of TIMP-2 as a biomarker in the diagnosis of CRC, especially in combination with CEA.However, further investigation is necessary.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 2 in the diagnosis of colorectal adenoma and cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mroczko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the importance of the measurement of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2 in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC in relation to clinicopathological features of tumor and patients' survival. Additionally, we determined serum MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in colorectal adenoma (CA patients and healthy controls and compared them with tumor markers, CEA and CA 19-9. The serum levels of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in 91 CRC patients, 28 CA subjects and 91 healthy controls were determined by ELISA method, but concentrations of CEA and CA 19-9 using MEIA method. Nonparametric statistical analyses were used. Serum levels of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were significantly lower in CRC patients than in healthy subjects and decreased with tumor stage. Additionally, MMP-2 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with CRC than in CA group. Diagnostic sensitivity of TIMP-2 (59% was the highest among biomarkers tested and increased in combined use with CEA (79%. Moreover, the area under ROC curve (AUC of TIMP-2 was larger than AUC of MMP-2 in differentiation between CRC and healthy subjects, but lower than AUC of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in differentiation between colorectal cancer and adenoma. Our findings suggest clinical usefulness of TIMP-2 as a biomarker in the diagnosis of CRC, especially in combination with CEA. However, further investigation is necessary.

  1. BMI status and intake of red meat, dietary fiber and alcohol in colorectal cancer patients prior to diagnosis : -an interim analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sebelien, Mari Bøe

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) can be modified by diet- and lifestyle related factors such as intake of red meat, dietary fiber and alcohol, as well as obesity. These risk factors may also increase the risk of recurrence, secondary cancers and comorbidity. The prevalence of obesity and the habitual diet of CRC patients directly prior to diagnosis is, however, not well characterized. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to characterize BMI and dietary intake of...

  2. The influence of marital status on stage at diagnosis and survival of patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingguo; Gan, Lu; Liang, Lei; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-03-30

    Marital status was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in various cancer types, but it hasn't been fully studied in colorectal cancer (CRC). The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database was used to compare survival outcomes with marital status in each stage. In total, 112, 776 eligible patients were identified. Patients in the widowed group were more frequently elderly women, more common of colon cancer, and more stage I/II in tumor stage (P married group (94.72% VS 94.10%). Married CRC patients had better 5year cause-specific survival (CSS) than those unmarried (P married patients at stage I (94.8% vs 89.8%, P vs 76.5%, P vs 53.9%, P VS 8.2%, P unmarried patients were at greater risk of cancer specific mortality. Despite favorable clinicpathological characteristics, widowed patients were at highest risk of death compared with other groups.

  3. CENPI is overexpressed in colorectal cancer and regulates cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Na; Li, Rongxin; Shi, Wenhao; He, Cui

    2018-06-21

    Centromere protein I (CENPI),an important member of centromere protein family, has been suggest to serve as a oncogene in breast cancer, but the clinical significance and biological function of CENPI in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unclear. In our results, we found CENPI was overexpressed in CRC tissues and cells, and associated with clinical stage, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and differentiation in CRC patients. However, there was no significant association between CENPI protein expression and overall survival time in colon cancer patients and rectal cancer patients through analyzing TCGA survival data. Moreover, CENPI mRNA and protein were increased in metastatic lymph nodes compared with primary CRC tissues. Down-regulation of CENPI expression suppresses CRC cell migration, invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition process. In conclusion, CENPI is overexpressed in CRC and functions as oncogene in modulating CRC cell migration, invasion and EMT process. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Influence of thymidylate synthase expression on survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal K Gajjar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thymidylate synthase (TS plays a critical role in nucleotide metabolism and is an important target for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, the standard chemotherapeutic drug for treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC. Aims and Methods: The present study aimed to evaluate TS variable number tandem repeat sequences (VNTR polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction and TS protein expression by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological parameters in untreated CRC patients (n = 100. Further, the prognostic and predictive role of TS has been evaluated. Results: For TS VNTR polymorphism, the observed frequencies of 2R/2R, 2R/3R, and 3R/3R genotypes were 22%, 51%, and 27%, respectively. When immunohistochemical localization was studied, cytoplasmic staining for TS was observed in 70% of patients. A significant inverse correlation was noted between TS protein expression and tumor, node, metastasis staging (P = 0.027, Dukes' staging (P = 0.039, and lymph node status (P = 0.012 of CRC patients. However, there was no significant correlation between TS VNTR polymorphism and TS protein expression. On survival analysis, a significantly shorter overall survival (OS was seen in CRC patients with negative protein expression (P = 0.031. Moreover, the subgroup of CRC patients treated only with surgery also showed a trend of poor OS in patients with negative TS protein expression (P = 0.058. However, neither TS polymorphism nor its protein expression was able to predict relapse-free survival. Conclusion: Negative TS protein expression may be related to unfavorable clinical outcome in CRC patients. However, further studies in a larger set of patients are necessary to better assess TS as a prognostic and predictive marker for 5-FU response in CRC patients.

  5. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival : Epidemiological insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanders, M. M. J.; Vissers, P. A. J.; Haak, H. R.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes

  6. The comparison of thrombocytosis and platelet-lymphocyte ratio as potential prognostic markers in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Krzystanek, Marcin; Josa, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the preoperative platelet count and the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) of different stages and with hepatic metastasis of CRC (mCRC) and to compare these factors as potential prognostic markers. Clinicopathologi...

  7. Incidence of colorectal cancer in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme C M DE; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Monteiro, Mariane; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is traditionally diagnosed after de sixth decade of life, although a small percentage of cases are diagnosed in patients under 40 years of age, and incidence is increasing. There exists a great volume of controversy regarding clinical outcome of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) when compared to elder counterparts. Our aims were to evaluate the rate of CRC in young patients, to review the pertaining literature and to discuss outcomes and clinical prognosis. A retrospective review involving patients with CRC was undertaken, focusing on age at diagnosis. The information extracted from this literature review showed a trend towards a decreased incidence in older people with an opposite effect among adolescents and young adults. Moreover, biological aggressiveness in young adults diagnosed with CRC has not been fully recognized, although it is usually diagnosed later and in association with adverse histological features. Besides that, these features don't affect outcome. These apparent increase in CRC incidence among young patients during the last decades raises the need for a greater suspicious when evaluating common symptoms in this group. Thus, educational programs should widespread information for both population and physicians to improve prevention and early diagnosis results. RESUMO O câncer colorretal (CCR) esporádico é tradicionalmente diagnosticado após a sexta década de vida, embora uma pequena porcentagem de casos seja diagnosticada em doentes abaixo dos 40 anos de idade, e a incidência está aumentando. Existe uma grande controvérsia a respeito da evolução clínica de doentes jovens portadores de CCR em comparação aos mais idosos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar a prevalência de CCR em doentes jovens, rever a literatura pertinente e discutir suas características mais importantes nesta faixa etária. Para tanto realizou-se revisão da literatura envolvendo doentes com CCR com foco na

  8. Overexpression of the S100A2 protein as a prognostic marker for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUDA, TAIKI; ISHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; MOGUSHI, KAORU; OKAZAKI, SATOSHI; ISHIGURO, MEGUMI; IIDA, SATORU; MIZUSHIMA, HIROSHI; TANAKA, HIROSHI; UETAKE, HIROYUKI; SUGIHARA, KENICHI

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker related to recurrence in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Stage II and III CRC tissue mRNA expression was profiled using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and copy number profiles of 125 patients were generated using an Affymetrix 250K Sty array. Genes showing both upregulated expression and copy number gains in cases involving recurrence were extracted as candidate biomarkers. The protein expression of the candidate gene was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 161 patients. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was also examined. We identified 9 candidate genes related to recurrence of stage II and III CRC, whose mRNA expression was significantly higher in CRC than in normal tissue. Of these proteins, the S100 calcium-binding protein A2 (S100A2) has been observed in several human cancers. S100A2 protein overexpression in CRC cells was associated with significantly worse overall survival and relapse-free survival, indicating that S100A2 is an independent risk factor for stage II and III CRC recurrence. S100A2 overexpression in cancer cells could be a biomarker of poor prognosis in stage II and III CRC recurrence and a target for treatment of this disease. PMID:26783118

  9. Impact of socioeconomic status on survival of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yufu; Hu, Hanqing; Huang, Rui; Xie, Lei; Liu, Enrui; Chen, Ying-Gang; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2017-12-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) has an impact on the survival of various cancers, but it has not been fully understood in colorectal cancer (CRC). The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database was adopted to detect the role of SES in the survival outcomes of CRC. A total of 184,322 eligible patients were included and SES status was analyzed. The multivariable analysis showed that Non-Hispanic Black (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24), being widowed (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.07), any Medicaid (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.33-1.39) and the lowest education level group patients had relative poorer prognosis. Besides, sex, tumor location, age, differentiation level and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage also had significant effects on overall survival of CRC. The individuals were further divided into five groups according to the number of survival-adverse factors. All of the four groups containing adverse factors showed impaired survival outcomes compared with the group containing no adverse factor.

  10. The yield of colorectal cancer among fast track patients with normocytic and microcytic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, I G; Fitzrol, D; Parker, R A; Kuzhively, J; Luscombe, N; Wells, A D; Menon, M; Bajwa, F M; Watson, M A

    2014-05-01

    We receive fast track referrals on the basis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) for patients with normocytic anaemia or for patients with no iron studies. This study examined the yield of colorectal cancer (CRC) among fast track patients to ascertain whether awaiting confirmation of IDA is necessary prior to performing bowel investigations. A review was undertaken of 321 and 930 consecutive fast track referrals from Centre A and Centre B respectively. Contingency tables were analysed using Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate significant predictors of CRC. Overall, 229 patients were included from Centre A and 689 from Centre B. The odds ratio for microcytic anaemia versus normocytic anaemia in the outcome of CRC was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5-3.9) for Centre A and 1.6 (95% CI: 0.8-3.3) for Centre B. In a logistic regression analysis (Centre B only), no significant difference in CRC rates was seen between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (adjusted odds ratio: 1.9, 95% CI: 0.9-3.9). There was no statistically significant difference in the yield of CRC between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (p=0.515, Fisher's exact test) in patients with anaemia only and no colorectal symptoms. Finally, CRC cases were seen in both microcytic and normocytic groups with or without low ferritin. There is no significant difference in the yield of CRC between fast track patients with microcytic and normocytic anaemia. This study provides insufficient evidence to support awaiting confirmation of IDA in fast track patients with normocytic anaemia prior to requesting bowel investigations.

  11. Colorectal cancer screening at US community health centers: Examination of sociodemographic disparities and association with patient-provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sue C; McKinley, Duane; Sripipatana, Alek; Makaroff, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are low among underserved populations. High-quality patient-physician communication potentially influences patients' willingness to undergo CRC screening. Community health centers (HCs) provide comprehensive primary health care to underserved populations. This study's objectives were to ascertain national CRC screening rates and to explore the relations between sociodemographic characteristics and patient-provider communication on the receipt of CRC screening among HC patients. Using 2014 Health Center Patient Survey data, bivariate and multivariate analyses examined the association of sociodemographic variables (sex, race/ethnicity, age, geography, preferred language, household income, insurance, and employment status) and patient-provider communication with the receipt of CRC screening. Patients between the ages of 65 and 75 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-4.64) and patients not in the labor force (aOR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.37-3.94) had higher odds of receiving CRC screening, whereas patients who were uninsured (aOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.18-0.61) and patients who were non-English-speaking (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.99) had lower odds. Patient-provider communication was not associated with the receipt of CRC screening. The CRC screening rate for HC patients was 57.9%, whereas the rate was 65.1% according to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 58.2% according to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey. The high ratings of patient-provider communication, regardless of the screening status, suggest strides toward a patient-centered medical home practice transformation that will assist in a positive patient experience. Addressing the lack of insurance, making culturally and linguistically appropriate patient education materials available, and training clinicians and care teams in cultural competency are critical for increasing future CRC screening rates. Cancer 2017

  12. Relevance of Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, Lore; Vanacker, Leen; Kenis, Cindy; Prenen, Hans; Van Cutsem, Erik; Van Der Auwera, Jacques; Van Eetvelde, Ellen; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Flamaing, Johan; Milisen, Koen; Lobelle, Jean Pierre; De Grève, Jacques; Wildiers, Hans

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the relevance of geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and to study functional status (FS) and chemotherapy-related toxicity during treatment. Patients with CRC aged ≥ 70 years were evaluated at baseline using a GA. Results were communicated to the treating physician. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, FS was reassessed, and chemotherapy-related toxicity was recorded. A total of 193 patients, with a median age of 77 years, were included. GA was abnormal in 75% and revealed unknown problems in 40%. Treatment was altered in 37% based on clinical assessment. GA led to geriatric interventions in 9 patients (5%) and additionally influenced treatment in 1 patient. At follow-up (n = 164), functional decline was observed in 29 patients (18%) for activities of daily living (ADL) and in 60 patients (37%) for instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Baseline IADL, depression, fatigue, and cognition were predictors for ADL decline, whereas no predictors for IADL decline could be identified. In the 109 patients receiving chemotherapy, stage and baseline fatigue were predictive for grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity, and baseline ADL, fatigue, and nutrition were predictive for grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicity. Although GA identified previously unknown problems in more than one-third of older CRC patients, the impact on interventions or treatment decisions was limited. Baseline GA parameters may predict functional decline and chemotherapy-related toxicity. Education of physicians treating older patients with CRC is an essential step in the implementation of GA and subsequent interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychological distress in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients following microsatellite instability testing for Lynch syndrome on the pathologist's initiative.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Brunner, H.G.; Duijvendijk, P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Dutch Guideline on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer published in 2008, patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) should undergo microsatellite instability (MSI) testing by a pathologist immediately after tumour resection if they are younger than 50 years, or if a second

  14. Influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus on Khorana venous thromboembolism risk in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyao Wang

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have documented the association between venous thromboembolism (VTE and colorectal cancer (CRC. The Khorana model is a VTE risk assessment model for predicting cancer-associated thrombosis. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM has also been reported to increase the risk of VTE. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of T2DM on Khorana VTE risk in CRC patients and to explore the relationship between Khorana VTE category and CRC clinicopathological factors. Methods: This analysis included 615 CRC patients (205 with T2DM. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were compared within each group. A comparison was made of the proportion of patients in different Khorana VTE risk categories in CRC patients with and without T2DM. The association between Khorana VTE risk category and clinicopathological factors among all the CRC patients was evaluated. Results: Fibrinogen levels of CRC patients with T2DM were significantly higher than those of non-diabetes patients (4.13 ± 1.06 vs 3.94 ± 0.98, p < 0.001. A higher proportion of CRC patients with T2DM were in the Khorana intermediate-to-high risk category (H = 4.749, p = 0.029. Female sex, diabetes, colon location (compared with rectum, larger tumor size, advanced pT stage and pN stage were correlated with the intermediate-to-high Khorana VTE risk category, with odd ratios (95% confidence intervals [CI] of 1.537 (1.064-2.220, 1.499 (1.027-2.186, 2.313 (1.588-3.370, 2.284 (1.542-3.383, 4.429 (2.088-9.396 and 1.822 (1.230-2.698, respectively. Conclusion: T2DM increases Khorana VTE risk in CRC patients. Female sex, diabetes, colon location, large tumor size and poor stage are associated with the intermediate-to-high Khorana VTE risk category.

  15. Increased colorectal cancer risk in first-degree relatives of patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boparai, K. S.; Reitsma, J. B.; Lemmens, V.; van Os, T. A. M.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Koornstra, J. J.; Nagengast, F. M.; van Hest, L. P.; Keller, J. J.; Dekker, E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is characterised by the presence of multiple colorectal hyperplastic polyps and is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. For first-degree relatives of HPS patients (FDRs) this has not been adequately quantified. Reliable

  16. Increased colorectal cancer risk in first-degree relatives of patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boparai, K.S.; Reitsma, J.B.; Lemmens, V.; Os, T.A. van; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.; Koornstra, J.J.; Nagengast, F.M.; Hest, L.P. van; Keller, J.J.; Dekker, E. den

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is characterised by the presence of multiple colorectal hyperplastic polyps and is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. For first-degree relatives of HPS patients (FDRs) this has not been adequately quantified. Reliable

  17. Increased colorectal cancer risk in first-degree relatives of patients with hyperplastic polyposis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boparai, K. S.; Lemmens, V.; van Os, T. A. M.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.; Koornstra, J. J.; Nagengast, F. M.; van Hest, L. P.; Keller, J. J.; Dekker, E.; Reitsma, J.

    Introduction Hyperplastic polyposis syndrome (HPS) is characterised by the presence of multiple colorectal hyperplastic polyps and is associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. For first-degree relatives of HPS patients (FDRs) this has not been adequately quantified. Reliable

  18. Association between glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in patients from Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhunussova, Gulnur; Zhunusbekova, Benazir; Djansugurova, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and the incidence is increasing in developed as well as developing countries including Kazakhstan. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are considered to be cancer susceptibility genes as they play a role in the detoxification of carcinogenic species. In this case-control study the influence of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms on CRC risk in Kazakhstan population were evaluated. Blood samples were collected from patients diagnosed with rectal or colon cancer (300 individuals) as well as a control cohort of healthy volunteers (300 individuals), taking into account the age, gender, ethnicity, and smoking habits of the CRC patients. Deletion polymorphisms were genotyped employing a multiplex PCR amplification method. Association between polymorphisms and CRC susceptibility risk was calculated using multivariate analysis and logistic regression for odd ratio (OR). The homozygous GSTM1 null genotype was associated with significantly increased risk of CRC (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.45-2.79, p = 0.0001) while the homozygous GSST1 null genotype was not associated with the risk of developing CRC (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.78-1.55, p = 0.001), but the heterozygous genotype correlated with CRC susceptibility (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.30-3.00, p = 0.001). Also, separate analyses of each of the main ethnic groups (Kazakh and Russian) showed a strong association of GSTM1 null genotype with CRC risk (for Kazakhs OR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.35-4.10, p = 0.006 and for Russians OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.17-2.89, p = 0.003). The CRC risk of GSTM1 null genotype in smokers was considerably higher (OR = 3.37, 95% CI = 1.78-6.38, p = 0.0007). The combination of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes in combined mixed population of Kazakhstan showed a trend to increasing the risk of developing CRC (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.00-2.56), but it was not statistically significant. In conclusion, the results of this case-control study for sporadic cases of

  19. Socio-demographic and other patient characteristics associated with time between colonoscopy and surgery, and choice of treatment centre for colorectal cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsbury, David; Harris, Mark Fort; Pascoe, Shane; Olver, Ian; Barton, Michael; Spigelman, Allan; O'Connell, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate key patient clinical and demographic characteristics associated with time between colonoscopy and surgery, and choice of treatment centre for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. This will add to the little published research examining the pathway following CRC diagnosis and prior to surgery. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of linked data. Setting A population-based sample of people diagnosed August 2004 to December 2007 in New South Wales, Australia. Participants ...

  20. Inconsistencies in patient perceptions and observer ratings of shared decision making: the case of colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Tracy; Cooper, Gregory; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2010-09-01

    To compare patient-reported and observer-rated shared decision making (SDM) use for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and evaluate patient, physician and patient-reported relational communication factors associated with patient-reported use of shared CRC screening decisions. Study physicians are salaried primary care providers. Patients are insured, aged 50-80 and due for CRC screening. Audio-recordings from 363 primary care visits were observer-coded for elements of SDM. A post-visit patient survey assessed patient-reported decision-making processes and relational communication during visit. Association of patient-reported SDM with observer-rated elements of SDM, as well as patient, physician and relational communication factors were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. 70% of patients preferred SDM for preventive health decisions, 47% of patients reported use of a SDM process, and only one of the screening discussions included all four elements of SDM per observer ratings. Patient report of SDM use was not associated with observer-rated elements of SDM, but was significantly associated with female physician gender and patient-reported relational communication. Inconsistencies exist between patient reports and observer ratings of SDM for CRC screening. Future studies are needed to understand whether SDM that is patient-reported, observer-rated or both are associated with informed and value-concordant CRC screening decisions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on glycaemic control among individuals with colorectal cancer using glucose lowering drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanders, M.M.J.; van Herk-Sukel, M.P.P.; Herings, R.M.C.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Haak, H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aims to evaluate the impact of cancer and its treatment on HbA1c values among individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) using glucose-lowering drugs (GLDs). Methods Patients with primary CRC (1998–2011) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry and linked to the PHARMO Database

  2. Methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoter in cell-free circulating DNA and its prognostic role in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaios, Dimitrios; Balgkouranidou, Ioanna; Karayiannakis, Anastasios; Bolanaki, Helen; Xenidis, Nikolaos; Amarantidis, Kyriakos; Chelis, Leonidas; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Lianidou, Evi; Trypsianis, Grigorios; Kakolyris, Stylianos

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequent epigenetic alteration. Using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), the methylation status of the adenomatous polyposis coli ( APC ) and Ras association domain family 1 isoform A ( RASSF1A ) genes was examined in cell-free circulating DNA from 155 plasma samples obtained from patients with early and advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). APC and RASSF1A hypermethylation was frequently observed in both early and advanced disease, and was significantly associated with a poorer disease outcome. The methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoters was investigated in cell-free DNA of patients with CRC. Using MSP, the promoter methylation status of APC and RASSF1A was examined in 155 blood samples obtained from patients with CRC, 88 of whom had operable CRC (oCRC) and 67 had metastatic CRC (mCRC). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with oCRC was 33%. Methylated APC promoter was significantly associated with older age (P=0.012), higher stage (P=0.014) and methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.050). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with mCRC was 53.7%. In these patients, APC methylation was significantly associated with methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.016). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in patients with oCRC was 25%. Methylated RASSF1A in oCRC was significantly associated with higher stage (P=0.021). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in mCRC was 44.8%. Methylated RASSF1A in mCRC was associated with moderate differentiation (P=0.012), high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (P=0.023) and methylated APC status (P=0.016). Patients with an unmethylated APC gene had better survival in both early (81±5 vs. 27±4 months, PAPC . Patients with an unmethylated RASSF1A gene had better survival in both early (71±6 vs. 46±8 months, PAPC and RASSF1A promoter methylation status and survival may be indicative of a prognostic role for these genes in CRC, which requires additional testing in larger studies.

  3. The Preoperative Peripheral Blood Monocyte Count Is Associated with Liver Metastasis and Overall Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shidong Hu

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common malignancy in males and the second most common in females worldwide. Distant metastases have a strong negative impact on the prognosis of CRC patients. The most common site of CRC metastases is the liver. Both disease progression and metastasis have been related to the patient's peripheral blood monocyte count. We therefore performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between the preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count and colorectal liver metastases (CRLM.Clinical data from 117 patients with colon cancer and 93 with rectal cancer who were admitted to the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital (Beijing, China between December 2003 and May 2015 were analysed retrospectively, with the permission of both the patients and the hospital.Preoperative peripheral blood monocyte counts, the T and N classifications of the primary tumour and its primary site differed significantly between the two groups (P 0.505 × 109 cells/L, high T classification and liver metastasis were independent risk factors for 5-year OS (RR: 2.737, 95% CI: 1.573~ 4.764, P <0.001; RR: 2.687, 95%CI: 1.498~4.820, P = 0.001; RR: 4.928, 95%CI: 2.871~8.457, P < 0.001.The demonstrated association between preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count and liver metastasis in patients with CRC recommends the former as a useful predictor of postoperative prognosis in CRC patients.

  4. Personalizing therapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ashley; Ma, Brigette B Y

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Several important scientific discoveries in the molecular biology of CRC have changed clinical practice in oncology. These included the comprehensive genome-wide profiling of CRC by the Cancer Genome Atlas Network, the discovery of mutations along the RAS-RAF signaling pathway as major determinants of response to antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor, the elucidation of new molecular subsets of CRC or gene signatures that may predict clinical outcome after adjuvant chemotherapy, and the innovative targeting of the family of vascular endothelial growth factor and receptors. These new data have allowed oncologists to individualize drug therapy on the basis of a patient's tumor's unique molecular profile, especially in the management of metastatic CRC. This review article will discuss the progress of personalized medicine in the contemporary management of CRC. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seeding after ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of liver metastases in patients with colorectal or breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Inna; Lorentzen, Torben; Linnemann, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoplasm seeding is a serious complication after liver metastases biopsy. Reported incidences vary between 10% and 19% for colorectal cancer (CRC) and are unknown for breast cancer (BC). The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the frequency of tumor seeding after ultrasound...... retrospectively reviewed. The endpoint was the development of abdominal wall recurrence following liver biopsy. RESULTS: Of total 2981 biopsies we identified 278 patients with CRC and 155 patients with BC biopsy-verified liver metastases. During the median follow-up of 25 months after biopsy (range 3-253 months......), no seeding was recorded in patients with BC. Within the median follow-up of 34 months (3-111 months), seeding was registered in 17/278 (6%) of patients with CRC; three patients of 278 (1%) had undoubtedly biopsy-related seeding, which became apparent six, nine, and 26 months after biopsy, respectively...

  6. CRC concise encyclopedia of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Weisstein, Eric W

    2003-01-01

    Upon publication, the first edition of the CRC Concise Encyclopedia of Mathematics received overwhelming accolades for its unparalleled scope, readability, and utility. It soon took its place among the top selling books in the history of Chapman & Hall/CRC, and its popularity continues unabated. Yet also unabated has been the dedication of author Eric Weisstein to collecting, cataloging, and referencing mathematical facts, formulas, and definitions. He has now updated most of the original entries and expanded the Encyclopedia to include 1000 additional pages of illustrated entries. The accessibility of the Encyclopedia along with its broad coverage and economical price make it attractive to the widest possible range of readers and certainly a must for libraries, from the secondary to the professional and research levels. For mathematical definitions, formulas, figures, tabulations, and references, this is simply the most impressive compendium available.

  7. Report: Cultural Research Centre (CRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Cross-Cultural Foundation of Uganda

    2010-01-01

    This report arises from research carried out in Iganga and Namutumba districts in late 2006/early 2007 by the Cultural Research Centre (CRC), based in Jinja. Our research focus was to gauge the impact of using Lusoga as a medium of instruction (since 2005 in "pilot" lower primary classes) within and outside the classroom. This initiative was in response to a new set of circumstances in the education sector in Uganda, especially the introduction by Government of teaching in local languages in ...

  8. Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation

    OpenAIRE

    JORDI SALAS; NURIA LASO; SERGI MAS; M. JOSE LAFUENTE; XAVIER CASTERAD; MANUEL TRIAS; ANTONIO BALLESTA; RAFAEL MOLINA; CARLOS ASCASO; SHICHUN ZHENG; JOHN K. WIENCKE; AMALIA LAFUENTE

    2004-01-01

    Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation BACKGROUND: The diversity of the Mediterranean diet and the heterogeneity of acquired genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) led us to examine the possible association between dietary factors and mutations, such as Ki-ras mutations, in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was based on 246 cases and 296 controls. For th...

  9. Downregulated Ku70 and ATM associated to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer among Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanfang Lu,1,2 Jingyan Gao,1,3 Yuanming Lu,1 1Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guangxi, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Research Center, Affiliated 2nd Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Human Anatomy and Histo-Embryology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Background: Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs are a key factor in carcinogenesis. The necessary repair of DSBs is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division. To address the relationship between altered expression of DSB repair of proteins Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM in colorectal cancer (CRC, we examined the expression levels and patterns of Ku70 and ATM in CRC samples. Methods: Expression and coexpression of Ku70 and ATM were investigated by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirmed further with fluorescent immunohistochemistry in CRC and pericancerous samples from 112 Chinese patients. Results: Downexpression patterns for both Ku70 and ATM were found in the CRC samples and were significantly associated with advanced tumor node metastasis stage and decreased 5-year overall survival rate. Conclusion: Downregulated Ku70 and ATM were associated with poor disease-free survival. Loss of Ku70 and ATM expression might act as a biomarker to predict poor prognosis in patients with CRC. Keywords: DNA double-strand breaks, ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, Ku70, colorectal cancer

  10. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Inoue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is predominantly a disease of elderly and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The increased availability of treatment options for CRC has made it more difficult for clinicians to decide on the optimal therapeutic approach in elderly patients, because of the potential for poorer outcomes due to an increased burden of comorbidities, functional dependency, and limited life expectancy. It is necessary to determine which elderly patients are likely to benefit from active cancer therapy, and the establishment of treatment markers for multimodality approaches is eagerly awaited. Elderly cancer patients are at risk of exposure to various intrinsic inflammatory mediators, such as tumor-generating cytokines and surgery-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is therefore important to understand the immunological changes occurring in the elderly and to adjust treatment strategies accordingly to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multimodality therapy for CRC that induce systemic inflammation. Several inflammation-based factors such as the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS may reflect the balance between tumor progression and host-related immunity, especially in elderly CRC patients. Appropriate selection criteria for multimodality therapy in elderly CRC patients may include not only tumor characteristics, but also host- and/or treatment-related factors such as comorbidities or surrogate markers using inflammation-based factors.----------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Inoue Y, Toiyama Y, Tanaka K, Mohri Y, Kusunoki M. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02014.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.4

  11. Decline in peripheral blood NKG2D+CD3+CD56+ NKT cells in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Rezaei, A; Kalantari, H; Bahador, A; Hassannejad, N; Maracy, M; Nouri, N; Sedghi, M; Ghazanfari, H; Bayat, B

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in the world. This cancer can be divided into non-metastatic and metastatic CRC stages. CD3+CD56+ NKT cell subsets are a minor T cell subset in peripheral blood and conduct the killing of tumor cells in direct manner. Little is obvious about levels and surface markers of these cells such as NKG2D in different cancers, especially in CRC. We included 15 non-metastatic (low-grade), 11 non-metastatic (high-grade), 10 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 18 healthy controls. The percentages of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and NKG2D+CD56+ NKT cells from samples were analyzed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of samples. We found that there was a significantly lower number of NKG2D+CD3+CD56+ cells in peripheral blood of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer compared with normal controls (77.53 ± 5.79 % vs 90.74 ± 9.84 %; pNKT cells was significantly lower in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer compared to healthy controls strengthens the hypothesis that NKT cells can play a substantial role in the protection against human colorectal cancer, and this opens up avenues for novel studies about elucidating the other aspects of tumor surveillance in CRC progression and immunotherapy (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 46).

  12. Frequency of hereditary colorectal cancer in Uruguayans patients with non polipotic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarroca, C.; Della Valle, A.; Fresco, R.; Peltomaki, P.; Lynch, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Colonic Cancer Family Polipótic not (CCFNP) is a syndrome transmission autosomal dominant characterized by the aggregation of colorectal cancer (CCR), frequently associated with other solid tumors. Few studies have investigated CCFNP frequency in colorectal cancer patients. these have shown marked geographic variation (0.3% to 13%). The objective of this study is to estimate the frequency of a population CCFNP CCR carriers Uruguayan cancer patients. All patients consecutively operated CRC were included in the Hospital Central Armed Forces (Montevideo, Uruguay) between 1987 and 2003. The cases were classified into 3 groups: 1) those who met the criteria Amsterdam (CCFNP), 2) those who did not meet these criteria but considered as a population of increased risk of cancer based on family history / staff (PRI), and 3) sporadic CRC. Genetic analysis was performed for Detection of mutations in hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 gene in patients subgroup 1. 461 patients were included, with a median age of 66 years. The subgroup 1 represented 2.5% 2 5.6% and 91.8% sporadic CRC. 75% of cases CCFNP were classified as under 55. Mutations in hMLH1 / hMSH2/hMSH6 were found in 16.6% of cases included in the subgroup 1 (2 in hMLH1, 1 in hMSH2, hMSH6 none). The proportion of patients who met the Amsterdam criteria matches with that observed by other authors. However, the percentage of cases classified CCFNP identified as carriers of mutations is lower than that reported (16.6% vs. ~ 70%). This may reflect a different genetic profile Uruguayan population

  13. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA colon cancer-associated transcript 2 is associated with advanced tumor progression and poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junling; Jiang, Yong; Zhu, Jing; Wu, Tao; Ma, Ju; Du, Chuang; Chen, Shanwen; Li, Tengyu; Han, Jinsheng; Wang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) colon cancer-associated transcript 2 (CCAT2) expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression levels of lncRNA CCAT2 in CRC, adjacent non-tumor and healthy colon mucosa tissues were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The disease-free survival and overall survival rates were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard analysis. The expression level of lncRNA CCAT2 in CRC tissues was increased significantly compared with adjacent normal tissues or non-cancerous tissues. CCAT2 expression was observed to be progressively increased between tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages I and IV. A high level of CCAT2 expression was revealed to be associated with poor cell differentiation, deeper tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, distance metastasis, vascular invasion and advanced TNM stage. Compared with patients with low levels of CCAT2 expression, patients with high levels of CCAT2 expression had shorter disease-free survival and overall survival times. Multivariate analyses indicated that high CCAT2 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor. Therefore, increased lncRNA CCAT2 expression maybe a potential diagnostic biomarker for CRC, and an independent predictor of prognosis in patients with CRC.

  14. The role of RCAS1 as a biomarker in diagnosing CRC and monitoring tumor recurrence and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Su-xia; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-juan; Jin, Gui-hua; Ying, Xia; He, Chen-chen; Guo, Xi-jing; Zhang, Jian-ying; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) plays an important role in tumor progression by helping tumor cell to escape from host immunological surveillance or modifying the characteristics of connective tissue around. RCAS1 may appropriately reflect the development and prognosis of tumor. In the study, we sought to identify the clinical significance of RCAS1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and tumor recurrence monitoring. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with tissue array slides was preformed to analyze RCAS1 protein expression in CRC, colorectal polyps, and normal colon tissues. RCAS1 levels in colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in colorectal polyps and normal colon tissues (PCRC are significantly higher than in healthy controls and polyps (PCRC was 82.1 %, which was higher than carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Especially in CEA-negative cases, the sensitivity of RCAS1 was 88.2 %. Finally, CRC patients who were followed up showed a serum RCAS1 level which significantly decreased after surgery (PCRC diagnosis but also useful for monitoring tumor recurrence. RCAS1 might be a supplementary serological marker for CRC.

  15. Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome: Assessment of the perspectives of patients with colorectal cancer regarding benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jessica Ezzell; Zepp, Jamilyn M; Gilmore, Mari J; Davis, James V; Esterberg, Elizabeth J; Muessig, Kristin R; Peterson, Susan K; Syngal, Sapna; Acheson, Louise S; Wiesner, Georgia L; Reiss, Jacob A; Goddard, Katrina A B

    2015-09-15

    Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), has been recommended among all patients newly diagnosed with CRC. However, there is limited literature regarding patient perspectives of tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among patients with CRC who are not selected for screening based on family history criteria. A total of 145 patients aged 39 to 87 years were administered surveys assessing perceived risk, patient perspectives, and potential benefits of and barriers to tumor screening for Lynch syndrome. Associations between patient-specific and cancer-specific factors and survey responses were analyzed. The majority of participants perceived their risk of developing Lynch syndrome as being low, with 9 participants (6.2%) anticipating an abnormal screening result. However, most participants endorsed the potential benefits of screening for themselves and their families, with 84.8% endorsing ≥6 benefits and 50.3% endorsing all 8 benefits. Participants also endorsed few potential barriers to screening, with 89.4% endorsing ≤4 of 9 potential barriers. A common barrier was worry about the cost of additional testing and surveillance, which was endorsed by 54.5% of participants. The level of distress associated with tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, which was very low, was not associated with age or CRC stage. The results of the current study indicate that patients with CRC overall have a positive attitude toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, endorse the benefits of screening, and experience low levels of distress. These findings provide insight into patient attitudes toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among unselected patients with CRC to inform educational approaches that assist in patient decision-making and guide the successful implementation of screening programs. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  16. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating Tim-3 in patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quanli; Yuan, Peng; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Huijuan; Fan, Huijie; Li, Tiepeng; Qin, Peng; Han, Lu; Fang, Weijia; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell exhaustion represents a progressive loss of T-cell function. The inhibitory receptor PD-1 is known to negatively regulate CD8+ T cell responses directed against tumor antigen, but the blockades of PD-1 pathway didn't show the objective responses in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Thus, further exploring the molecular mechanism responsible for inducing T-cell dysfunction in CRC patients may reveal effective strategies for immune therapy. This study aims to characterize co-inhibitory receptors on T cells in CRC patients to identify novel targets for immunotherapy. In this study, peripheral blood samples from 20 healthy controls and 54 consented CRC patients, and tumor and matched paraneoplastic tissues from 7 patients with advanced CRC, subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3 receptors on CD8+ T cells. It was found that CRC patients presented with significantly higher levels of circulating Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells compared to the healthy controls (medians of 3.12% and 1.99%, respectively, p = 0.0403). A similar increase of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells was also observed in the tumor tissues compared to paraneoplastic tussues. Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in tumor tissues produced even less cytokine than that in paraneoplastic tissues. Functional ex vivo experiments showed that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells produced significantly less IFN-γ than Tim-3−PD-1−CD8+ T cells, followed by Tim-3+PD-1−CD8+ T cells, and Tim-3−PD-1+CD8+ T cells, indicating a stronger inhibition of IFN-γ production of Tim-3+CD8+ T cells. It is also found in this study that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cell increase in circulation was correlated with clinical cancer stage but not histologic grade and serum concentrations of cancer biomarker CEA. Our results indicate that upregulation of the inhibitory receptor Tim-3 may restrict T cell responses in CRC patients, and therefore blockage of Tim-3 and thus restoring T cell responses may be a potential

  17. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults: A Study From the South Australian Population-Based Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatandoust, Sina; Price, Timothy J; Ullah, Shahid; Roy, Amitesh C; Beeke, Carole; Young, Joanne P; Townsend, Amanda; Padbury, Robert; Roder, David; Karapetis, Christos S

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy. There is growing evidence that CRC incidence is increasing in the younger population. There is controversy surrounding the prognosis of young patients with CRC. In this study we reviewed Australian patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) who were younger than 40 years of age at the time of diagnosis of metastatic disease. To our knowledge this is the first study to focus on this age group with mCRC. This was a retrospective study using data from the South Australian Metastatic Colorectal Cancer database. We compared patient and disease characteristics, management approaches, and outcomes for age groups Young-onset mCRC patients, when defined as aged younger than 40 years, have equivalent survival compared with their older counterparts. This is despite differences in disease characteristics and management approach between the 2 groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic variations of the A13/A14 repeat located within the EGFR 3′ untranslated region have no oncogenic effect in patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Frebourg, Thierry; Sesboüé, Richard; Sefrioui, David; Tougeron, David; Lamy, Aude; Blanchard, France; Le Pessot, Florence; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Michel, Pierre; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The EGFR 3′ untranslated region (UTR) harbors a polyadenine repeat which is polymorphic (A13/A14) and undergoes somatic deletions in microsatellite instability (MSI) colorectal cancer (CRC). These mutations could be oncogenic in colorectal tissue since they were shown to result into increased EGFR mRNA stability in CRC cell lines. First, we determined in a case control study including 429 CRC patients corresponding to different groups selected or not on age of tumor onset and/or familial history and/or MSI, whether or not, the germline EGFR A13/A14 polymorphism constitutes a genetic risk factor for CRC; second, we investigated the frequency of somatic mutations of this repeat in 179 CRC and their impact on EGFR expression. No statistically significant difference in allelic frequencies of the EGFR polyA repeat polymorphism was observed between CRC patients and controls. Somatic mutations affecting the EGFR 3′UTR polyA tract were detected in 47/80 (58.8%) MSI CRC versus 0/99 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. Comparative analysis in 21 CRC samples of EGFR expression, between tumor and non malignant tissues, using two independent methods showed that somatic mutations of the EGFR polyA repeat did not result into an EGFR mRNA increase. Germline and somatic genetic variations occurring within the EGFR 3′ UTR polyA tract have no impact on CRC genetic risk and EGFR expression, respectively. Genotyping of the EGFR polyA tract has no clinical utility to identify patients with a high risk for CRC or patients who could benefit from anti-EGFR antibodies

  19. A network-based gene expression signature informs prognosis and treatment for colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported gene expression signatures that predict recurrence risk in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC patients with minimal gene membership overlap and undefined biological relevance. The goal of this study was to investigate biological themes underlying these signatures, to infer genes of potential mechanistic importance to the CRC recurrence phenotype and to test whether accurate prognostic models can be developed using mechanistically important genes.We investigated eight published CRC gene expression signatures and found no functional convergence in Gene Ontology enrichment analysis. Using a random walk-based approach, we integrated these signatures and publicly available somatic mutation data on a protein-protein interaction network and inferred 487 genes that were plausible candidate molecular underpinnings for the CRC recurrence phenotype. We named the list of 487 genes a NEM signature because it integrated information from Network, Expression, and Mutation. The signature showed significant enrichment in four biological processes closely related to cancer pathophysiology and provided good coverage of known oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and CRC-related signaling pathways. A NEM signature-based Survival Support Vector Machine prognostic model was trained using a microarray gene expression dataset and tested on an independent dataset. The model-based scores showed a 75.7% concordance with the real survival data and separated patients into two groups with significantly different relapse-free survival (p = 0.002. Similar results were obtained with reversed training and testing datasets (p = 0.007. Furthermore, adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly associated with prolonged survival of the high-risk patients (p = 0.006, but not beneficial to the low-risk patients (p = 0.491.The NEM signature not only reflects CRC biology but also informs patient prognosis and treatment response. Thus, the network

  20. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n = 69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients.

  1. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel

    2014-01-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites (cMS) and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n=69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n=31) and healthy controls (n=52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (p=0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients. PMID:19957108

  2. Two small RNAs, CrcY and CrcZ, act in concert to sequester the Crc global regulator in Pseudomonas putida, modulating catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Renata; Fonseca, Pilar; Rojo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The Crc protein is a translational repressor that recognizes a specific target at some mRNAs, controlling catabolite repression and co-ordinating carbon metabolism in pseudomonads. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the levels of free Crc protein are controlled by CrcZ, a sRNA that sequesters Crc, acting as an antagonist. We show that, in Pseudomonas putida, the levels of free Crc are controlled by CrcZ and by a novel 368 nt sRNA named CrcY. CrcZ and CrcY, which contain six potential targets for Crc, were able to bind Crc specifically in vitro. The levels of CrcZ and CrcY were low under conditions generating a strong catabolite repression, and increased strongly when catabolite repression was absent. Deletion of either crcZ or crcY had no effect on catabolite repression, but the simultaneous absence of both sRNAs led to constitutive catabolite repression that compromised growth on some carbon sources. Overproduction of CrcZ or CrcY significantly reduced repression. We propose that CrcZ and CrcY act in concert, sequestering and modulating the levels of free Crc according to metabolic conditions. The CbrA/CbrB two-component system activated crcZ transcription, but had little effect on crcY. CrcY was detected in P. putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas syringae, but not in P. aeruginosa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Significance of Serum Total Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in a variety of diseases. Prospective studies investigating the relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers and the status and development of colorectal cancer (CRC are scarce; previous studies have failed to establish a relationship between the serum total oxidant/antioxidant status and CRC. Therefore, we compared the total serum oxidant/antioxidant levels of CRC patients and healthy subjects, and analyzed their clinical significance in the CRC. Fasting blood samples from 132 CRC patients and 64 healthy subjects were collected. Oxidative stress parameters, including total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS, were measured, and the oxidative stress index (OSI was calculated. The TOS and OSI levels increased significantly (P0.05.However, the levels of TOS, TAS, and OSI were significantly different between patients with no metastasis and those with metastases to two organs (P<0.05 Finally, the parameters are affected by smoking and drinking, and subsequent research should be conducted excluding the relevant influencing factors.

  4. Undefined familial colorectal cancer and the role of pleiotropism in cancer susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Sara E; Broderick, Peter; Chubb, Daniel; Kinnersley, Ben; Sherborne, Amy L; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-10-01

    Although family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) a genetic diagnosis cannot be obtained in over 50 % of familial cases when screened for known CRC cancer susceptibility genes. The genetics of undefined-familial CRC is complex and recent studies have implied additional clinically actionable mutations for CRC in susceptibility genes for other cancers. To clarify the contribution of non-CRC susceptibility genes to undefined-familial CRC we conducted a mutational screen of 114 cancer susceptibility genes in 847 patients with early-onset undefined-familial CRC and 1609 controls by analysing high-coverage exome sequencing data. We implemented American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics standards and guidelines for assigning pathogenicity to variants. Globally across all 114 cancer susceptibility genes no statistically significant enrichment of likely pathogenic variants was shown (6.7 % cases 57/847, 5.3 % controls 85/1609; P = 0.15). Moreover there was no significant enrichment of mutations in genes such as TP53 or BRCA2 which have been proposed for clinical testing in CRC. In conclusion, while we identified genes that may be considered interesting candidates as determinants of CRC risk warranting further research, there is currently scant evidence to support a role for genes other than those responsible for established CRC syndromes in the clinical management of familial CRC.

  5. CRC handbook of modern telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Morreale, Patricia A

    2001-01-01

    This authoritative handbook, contributed to by a team of international experts, covers the most dynamic areas in the changing telecommunications landscape. Written for telecommunications specialists who implement the new technologies, The CRC Handbook of Modern Telecommunications is an excellent companion volume to the authors' The Telecommunications Handbook, but stands well on its own, as it extends the range of topics to include voice over Internet, traffic management, quality of service, and other dominant future trends. It is an indispensable reference for all professionals working in the

  6. AGXT and ERCC2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU/oxaliplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, J B; Thomsen, M.; Guren, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples fro...... as markers of clinical outcome in oxaliplatin-treated mCRC patients. If validated in other studies, they could improve the selection of therapy in mCRC.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 11 August 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.54....

  7. Understanding intention to undergo colonoscopy among intermediate-risk siblings of colorectal cancer patients: a test of a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Markowitz, Arnold; Winawer, Sidney; Guillem, Jose; Meropol, Neal J; Haller, Daniel; Jandorf, Lina; Rakowski, William; Babb, James; Duncan, Terry

    2003-01-01

    There is a need for research to identify factors influencing intentions to undergo colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among family members at risk for CRC. This study tested a mediational model primarily guided by Ronis' elaboration of the Health Belief Model in predicting intention to have colorectal cancer screening among siblings of individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer prior to age 56 years. Data were collected from 534 siblings of individuals diagnosed with CRC. A baseline survey was administered by telephone. Measures included perceived susceptibility, CRC severity, physician and family support for CRC screening, cancer-specific distress, the closeness of the relationship with the affected sibling, and future intention to have a colonoscopy. Participant age, gender, and number of prior colonoscopies, as well as the stage of the affected patient's cancer and time from the patient's diagnosis to the interview, were controlled for in the analyses. The proposed model was not a good fit to the data. A respecified model was fit to the data. In this model, physician support, family support, and sibling closeness were significantly associated with both perceived benefits and barriers. Perceived severity was associated with barriers. Benefits and barriers, as well as cancer-specific distress, were directly associated with colonoscopy intentions. Results were consistent with a mediational role for benefits and barriers in the associations of sibling closeness and with a mediational role for barriers in the association between perceived severity and colonoscopy intentions. Family and physician support impacted intentions both directly and indirectly through effects on benefits and barriers. Perceived risk was not associated with benefits, barriers, or colonoscopy intentions. Intervention efforts to increase colonoscopy intentions may benefit from targeting family influences, particularly the affected proband in the family, as well as physician influence, cancer

  8. Randomized controlled trial of storytelling compared to a personal risk tool intervention on colorectal cancer screening in low-income patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkey, Linda K; McClain, Darya; Roe, Denise J; Hector, Richard D; Lopez, Ana Maria; Sillanpaa, Brian; Gonzalez, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Screening rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) lag for low-income, minority populations, contributing to poorer survival rates. A model of storytelling as culture-centric health promotion was tested for promoting CRC screening. A two-group parallel randomized controlled trial. Primary care, safety-net clinics. Low-income patients due for CRC screening, ages 50 to 75 years, speaking English or Spanish. Patients were exposed to either a video created from personal stories composited into a drama about "Papa" receiving CRC screening, or an instrument estimating level of personal cancer risk. Patients received a health care provider referral for CRC screening and were followed up for 3 months to document adherence. Behavioral factors related to the narrative model (identification and engagement) and theory of planned behavior. Main effects of the interventions on screening were tested, controlling for attrition factors, and demographic factor associations were assessed. Path analysis with model variables was used to test the direct effects and multiple mediator models. Main effects on CRC screening (roughly half stool-based tests, half colonoscopy) did not indicate significant differences (37% and 42% screened for storytelling and risk-based messages, respectively; n = 539; 33.6% male; 62% Hispanic). Factors positively associated with CRC screening included being female, Hispanic, married or living with a partner, speaking Spanish, having a primary care provider, lower income, and no health insurance. Engagement, working through positive attitudes toward the behavior, predicted CRC screening. A storytelling and a personalized risk-tool intervention achieved similar levels of screening among unscreened/underscreened, low-income patients. Factors usually associated with lower rates of screening (e.g., no insurance, being Hispanic) were related to more adherence. Both interventions' engagement factor facilitated positive attitudes about CRC screening associated with behavior

  9. How much do cancer-related symptoms contribute to health-related quality of life in lung and colorectal cancer patients? A report from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzik, Kelly M; Ganz, Patricia A; Martin, Michelle Y; Petersen, Laura; Hays, Ron D; Arora, Neeraj; Pisu, Maria

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this study was to examine associations of symptoms with physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and in patients with lung cancer. Patients with newly diagnosed CRC (n = 3040) or lung cancer (n = 2297) who were participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium study completed surveys on general HRQOL and symptoms. HRQOL was measured by using physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores on the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item short-form heath survey. Nonspecific cancer symptoms were measured using items from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core quality-of-life questionnaire. Cancer type-specific modules developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer were used to assess CRC-specific and lung cancer-specific symptoms. For both cancer types, linear regression models that were controlled for demographic and clinical information were used to examine correlations of nonspecific and cancer-specific symptoms with PCS and MCS scores. PCS scores for patients with CRC and lung cancer were below the general population norm of 50 (43 and 37, respectively), and MCS scores were at the population norm. For the CRC sample, in the model that included both symptom indices, an increase in nonspecific symptoms was more strongly associated with lower PCS and MCS scores than an increase in CRC-specific symptoms (PCS, standardized coefficient [β] = -0.41 vs -0.09; MCS, β = -0.38 vs -0.08). In a similar model for lung cancer, increases in lung cancer-specific symptoms were more strongly associated with lower PCS scores (β = -0.34 vs -0.20), whereas nonspecific symptoms were more strongly associated with lower MCS scores (β = -0.34 vs -0.14). Symptoms were associated with HRQOL impairments in recently diagnosed patients. Additional supportive care implemented early in cancer care

  10. Undefined familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Theodoropoulos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers of the world, is actually a spectrum of several subtypes, with different molecular profiles, clinico-pathological characteristics and possibly separate pathways of progression. It is estimated that in approximately 25%-35% of cases, a familial component exists, so they are classified as familial CRC (fCRC). However the known hereditary CRC syndromes justify only up to 5%. The rest are attributed to some inherited genetic predisposition passed to offspring through low-penetrance genes, which in the proper environmental setting can bring on tumorigenesis. Furthermore, part of the familial clustering may be attributed to chance. Because of the complexity regarding the etiology of CRC, the clinician is sometimes faced with obscure patient data, and cannot be sure if they are dealing with fCRC or sporadic CRC. The elucidation of what is going on with the as yet "undefined" portion of CRC will aid not only in the diagnosis, classification and treatment of CRC, but more importantly in the proper adjustment of the screening guidelines and in genetic counselling of patients.

  11. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients qualified to systemic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ziętarska, Monika; Krawczyk-Lipiec, Joanna; Kraj, Leszek; Zaucha, Renata; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Cancer is usually associated with impaired nutritional status, which is one of the factors contributing to the deterioration of the results of surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. The aim of this study was the assessment of the nutritional status of patients with CRC qualified to chemotherapy. Material and methods Seventy-five persons aged 40–86 years with colorectal cancer were examined. To evaluate the nutritional status NRS 2002, SGA, SCRINIO Working Group classificatio...

  12. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients qualified to systemic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Ziętarska; Joanna Krawczyk-Lipiec; Leszek Kraj; Renata Zaucha; Sylwia Małgorzewicz

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study . Cancer is usually associated with impaired nutritional status, which is one of the factors contributing to the deterioration of the results of surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. The aim of this study was the assessment of the nutritional status of patients with CRC qualified to chemotherapy. Material and methods : Seventy-five persons aged 40–86 years with colorectal cancer were examined. To evaluate the nutritional status NRS 2002, SGA, SCRINIO Working Group...

  13. Avoiding restorative proctocolectomy for colorectal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis based on preoperative diagnosis involving p53 immunostaining: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Haruki; Shimomura, Manabu; Hinoi, Takao; Egi, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Koji; Yano, Takuya; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Saitou, Yasufumi; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Miguchi, Masashi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-03-26

    The standard operation for colitic cancer in ulcerative colitis (UC) is restorative proctocolectomy; however, sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) can coincidentally arise in patients with UC and the optimal procedure remains controversial. Therefore, it is crucial to preoperatively determine whether the CRC in UC is a sporadic or colitic cancer. We report a case of avoiding proctocolectomy for sporadic CRC in a patient with UC based on preoperative diagnosis involving p53 immunostaining. A 73-year-old man with CRC in UC had undergone sigmoid colectomy with lymphadenectomy because of the submucosal deep invasion pathologically after endoscopic mucosal resection. The cancer was diagnosed sporadic cancer preoperatively not only based on the endoscopic, clinical, and histological patterns but also that the colon epithelium was unlikely to develop dysplasia as the circumference and unaffected UC mucosa did not detect p53 protein overexpression. Recent reports have shown that the immunohistochemical detection of p53 protein overexpression can be useful for a differential diagnosis and as a predictor of dysplasia and colitic cancer. The analysis of p53 mutation status based on immunostaining of p53 protein expression in the unaffected UC mucosa can be useful for the decision regarding a surgical procedure for CRC in patients with UC.

  14. Colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary referral centre in Malaysia: a five year follow-up review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mohd Radzniwan A; Aziz, Aznida Firzah Abdul; Ahmad, Saharuddin; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Sagap, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major malignancies in the world. In Malaysia, CRC is fast becoming the commonest cause of cancer death. Its etiology is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. This study looked at the profile and outcome of five-year follow-up of patients with CRC. Retrospective case review study done on CRC patients at University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Patientsandapos; socio-demographic characteristics, modalities of treatment, cancer characteristics and outcome at 5-year follow up were extracted from the case records. A total of 107 case records of patients were analyzed. Peak age of CRC presentation was 40-69 years (71.1%). Male to female ratio was 1.2:1 with Chinese predominance (52.3%). Anaemia and its related symptoms including per rectal bleeding was the commonest clinical presentation. The median duration of clinical presentation was 13 weeks (IQR 21.8). More than two-thirds presented as non-emergency cases (69.2%). Most patients presented with Dukes C stage (40.2%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 40% with local recurrence rate of 19.6%. Metastasis after curative-intend treatment (surgery with adjuvant therapy) developed in 26% of patients. Lower recurrence (p = 0.016, OR = 0.205) and metastatic disease (p = 0.02, OR = 0.24) found among the Chinese patients. Almost half of the patients defaulted follow up care (43%), most often within the first year of treatment (22.4%) and the Chinese were the least likely to default (p= 0.04, OR = 0.45). Socio-demographic profile of CRC patients in UKMMC is comparable to Asia pacific region. Apparent delay in seeking treatment gives rise to poor overall survival and local recurrence rates.

  15. Frequency of hereditary colorectal cancer in Uruguayans patients with non polipotic colorectal cancer; Frecuencia de cancer colorrectal hereditario no polipotico en pacientes uruguayos con cancer colorrectal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarroca, C.; Della Valle, A.; Fresco, R.; Peltomaki, P.; Lynch, H. [Hospital Central de las Fuerzas Armadas, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2010-12-15

    Full text: Colonic Cancer Family Polipótic not (CCFNP) is a syndrome transmission autosomal dominant characterized by the aggregation of colorectal cancer (CCR), frequently associated with other solid tumors. Few studies have investigated CCFNP frequency in colorectal cancer patients. these have shown marked geographic variation (0.3% to 13%). The objective of this study is to estimate the frequency of a population CCFNP CCR carriers Uruguayan cancer patients. All patients consecutively operated CRC were included in the Hospital Central Armed Forces (Montevideo, Uruguay) between 1987 and 2003. The cases were classified into 3 groups: 1) those who met the criteria Amsterdam (CCFNP), 2) those who did not meet these criteria but considered as a population of increased risk of cancer based on family history / staff (PRI), and 3) sporadic CRC. Genetic analysis was performed for Detection of mutations in hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 gene in patients subgroup 1. 461 patients were included, with a median age of 66 years. The subgroup 1 represented 2.5% 2 5.6% and 91.8% sporadic CRC. 75% of cases CCFNP were classified as under 55. Mutations in hMLH1 / hMSH2/hMSH6 were found in 16.6% of cases included in the subgroup 1 (2 in hMLH1, 1 in hMSH2, hMSH6 none). The proportion of patients who met the Amsterdam criteria matches with that observed by other authors. However, the percentage of cases classified CCFNP identified as carriers of mutations is lower than that reported (16.6% vs. ~ 70%). This may reflect a different genetic profile Uruguayan population.

  16. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  17. Effects of a psycho-educational programme on health-related quality of life in patients treated for colorectal and anal cancer: A feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson-Nevo, Emma; Karlsson, Jan; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) may have a negative impact on a person's quality of life. Psycho-educational interventions for patients with CRC are rarely studied. The purpose of this feasibility trial was to evaluate the effect of a psycho-educational programme (PEP) on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients treated for CRC and anal cancer. Patients with CRC and anal cancer were randomly assigned to a PEP (n = 47) or standard treatment (n = 39). The PEP included informative lectures, discussion, and reflection. HRQL was evaluated using the SF-36 at baseline and 1, 6, and 12 months after the end of the PEP. Patients in the PEP group had significantly better Mental Health scores after 1 month and significantly better Bodily Pain scores after 6 months compared with patients who received standard care. The results of this study indicate that a PEP can have a short-term effect on the mental health and bodily pain of patients treated for CRC and anal cancer when comparing with a control group. The article discusses the methodological difficulties of evaluating an intervention such as this PEP in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Identification of serum angiopoietin-2 as a biomarker for clinical outcome of colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab-containing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, V; Coutelle, O; Neuneier, J; Reinacher-Schick, A; Schnell, R; Koslowsky, T C; Weihrauch, M R; Cremer, B; Kashkar, H; Odenthal, M; Augustin, H G; Schmiegel, W; Hallek, M; Hacker, U T

    2010-10-26

    The combination of chemotherapy with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab is a standard of care in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, biomarkers predicting outcome of bevacizumab-containing treatment are lacking. As angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is a key regulator of vascular remodelling in concert with VEGF, we investigated its role as a biomarker in metastatic CRC. Serum Ang-2 levels were measured in 33 healthy volunteers and 90 patients with CRC. Of these, 34 had metastatic disease and received bevacizumab-containing therapy. To determine the tissue of origin of Ang-2, quantitative real-time PCR was performed on microdissected cryosections of human CRC and in a murine xenograft model of CRC using species-specific amplification. Ang-2 originated from the stromal compartment of CRC tissues. Serum Ang-2 levels were significantly elevated in patients with metastatic CRC compared with healthy controls. Amongst patients receiving bevacizumab-containing treatment, low pre-therapeutic serum Ang-2 levels were associated with a significant better response rate (82 vs 31%; Panti-angiogenic treatment.

  19. Sarcopenia is linked to treatment toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Antoun, Sami; Dalban, Cécile; Malka, David; Mansourbakht, Touraj; Zaanan, Aziz; Latko, Ewa; Taieb, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy toxicity could be linked to decreased skeletal muscle (sarcopenia). We evaluated the effect of sarcopenia on chemotherapy toxicity among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. All consecutive mCRC patients in 3 hospitals were enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Several nutritional indexes and scores were generated. Computed tomography (CT) images were analyzed to evaluate cross-sectional areas of muscle tissue (MT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Toxicities were evaluated in the 2 mo following clinical evaluation. Fifty-one mCRC patients were included in the study. Sarcopenia was observed in 71% of patients (39% of women and 82% of men) whereas only 4% and 18% were considered as underweight using body mass index (BMI) or severely malnourished using the Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), respectively. Grade 3-4 toxicities were observed in 28% of patients. In multivariate analysis including age, sex, BMI, sarcopenia, SAT, and VAT, the only factor associated with Grade 3-4 toxicities was sarcopenia (odds ratio = 13.55; 95% confidence interval [1.08; 169.31], P = 0.043). In mCRC patients undergoing chemotherapy, sarcopenia was much more frequently observed than visible malnutrition. Despite the small number of patients included in our study, we found sarcopenia to be significantly associated with severe chemotherapy toxicity.

  20. Symptom burden & quality of life among patients receiving second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Mark S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bevacizumab (B and cetuximab (C are both approved for use in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in the second-line. We examined patient reported symptom burden during second-line treatment of mCRC. Methods Adult mCRC patients treated in the second-line setting with a regimen that included B, C, or chemotherapy only (O and who had completed ≥ 1 Patient Care Monitor (PCM surveys as part of routine clinical care were drawn from the ACORN Data Warehouse. Primary endpoints were rash, dry skin, itching, nail changes, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, burning in hands/feet, and diarrhea. Linear mixed models examined change in PCM scores across B, C and O (B = reference. Results 182 patients were enrolled (B: n = 106, C: n = 38, O: n = 38. Patients were 51% female, 67% Caucasian, with mean age of 62.0 (SD = 12.6. Groups did not differ on demographic or clinical characteristics. The most common second-line regimens were FOLFIRI ± B or C (23.1% and FOLFOX ± B or C (22.5%. Results showed baseline scores to be strongly predictive of second-line symptoms across all PCM items (all p’s  Conclusions Patients receiving second-line treatment for mCRC with B report less symptom burden, especially dermatologic, compared to patients treated with C.

  1. Association between socioeconomic status, surgical treatment and mortality in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, V K; Aarts, M J; Van Grevenstein, W M U; Koopman, M; Van Oijen, M G H; Lemmens, V E; Siersema, P D

    2014-08-01

    High socioeconomic status is associated with better survival in colorectal cancer (CRC). This study investigated whether socioeconomic status is associated with differences in surgical treatment and mortality in patients with CRC. Patients diagnosed with stage I-III CRC between 2005 and 2010 in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry area in the Netherlands were included. Socioeconomic status was determined at a neighbourhood level by combining the mean household income and the mean value of the housing. Some 4422 patients with colonic cancer and 2314 with rectal cancer were included. Patients with colonic cancer and high socioeconomic status were operated on with laparotomy (70·7 versus 77·6 per cent; P = 0·017), had laparoscopy converted to laparotomy (15·7 versus 29·5 per cent; P = 0·008) and developed anastomotic leakage or abscess (9·6 versus 12·6 per cent; P = 0·049) less frequently than patients with low socioeconomic status. These differences remained significant after adjustment for patient and tumour characteristics. In rectal cancer, patients with high socioeconomic status were more likely to undergo resection (96·3 versus 93·7 per cent; P = 0·083), but this was not significant in multivariable analysis (odds ratio (OR) 1·44, 95 per cent confidence interval 0·84 to 2·46). The difference in 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with colonic cancer and high and low socioeconomic status (3·6 versus 6·8 per cent; P socioeconomic status have more favourable surgical treatment characteristics than patients with low socioeconomic status. The lower 30-day postoperative mortality found in patients with colonic cancer and high socioeconomic status is largely explained by patient and surgical factors. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Microsatellite Status of Primary Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Incidence of Postoperative Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Aki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Hata, Keisuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms stratified by the nature of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we revealed it on the basis of the microsatellite (MS) status of primary CRC. We retrospectively reviewed 338 patients with CRC and calculated the risk of neoplasms during postoperative surveillance colonoscopy in association with the MS status of primary CRC. A propensity score method was applied. We identified a higher incidence of metachronous rectal neoplasms after the resection of MS stable CRC than MS instable CRC (adjusted HR 5.74, p=0.04). We also observed a higher incidence of colorectal tubular adenoma in patients with MSS CRC (adjusted hazard ratio 7.09, pcolorectal cancer influenced the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic value of CpG island methylator phenotype among colorectal cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juo, Y Y; Johnston, F M; Zhang, D Y; Juo, H H; Wang, H; Pappou, E P; Yu, T; Easwaran, H; Baylin, S; van Engeland, M; Ahuja, N

    2014-12-01

    Divergent findings regarding the prognostic value of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients exist in current literature. We aim to review data from published studies in order to examine the association between CIMP and CRC prognosis. A comprehensive search for studies reporting disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), or cancer-specific mortality of CRC patients stratified by CIMP is carried out. Study findings are summarized descriptively and quantitatively, using adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) as summary statistics. Thirty-three studies reporting survival in 10 635 patients are included for review. Nineteen studies provide data suitable for meta-analysis. The definition of CIMP regarding gene panel, marker threshold, and laboratory method varies across studies. Pooled analysis shows that CIMP is significantly associated with shorter DFS (pooled HR estimate 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.97, Q = 3.95, I(2) = 0%) and OS (pooled HR estimate 1.43; 95% CI 1.18-1.73, Q = 4.03, I(2) = 0%) among CRC patients irrespective of microsatellite instability (MSI) status. Subgroup analysis of microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC patients also shows significant association between shorter OS (pooled HR estimate 1.37; 95% CI 1.12-1.68, Q = 4.45, I(2) = 33%) and CIMP. Seven studies have explored CIMP's value as a predictive factor on stage II and III CRC patient's DFS after receiving adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy: of these, four studies showed that adjuvant chemotherapy conferred a DFS benefit among CIMP(+) patients, one concluded to the contrary, and two found no significant correlation. Insufficient data was present for statistical synthesis of CIMP's predictive value among CRC patients receiving adjuvant 5-FU therapy. CIMP is independently associated with significantly worse prognosis in CRC patients. However, CIMP's value as a predictive factor in assessing whether adjuvant 5-FU therapy will confer additional survival

  4. TNF-α -308 A allele is associated with an increased risk of distant metastasis in rectal cancer patients from Southwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, an important factor in systematic inflammation, is reportedly involved in several cancer types. The TNF-α -308 G>A (rs1800629 polymorphism in the promoter region influences TNF-α production. The association between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC is not fully understood, especially the connections between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and clinical features of CRC. In this study, TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism was genotyped in 1140 individuals with or without CRC from Southwestern China. In case-control studies, we found no association between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and CRC risk. Analysis of the correlations between TNF-α -308 G>A polymorphism and clinical features of CRC revealed that TNF-α -308 A allele was associated with higher body mass index (BMI larger tumor size, and distant tumor metastasis in all CRC patients. Notably, rectal cancer (a subtype of CRC patients with TNF-α -308 A allele had a very high risk of distant tumor metastasis [odds ratio (OR = 4.481; 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.072-9.693; P = 0.00025]. The association between TNF-α -308 A allele and distant tumor metastasis remained even significant after adjusting all clinical characteristics (OR = 7.099; 95% CI: 2.482-20.301; P = 0.000256 in rectal cancer patients. Our results suggested that TNF-α -308 A allele was significantly associated with distant tumor metastasis in rectal cancer patients.

  5. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Bécouarn, Yves; Belleannée, Geneviève; Pinon, Elodie; Jaffré, Anne; Coureau, Gaëlle; Auby, Dominique; Renaud-Salis, Jean-Louis; Rullier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery), and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN), non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68%) with colon and 381 (32%) with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location); whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care. Guideline compliance was high, although some organizational

  6. Incidence of Second Primary Malignancies Following Colorectal Cancer: A Distinct Pattern of Occurrence Between Colon and Rectal Cancers and Association of Co-Morbidity with Second Primary Malignancies in a Population-Based Cohort of 98,876 Patients in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Ting; Liu, Chia-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Teng, Chung-Jen; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Jen-Kou; Lin, Chun-Chi; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Wang, Huann-Sheng; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Wei-Shone; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chen, Ming-Huang; Teng, Hao-Wei; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Yen, Chueh-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the features of second primary malignancies (SPMs) among patients with prior colorectal cancer (CRC) using a nationwide population-based dataset. Patients with CRC newly diagnosed between 1996 and 2011, and >1 year of follow-up were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of SPMs in patients with CRC were calculated. During the 16-year study period, 4259 SPMs developed among 98,876 CRC patients. The median duration of follow-up was 4.03 years. The SIR for all SPMs was 1.13 (95% confidence interval = 1.10–1.17). Compared with the general population, a higher incidence of thyroid, prostate, ovarian, and hematologic malignancies developed among patients with colon cancer, whereas the risk for bone and soft tissue cancers increased among patients with rectal cancer. The risk for breast, bladder, kidney, lung, and uterine cancers was significantly higher in patients with colon and rectal cancers than the general population. The risk for liver and biliary tract cancers declined in patients with rectal cancer. Based on multivariate analysis among patients with CRC, age ≥70 years, men, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cirrhosis, and dyslipidemia were independent predictors of an SPM. In conclusion, patients with CRC were at increased risk for a second cancer. The pattern of SPMs was distinct between patients with colon and rectal cancer. Age, men, COPD, cirrhosis, and dyslipidemia were independent risk factors for SPMs. Surveillance and education should be provided for survivors with respect to risk for SPMs. PMID:26131831

  7. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  8. Expression of Foxp3 in colorectal cancer but not in Treg cells correlates with disease progression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg expressing the transcription factor forkhead-box protein P3 (Foxp3 have been identified to counteract anti-tumor immune responses during tumor progression. Besides, Foxp3 presentation by cancer cells itself may also allow them to evade from effector T-cell responses, resulting in a survival benefit of the tumor. For colorectal cancer (CRC the clinical relevance of Foxp3 has not been evaluated in detail. Therefore the aim of this study was to study its impact in colorectal cancer (CRC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene and protein analysis of tumor tissues from patients with CRC was performed to quantify the expression of Foxp3 in tumor infiltrating Treg and colon cancer cells. The results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and patients overall survival. Serial morphological analysis demonstrated Foxp3 to be expressed in cancer cells. High Foxp3 expression of the cancer cells was associated with poor prognosis compared to patients with low Foxp3 expression. In contrast, low and high Foxp3 level in tumor infiltrating Treg cells demonstrated no significant differences in overall patient survival. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings strongly suggest that Foxp3 expression mediated by cancer cells rather than by Treg cells contribute to disease progression.

  9. Are metformin, statin and aspirin use still associated with overall mortality among colorectal cancer patients with diabetes if adjusted for one another?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanders, M. M. J.; van Herk-Sukel, M. P. P.; Vissers, P. A. J.; Herings, R. M. C.; Haak, H. R.; van de Poll-Franse, L. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metformin, statin and aspirin use seem associated with decreased mortality in cancer patients, though, without adjusting for one another. Independent associations of these drugs with overall mortality after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis within glucose-lowering drugs (GLDs) users were

  10. Evaluation of the detection of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in cancer development and progression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Stogiannitsi, Maria; Koulouridi, Asimina; Sfakianaki, Maria; Voutsina, Alexandra; Sotiriou, Afroditi; Athanasakis, Elias; Xynos, Evangelos; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Tzardi, Maria; Souglakos, John

    2018-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play essential role in innate and acquired immunity, are expressed in various cell types, and are associated with altered susceptibility to many diseases, and cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate TLR2 (-196 to-174del), TLR4 (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile) and TLR9 (T1237C and T1486C) gene polymorphisms at risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression. Peripheral blood was obtained from 397 patients with adjuvant (stage II/III, n = 202) and metastatic (n = 195) CRC. Moreover, blood samples from 50 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with adenomatous polyps were also included as control groups. DNA from patients and controls was analyzed using PCR and PCR-RFLP for genotyping functional polymorphism within TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 genotypes. TLR2-196 to-174del/del genotype was detected in 76.6% of the patients and was significantly higher that the controls groups (p<0.001). TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR4 Thr399Ile, TLR9 T1237C and T1486C homozygous genotypes were detected in 70.5%, 70.5%, 61.5% and 61.5% of the patients respectively, and were also significantly higher than that in the control groups (p<0.001). All polymorphisms detected were also significantly associated with the metastatic disease (p<0.001) leading to shorter overall survival (p<0.001); whereas, TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms were significantly associated with KRAS mutations. The detection of higher frequencies of the TLR2, TLR4 and/or TLR9 polymorphisms in CRC patients compared with the control groups highlight the role of these polymorphism in CRC development and cancer progression.

  11. Exploratory biomarker analysis for treatment response in KRAS wild type metastatic colorectal cancer patients who received cetuximab plus irinotecan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Ahn, Tae Jin; Lee, Eunjin; Do, In-Gu; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Suk Hyeong; Lee, Jeeyun; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2015-01-01

    More than half of the patients selected based on KRAS mutation status fail to respond to the treatment with cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We designed a study to identify additional biomarkers that could act as indicators for cetuximab treatment in mCRC. We investigated 58 tumor samples from wild type KRAS CRC patients treated with cetuximab plus irinotecan (CI). We conducted the genotyping for mutations in either BRAF or PIK3CA and profiled comprehensively the expression of 522 kinase genes. BRAF mutation was detected in 5.1 % (3/58) of patients. All 50 patients showed wild type PIK3CA. Gene expression patterns that categorized patients with or without the disease control to CI were compared by supervised classification analysis. PSKH1, TLK2 and PHKG2 were overexpressed significantly in patients with the disease control to IC. The higher expression value of PSKH1 (r = 0.462, p < 0.001) and TLK2 (r = 0.361, p = 0.005) had the significant correlation to prolonged PFS. The result of this work demonstrated that expression nature of kinase genes such as PSKH1, TLK2 and PHKG2 may be informative to predict the efficacy of CI in wild type KRAS CRC. Mutations in either BRAF or PIK3CA were rare subsets in wild type KRAS CRC

  12. Association of oncogenic bacteria with colorectal cancer in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youlian; He, Hanchang; Xu, Haoming; Li, Yingfei; Li, Zhiming; Du, Yanlei; He, Jie; Zhou, Yongjian; Wang, Hong; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-12-06

    To quantify Fusobacterium spp., Enterococcus faecalis (E.faecalis), Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and their possible association with CRC clinicopathogical features, we collected the resected tumors and adjacent normal tissues (N) from 97 CRC patients. 48 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) were also recruited. Real-time PCR was used for bacterial quantification. The median abundance ofFusobacterium spp.(p colon tissue in the proximity of the tumor.

  13. Deletions at SLC18A1 increased the risk of CRC and lower SLC18A1 expression associated with poor CRC outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Li, Zhenli; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Dan; Tang, Shunli; Yin, Xiaoyang; Xu, Fangying; Li, Hui; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Tao; Deng, Hong; Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Qiong; Wang, Jing; Yin, Wei; Zhu, Yimin; Lai, Maode

    2017-10-26

    Copy number variations (CNVs) contribute to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a two-stage association study to identify CNV risk loci for CRC. We performed a gene-based rare CNV study on 694 sporadic CRC and 1641 controls using Illumina Human-OmniExpress-12v1.0 BeadChips, and further replicated in 934 CRC cases and 2680 controls for risk CNVs by using TaqMan Copy Number Assay. Tumor buddings, cancer cells in the center of primary tumor and normal intestinal epithelial cells were captured using laser capture microdissection (LCM) and were assayed using AffymetrixGeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. In addition, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Gene Expression Omnibus data were assessed for the effects of risk CNVs. We found that germline deletions affecting the last six exons of SLC18A1 significantly associated with CRC with a combined P value of 6.4 × 10-5 by a two-stage analysis. Both in TCGA CRC RNA seq dataset and GDS4382, SLC18A1 was significantly down regulated in CRC tissues than in paired normal tissues (N = 32 and 17 pairs, P = 0.004 and 0.009, respectively). In LCM samples, similar observations were obtained that the expression levels of SLC18A1 in the tumor buddings, cancer cells in the center of primary tumor, and stroma of both tumor budding and cancer cells were lower than normal intestinal epithelial and stromal cells (fold change = 0.17-0.62, 0.12-0.57 and 0.37-0.68, respectively). In summary, the germline deletions at SLC18A1 contributed to the development of CRC. The role of SLC18A1 required further exploration. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Prognostic evaluation of platelet to lymphocyte ratio in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chong; Gao, Peng; Yang, Yuchong; Chen, Xiaowan; Wang, Longyi; Yu, Dehao; Song, Yongxi; Xu, Qingzhou; Wang, Zhenning

    2017-10-17

    Growing evidence indicates that inflammation plays an important role in cancer progression and prognosis; however, the prognostic role of platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. A cohort of 1845 CRC patients from the Department of Surgical Oncology at The First Hospital of China Medical University (CMU-SO) was retrospectively analyzed. Harrell's concordance index (c-index) was used to determine the optimal cut-off value of PLR and evaluate its predictive ability. Our results from CMU-SO indicated that the overall survival (OS) rate was significantly lower in the high-PLR group compared with the low-PLR group ( P = 0.001). A similar result was observed for the cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate between these two groups ( P = 0.001). The multivariate analysis indicated that high PLR was an independent prognostic indicator of poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.356, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.117-1.647, P = 0.002) and CSS (HR = 1.364, 95% CI = 1.111-1.675, P = 0.003). In addition, the c-indexes of TNM staging combined with PLR were greater than those of TNM staging alone (OS: 0.768 vs. 0.732; CSS: 0.785 vs. 0.746). In conclusion, elevated PLR is a negative prognostic indicator of CRC and may serve as an additional index of the current TNM staging system for predicting CRC.

  15. PTEN expression is consistent in colorectal cancer primaries and metastases and associates with patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atreya, Chloe E; Sangale, Zaina; Xu, Nafei; Matli, Mary R; Tikishvili, Eliso; Welbourn, William; Stone, Steven; Shokat, Kevan M; Warren, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) negatively regulates the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. In colorectal cancer (CRC), observed frequencies of loss of PTEN expression, concordant expression in primary tumors and metastases, and the association of PTEN status with outcome vary markedly by detection method. We determined the degree to which PTEN expression is consistent in 70 matched human CRC primaries and liver metastases using a validated immunohistochemistry assay. We found loss of PTEN expression in 12.3% of assessable CRC primaries and 10.3% of assessable liver metastases. PTEN expression (positive or negative) was concordant in 98% of matched colorectal primaries and liver metastases. Next we related PTEN status to mutations in RAS and PI3K pathway genes (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) and to overall survival (OS). PTEN expression was not significantly associated with the presence or absence of mutations in RAS or PI3K pathway genes. The median OS of patients whose tumors did not express PTEN was 9 months, compared to 49 months for patients whose tumors did express PTEN (HR = 6.25, 95% confidence intervals (CI) (1.98, 15.42), P = 0.0017). The association of absent PTEN expression with increased risk of death remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR = 6.31, 95% CI (2.03, 17.93), P = 0.0023). In summary, PTEN expression was consistent in matched CRC primaries and in liver metastases. Therefore, future investigations of PTEN in metastatic CRC can use primary tumor tissue. In patients with liver-only metastases, loss of PTEN expression predicted poor OS. We observed concordant PTEN expression in 98% of colorectal cancer (CRC) primary and liver metastasis pairs using a validated immunohistochemistry assay. Consistent PTEN expression at both disease sites is significant because tumor tissue is usually available from CRC primaries but not metastases. Loss of PTEN expression associated with poor survival of

  16. ABC-Transporter Expression Does Not Correlate with Response to Irinotecan in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trumpi, K.; Emmink, B. L.; Prins, A. M.; van Oijen, M. G. H.; van Diest, P. J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Kranenburg, O.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Active efflux of irinotecan by ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters, in particular ABCB1 and ABCG2, is a well-established drug resistance mechanism in vitro and in pre-clinical mouse models, but its relevance in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the

  17. Lymph node status as a prognostic factor after palliative resection of primary tumor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingguo; Wang, Changjian; Li, Yaqi; Li, Xinxiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, Guoxiang; Lian, Peng; Cai, Sanjun

    2017-07-18

    Lymph node (LN) status is one of the most important predictors for M0 colorectal cancer patients. However, its clinical impact on stage IV colorectal cancer remains unclear. The study aimed to explore the prognostic value of LN status after palliative resection of primary tumor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We combined analyses of mCRC patients in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database and Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC).A total of 17,553 patients with mCRC were identified in SEER database. X-tile program was adopted to identify 2 and 10 as optimal cutoff values for negative lymph node (NLN) count to divide patients into 3 subgroups of high, middle and low risk of cancer related death. N stage and NLN count were verified as independent prognostic factors in multivariate analyses of patients in whole cohort and in subgroup analyses of each N stage (Pcolorectal cancer. Advanced N stage and small number of NLN were correlated with high risk of cancer related death after palliative resection of primary tumor.

  18. Gene expression profiling demonstrates WNT/β-catenin pathway genes alteration in Mexican patients with colorectal cancer and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivonne Wence-Chavez, Laura; Palomares-Chacon, Ulises; Pablo Flores-Gutierrez, Juan; Felipe Jave-Suarez, Luis; Del Carmen Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Barros-Nunez, Patricio; Esperanza Flores-Martinez, Silvia; Sanchez-Corona, Jose; Alejandra Rosales-Reynoso, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown a strong association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The fundamental mechanisms that support this association are not entirely understood; however, it is believed that hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia may be involved. Some proposed mechanisms include upregulation of mitogenic signaling pathways like MAPK, PI3K, mTOR, and WNT, which are involved in cell proliferation, growth, and cancer cell survival. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression profile and identify differently expressed genes involved in mitogenic pathways in CRC patients with and without DM. In this study, microarray analysis of gene expression followed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed in cancer tissue from CRC patients with and without DM to identify the gene expression profiles and validate the differently expressed genes. Among the study groups, some differently expressed genes were identified. However, when bioinformatics clustering tools were used, a significant modulation of genes involved in the WNT pathway was evident. Therefore, we focused on genes participating in this pathway, such as WNT3A, LRP6, TCF7L2, and FRA-1. Validation of the expression levels of those genes by qPCR showed that CRC patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) expressed significantly more WNT3Ay LRP6, but less TCF7L2 and FRA-1 compared to controls, while in CRC patients with DM the expression levels of WNT3A, LRP6, TCF7L2, and FRA-1 were significantly higher compared to controls. Our results suggest that WNT/β-catenin pathway is upregulated in patients with CRC and DM, demonstrating its importance and involvement in both pathologies.

  19. Serum concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin is significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Blanco, Ignacio; Menéndez, Manuel; Rodrigo, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The association between alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently controversial. The present study compares AAT serum concentrations and gene frequencies between a group of CRC patients and a control group of healthy unrelated people (HUP). 267 CRC subjects (63% males, 72 ± 10 years old) were enlisted from a Hospital Clinic setting in Asturias, Spain. The HUP group comprised 327 subjects (67% males, mean age 70 ± 7.5 years old) from the same geographical region. Outcome measures were AAT serum concentrations measured by nephelometry, and AAT phenotyping characterization by isoelectric focusing. Significantly higher serum concentrations were found among CRC (208 ± 60) than in HUP individuals (144 ± 20.5) (p = 0.0001). No differences were found in the phenotypic distribution of the Pi*S and Pi*Z allelic frequencies (p = 0.639), although the frequency of Pi*Z was higher in CRC (21%) than in HUP subjects (15%). The only statistically significant finding in this study was the markedly higher AAT serum concentrations found in CRC subjects compared with HUP controls, irrespective of whether their Pi* phenotype was normal (Pi*MM) or deficient (Pi*MS, Pi*MZ and Pi*SZ). Although there was a trend towards the more deficient Pi* phenotype the more advanced the tumor, the results were inconclusive due to the small sample size. Consequently, more powerful studies are needed to reach firmer conclusions on this matter

  20. Prognostic Significance of Pre-operative FDG-PET in Colorectal Cancer Patients with Hepatic Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Sang; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Duck Woo; Kang, Sung Bum; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Keun Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic value of preoperative FDG-PET in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with hepatic metastasis (HM). 24 CRC patients (M:F=14:10; age, 63{+-}10 yrs) with HM who had undergone preoperative FDG PET were included. Cure-intent surgery was performed in all the patients and HMs were controlled using resection (n=13), radio-frequency ablation (RFA) (n=7), and resection plus RFA (n=4). Potential prognostic markers tested were maxSUV of primary tumor, maxSUV of HM, maxSUV ratio of HM over primary tumor (M/P ratio), histologic grade, CEA level, venous/lymphatic/nerve invasion, T stage, N stage, no. of HM, no. of lymph node metastasis, and treatment modality of HM. 14 CRC patients developed a recurrence with a median follow-up duration of 244 days, whereas 10 patients did not develop recurrence with a median follow-up duration of 504 days. M/P ratios but other potential prognostic markers were significantly higher in the recurrent patients (0.72{+-}0.14) than recurrence-free patients (0.54{+-}0.23) (p=0.038). M/P ratio only was found to predict recurrence by Cox multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 37.7, 95% confidence interval 2.01-706.1, p=0.016). The 11 patients with lower M/P ratio of <0.61 had significantly better disease-free survival rate than the 13 patients with higher M/P ratio ({>=}0.61) (p=0.026). maxSUV ratio of HM over primary tumor (M/P ratio) may be useful for prognosis prediction of CRC patients with HM. Higher FDG uptake of HM than that of primary tumor may indicate a more advanced status in stage IV CRC.

  1. Improving the Yield of Histological Sampling in Patients With Suspected Colorectal Cancer During Colonoscopy by Introducing a Colonoscopy Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gado, Ahmed; Ebeid, Basel; Abdelmohsen, Aida; Axon, Anthony

    2011-08-01

    Masses discovered by clinical examination, imaging or endoscopic studies that are suspicious for malignancy typically require biopsy confirmation before treatment is initiated. Biopsy specimens may fail to yield a definitive diagnosis if the lesion is extensively ulcerated or otherwise necrotic and viable tumor tissue is not obtained on sampling. The diagnostic yield is improved when multiple biopsy samples (BSs) are taken. A colonoscopy quality-assurance program (CQAP) was instituted in 2003 in our institution. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of instituting a CQAP on the yield of histological sampling in patients with suspected colorectal cancer (CRC) during colonoscopy. Initial assessment of colonoscopy practice was performed in 2003. A total of five patients with suspected CRC during colonoscopy were documented in 2003. BSs confirmed CRC in three (60%) patients and were nondiagnostic in two (40%). A quality-improvement process was instituted which required a minimum six BSs with adequate size of the samples from any suspected CRC during colonoscopy. A total of 37 patients for the period 2004-2010 were prospectively assessed. The diagnosis of CRC was confirmed with histological examination of BSs obtained during colonoscopy in 63% of patients in 2004, 60% in 2005, 50% in 2006, 67% in 2007, 100% in 2008, 67% in 2009 and 100% in 2010. The yield of histological sampling increased significantly ( p quality assurance and improvement program increased the yield of histological sampling in patients with suspected CRC during colonoscopy.

  2. Clinical Significance and Prognostic Relevance of Microsatellite Instability in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Copija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability (MSI is a marker of the replication error phenotype. It is caused by impaired DNA mismatch repair processes (MMR, resulting in ineffectiveness of the mechanisms responsible for the DNA replication precision and postreplicative DNA repair. MSI underlies the pathogenesis of 10%–20% of colorectal cancer (CRC cases. The data about the potential value of MMR status as a predictive factor for 5-fluorouracil (FU-based chemotherapy remain unclear. According to National Comprehensive Cancer Network updated guidelines, MSI testing is recommended for all patients with stage II CRC because patients with MSI-H (high-frequency MSI tumour may have a good prognosis and obtain no benefit from 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy. The significance of the MSI status as a predictive factor for patients with metastatic disease was not confirmed. The association between the MSI status and the efficacy of the therapy based on anti-programmed death-1 receptor inhibitors requires further studies.

  3. Genetic polymorphism in a VEGF-independent angiogenesis gene ANGPT1 and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients after surgical resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyao Dai

    Full Text Available The VEGF-independent angiogenic signaling plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its implication in the clinical outcome of CRC has not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the association between genetic variations in several major VEGF-independent signaling pathway genes and the overall survival of CRC patients.Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in four important VEGF-independent angiogenic genes (ANGPT1, AMOT, DLL4 and ENG were genotyped in a Chinese population with 408 CRC patients.One SNP, rs1954727 in ANGPT1, was significantly associated with CRC overall survival. Compared to patients with the homozygous wild-type genotype of rs1954727, those with heterozygous and homozygous variant genotypes exhibited a favorable overall survival with a hazard ratio (HR of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.43, P = 0.623, and 0.32 (95% CI 0.15-0.71, P = 0.005, respectively (P trend = 0.008. In stratified analysis, this association remained significant in patients receiving chemotherapy (P trend = 0.012, but not in those without chemotherapy. We further evaluated the effects of chemotherapy on CRC survival that was stratified by rs1954727 genotypes. We found that chemotherapy resulted in a significantly better overall survival in the CRC patients (HR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.75, P = 0.002, which was especially prominent in those patients with the heterozygous genotype of rs1954727 (HR = 0.45, 95%CI 0.22-0.92, P = 0.028.Our data suggest that rs1954727 in ANGPT1 gene might be a prognostic biomarker for the overall survival of CRC patients, especially in those receiving chemotherapy, a finding that warrants validation in larger independent populations.

  4. Audit of the introduction of CT colonography for detection of colorectal carcinoma in a non-academic environment and its implications for the national bowel cancer screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.; Atchley, J.; Higginson, A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare the sensitivity of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) with computed tomography colonography (CTC) to determine whether CTC is superior for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) locally, and to compare the results to those of a national barium enema audit. Materials and methods: All patients undergoing diagnostic DCBE or CTC between January 2003 and December 2005 were identified from the picture archiving communication system (PACS). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CRC were identified from the local cancer registry. Patients who were not diagnosed as having CRC on imaging were assumed true negatives if they were not listed in the cancer registry by December 2007, giving a minimum of 2 years follow-up. DCBE and CTC reports of all patients with CRC were analysed, and cancer detection was considered to have occurred (positive test result) if the report stated the definite presence of CRC or possible CRC requiring further investigation. Results: 2520 DCBEs and 604 CTCs were included. Twenty-one of 33 patients with CRC were detected using DCBE (incidence 1.31%, sensitivity 63.7%). Thirty-two of 33 patients with CRC were -detected using CTC (incidence 5.46%, sensitivity 97.7%). Conclusion: CTC is more sensitive for the detection of CRC, and its introduction in a district general hospital is justified. However, there has been a consequent decline in DCBE sensitivity, which, if reflected nationally, suggests CTC is the preferential screening test for CRC

  5. Audit of the introduction of CT colonography for detection of colorectal carcinoma in a non-academic environment and its implications for the national bowel cancer screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S. [Department of Radiology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Cosham, Portsmouth PO3 6AD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Susan.Thomas@porthosp.nhs.uk; Atchley, J.; Higginson, A. [Department of Radiology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Southwick Hill Road, Cosham, Portsmouth PO3 6AD (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Aim: To compare the sensitivity of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) with computed tomography colonography (CTC) to determine whether CTC is superior for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) locally, and to compare the results to those of a national barium enema audit. Materials and methods: All patients undergoing diagnostic DCBE or CTC between January 2003 and December 2005 were identified from the picture archiving communication system (PACS). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CRC were identified from the local cancer registry. Patients who were not diagnosed as having CRC on imaging were assumed true negatives if they were not listed in the cancer registry by December 2007, giving a minimum of 2 years follow-up. DCBE and CTC reports of all patients with CRC were analysed, and cancer detection was considered to have occurred (positive test result) if the report stated the definite presence of CRC or possible CRC requiring further investigation. Results: 2520 DCBEs and 604 CTCs were included. Twenty-one of 33 patients with CRC were detected using DCBE (incidence 1.31%, sensitivity 63.7%). Thirty-two of 33 patients with CRC were -detected using CTC (incidence 5.46%, sensitivity 97.7%). Conclusion: CTC is more sensitive for the detection of CRC, and its introduction in a district general hospital is justified. However, there has been a consequent decline in DCBE sensitivity, which, if reflected nationally, suggests CTC is the preferential screening test for CRC.

  6. Psychological distress in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients following microsatellite instability testing for Lynch syndrome on the pathologist's initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsbergen, K M; Prins, J B; Brunner, H G; van Duijvendijk, P; Nagengast, F M; van Krieken, J H; Ligtenberg, M; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2012-06-01

    According to the Dutch Guideline on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer published in 2008, patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) should undergo microsatellite instability (MSI) testing by a pathologist immediately after tumour resection if they are younger than 50 years, or if a second CRC has been diagnosed before the age of 70 years, owing to the high risk of Lynch syndrome (MIPA). The aim of the present MIPAPS study was to investigate general distress and cancer-specific distress following MSI testing. From March 2007 to September 2009, 400 patients who had been tested for MSI after newly diagnosed CRC were recruited from 30 Dutch hospitals. Levels of general distress (SCL-90) and cancer-specific distress (IES) were assessed immediately after MSI result disclosure (T1) and 6 months later (T2). Response rates were 23/77 (30%) in the MSI-positive patients and 58/323 (18%) in the MSI-negative patients. Levels of general distress and cancer-specific distress were moderate. In the MSI-positive group, 27% of the patients had high general distress at T1 versus 18% at T2 (p = 0.5), whereas in the MSI-negative group, these percentage were 14 and 18% (p = 0.6), respectively. At T1 and T2, cancer-specific distress rates in the MSI-positive group and MSI-negative group were 39 versus 27% (p = 0.3) and 38 versus 36% (p = 1.0), respectively. High levels of general distress were correlated with female gender, low social support and high perceived cancer risk. Moderate levels of distress were observed after MSI testing, similar to those found in other patients diagnosed with CRC. Immediately after result disclosure, high cancer-specific distress was observed in 40% of the MSI-positive patients.

  7. 5-ASA - colorectal cancer - cell death : an intriguing threesome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelink, Pim Johan

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complicated disease in which both genetic pre-desposition and environmental factors are important. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of developing CRC, and it is believed that treatment of IBD patients with 5-Aminosalicylic acid

  8. Importance of circulating tumor cells in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalum, Guus; Stam, Gerrit-Jan; Scholten, Loes F.A.; Mastboom, Walter J.B.; Vermes, I.; Tibbe, Arjan G.J.; De Groot, Marco R.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2015-01-01

    Presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) is associated with poor prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study was conducted to determine if the presence of CTC prior to surgery and during follow‑up in patients with newly diagnosed non-metastatic CRC can identify

  9. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied retrospectively tumor samples of 83 Saudi metastatic CRC patients for KRAS mutations in codon 12 and codon 13, to evaluate the relevance of KRAS mutation positive colorectal cancers with metastatic sites. KRAS mutation was observed in 42.2% (35/83) patients with CRC. The most common mutations were in ...

  10. Cathepsin X in serum from patients with colorectal cancer: relation to prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizin, Tjasa; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Kos, Janko

    2012-01-01

    Background Up-regulation of lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin X (Cat X) is associated with disorders of the immune system and neurodegenerative diseases, while its role in the development and progression of cancer is less understood. Enhanced secretion of pro-Cat X was observed in malignant processes, and therefore, the level of total serum Cat X rather than the active enzyme may better reflect the tumour status. Patients and methods Seventy-seven patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) were included in a retrospective study. Blood samples were collected prior to therapy. Using ELISA, the values of total Cat X were measured in serum. Groups of healthy persons (n=77), patients with adenomas (n=77) and patients with non-neoplastic findings (n=77) were included. Results Significant differences between the group of colorectal patients and the groups of healthy persons, adenoma patients and patients with non-malignant findings could not be shown (p=0.89). Within the group of CRC, higher levels of total Cat X significantly correlated to shorter overall survival (HR=2.08, 95% CI:1.07–4.05, p=0.028). Conclusions Total serum Cat X could be a useful prognostic indicator for determining survival of patients with CRC. Increased serum levels of total Cat X may reflect more aggressive tumour cell phenotypes and suggest the involvement of Cat X in processes involved in later stages of tumour progression. PMID:23077459

  11. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  12. Preoperative body size and composition, habitual diet, and post-operative complications in elective colorectal cancer patients in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstad, P; Haugum, B; Helgeland, M; Bukholm, I; Almendingen, K

    2013-08-01

    Both malnutrition and obesity are related to worsened post-operative outcomes after colorectal surgery. Obese cancer patients may be malnourished as a result of short-term weight loss. The present study aimed to evaluate preoperative nutritional status, body composition and dietary intake related to post-operative complications (POC) and post-operative hospital days (POHD) in elective colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Anthropometry, body composition measured by bioelectric spectroscopy and dietary habits assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire were examined in 100 newly-diagnosed CRC patients. Data from 30-day POC and POHD were collected from medical records. Nonparametric and chi-squared tests and logistic regression were used to analyse associations between body and dietary variables and post-operative outcome. Twenty-nine patients had at least one POC. The median POHD was six. Body size and composition measures and short-term weight loss were no different between patients with and without POC, or between patients with POHD body size, body composition and short-term weight loss were not related to 30-day post-operative outcomes in CRC patients. A high content of marine n-3 PUFA in preoperative habitual diets may protect against POC after CRC surgery. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. Limitations in SELDI-TOF MS whole serum proteomic profiling with IMAC surface to specifically detect colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qi; Gu, Jin; Shen, Jing; Li, Zhen-fu; Jie, Jian-zheng; Wang, Wen-yue; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Zhong-tao; Li, Zhi-xia; Yan, Li

    2009-01-01

    Surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) analysis on serum samples was reported to be able to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) from normal or control patients. We carried out a validation study of a SELDI-TOF MS approach with IMAC surface sample processing to identify CRC. A retrospective cohort of 338 serum samples including 154 CRCs, 67 control cancers and 117 non-cancerous conditions was profiled using SELDI-TOF-MS. No CRC 'specific' classifier was found. However, a classifier consisting of two protein peaks separates cancer from non-cancerous conditions with high accuracy. In this study, the SELDI-TOF-MS-based protein expression profiling approach did not perform to identify CRC. However, this technique is promising in distinguishing patients with cancer from a non-cancerous population; it may be useful for monitoring recurrence of CRC after treatment

  14. Effects of Colorectal Cancer Screening on Population Health: a modeling assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the Netherlands and other developed countries. Each year, more than 10,000 cases are newly diagnosed in the Netherlands and over 1 million worldwide. About half of these patients die of the disease. CRC is most

  15. The Preoperative Peripheral Blood Monocyte Count Is Associated with Liver Metastasis and Overall Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shidong; Zou, Zhenyu; Li, Hao; Zou, Guijun; Li, Zhao; Xu, Jian; Wang, Lingde; Du, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in males and the second most common in females worldwide. Distant metastases have a strong negative impact on the prognosis of CRC patients. The most common site of CRC metastases is the liver. Both disease progression and metastasis have been related to the patient's peripheral blood monocyte count. We therefore performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between the preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count and colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Clinical data from 117 patients with colon cancer and 93 with rectal cancer who were admitted to the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital (Beijing, China) between December 2003 and May 2015 were analysed retrospectively, with the permission of both the patients and the hospital. Preoperative peripheral blood monocyte counts, the T and N classifications of the primary tumour and its primary site differed significantly between the two groups (P colon cancer (OR: 0.078, 95%CI: 0.020~0.309, P 0.505 × 109 cells/L, high T classification and liver metastasis were independent risk factors for 5-year OS (RR: 2.737, 95% CI: 1.573~ 4.764, P <0.001; RR: 2.687, 95%CI: 1.498~4.820, P = 0.001; RR: 4.928, 95%CI: 2.871~8.457, P < 0.001). The demonstrated association between preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count and liver metastasis in patients with CRC recommends the former as a useful predictor of postoperative prognosis in CRC patients.

  16. Cell-free DNA in healthy individuals, noncancerous disease and strong prognostic value in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Appelt, Ane L; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate total cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients during treatment with second-line chemotherapy and in healthy controls and patients with different comorbidities. Patient treated with second-line irinotecan for metastatic CRC (n = 100), a cohort...

  17. Primary care colorectal cancer screening correlates with breast cancer screening: implications for colorectal cancer screening improvement interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Pandhi, Nancy; Kraft, Sally; Potvien, Aaron; Carayon, Pascale; Smith, Maureen A

    2018-04-25

    National colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have plateaued. To optimize interventions targeting those unscreened, a better understanding is needed of how this preventive service fits in with multiple preventive and chronic care needs managed by primary care providers (PCPs). This study examines whether PCP practices of other preventive and chronic care needs correlate with CRC screening. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 90 PCPs and 33,137 CRC screening-eligible patients. Five PCP quality metrics (breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, HgbA1c and LDL testing, and blood pressure control) were measured. A baseline correlation test was performed between these metrics and PCP CRC screening rates. Multivariable logistic regression with clustering at the clinic-level estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for these PCP quality metrics, patient and PCP characteristics, and their relationship to CRC screening. PCP CRC screening rates have a strong correlation with breast cancer screening rates (r = 0.7414, p < 0.001) and a weak correlation with the other quality metrics. In the final adjusted model, the only PCP quality metric that significantly predicted CRC screening was breast cancer screening (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.11-1.42; p < 0.001). PCP CRC screening rates are highly concordant with breast cancer screening. CRC screening is weakly concordant with cervical cancer screening and chronic disease management metrics. Efforts targeting PCPs to increase CRC screening rates could be bundled with breast cancer screening improvement interventions to increase their impact and success.

  18. Virilisation during Pregnancy in a Patient with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Conway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the case of a 25-year-old woman with virilisation occurring during pregnancy in the presence of metastatic colorectal cancer. Virilisation during pregnancy is rare. The potential causes include adrenal, foetal, or ovarian pathologies. The most common causes during pregnancy are pregnancy luteoma and hyperreactio luteinalis. The incidence of cancer during pregnancy is rare and the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in pregnancy is even rarer. The presenting signs and symptoms of CRC can be confused with symptoms commonly encountered during pregnancy, thereby delaying diagnosis and commencement of treatment. Diagnosis and staging also proves more problematic in the pregnant patient as the usual modalities of colonoscopy with biopsy and imaging with CT are relatively contraindicated. Treatment is dependent on gestational age of the foetus. There is currently no agreed best practice as to the role of prophylactic oophorectomy in the prevention of metachronous ovarian metastases. Surgical and adjuvant treatments have implications for females of child-bearing age.

  19. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  20. Protein content and functional characteristics of serum-purified exosomes from patients with colorectal cancer revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyu; Xie, Yong; Xu, Lai; Zhan, Shaohua; Xiao, Yi; Gao, Yanpan; Wu, Bin; Ge, Wei

    2017-02-15

    Tumor cells of colorectal cancer (CRC) release exosomes into the circulation. These exosomes can mediate communication between cells and affect various tumor-related processes in their target cells. We present a quantitative proteomics analysis of the exosomes purified from serum of patients with CRC and normal volunteers; data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003875. We identified 918 proteins with an overlap of 725 Gene IDs in the Exocarta proteins list. Compared with the serum-purified exosomes (SPEs) of normal volunteers, we found 36 proteins upregulated and 22 proteins downregulated in the SPEs of CRC patients. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that upregulated proteins are involved in processes that modulate the pretumorigenic microenvironment for metastasis. In contrast, differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that play critical roles in tumor growth and cell survival were principally downregulated. Our study demonstrates that SPEs of CRC patients play a pivotal role in promoting the tumor invasiveness, but have minimal influence on putative alterations in tumor survival or proliferation. According to bioinformatics analysis, we speculate that the protein contents of exosomes might be associated with whether they are involved in premetastatic niche establishment or growth and survival of metastatic tumor cells. This information will be helpful in elucidating the pathophysiological functions of tumor-derived exosomes, and aid in the development of CRC diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2016 UICC.

  1. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  2. The Gene Polymorphism of the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Correlates with Tumor Size and Patient Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Röcken

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the putative significance of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE in colorectal cancer (CRC biology. Local expression of ACE was investigated by quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry in CRCs and adenomas. ACE insertion (I/deletion (D polymorphism was studied in 141 CRC patients and 189 controls. ACE mRNA was upregulated in CRCs compared to corresponding nonlesional tissues (2.5-fold; P = .009. ACE protein was more commonly expressed in adenomas [17 (81 %] and cancer epithelial cells [22 (100%] than in corresponding non-neoplastic crypt and surface epithelium [2 (10% and 2 (9%, respectively]. Thirty-seven CRC patients (26% carried II genotype, 69 (49% carried ID genotype, 35 (25% carried DD genotype. The distribution of the genotypes did not differ from that of controls. Female CRC patients more commonly carried the ID genotype and less frequently the II and DD genotypes compared with male patients (P = .033. Men heterozygous or homozygous for the D-allele had larger tumors compared to carriers of the II genotype (P < .01. Women homozygous for the D-allele lived longer than carriers of the ID and II genotypes. Our study shows that ACE is differentially expressed in CRCs and that gene polymorphism is associated with gender-specific differences in primary tumor size and patient survival.

  3. T cell subpopulations in lymph nodes may not be predictive of patient outcome in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Han-Seung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune response has been proposed to be an important factor in determining patient outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC. Previous studies have concentrated on characterizing T cell populations in the primary tumour where T cells with regulatory effect (Foxp3+ Tregs have been identified as both enhancing and diminishing anti-tumour immune responses. No previous studies have characterized the T cell response in the regional lymph nodes in CRC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse CD4, CD8 or Foxp3+ T cell populations in the regional lymph nodes of patients with stage II CRC (n = 31, with (n = 13 or without (n = 18 cancer recurrence after 5 years of follow up, to determine if the priming environment for anti-tumour immunity was associated with clinical outcome. Results The proportions of CD4, CD8 or Foxp3+ cells in the lymph nodes varied widely between and within patients, and there was no association between T cell populations and cancer recurrence or other clinicopathological characteristics. Conclusions These data indicate that frequency of these T cell subsets in lymph nodes may not be a useful tool for predicting patient outcome.

  4. Prospectively measured lifestyle factors and BMI explain differences in health-related quality of life between colorectal cancer patients with and without comorbid diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, P.A.J.; Thong, M.S.Y.; Pouwer, F.; Creemers, G.-J.; Slooter, G.D.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the longitudinal association between lifestyle factors, body mass index (BMI), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among colorectal cancer patients with (CRCDM+) and without diabetes (CRCDM−). Methods Data from a longitudinal study among CRC patients

  5. Changes in circulating microRNA-126 during treatment with chemotherapy and bevacizumab predicts treatment response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Carlsen, A L; Heegaard, N H H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated the predictive value of circulating microRNA-126 (cir-miRNA-126) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab.METHODS: The study included 68 patients. Blood samples (plasma) were collected b...

  6. Prognostic analysis and comparison of colon cancer in Han and Hui patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Qu-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Peng; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chhetri, Jagadish K

    2014-05-07

    To investigate the relevant prognostic factors and their differences between colorectal cancer (CRC) patients of Chinese Han and Hui ethnicities in the Beijing region. A retrospective analysis of 880 patients diagnosed with CRC at Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University between September 2001 and September 2011 was performed. Among the 880 patients, 398 and 482 were Hui and Han, respectively. Characteristics including sex, age, diet, tumor size, primary tumor site, Dukes' stage and degree of differentiation were analyzed for their influence on prognosis. Data on dietary structures were recorded through a questionnaire survey conducted during the patient's first visit, return visit or follow-up checkups. Among patients with colon cancer, the 5-year survival rate for patients of Hui ethnicity was lower than that for Han patients (P = 0.025). Six risk factors (age of onset, dietary structure, tumor size, Dukes' stage, location of cancer and degree of differentiation) in both Han and Hui patients were identified as prognostic factors (P dietary structure was a statistically significant factor, and diet varied significantly between the two ethnic groups. Dietary structure has a significant influence on colon cancer prognosis among Han and Hui patients with colon cancer in Beijing, which may cause a difference in their survival rates.

  7. Understanding Cancer Worry Among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Schmidt, Alyssa; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Sutton, Steven K; Davis, Stacy N; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Abdulla, Rania; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Schultz, Ida; Roetzheim, Richard; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2018-06-04

    To reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disparities, it is important to understand correlates of different types of cancer worry among ethnically diverse individuals. The current study examined the prevalence of three types of cancer worry (i.e., general cancer worry, CRC-specific worry, and worry about CRC test results) as well as sociodemographic and health-related predictors for each type of cancer worry. Participants were aged 50-75, at average CRC risk, nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines, and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire assessing sociodemographics, health beliefs, healthcare experiences, and three cancer worry measures. Associations between study variables were examined with separate univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Responses from a total of 416 participants were used. Of these, 47% reported experiencing moderate-to-high levels of general cancer worry. Predictors of general cancer worry were salience and coherence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3]), perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3), and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 0.1]). Fewer (23%) reported moderate-to-high levels of CRC-specific worry or CRC test worry (35%). Predictors of CRC worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.3, 1.6]) and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.2]); predictors of CRC test result worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3) and marital status (aOR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.1, 3.7] for married/partnered vs. single and aOR = 2.3, 95% CI [1.3, 4.1] for divorced/widowed vs. single). Perceived susceptibility consistently predicted the three types of cancer worry, whereas other predictors varied between cancer worry types and in magnitude of association. The three types of cancer worry were generally predicted by health beliefs, suggesting potential malleability. Future research should include multiple

  8. Risk Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer in a Subset of Patients with Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 in Taiwan Fulfilling the Amsterdam II Criteria for Lynch Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Bunya Kamiza

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes, is a predisposing factor for colorectal cancer (CRC. This retrospective cohort study investigated the risk factors associated with the development of CRC in patients with MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutations.In total, 301 MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers were identified from the Amsterdam criteria family registry provided by the Taiwan Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Consortium. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs to determine the association between the risk factors and CRC development. A robust sandwich covariance estimation model was used to evaluate family dependence.Among the total cohort, subjects of the Hakka ethnicity exhibited an increased CRC risk (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.09-2.34; however, those who performed regular physical activity exhibited a decreased CRC risk (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41-0.88. The CRC risk was enhanced in MLH1 germline mutation carriers, with corresponding HRs of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.16-2.55 and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.34-0.83 among subjects of the Hakka ethnicity and those who performed regular physical activity, respectively. In addition, the total cohort with a manual occupation had a 1.56 times higher CRC risk (95% CI = 1.07-2.27 than did that with a skilled occupation. Moreover, MSH2 germline mutation carriers with blood group type B exhibited an increased risk of CRC development (HR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.06-6.58 compared with those with blood group type O.The present study revealed that Hakka ethnicity, manual occupation, and blood group type B were associated with an increased CRC risk, whereas regular physical activity was associated with a decreased CRC risk in MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Individuals With Cystic Fibrosis for Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gini, A. (Andrea); Zauber, Ann; Cenin, Dayna R.; Omidvari, A.-H. (Amir-Houshang); Hempstead, S.E. (Sarah E.); Fink, A.K. (Aliza K.); Lowenfels, A.B. (Albert B.); Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims: Individuals with cystic fibrosis are at increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with the general population, and risk is higher among those who received an organ transplant. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine optimal CRC screening strategies for patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods: We adjusted the existing Microsimulation Screening Analysis-Colon model to reflect increased CRC risk and lower life expectancy in patients with cys...

  10. Randomized controlled dissemination study of community-to-clinic navigation to promote CRC screening: Study design and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkey, Linda; Szalacha, Laura; Herman, Patricia; Gonzalez, Julie; Menon, Usha

    2017-02-01

    Regular screening facilitates early diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and reduction of CRC morbidity and mortality. Screening rates for minorities and low-income populations remain suboptimal. Provider referral for CRC screening is one of the strongest predictors of adherence, but referrals are unlikely among those who have no clinic home (common among poor and minority populations). This group randomized controlled study will test the effectiveness of an evidence based tailored messaging intervention in a community-to-clinic navigation context compared to no navigation. Multicultural, underinsured individuals from community sites will be randomized (by site) to receive CRC screening education only, or education plus navigation. In Phase I, those randomized to education plus navigation will be guided to make a clinic appointment to receive a provider referral for CRC screening. Patients attending clinic appointments will continue to receive navigation until screened (Phase II) regardless of initial arm assignment. We hypothesize that those receiving education plus navigation will be more likely to attend clinic appointments (H1) and show higher rates of screening (H2) compared to those receiving education only. Phase I group assignment will be used as a control variable in analysis of screening follow-through in Phase II. Costs per screening achieved will be evaluated for each condition and the RE-AIM framework will be used to examine dissemination results. The novelty of our study design is the translational dissemination model that will allow us to assess the real-world application of an efficacious intervention previously tested in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer who develop brain metastasis: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountzilas, Christos; Chang, Katherine; Hernandez, Brian; Michalek, Joel; Crownover, Richard; Floyd, John; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2017-02-01

    The development of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a rare and late event. We sought to investigate the clinical characteristics, disease course and safety using biologic agents in our patients with CRC who develop brain metastases. A retrospective review of patients with CRC with brain metastases treated at our institution from 01/2005-01/2015 was performed. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Forty patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 55.5 years, 67.5% were males, and 28% had a KRAS mutation. Twenty-four percent were treatment-naive at the time of BM diagnosis. Patients had a median of two brain lesions. Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 22.5% had both surgical resection and brain radiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.2 months after development of BM. Overall survival was longer in patients who received combined modality local therapy compared to patients treated with surgical resection or radiotherapy alone. Patients who received systemic treatment incorporating biologics following development of BM had a median overall survival of 18.6 months. Overall, the administration of biologic agents was safe and well tolerated. In summary, BM is an uncommon and late event in the natural history of metastatic CRC. The ability to deliver combined-modality local brain therapy as well as availability of more systemic therapy options appear to lead to improved outcomes.

  12. CRC-cards for Product Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars; Riis, Jesper; Hansen, Benjamin Loer

    2003-01-01

    , transportation, service and decommissioning. A main challenge when building product models is to collect and document the product related data, information and knowledge in a structured way. CRC cards are index cards (or computerized versions of these) which are used to record proposed classes, the behavior......This paper describes the CRC (class, responsibility, collaboration) modelling process for building product models. A product model is normally represented in an IT system which contains data, information and knowledge on industrial products and their life cycle properties e.g. manufacturing...... of the classes, their responsibilities, and their relationship to other classes (collaboration). CRC modelling gives an effective, low-tech method for domain-experts, programmers and users to work closely together to identify, structure, understand and document a product model. CRC cards were originally...

  13. Psychotherapy for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong Guan, Ng; Mohamed, Salina; Kian Tiah, Lai; Kar Mun, Teoh; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida

    2016-07-01

    Objective Psychotherapy is a common non-pharmacological approach to help cancer patients in their psychological distress. The benefit of psychotherapies was documented, but the types of psychotherapies proposed are varied. Given that the previous literature review was a decade ago and no quantitative analysis was done on this topic, we again critically and systematically reviewed all published trials on psychotherapy in cancer patients. Method We identified 17 clinical trials on six types of psychotherapy for cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE. Result There were four trials involved adjunct psychological therapy which were included in quantitative analysis. Each trial demonstrated that psychotherapy improved the quality of life and coping in cancer patients. There was also a reduction in distress, anxiety, and depression after a psychological intervention. However, the number and quality of clinical trials for each type of psychotherapy were poor. The meta-analysis of the four trials involved adjunct psychological therapy showed no significant change in depression, with only significant short-term improvement in anxiety but not up to a year-the standardized mean differences were -0.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.57, -0.16) at 2 months, -0.21 (95% CI = -0.42, -0.01) at 4 months, and 0.03 (95 % CI = -0.19, 0.24) at 12 months. Conclusion The evidence on the efficacy of psychotherapy in cancer patients is unsatisfactory. There is a need for more rigorous and well-designed clinical trials on this topic.

  14. A Complete Response Case in a Patient with Multiple Lung Metastases of Rectal Cancer Treated with Bevacizumab plus XELIRI Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Hashida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that many patients with lung metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC underwent chemotherapy with fluorouracil, folinic acid, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or capecitabine. There is a small number of reports about the capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV therapy for patients with metastatic CRC in Japan. We report a case of successful BV+XELIRI therapy for rectal cancer with multiple lung metastases as first-line chemotherapy. A 53-year-old female presented with advanced rectal cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Following surgery, the patient was treated with XELIRI+BV. After 6 courses, a computed tomography scan showed complete response of the lung metastases. No recurrence has occurred for 3 years after chemotherapy was stopped.

  15. Current status of treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with special reference to cetuximab and elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Pfeiffer

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Per Pfeiffer, Camilla Qvortrup, Jon K BjerregaardDepartment of Oncology, Odense University Hospital. Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark. Odense C, DenmarkPurpose: Elderly cancer patients often have co-morbidities and other characteristics that make the selection of optimal treatment more complex. The introduction of targeted therapies in colorectal cancer has further complicated this problem. This review will focus on the role of the EGFR antibody cetuximab in elderly patients.Methods: We have reviewed the available evidence in the literature to evaluate the results of therapy with cetuximab, alone or in combination with chemotherapy, with a focus on elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC.Results: In patients with mCRC, combination chemotherapy prolongs median survival to more than 18 months and even around 24 months in combination with cetuximab in selected patients. No prospective studies have evaluated cetuximab in elderly patients. However, subgroup analyses from randomized trials and retrospective analysis suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapy and cetuximab is maintained in fit elderly patients, but with slightly increased but acceptable toxicity.Conclusion: No prospective cetuximab studies have been conducted solely in a population of elderly patients. However, available data suggest that outcomes in the fit elderly mirror results observed in younger patients.Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer, cetuximab, elderly patients

  16. [Inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes identified in the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (INEN), Lima, Peru;].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mujica, María del Carmen; Sullcahuamán-Allende, Yasser; Barreda-Bolaños, Fernando; Taxa-Rojas, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world and is classified according to their origin in sporadic CRC (~ 70%) and genetic CRC (~ 30%), this latter involves cases of familial aggregation and inherited síndromes that predispose to CRC. To describe inherited CRC predisposition syndromes, polyposic and non-polyposic, identified in the Oncogenetics Unit at National Institute of Cancer Disease (INEN). A descriptive observational record from the attentions of the Oncogenetics Unit at INEN during 2009 to 2013. We included patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis who were referred for clinical assessment to the Oncogenetics Unitat INEN. 59.3 % were female, 40.7 % male, 69.8% under 50 years old, 60.5% had a single CRC, 23.2% had more than one CRC or CRC associated with other extracolonic neoplasia and 32.6% had a familiar history of cancer with autosomal dominant inheritance. According to the clinical genetic diagnosis, 93.1% of the included cases were inherited syndromes that predispose to CRC, with 33.8% of colonic polyposis syndromes, 23.3% of hereditary nonpolyposis CRC syndromes (HNPCC) and 36.0% of CCRHNP probable cases. Clinical genetic evaluation of patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis can identify inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes and provide an appropriategenetic counseling to patients and relatives at risk, establishing guidelines to follow-up and prevention strategies to prevent morbidity and mortality by cancer.

  17. Influential factors on treatment decision making among patients with colorectal cancer: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranley, Nicole M; Curbow, Barbara; George, Thomas J; Christie, Juliette

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, a greater emphasis has been placed on shared decision-making (SDM) techniques between providers and patients with the goal of helping patients make informed decisions about their care and subsequently to improve patient health outcomes. Previous research has shown variability in treatment decision-making among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), and there is little comprehensive information available to help explain this variability. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the current state of the literature on factors that are influential in treatment decision-making among patients with CRC. A priori search terms using Boolean connectors were used to examine PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and MEDLINE for relevant studies. Eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study included patients with CRC and examination of influences on CRC treatment decision-making. All relevant data were extracted including, author, title and year, study methodology, and study results. Findings (n = 13) yielded influences in four areas: informational, patient treatment goals, patient role preferences, and relationship with provider. Quality of life and trust in physician were rated a high priority among patients when making decisions between different therapeutic options. Several studies found that patients wanted to be informed and involved but did not necessarily want to make autonomous treatment choices, with many preferring a more passive role. Providers who initiate a dialog to better understand their patients' treatment goals can establish rapport, increase patient understanding of treatment options, and help patients assume their desired role in their decision-making. Overall, there were a small number of studies that met all inclusion criteria with most used a cross-sectional design.

  18. Outcomes of colorectal cancer patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis treated with chemotherapy with and without targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, Y L B; Simkens, L H J; Lemmens, V E P P; Koopman, M; Teerenstra, S; Bleichrodt, R P; de Hingh, I H J T; Punt, C J A

    2012-07-01

    Although systemic therapies have shown to result in survival benefit in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), outcomes in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) are poor. No data are available on outcomes of current chemotherapy schedules plus targeted agents in mCRC patients with PC. Previously untreated mCRC patients treated with chemotherapy in the CAIRO study and with chemotherapy and targeted therapy in the CAIRO2 study were included and retrospectively analysed according to presence or absence of PC at randomisation. Patient demographics, primary tumour characteristics, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and occurrence of toxicity were evaluated. Thirty-four patients with PC were identified in the CAIRO study and 47 patients in the CAIRO2 study. Median OS was decreased for patients with PC compared with patients without PC (CAIRO: 10.4 versus 17.3 months, respectively (p ≤ 0.001); CAIRO2: 15.2 versus 20.7 months, respectively (p treatment cycles did not differ between patients with or without PC in both studies. Occurrence of major toxicity was more frequent in patients with PC treated with sequential chemotherapy in the CAIRO study as compared to patients without PC. This was not reflected in reasons to discontinue treatment. In the CAIRO2 study, no differences in major toxicity were observed. Our data demonstrate decreased efficacy of current standard chemotherapy with and without targeted agents in mCRC patients with PC. This suggests that the poor outcome cannot be explained by undertreatment or increased susceptibility to toxicity, but rather by relative resistance to treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long noncoding RNA lnc-sox5 modulates CRC tumorigenesis by unbalancing tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaiming; Zhao, Zhenxian; Liu, Kuanzhi; Zhang, Jian; Li, Guanghua; Wang, Liang

    2017-07-03

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) have been recently regarded as systemic regulators in multiple biologic processes including tumorigenesis. In this study, we observed the expression of lncRNA lnc-sox5 was significantly increased in colorectal cancer (CRC). Despite the CRC cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis was not affected by lnc-sox5 knock-down, lnc-sox5 knock-down suppressed CRC cell migration and invasion. In addition, xenograft animal model suggested that lnc-sox5 knock-down significantly suppressed the CRC tumorigenesis. Our results also showed that the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) was significantly reduced by lnc-sox5 knock-down and therefore modulated the infiltration and cytotoxicity of CD3 + CD8 + T cells. Taken together, these results suggested that lnc-sox5 unbalances tumor microenvironment to regulate colorectal cancer progression.

  20. The safety and efficacy of microwave ablation for the treatment of CRC pulmonary metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui; Shi, Liangrong; Qiang, Weiguang; Wu, Jun; Ji, Mei; Lu, Qicheng; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Bin; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping

    2017-11-16

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a recently developed thermal ablation technique that has been used for the treatment of different types of tumours. In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous MWA for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) pulmonary metastases. From June 2010 to June 2015, 48 unresectable lesions in 32 patients with CRC pulmonary metastases were subjected to CT-guided MWA. Imaging follow-up was with contrast-enhanced CT and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Oncologic imaging showed that 42 (87.5%) of the 48 lesions in the 32 patients were completely ablated. Needle track metastatic seeding was not found, and no patient deaths occurred within 30 d after ablation. The mean hospital stay was 3 d (range, 2-7 d). Pneumothorax was the most frequent complication and occurred in 6 (12.5%) of the 48 lesions. The median survival time was 31 months (95% CI: 15.4-46.6). The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 79.5%, 63.1% and 44.4%, respectively. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that tumour size, disease-free interval (DFI) and number of tumours were significantly related to the overall survival time (p = .007, p = .022 and p = .030, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that tumour size was an independent prognostic factor for survival (p = .017). CT-guided percutaneous MWA is a safe and effective minimally invasive method for treating CRC pulmonary metastases.

  1. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Gazala; Moss, Rebecca A; Braiteh, Fadi; Saltzman, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT) trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib’s mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue) experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these events early in the course of treatment will be instrumental in ensuring optimal patient management and continuation of regorafenib therapy

  2. Clinical and economic impact of infusion reactions in patients with colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, K. A.; Wang, P. F.; Barber, B. L.; Long, S. R.; Bagalman, J. E.; Wagner, V.; Song, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Systemic agents in cancer treatment were often associated with possible infusion reactions (IRs). This study estimated the incidence of IRs requiring medical intervention and assessed the clinical and economic impacts of IRs in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with cetuximab. Patients and methods: Details on patients with CRC receiving cetuximab in 2004–2006 were extracted from a large USA administrative claims database. IRs were identified based on the occurrence of outpatient treatment, emergency room (ER) visit, and/or hospitalization for hypersensitivity and allergic reactions. Multivariate regressions were used to examine potential risk factors and quantify the economic impact of IRs. Results: A total of 1122 CRC patients receiving cetuximab were identified. The incidence of IRs requiring medical intervention was 8.4%. Sixty-eight percent of the patients had treatment disruptions and 34% discontinued cetuximab treatment. Mean adjusted costs were $13 863 for cetuximab administrations with an IR requiring ER visit or hospitalization and $6280 for those with an IR requiring outpatient treatment, compared with $4555 for those without an IR. Conclusions: The incidence rate of cetuximab-related IRs requiring medical intervention in clinical practice was found to be higher than rates reported in the product label and clinical trials. The clinical and economic impacts of these IRs are substantial. PMID:20100773

  3. Pseudomonas putida growing at low temperature shows increased levels of CrcZ and CrcY sRNAs, leading to reduced Crc-dependent catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Pilar; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The Crc protein of Pseudomonas inhibits the expression of genes involved in the transport and assimilation of a number of non-preferred carbon sources when preferred substrates are available, thus coordinating carbon metabolism. Crc acts by binding to target mRNAs, inhibiting their translation. In Pseudomonas putida, the amount of free Crc available is controlled by two sRNAs, CrcY and CrcZ, which bind to and sequester Crc. The levels of these sRNAs vary according to metabolic conditions. Pseudomonas putida grows optimally at 30°C, but can also thrive at 10°C. The present work shows that when cells grow exponentially at 10°C, the repressive effect of Crc on many genes is significantly reduced compared with that seen at 30°C. Total Crc levels were similar at both temperatures, but those of CrcZ and CrcY were significantly higher at 10°C. Therefore, Crc-mediated repression may, at least in part, be reduced at 10°C because the fraction of Crc protein sequestered by CrcZ and CrcY is larger, reducing the amount of free Crc available to bind its targets. This may help P. putida to face cold stress. The results reported might help understanding the behaviour of this bacterium in bioremediation or rhizoremediation strategies at low temperatures. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Efficacy, Safety and Cost of Regorafenib in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in French Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Fabien; Lenoble, Sabrina; Lakkis, Zaher; Nguyen, Thierry; Limat, Samuel; Borg, Christophe; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Nerich, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib is an orally administered multikinase inhibitor that has been approved for patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Even though regorafenib significantly improved survival in two international phase 3 trials (CORRECT and CONCUR), a high rate of treatment-related toxic effects and dose modifications were observed with a modest benefit. The aim of this study was to provide information concerning the efficacy, safety, and cost of regorafenib in patients with mCRC in clinical practice. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated with regorafenib monotherapy for unresectable mCRC in five Franche-Comté cancer hospitals (France). The primary end point was overall survival. Secondary end points were safety and descriptive cost analyses of patients treated with regorafenib in clinical practice. Another aim of this study was to assess the impact of regorafenib prescription on the risk of hospitalization in real-life practice. From January 2014 to August 2014, 29 consecutive patients were enrolled. Patients were heavily pretreated and were refractory to standard chemotherapies. The primary tumor sites were the colon and the rectum for 55% and 45% of patients, respectively. Fifteen patients (51%) harbored an RAS mutation. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group - Performance Status (PS) was 0-1 for 86% of patients and 2 for 14% of patients. Nineteen patients (66%) initially received reduced doses of 120 or 80 mg/day. The median duration of treatment was 2.5 months (range, 0.13-11.4 months). Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 86% of patients. The most frequent adverse events of any grade were fatigue (35%), diarrhea (20%), and hand-foot skin reaction (20%). Grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 10 patients (35%). Three patients (10%) were admitted to hospital due to drug-related severe adverse events. The mean cost of patient management with regorafenib for the duration of treatment was 9908 ± 8191

  5. Promoter Hypermethylation of the Eyes Absent 4 Gene is a Tumor-Specific Epigenetic Biomarker in Iranian Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matineh Barati Bagerabad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether hypermethylation of Eyes Absent 4 (EYA4 is also implicated in Iranian Colorectal Cancer (CRC patients or not. From fresh frozen tissues, samples from 38 paired (cancer and normal CRC tissue specimens were used in this study, the DNA was isolated, sodium bisulfite treated and analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase (MSP chain reaction using primers specific for unmethylated or methylated promoter sequences of the EYA4 gene. We also analyzed EYA4 mRNA expression using real time RT-PCR. Demographic characteristics of these patients including age, sex, tumor grade, location, stage, and TNM classification were evaluated and the relationship between methylation status of the gene and clinicopathological features was analyzed. Current study indicated that EYA4 promoter hypermethylation has a sensitivity of 81.57% and specificity of 78.94%. Findings showed lower expression of EYA-4 in methylated samples in comparison with its normal adjacent tissue, although it was not significant (P>0.05. No significant associations were observed between EYA4 hypermethylation and the clinicopathological characteristics. Although the clinical patient outcome of our 38 CRC patients was not associated with EYA4 promoter hypermethylation, the high frequency of this methylation and its high sensitivity and specificity to neoplastic cells may qualify EYA4 promoter methylation as a potential candidate screening marker in Iranian population and may help to improve early detection of CRC.

  6. Is there a relationship between positive affect and other dimensions of quality of life in colorectal cancer patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cardoso Louro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It can be stated from the previous research that positive emotions should allow to better health outcomes in sick populations. The aim of the present work is to know the state-of-the-art of how positive affect (PA relates with quality of life in colorectal cancer (CRC patients, as well as to give some guidelines to develop more efficacious psychological interventions in CRC patients to enhance positive affect. This review describes a search of published literature from January 2001 to March of 2012 on the Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Psycho Inf and Cochrane databases using publications that contain positive emotions, positive affect, health outcomes, quality of life, CRC and cancer. These articles were classified into two groups: a "descriptive papers" b "interventional studies". Results from "descriptive papers" suggest that positive affect (PA was significantly associated with greater levels of general health, better social functioning, benefit finding, positive changes, low depression, less anxiety and greather psychological well-being. PA also increases when different activities are developed. The overall results from interventional studies suggest that the interventions described can be recommended for improving patient's levels of positive affect. The present review offers some suggestions which could be useful for CRC patients.

  7. Concentration of circulating miRNA-containing particles in serum enhances miRNA detection and reflects CRC tissue-related deregulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSharawy, Abdou; Röder, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Kalthoff, Holger

    2016-11-15

    The emerging potential of miRNAs as biomarkers for cancer detection demands parallel evaluation of strategies for reliable identification of disease-related signatures from easily accessible and pertinent body compartments. Here, we addressed whether efficient concentration of circulating miRNA-carrying particles is a rationale for miRNA biomarker discovery. We systematically compared miRNA signatures in 93 RNA preparations from three serum entities (whole serum, particle-concentrated, and particle-depleted fractions) and corresponding tissue samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as a model disease. Significant differences between whole sera and particle-concentrated serum fractions of CRC patients emerged for 45 of 742 tested miRNAs. Twenty-eight of these 45 miRNAs were differentially expressed between particle-concentrated serum fractions of metastatic CRC- and healthy individuals. Over half of these candidates (15 of 28) showed deregulations only in concentrated serum fractions, but not in whole sera, compared to the respective controls.Our results also provided evidence of a consistent downregulation of miR-486 and miR-92a, and further showed a possible "strand-specific" deregulation of extracellular miRNAs in CRC. More importantly, most of the identified miRNAs in the enriched sera reflected the patterns of the corresponding tumor tissues and showed links to cancer-related inflammation. Further investigation of seven serum pools revealed a subset of potential extracellular miRNA candidates to be implicated in both neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.Our findings demonstrate that enrichment and sensitive detection of miRNA carriers is a promising approach to detect CRC-related pathological changes in liquid biopsies, and has potential for clinical diagnostics.

  8. Differential gene expression between African American and European American colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Jovov

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC is higher in African Americans (AAs than other ethnic groups in the U. S., but reasons for the disparities are unknown. We performed gene expression profiling of sporadic CRCs from AAs vs. European Americans (EAs to assess the contribution to CRC disparities. We evaluated the gene expression of 43 AA and 43 EA CRC tumors matched by stage and 40 matching normal colorectal tissues using the Agilent human whole genome 4x44K cDNA arrays. Gene and pathway analyses were performed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM, Ten-fold cross validation, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. SAM revealed that 95 genes were differentially expressed between AA and EA patients at a false discovery rate of ≤5%. Using IPA we determined that most prominent disease and pathway associations of differentially expressed genes were related to inflammation and immune response. Ten-fold cross validation demonstrated that following 10 genes can predict ethnicity with an accuracy of 94%: CRYBB2, PSPH, ADAL, VSIG10L, C17orf81, ANKRD36B, ZNF835, ARHGAP6, TRNT1 and WDR8. Expression of these 10 genes was validated by qRT-PCR in an independent test set of 28 patients (10 AA, 18 EA. Our results are the first to implicate differential gene expression in CRC racial disparities and indicate prominent difference in CRC inflammation between AA and EA patients. Differences in susceptibility to inflammation support the existence of distinct tumor microenvironments in these two patient populations.

  9. Trends in the Treatment of Metastatic Colon and Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Yabroff, K Robin; Warren, Joan L; Zeruto, Christopher; Chawla, Neetu; Lamont, Elizabeth B

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the use and costs of antineoplastic regimens for elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We report population-based trends over a 10-year period in the treatment, survival, and costs in mCRC patients, stratified by ages 65-74 and 75+. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data for persons diagnosed with metastatic colon (N=16117) or rectal cancer (N=4008) between 2000 and 2009. We estimated the adjusted percent of patients who received antineoplastic agents, by type, number, and their costs 12 months following diagnosis. We report the percent of patients who received 3 or more of commonly prescribed agents and estimate survival for the 24-month period following diagnosis by age and treatment. The percentage that received 3 or more agents increased from 3% to 73% in colon patients aged 65-74 and from 2% to 53% in patients 75+. Similar increases were observed in rectal patients. Average 1-year costs per patient in 2009 were $106,461 and $102,680 for colon and rectal cancers, respectively, reflecting an increase of 32% and 20%, for patients who received antineoplastic agents. Median survival increased by about 6 and 10 months, respectively, for colon and rectal patients aged 65-74 who received antineoplastic agents, but an improvement of only 1 month of median survival was observed for patients 75+. Expensive multiple agent regimens are increasingly used in older mCRC patients. For patients aged 64-75 years, these treatments may be associated with several months of additional life, but patients aged 75+ may incur considerable expense without any survival benefit.

  10. Association of Primary Tumor Site With Mortality in Patients Receiving Bevacizumab and Cetuximab for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljehani, Mayada A; Morgan, John W; Guthrie, Laurel A; Jabo, Brice; Ramadan, Majed; Bahjri, Khaled; Lum, Sharon S; Selleck, Matthew; Reeves, Mark E; Garberoglio, Carlos; Senthil, Maheswari

    2018-01-01

    Biologic therapy (BT) (eg, bevacizumab or cetuximab) is increasingly used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Recent investigations have suggested that right- or left-sided primary tumor origin affects survival and response to BT. To evaluate the association of tumor origin with mortality in a diverse population-based data set of patients receiving systemic chemotherapy (SC) and bevacizumab or cetuximab for mCRC. This population-based nonconcurrent cohort study of statewide California Cancer Registry data included all patients aged 40 to 85 years diagnosed with mCRC and treated with SC only or SC plus bevacizumab or cetuximab from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014. Patients were stratified by tumor origin in the left vs right sides. Treatment with SC or SC plus bevacizumab or cetuximab. Mortality hazards by tumor origin (right vs left sides) were assessed for patients receiving SC alone or SC plus bevacizumab or cetuximab. Subgroup analysis for patients with wild-type KRAS tumors was also performed. A total of 11 905 patients with mCRC (6713 men [56.4%] and 5192 women [43.6%]; mean [SD] age, 60.0 [10.9] years) were eligible for the study. Among these, 4632 patients received SC and BT. Compared with SC alone, SC plus bevacizumab reduced mortality among patients with right- and left-sided mCRC, whereas SC plus cetuximab reduced mortality only among patients with left-sided tumors and was associated with significantly higher mortality for right-sided tumors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.31; 95% CI, 1.14-1.51; P < .001). Among patients treated with SC plus BT, right-sided tumor origin was associated with higher mortality among patients receiving bevacizumab (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.25-1.36; P < .001) and cetuximab (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.68-2.12; P < .001) BT, compared with left-sided tumor origin. In patients with wild-type KRAS tumors (n = 668), cetuximab was associated with reduced mortality among only patients with left-sided mCRC compared

  11. Colorectal cancer intrinsic subtypes predict chemotherapy benefit, deficient mismatch repair and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roepman, P.; Schlicker, A.; Tabernero, J.; Majewski, I.; Tian, S.; Moreno, V.; Snel, M.H.; Chresta, C.M.; Rosenberg, R.; Nitsche, U.; Macarulla, T.; Capella, G.; Salazar, R.; Orphanides, G.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Bernards, R.; Simon, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    In most colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, outcome cannot be predicted because tumors with similar clinicopathological features can have differences in disease progression and treatment response. Therefore, a better understanding of the CRC biology is required to identify those patients who will

  12. Cancer Stem Cells and Molecular Biology Test in Colorectal Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effendi-Ys, Rustam

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in males, the second in females, and is the second leading cause of cancer related death worldwide. Within Indonesia's 250 million population, the incidence rates for CRC per 100,000 population were 15.2 for males and 10.2 for females, and estimated 63,500 cases per year.  More than 50% of colorectal cancer patients will develop metastasis. CRC is still the main cause of tumor-related death, and although most CRC patients are treated with surgery to remove the tumor tissue, some of the CRC patients recurred. Chemotherapy used as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy also has several problems, in which these treatments are useless in tumor cells with chemo-resistance. Molecular testing of CRC from tumor tissues has important implications for the selection of treatment. Biomarkers can be used as prognostic value, molecular predictive factors, and targeted therapy. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered as the origin of tumorigenesis, development, metastasis and recurrence. At present, it has been shown that CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. This review aims to summarize the issue on CSCs, and the future development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  13. CT Colonography in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer in Ireland; Economical Considerations and the Potential for Centralisation of Service Provision

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Torreggiani, WC

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Ireland (excluding non melanomatous skin cancer)1.There were roughly 950 women and 1,330 men diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually in Ireland during 2007-20091. By 2020, with our aging population it is estimated that there will be an increase in colorectal cancer of 79 per cent in men and 56 per cent in women1. Colorectal cancer screening by faecal occult blood testing has been shown to reduce CRC mortality. In Europe, colonoscopy is mainly used to investigate faecal occult blood test positive or symptomatic patients, or as a preventive strategy in those with increased CRC risk2

  14. Consensus statement on essential patient characteristics in systemic treatment trials for metastatic colorectal cancer: Supported by the ARCAD Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goey, Kaitlyn K H; Sørbye, Halfdan; Glimelius, Bengt; Adams, Richard A; André, Thierry; Arnold, Dirk; Berlin, Jordan D; Bodoky, György; de Gramont, Aimery; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Eng, Cathy; Falcone, Alfredo; Grothey, Axel; Heinemann, Volker; Hochster, Howard S; Kaplan, Richard S; Kopetz, Scott; Labianca, Roberto; Lieu, Christopher H; Meropol, Neal J; Price, Timothy J; Schilsky, Richard L; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Shacham-Shmueli, Einat; Shi, Qian; Sobrero, Alberto F; Souglakos, John; Van Cutsem, Eric; Zalcberg, John; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Punt, Cornelis J A; Koopman, Miriam

    2018-06-21

    Patient characteristics and stratification factors are key features influencing trial outcomes. However, there is substantial heterogeneity in reporting of patient characteristics and use of stratification factors in phase 3 trials investigating systemic treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to develop a minimum set of essential baseline characteristics and stratification factors to include in such trials. We performed a modified, two-round Delphi survey among international experts with wide experience in the conduct and methodology of phase 3 trials of systemic treatment of mCRC. Thirty mCRC experts from 15 different countries completed both consensus rounds. A total of 14 patient characteristics were included in the recommended set: age, performance status, primary tumour location, primary tumour resection, prior chemotherapy, number of metastatic sites, liver-only disease, liver involvement, surgical resection of metastases, synchronous versus metachronous metastases, (K)RAS and BRAF mutation status, microsatellite instability/mismatch repair status and number of prior treatment lines. A total of five patient characteristics were considered the most relevant stratification factors: RAS/BRAF mutation status, performance status, primary tumour sidedness and liver-only disease. This survey provides a minimum set of essential baseline patient characteristics and stratification factors to include in phase 3 trials of systemic treatment of mCRC. Inclusion of these patient characteristics and strata in study protocols and final study reports will improve interpretation of trial results and facilitate cross-study comparisons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C. Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in younger (age < 50 populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute’s Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n=6,862. Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50 and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70 CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13% and Hispanic (15% than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp. and ≥70 years (7% each. A larger proportion of young white (41% and Hispanic (33% patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%. The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%. Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  16. Improved survival for rectal cancer compared to colon cancer: the four cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Pamela; Hall, Claire; Davidson, Callum; Dixon, Liane; Dobbs, Bruce; Robinson, Bridget; Frizelle, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. This study was undertaken to evaluate survival outcomes and changes of disease outcomes of CRC patients over the last decades. A retrospective analysis of CRC patients in Christchurch was performed in four patient cohorts at 5 yearly intervals; 1993-94, 1998-99, 2004-05 and 2009. Data on cancer location, stage, surgical and oncological treatment and survival were collected. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed. There were 1391 patients (355, 317, 419 and 300 per cohort), 1037 colon and 354 rectal cancers, respectively. For colon cancer, right-sided cancers appeared more common in later cohorts (P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in the number of permanent stomas for colon cancer patients (P = 0.001). There was an analogous trend for rectal cancers (P = 0.075). More CRC patients with stage IV disease were treated surgically (P = 0.001) and colon cancer stages I and II tended to have increased survival if operated by a colorectal surgeon (P = 0.06). Oncology referrals have increased remarkably (P = 0.001). Overall 56% of patients were alive at 5 years however rectal cancer patients had significantly better 5-year survival than those with colon cancer (P rectal cancer patients have a better 5-year survival than colon cancer patients. The improved survival with early stage colon cancers operated on by specialist colorectal surgeons needs further exploration. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. The clinical value of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Yoneda, Kazue; Takuwa, Teruhisa; Kuroda, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Seiji; Okumura, Yoshitomo; Kondo, Nobuyuki; Tsujimura, Tohru; Nakano, Takashi; Hasegawa, Seiki

    2018-03-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are a potential surrogate for distant metastasis and are considered a useful clinical prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This prospective study evaluated the preoperative CTC count as a prognostic factor for pulmonary metastasectomy in mCRC patients. Seventy-nine mCRC patients who underwent curative-intent pulmonary metastasectomy were included. Preoperatively, 7.5 mL of peripheral blood from each patient was quantitatively evaluated for CTCs with the CellSearch ® system. The clinical significance of CTC count was evaluated according to Kaplan-Meier analyses and log-rank test. Multivariate analyses of the perioperative variables were performed. The distribution of CTC counts were as follows; 0 in 66 patients (83.5%), 1 in eight patients (10.1%), 2 in three patients (3.8%), and 3 and 6 in one patient (1.3%). The patients with multiple CTCs (CTC count ≥2) had significant shorter disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.005, median DFS; 19.8 vs . 8.6 months) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.035, median DFS; not reached vs. 37.8 months), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the patients with multiple CTCs had elevated risk of recurrence [hazard ratio (HR), 3.28; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-8.67; P=0.017]. The detected rate of CTCs was quite low in mCRC patients who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy. The patient with multiple CTCs had shorter DFS in this study. The larger prospective clinical study is needed to establish the meaning of CTC in mCRC candidate for pulmonary metastasectomy.

  18. Intensified follow-up in colorectal cancer patients using frequent Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA) measurements and CEA-triggered imaging : Results of the randomized "CEAwatch" trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, C. J.; Zhan, Z.; van den Heuvel, E.; Grossmann, I.; Doornbos, P. M.; Havenga, K.; Manusama, E.; Klaase, J.; van der Mijle, H. C. J.; Lamme, B.; Bosscha, K.; Baas, P.; van Ooijen, B.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.; Marinelli, A.; van der Zaag, E.; Wasowicz, D.; de Bock, G. H.; Wiggers, T.

    Aim: The value of frequent Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA) measurements and CEA-triggered imaging for detecting recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients was investigated in search for an evidence-based follow-up protocol. Methods: This is a randomized-controlled multicenter prospective

  19. Quantitative cell-free DNA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in relation to third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan and the quantitative relationship of cfDNA with tumor-specific mutations in plasma....

  20. Statin use is not associated with improved progression free survival in cetuximab treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results from the CAIRO2 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krens, Lisanne L.; Simkens, Lieke H. J.; Baas, Jara M.; Koomen, Els R.; Gelderblom, Hans; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Statins may inhibit the expression of the mutant KRAS phenotype by preventing the prenylation and thus the activation of the KRAS protein. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the effect of statin use on outcome in KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC) treated with

  1. The effect of individualized nutritional counseling on muscle mass and treatment outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer undergoing chemotherapy: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Anne; Blauwhoff-Buskermolen, Susanne; Langius, Jacqueline A. E.; Berkhof, Johannes; Verheul, Henk M. W.; de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.

    2015-01-01

    A low muscle mass is prevalent in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and has been associated with poor treatment outcome. Chemotherapeutic treatment has an additional unfavorable effect on muscle mass. Sufficient protein intake and physical activity are known to induce muscle protein

  2. DYPD genotyping to predict toxicity in patients with stage III colon cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in the PETACC-8 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boige, Valérie; Vincent, Marc; Alexandre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding resection of the primary tumour with few or absent symptoms in patients with synchronous unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A potential benefit of resection of the primary tumour is to prevent complications of the primary tumour in later s...

  3. Cancer patients' evaluation of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication.......The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication....

  4. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  5. Quantitative analysis of TEM-8 and CEA tumor markers indicating free tumor cells in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisossadati, Reza; Farshchian, Moein; Ganji, Azita; Tavassoli, Alieza; Velayati, Arash; Dadkhah, Ezzat; Chavoshi, Somaye; Mehrabi Bahar, Mostafa; Memar, Bahram; Rajabi Mashhadi, Mohammad Taghi; Naseh, Hossein; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Moghbeli, Meysam; Moaven, Omeed; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2011-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer in the world. Approximately in 50 percent of patients, metastatic disease is a major cause of death. Therefore, early diagnosis of CRC is crucial for a successful outcome. For the detection of circulating cancer cells, this study applied a sensitive method that employed specific tumor markers for early detection. A total of 80 blood samples from 40 CRC patients and 40 age-matched healthy controls were collected for the study. The circulating mRNA levels of two CRC tumor markers, tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM-8) and carcinoembryogenic antigen (CEA) were evaluated using an absolute quantitative real-time PCR assay in a Stratagene Mx-3000P real-time PCR system. GAPDH was used as the endogenous control. TEM-8 and CEA were primarily detected more in the CRC patients rather than in the controls: 22/40 vs 9/40, p=0.009 and 30/40 vs 11/40, p=0.00054, respectively. In the CRC patients, the mRNA level of these markers was significantly higher in comparison to the normal controls (p=0.018 and 0.01). The overall sensitivity of this panel was 65% with a specificity of 75%. Statistical analysis for demographic variants did not reach significant values. TEM-8 and CEA markers were detected more frequently and in significantly higher levels in the blood samples of patients compared with samples from age-matched healthy controls. The copy number of CEA and TEM-8 mRNA, as detected by a real-time quantitative PCR, appears to be a promising marker for evaluating the risk of tumor spread.

  6. Colorectal cancer patients' preferences for type of caregiver during survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieldraaijer, T; Duineveld, L A M; Donkervoort, S C; Busschers, W B; van Weert, H C P M; Wind, J

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors are currently included in a secondary care-led survivorship care programme. Efforts are underway to transfer this survivorship care to primary care, but met with some reluctance by patients and caregivers. This study assesses (1) what caregiver patients prefer to contact for symptoms during survivorship care, (2) what patient factors are associated with a preferred caregiver, and (3) whether the type of symptom is associated with a preferred caregiver. A cross-sectional study of CRC survivors at different time points. For 14 different symptoms, patients reported if they would consult a caregiver, and who they would contact if so. Patient and disease characteristics were retrieved from hospital and general practice records. Two hundred and sixty patients participated (response rate 54%) of whom the average age was 67, 54% were male. The median time after surgery was seven months (range 0-60 months). Patients were divided fairly evenly between tumour stages 1-3, 33% had received chemotherapy. Men, patients older than 65 years, and patients with chronic comorbid conditions preferred to consult their general practitioner (GP). Women, patients with stage 3 disease, and patients that had received chemotherapy preferred to consult their secondary care provider. For all symptoms, patients were more likely to consult their GP, except for (1) rectal blood loss, (2) weight loss, and (3) fear that cancer had recurred, in which case they would consult both their primary and secondary care providers. Patients appreciated all caregivers involved in survivorship care highly; with 8 out of 10 points. CRC survivors frequently consult their GP in the current situation, and for symptoms that could alarm them to a possible recurrent disease consult both their GP and secondary care provider. Patient and tumour characteristics influence patients' preferred caregiver.

  7. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Sanoff, Hanna K; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Baron, John A; Lund, Jennifer L; Sandler, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 ( n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age age 50-69, age ≥ 70) CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13%) and Hispanic (15%) than patients aged 50-69 years (11% and 10%, resp.) and ≥70 years (7% each). A larger proportion of young white (41%) and Hispanic (33%) patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%). The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%). Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  8. Predictive value of pretreatment lymphocyte count in stage II colorectal cancer and in high-risk patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Huixun; Huang, Liyong; Li, Dawei; Li, Qingguo; Li, Xinxiang

    2016-01-05

    Pretreatment lymphocyte count (LC) has been associated with prognosis and chemotherapy response in several cancers. The predictive value of LC for stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) and for high-risk patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) has not been determined. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 1332 consecutive stage II CRC patients who underwent curative tumor resection was conducted. A pretreatment LC value risk, 459 (62.2%) of whom received AC. Patients with low LCs had significantly worse 5-year OS (74.6% vs. 90.2%, p risk patients with low LCs had the poorest DFS (p value or combined with high-risk status were both independent prognostic factors(p risk, AC-treated patients with high LCs had significantly longer DFS than untreated patients (HR, 0.594; 95% CI, 0.364-0.970; p = 0.035). There was no difference or trend for DFS or OS in patients with low LCs, regardless of the use of AC (DFS, p = 0.692; OS, p = 0.522). Low LC was also independently associated with poorer DFS in high-risk, AC-treated patients (HR, 1.885; 95% CI, 1.112-3.196; p = 0.019). Pretreatment LC is an independent prognostic factor for survival in stage II CRC. Furthermore, pretreatment LC reliably predicts chemotherapeutic efficacy in high-risk patients with stage II CRC.

  9. CT texture features of liver parenchyma for predicting development of metastatic disease and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott J; Zea, Ryan; Kim, David H; Lubner, Meghan G; Deming, Dustin A; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2018-04-01

    To determine if identifiable hepatic textural features are present at abdominal CT in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) prior to the development of CT-detectable hepatic metastases. Four filtration-histogram texture features (standard deviation, skewness, entropy and kurtosis) were extracted from the liver parenchyma on portal venous phase CT images at staging and post-treatment surveillance. Surveillance scans corresponded to the last scan prior to the development of CT-detectable CRC liver metastases in 29 patients (median time interval, 6 months), and these were compared with interval-matched surveillance scans in 60 CRC patients who did not develop liver metastases. Predictive models of liver metastasis-free survival and overall survival were built using regularised Cox proportional hazards regression. Texture features did not significantly differ between cases and controls. For Cox models using all features as predictors, all coefficients were shrunk to zero, suggesting no association between any CT texture features and outcomes. Prognostic indices derived from entropy features at surveillance CT incorrectly classified patients into risk groups for future liver metastases (p < 0.001). On surveillance CT scans immediately prior to the development of CRC liver metastases, we found no evidence suggesting that changes in identifiable hepatic texture features were predictive of their development. • No correlation between liver texture features and metastasis-free survival was observed. • Liver texture features incorrectly classified patients into risk groups for liver metastases. • Standardised texture analysis workflows need to be developed to improve research reproducibility.

  10. Tumour gene expression predicts response to cetuximab in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J B; Dutta, D; Watson, D; Maddala, T; Munneke, B M; Shak, S; Rowinsky, E K; Xu, L-A; Harbison, C T; Clark, E A; Mauro, D J; Khambata-Ford, S

    2011-02-01

    Although it is accepted that metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRCs) that carry activating mutations in KRAS are unresponsive to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies, a significant fraction of KRAS wild-type (wt) mCRCs are also unresponsive to anti-EGFR therapy. Genes encoding EGFR ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are promising gene expression-based markers but have not been incorporated into a test to dichotomise KRAS wt mCRC patients with respect to sensitivity to anti-EGFR treatment. We used RT-PCR to test 110 candidate gene expression markers in primary tumours from 144 KRAS wt mCRC patients who received monotherapy with the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results were correlated with multiple clinical endpoints: disease control, objective response, and progression-free survival (PFS). Expression of many of the tested candidate genes, including EREG and AREG, strongly associate with all clinical endpoints. Using multivariate analysis with two-layer five-fold cross-validation, we constructed a four-gene predictive classifier. Strikingly, patients below the classifier cutpoint had PFS and disease control rates similar to those of patients with KRAS mutant mCRC. Gene expression appears to identify KRAS wt mCRC patients who receive little benefit from cetuximab. It will be important to test this model in an independent validation study.

  11. Analysis of a gene panel for targeted sequencing of colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Højgaard; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G; Sierakowska Juncker, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Surgical intervention is a successful treatment for stage I patients, whereas other more advanced cases may require adjuvant chemotherapy. The selection of effective adjuvant treatments remains, however, challenging. Accurate patient...

  12. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect: Know the Signs and Symptoms of Infection Neutropenia and Risk for Infection Health Care Providers Educational Materials Cancer and Flu How to Prevent Flu from Spreading Flu Symptoms Information for Families and Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and ...

  13. Optimising the use of cetuximab in the continuum of care for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard M; Montagut, Clara; Wainberg, Zev A; Ronga, Philippe; Audhuy, François; Taieb, Julien; Stintzing, Sebastian; Siena, Salvatore; Santini, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy is a standard of care in the first-line treatment of RAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and has demonstrated efficacy in later lines. Progressive disease (PD) occurs when tumours develop resistance to a therapy, although controversy remains about whether PD on a combination of chemotherapy and targeted agents implies resistance to both components. Here, we propose that some patients may gain additional clinical benefit from the reuse of cetuximab after having PD on regimens including cetuximab in an earlier treatment line. We conducted a non-systematic literature search in PubMed and reviewed published and ongoing clinical trials, focusing on later-line cetuximab reuse in patients with mCRC. Evidence from multiple studies suggests that cetuximab can be an efficacious and tolerable treatment when continued or when fit patients with mCRC are retreated with it after a break from anti-EGFR therapy. Furthermore, on the basis of available preclinical and clinical evidence, we propose that longitudinal monitoring of RAS status may identify patients suitable for such a strategy. Patients who experience progression on cetuximab plus chemotherapy but have maintained RAS wt tumour status may benefit from continuation of cetuximab with a chemotherapy backbone switch because they have probably developed resistance to the chemotherapeutic agents rather than the biologic component of the regimen. Conversely, patients whose disease progresses on cetuximab-based therapy due to drug-selected clonal expansion of RAS- mutant tumour cells may regain sensitivity to cetuximab following a defined break from anti-EGFR therapy. Looking to the future, we propose that RAS status determination at disease progression by liquid, needle or excisional biopsy may identify patients eligible for cetuximab continuation and rechallenge. With this approach, treatment

  14. Analytical validation of a novel multiplex test for detection of advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer in symptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Roslyn; Croner, Lisa J; Bucci, John; Kairs, Stefanie N; You, Jia; Beasley, Sharon; Blimline, Mark; Carino, Rochele B; Chan, Vicky C; Cuevas, Danissa; Diggs, Jeff; Jennings, Megan; Levy, Jacob; Mina, Ginger; Yee, Alvin; Wilcox, Bruce

    2018-05-30

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is key to reducing associated mortality. Despite the importance of early detection, approximately 40% of individuals in the United States between the ages of 50-75 have never been screened for CRC. The low compliance with colonoscopy and fecal-based screening may be addressed with a non-invasive alternative such as a blood-based test. We describe here the analytical validation of a multiplexed blood-based assay that measures the plasma concentrations of 15 proteins to assess advanced adenoma (AA) and CRC risk in symptomatic patients. The test was developed on an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay platform employing four multi-marker panels, to be implemented in the clinic as a laboratory developed test (LDT). Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and College of American Pathologists (CAP) regulations, a United States-based clinical laboratory utilizing an LDT must establish performance characteristics relating to analytical validity prior to releasing patient test results. This report describes a series of studies demonstrating the precision, accuracy, analytical sensitivity, and analytical specificity for each of the 15 assays, as required by CLIA/CAP. In addition, the report describes studies characterizing each of the assays' dynamic range, parallelism, tolerance to common interfering substances, spike recovery, and stability to sample freeze-thaw cycles. Upon completion of the analytical characterization, a clinical accuracy study was performed to evaluate concordance of AA and CRC classifier model calls using the analytical method intended for use in the clinic. Of 434 symptomatic patient samples tested, the percent agreement with original CRC and AA calls was 87% and 92% respectively. All studies followed CLSI guidelines and met the regulatory requirements for implementation of a new LDT. The results provide the analytical evidence to support the implementation of the novel multi-marker test as

  15. Systematic identification and validation of candidate genes for detection of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood specimens of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Röckel, Matthias; Nees, Matthias; Röder, Christian; Kienle, Peter; Von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kalthoff, Holger; Neumaier, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The presence of tumor cells in peripheral blood is being regarded increasingly as a clinically relevant prognostic factor for colorectal cancer patients. Current molecular methods are very sensitive but due to low specificity their diagnostic value is limited. This study was undertaken in order to systematically identify and validate new colorectal cancer (CRC) marker genes for improved detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of colorectal cancer patients. Marker genes with upregulated gene expression in colorectal cancer tissue and cell lines were identified using microarray experiments and publicly available gene expression data. A systematic iterative approach was used to reduce a set of 346 candidate genes, reportedly associated with CRC to a selection of candidate genes that were then further validated by relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Analytical sensitivity of RT-PCR assays was determined by spiking experiments with CRC cells. Diagnostic sensitivity as well as specificity was tested on a control group consisting of 18 CRC patients compared to 12 individuals without malignant disease. From a total of 346-screened genes only serine (or cysteine) proteinase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 5 (SERPINB5) showed significantly elevated transcript levels in peripheral venous blood specimens of tumor patients when compared to the nonmalignant control group. These results were confirmed by analysis of an enlarged collective consisting of 63 CRC patients and 36 control individuals without malignant disease. In conclusion SERPINB5 seems to be a promising marker for detection of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients.

  16. Let-7 miRNA-binding site polymorphism in the KRAS 3′UTR; colorectal cancer screening population prevalence and influence on clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersem Janne B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have reported associations between a variant allele in a let-7 microRNA complementary site (LCS6 within the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR of KRAS (rs61764370 and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients receiving cetuximab. The variant allele has also been associated with increased cancer risk. We aimed to reveal the incidence of the variant allele in a colorectal cancer screening population and to investigate the clinical relevance of the variant allele in mCRC patients treated with 1st line Nordic FLOX (bolus 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab. Methods The feasibility of the variant allele as a risk factor for CRC was investigated by comparing the LCS6 gene frequencies in 197 CRC patients, 1060 individuals with colorectal polyps, and 358 healthy controls. The relationship between clinical outcome and LCS6 genotype was analyzed in 180 mCRC patients receiving Nordic FLOX and 355 patients receiving Nordic FLOX + cetuximab in the NORDIC-VII trial (NCT00145314. Results LCS6 frequencies did not vary between CRC patients (23%, individuals with polyps (20%, and healthy controls (20% (P = 0.50. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated in the NORDIC-VII cohort even if numerically increased progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were found in patients with the LCS6 variant allele (8.5 (95% CI: 7.3-9.7 months versus 7.8 months (95% CI: 7.4-8.3 months, P = 0.16 and 23.5 (95% CI: 21.6-25.4 months versus 19.5 months (95% CI: 17.8-21.2 months, P = 0.31, respectively. Addition of cetuximab seemed to improve response rate more in variant carriers than in wild-type carriers (from 35% to 57% versus 44% to 47%, however the difference was not statistically significant (interaction P = 0.16. Conclusions The LCS6 variant allele does not seem to be a risk factor for development of colorectal polyps or CRC. No statistically significant effect of the

  17. Putative contribution of CD56 positive cells in cetuximab treatment efficacy in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maréchal, Raphaël; De Schutter, Jef; Nagy, Nathalie; Demetter, Pieter; Lemmers, Arnaud; Devière, Jacques; Salmon, Isabelle; Tejpar, Sabine; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Activity of cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, is largely attributed to its direct antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) could be another possible mechanism of cetuximab antitumor effects and its specific contribution on the clinical activity of cetuximab is unknown. We assessed immune cells infiltrate (CD56, CD68, CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3) in the primary tumor of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with a first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy in the framework of prospective trials (treatment group) and in a matched group of mCRC patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without cetuximab (control group). The relationship between intra-tumoral immune effector cells, the K-ras status and the efficacy of the treatment were investigated. We also evaluated in vitro, the ADCC activity in healthy donors and chemonaive mCRC patients and the specific contribution of CD56 + cells. ADCC activity against DLD1 CRC cell line is maintained in cancer patients and significantly declined after CD56 + cells depletion. In multivariate analysis, K-ras wild-type (HR: 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.3), p = 0.001) and tumor infiltrating CD56 + cells (HR: 2.6, (95%CI:1.14-6.0), p = 0.019) were independent favourable prognostic factors for PFS and response only in the cetuximab treatment group. By contrast CD56 + cells failed to predict PFS and response in the control group. CD56 + cells, mainly NK cells, may be the major effector of ADCC related-cetuximab activity. Assessment of CD56 + cells infiltrate in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma may provide additional information to K-ras status in predicting response and PFS in mCRC patients treated with first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy

  18. The prognostic value of the systemic inflammatory score in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Matsutani, Shinji; Kimura, Kenjiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2018-07-01

    Inflammation has been widely recognized as a contributor to cancer progression and several inflammatory markers have been reported as associated with the clinical outcomes in patients with various types of cancer. Recently, a novel inflammatory marker, the systemic inflammatory score (SIS), which is based on a combination of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and the serum albumin concentration has been reported as a useful prognostic marker. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of the SIS in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The retrospective cohort study included 160 patients who underwent combination chemotherapy for unresectable mCRC between January 2008 and December 2016. The SIS was used to classify the patients into three groups based on their LMR and the serum albumin concentration. Patients with high-LMR and high serum albumin level were given a score of 0; patients with low-LMR or low serum albumin level were given a score of 1; patients with low-LMR and low serum albumin level were given a score of 2. There were significant differences in the overall survival among the three SIS groups and the SIS was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival. Although the SIS was significantly associated with the overall survival rate even when using the original cut-off values, the SIS according to the new cut-off values had a more accurate prognostic value. The present study determined that the SIS was a useful biomarker for predicting the survival outcomes in patients with unresectable mCRC, although the optimum cut-off value of the SIS according to the patients' background needs to be examined in further studies.

  19. Prognostic factors and multidisciplinary treatment modalities for brain metastases from colorectal cancer: analysis of 93 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Xiao-Dong; Cai, Yan-Tao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Zhen-Yang; Xiang, Jian-Bin; Chen, Zong-You

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review patient characteristics and evaluate the potential factors affecting prognosis in cases of brain metastasis (BM) from colorectal cancer (CRC). We retrospectively reviewed 93 cases of BM from CRC in our hospital. Patient demographics, neurologic symptoms, and location and number of BMs were recorded. Factors analyzed included: age; sex; Karnofsky performance score; number of BMs; presence of extracranial metastases; dimensions; location of tumors; treatment modalities. The overall 1- and 2-year survival rates were 27.7 and 9.9 %. On multivariate analysis, the number of BMs, extracranial metastases and the initial treatment modalities were found to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Patients treated with surgical resection followed by WBRT or SRS had an improved prognosis relative to those treated with surgery alone (P = 0.02 and P = 0.02, respectively). No significance difference in survival rate was found between patients treated with SRS alone or SRS plus WBRT (P = 0.11). Surgical resection of BMs from CRC in selected patients may help prolong survival. Additional radiotherapy following surgery is valuable in improving prognosis. Extracranial metastasis, multiple BM lesions and initial non operation can be considered as independent factors associated with poor prognosis

  20. ZEB1 Mediates Drug Resistance and EMT in p300-Deficient CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Darina; Bordonaro, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the hypothesis that ZEB1-Wnt-p300 signaling integrates epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. The HDACi butyrate, derived from dietary fiber, has been linked to CRC prevention, and other HDACis have been proposed as therapeutic agents against CRC. We have previously discussed that resistance to butyrate likely contributes to colonic carcinogenesis, and we have demonstrated that butyrate resistance leads to cross-resistance to cancer therapeutic HDACis. Deregulated Wnt signaling is the major initiating event in most CRC cases. One mechanism whereby butyrate and other HDACis exert their anti-CRC effects is via Wnt signaling hyperactivation, which promotes CRC cell apoptosis. The histone acetylases (HATs) CBP and p300 are mediators of Wnt transcriptional activity, and play divergent roles in the downstream consequences of Wnt signaling. CBP-mediated Wnt signaling is associated with cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance; whereas, p300-mediated Wnt activity is associated with differentiation. We have found that CBP and p300 differentially affect the ability of butyrate to influence Wnt signaling, apoptosis, and proliferation. ZEB 1 is a Wnt signaling-targeted gene, whose product is a transcription factor expressed at the invasive front of carcinomas where it promotes malignant progression and EMT. ZEB1 is typically a transcriptional repressor; however, when associated with p300, ZEB1 enhances transcription. These changes in ZEB1 activity likely affect the cancer cell phenotype. ZEB1 has been shown to promote resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and expression of ZEB1 is upregulated in butyrate-resistant CRC cells that lack p300 expression. Since the expression of ZEB1 correlates with poor outcomes in cancer, ZEB represents a relevant therapeutic target. Here we propose that targeting the signaling network established by ZEB1, Wnt signaling, and p300

  1. Mismatch repair status and synchronous metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Morton, Dion

    2015-01-01

    The causality between the metastatic potential, mismatch repair status (MMR) and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex. This study aimed to investigate the impact of MMR in CRC on the occurrence of synchronous metastases (SCCM) and survival in patients with SCCM on a national basis....... A nationwide cohort study of 6,692 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database and merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable and multinomial...

  2. A Media and Clinic Intervention to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Ohio Appalachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Krok-Schoen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the effectiveness of a colorectal cancer (CRC screening intervention among adults living in Ohio Appalachia. Methods. We conducted a group-randomized trial of a county-level intervention among adults living in 12 Ohio Appalachian counties who received a media campaign and clinic intervention focused on either CRC screening or fruits and vegetables. Participants’ percentage within CRC screening guidelines was assessed with cross-sectional surveys conducted annually for four years, and validated with medical record review of screening. Results. On average, screening data were obtained on 564 intervention and 559 comparison participants per year. There was no difference in the Wave 4 CRC screening rates of intervention and comparison counties (35.2% versus 31.4%. Multivariate analyses found that high perceived risk of CRC, willingness to have a CRC test if recommended by a doctor, doctor recommendation of a CRC screening test, and patient-physician communication about changes in bowel habits, family history of CRC, and eating fruits and vegetables were significant (p<0.05 predictors of being within CRC screening guidelines. Conclusions. The intervention was not effective in increasing CRC rates among Ohio Appalachian adults. Future research should determine how media and clinic-based interventions can be modified to improve CRC screening rates among this underserved population.

  3. Social Support Is a Predictor of Lower Stress and Higher Quality of Life and Resilience in Brazilian Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Lucia Siqueira; Heitkemper, Margaret M; Alencar, Gizelton Pereira; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Silva, Rodrigo Marques da; Jarrett, Monica E

    The well-being of patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC) is affected by psychological effects associated with cancer treatment. However, little is known about the impact of these psychological factors in Brazilian patients with CRC. The aim of this study was to determine whether perceived stress, social support, and resilience are associated with quality of life in urban Brazilian patients receiving chemotherapy treatment for CRC. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 144 Brazilian CRC patients in an ambulatory oncology clinic. The participants completed 5 questionnaires: Demographics, Perceived Stress Scale 14, Social Support Satisfaction Scale, Resilience Scale, and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires (C30 and CR29). Confirmatory factor analysis modeling and Cronbach's α were used to examine construct validity and internal consistency. We used the MPlus 3.0 to construct and validate the structural model. There was a moderate and positive effect of resilience on the physical, social, and emotional aspects of quality of life. Social support had a strong and positive direct effect on quality of life (ie, social, physical, social, and emotional). Social support had a negative effect on stress perception. Resilience was also negatively related to stress perception. Family support and professional social support are important factors for Brazilian CRC patients. Resilience is an important ally for patients. It is important for nurses to consider this when developing educational and psychological interventional strategies to reduce stress and ultimately improve quality of life in this population. Psychological factors that improve quality of life should be evaluated in patients undergoing treatment for cancer.

  4. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented...... implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...

  5. Increased serum levels of tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor independently predict a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an insufficient number of reliable prognostic and response predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer (CRC management. In a previous study, we found that high tumour tissue expression of tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor (TATI correlated with liver metastasis and an impaired prognosis in CRC. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic validity of serum TATI (s-TATI in CRC. We further assessed the prognostic value of carcino-embryonic antigen in serum (s-CEA and the interrelationship between s-TATI and TATI in tissue (t-TATI. Methods Using an immunofluorometric assay, s-TATI levels were analysed in 334 preoperatively collected serum samples from patients with CRC. Spearman's Rho and Chi-square test were used for analysis of correlations between s-TATI and clinicopathological parameters, s-CEA and t-TATI. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox uni- and multivariate regression analysis were used to estimate disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS according to quartiles of s-TATI and cut-offs derived from ROC-analysis of s-TATI and s-CEA. Results Increased levels of s-TATI were associated with a reduced DFS (HR = 2.00; 95% CI 1.40-2.84, P P P = 0.034 for DFS and HR = 1.78; 95% CI 1.25-2.53, P = 0.001 for OS. There was no significant association between s-TATI and t-TATI. The prognostic value of s-CEA was also evident, but somewhat weaker than for s-TATI. Conclusions High preoperative s-TATI levels predict a poor prognosis in patients with CRC, and the prognostic value is independent of established prognostic parameters and t-TATI expression. These data suggest that s-TATI might be a useful marker for prognostic stratification in CRC.

  6. Readability, suitability, and health content assessment of web-based patient education materials on colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chenlu; Champlin, Sara; Mackert, Michael; Lazard, Allison; Agrawal, Deepak

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the Unites States are still below target level. Web-based patient education materials are used by patients and providers to provide supplemental information on CRC screening. Low literacy levels and patient perceptions are significant barriers to screening. There are little data on the quality of these online materials from a health literacy standpoint or whether they address patients' perceptions. To evaluate the readability, suitability, and health content of web-based patient education materials on colon cancer screening. Descriptive study. Web-based patient materials. Twelve reputable and popular online patient education materials were evaluated. Readability was measured by using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level, and suitability was determined by the Suitability Assessment of Materials, a scale that considers characteristics such as content, graphics, layout/typography, and learning stimulation. Health content was evaluated within the framework of the Health Belief Model, a behavioral model that relates patients' perceptions of susceptibility to disease, severity, and benefits and barriers to their medical decisions. Each material was scored independently by 3 reviewers. Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level score, Suitability Assessment of Materials score, health content score. Readability for 10 of 12 materials surpassed the maximum recommended sixth-grade reading level. Five were 10th grade level and above. Only 1 of 12 materials received a superior suitability score; 3 materials received inadequate scores. Health content analysis revealed that only 50% of the resources discussed CRC risk in the general population and <25% specifically addressed patients at high risk, such as African Americans, smokers, patients with diabetes, and obese patients. For perceived barriers to screening, only 8.3% of resources discussed embarrassment, 25% discussed pain with colonoscopy, 25% addressed cost of colonoscopy, and none

  7. Clinicopathologic Significance of CXCL12 and CXCR4 Expressions in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Yoshuantari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC is both a global and national burden, being the third most common malignancy in men and the second in women, worldwide. The prognosis of CRC is affected by various factors like the histological grade, angiolymphatic invasion, and distant metastases. Metastasis is an intricate process; one of the possible mechanisms is through the interaction of the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCR4. This study aims to reveal the expression patterns of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in CRC. Methods. The quantitative expressions of CXCL12 and CXCR4 messenger RNA (mRNA were evaluated in 32 patients with adenocarcinoma-type CRC. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was performed on formalin-fixed tissues. CXCL12 and CXCR4’s expressions, clinicopathologic features, and the treatment response to the CRC were analysed. Results. All tumour tissues showed higher levels of both chemokines compared to normal colonic tissue. The expression of CXCL12 mRNA was higher in rectal location (p=0.04 with a tendency to be higher in later stages (p=0.15, while the expression of CXCR4 was lower in tumours with a lymphatic invasion (p=0.02, compared to their counterparts. There was no difference in the expression of CXCL12 and CXCR4 according to the patients’ ages, gender, tumour differentiation, or response to chemotherapy. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that the mRNA expression of CXCL12 was significantly correlated with rectal location. CXCR4 mRNA expression was inversely correlated in tumours with a lymphatic invasion.

  8. Effect of fisetin supplementation on inflammatory factors and matrix metalloproteinase enzymes in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad-Naeimi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Mohammad; Esfahani, Ali; Darvish Aminabad, Esmaeil

    2018-04-25

    A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis and chemotherapeutic resistance in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Natural flavonoids are promising agents for inflammation-related tumor progression in patients with CRC. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of flavonoid fisetin supplementation on the inflammatory status and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in these patients. In this double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, 37 CRC patients undergoing chemotherapy were assigned to receive either 100 mg fisetin (n = 18) or placebo (n = 19) for seven consecutive weeks. The supplementation began one week before chemotherapy and continued until the end of the second chemotherapy cycle. Levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), MMP-7, and MMP-9 were measured in plasma using ELISA, before and after the intervention. The trial was registered at http://www.irct.ir (code: IRCT2015110511288N9). The participants were 55.59 ± 15.46 years old with 62.16% being male. After the intervention, the plasma levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP reduced significantly in the fisetin group (p < 0.04 and p < 0.01, respectively). Additionally, fisetin supplementation suppressed the values of MMP-7 levels (p < 0.02). However, significant changes were observed only in IL-8 concentrations in the fisetin group when compared with the placebo group (p < 0.03). The changes in the levels of other metabolic factors were not statistically significant. According to the results, fisetin could improve the inflammatory status in CRC patients, suggesting it as a novel complementary antitumor agent for these patients and warranting further studies.

  9. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan G

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gazala Khan,1 Rebecca A Moss,2 Fadi Braiteh,3,4 Marc Saltzman5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 3US Oncology Research, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 4Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 5Innovative Medical Research of South Florida, Inc, Aventura, FL, USA Abstract: Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib's mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these

  10. Effect of Primary Tumor Location on Second- or Later-line Treatment Outcomes in Patients With RAS Wild-type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and All Treatment Lines in Patients With RAS Mutations in Four Randomized Panitumumab Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckx, Nele; Koukakis, Reija; Op de Beeck, Ken; Rolfo, Christian; Van Camp, Guy; Siena, Salvatore; Tabernero, Josep; Douillard, Jean-Yves; André, Thierry; Peeters, Marc

    2018-03-08

    The primary tumor location has a prognostic impact in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We report the results from retrospective analyses assessing the effect of tumor location on prognosis and efficacy of second- and later-line panitumumab treatment in patients with RAS wild-type (WT) mCRC and on prognosis in all lines of treatment in patients with RAS mutant (MT) mCRC. RAS WT data (n = 483) from 2 randomized phase III panitumumab trials (ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers, NCT00339183 and NCT00113763) were analyzed for treatment outcomes stratified by tumor location. The second analysis assessed the effect of tumor location in RAS MT patients (n = 1205) from 4 panitumumab studies (ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers, NCT00364013, NCT00819780, NCT00339183, and NCT00113763). Primary tumors located in the cecum to transverse colon were coded as right-sided; those located from the splenic flexure to the rectum were coded as left-sided. Of all patients, the tumor location was ascertained for 83% to 88%; 71% to 77% of patients had left-sided tumors. RAS WT patients with right-sided tumors did worse for all efficacy parameters compared with those with left-sided tumors. The patients with left-sided tumors had better outcomes with panitumumab than with the comparator treatment. Because of the low patient numbers, no conclusions could be drawn for right-sided mCRC. The prognostic effect of tumor location on survival was unclear for RAS MT patients. These retrospective analyses have confirmed that RAS WT right-sided mCRC is associated with a poor prognosis, regardless of the treatment. RAS WT patients with left-sided tumors benefitted from the addition of panitumumab in second or later treatment lines. Further research is warranted to determine the optimum management of right-sided mCRC and RAS MT tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation of FCGR3A and EGFR germline polymorphisms with the efficacy of cetuximab in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pander, Jan; Gelderblom, Hans; Antonini, Ninja F.; Tol, Jolien; van Krieken, Johan H. J. M.; van der Straaten, Tahar; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Next to KRAS mutation status, additional predictive markers are needed for the response to cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Previous studies indicated that germline polymorphisms in specific genes may predict efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in mCRC patients.

  12. The intestinal stem cell signature identifies colorectal cancer stem cells and predicts disease relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Jung, P.; Iglesias, M.; Cespedes, M.V.; Rossell, D.; Sevillano, M.; Hernando-Momblona, X.; da Silva-Diz, V.; Munoz, P.; Clevers, H.; Sancho, E.; Mangues, R.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    A frequent complication in colorectal cancer (CRC) is regeneration of the tumor after therapy. Here, we report that a gene signature specific for adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs) predicts disease relapse in CRC patients. ISCs are marked by high expression of the EphB2 receptor, which becomes

  13. Seasonal variation in short-term mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L H; Nielsen, H; Pedersen, L

    2010-01-01

    Comorbidity has a major impact on short-term and long-term survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) and many CRC patients suffer from comorbidities. Mortality rates for comorbidities like cardio-respiratory diseases exhibit distinct seasonal variations with highest rates in the winter. Therefore, we...

  14. The long non-coding RNA TUG1 indicates a poor prognosis for colorectal cancer and promotes metastasis by affecting epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Junfeng; Ding, Chaohui; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xiefu; Zhao, Chunlin; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that are involved in gene expression regulation. Taurine up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) is a cancer progression related lncRNA in some tumor oncogenesis; however, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, we determined the expression patterns of TUG1 in CRC patients and explored its effect on CRC cell metastasis using cultured representative CRC cell lines. Methods The expression levels o...

  15. KRAS biomarker testing disparities in colorectal cancer patients in New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Greenbaum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO guidelines recommend that all patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC receive KRAS testing to guide anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment. The aim of this study was to assess for disparities in KRAS testing and mutational status. Methods: The New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR, a population-based cancer registry participating in the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, was queried to identify all incident cases of CRC diagnosed among New Mexico residents from 2010 to 2013. Results: Six hundred thirty-seven patients were diagnosed with mCRC from 2010–2013. As expected, KRAS testing in Stage 4 patients presented the highest frequency (38.4%, though testing in stage 3 (8.5%, stage 2 (3.4% and stage 1 (1.2% was also observed. In those with metastatic disease, younger patients (≤ 64 years were more likely to have had testing than patients 65 years and older (p < 0.0001. Patients residing in urban areas received KRAS testing more often than patients living in rural areas (p = 0.019. No significant racial/ethnic disparities were observed (p = 0.66. No significant differences were seen by year of testing. Conclusion: Age and geographic disparities exist in the rates of KRAS testing, while sex, race/ethnicity and the year tested were not significantly associated with testing. Further study is required to assess the reasons for these disparities and continued suboptimal adherence to current ASCO KRAS testing guidelines. Keywords: Oncology, Health sciences, Clinical genetics

  16. Bevacizumab treatment in the elderly patient with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bartolomeo M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maria Di Bartolomeo,1 Claudia Maggi,1 Francesca Ricchini,1 Filippo Pietrantonio,1 Roberto Iacovelli,1 Filippo de Braud,1 Alessandro Inno2 1Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy Abstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, like many cancers, is primarily a disease of elderly people. Despite this prevalence, such patients are often excluded from randomized trials or represent a minority of enrolled patients. Moreover, the criteria for establishing benefit or side effects of treatment strategies in this population are uncertain and not well recognized. Bevacizumab improves the outcome of mCRC when used in combination with standard first-line and second-line chemotherapy and beyond the first disease progression when given with a chemotherapy backbone different from that used in the precedent line. The particular toxicity profile of this antiangiogenesis agent (in particular hypertension, thromboembolic events, hemorrhage, and renal failure may discourage its use in elderly patients with comorbidities. Data from subgroup analyses of randomized trials and the results of recent cohort studies suggest a significant benefit from the addition of bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy for elderly patients comparable with that observed in younger patients, except for the increased risk for thromboembolic events. Age alone should not be a barrier to use of bevacizumab, and further research with a more complete geriatric assessment should investigate the role of bevacizumab in elderly patients with mCRC to avoid undertreatment of this patient population due to a ­historical conservative approach. Keywords: bevacizumab, elderly, metastatic colorectal cancer, antivascular treatment, review

  17. Associations Between Dietary Patterns and Longitudinal Quality of Life Changes in Colorectal Cancer Patients: The ColoCare Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigic, Biljana; Boeing, Heiner; Toth, Reka; Böhm, Jürgen; Habermann, Nina; Scherer, Dominique; Schrotz-King, Petra; Abbenhardt-Martin, Clare; Skender, Stephanie; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Syrjala, Karen; Jacobsen, Paul B; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2018-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important clinical outcome in cancer patients. We investigated associations between dietary patterns and QoL changes in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The study included 192 CRC patients with available EORTC QLQ-C30 data before and 12 months post-surgery and food frequency questionnaire data at 12 months post-surgery. Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Multivariate regression models assessed associations between dietary patterns and QoL changes over time. We identified four major dietary patterns: "Western" dietary pattern characterized by high consumption of potatoes, red and processed meat, poultry, and cakes, "fruit&vegetable" pattern: high intake of vegetables, fruits, vegetable oils, and soy products, "bread&butter" pattern: high intake of bread, butter and margarine, and "high-carb" pattern: high consumption of pasta, grains, nonalcoholic beverages, sauces and condiments. Patients following a "Western" diet had lower chances to improve in physical functioning (OR = 0.45 [0.21-0.99]), constipation (OR = 0.30 [0.13-0.72]) and diarrhea (OR: 0.44 [0.20-0.98]) over time. Patients following a "fruit&vegetable" diet showed improving diarrhea scores (OR: 2.52 [1.21-5.34]. A "Western" dietary pattern after surgery is inversely associated with QoL in CRC patients, whereas a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may be beneficial for patients' QoL over time.

  18. Connective tissue growth factor acts as a therapeutic agent and predictor for peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Been-Ren; Chang, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Liang, Jin-Tung; Lee, Po-Huang; Chang, King-Jen; Kuo, Min-Liang

    2011-05-15

    Here, we aimed to investigate the role of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and to characterize the underlying mechanism of CTGF mediating adhesion. A cohort of 136 CRC patient specimens was analyzed in this study. CRC cell lines were used for in vitro adhesion assay and in vivo peritoneal dissemination experiment. Recombinant CTGF protein treatment, transfection of CTGF expression plasmids, and knockdown of CTGF expression in CRC cells were utilized to evaluate the integrin α5, which served as a target of CTGF in inhibiting peritoneal seeding. The analysis of CRC tissues revealed an inverse correlation between CTGF expression and prevalence of PC. Lower CTGF level in CRC patients was associated with higher peritoneal recurrence rate after surgery. Inducing CTGF expression in cancer cells resulted in decreased incidence of PC and increased rate of mice survival. The mice received intraperitoneal injection of recombinant CTGF protein simultaneously with cancer cells or following tumor formation; in both cases, peritoneal tumor dissemination was found to be effectively inhibited in the mouse model. Functional assay revealed that CTGF significantly decreased the CRC cell adhesion ability, and integrin α5 was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR and functional blocking assay as a downstream effector in the CTGF-mediated inhibition of CRC cell adhesion. CTGF acts as a molecular predictor of PC and could be a potential therapeutic target for the chemoprevention and treatment of PC in CRC patients. ©2011 AACR.

  19. Intra-tumoural vessel area estimated by expression of epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 and microRNA-126 in primary tumours and metastases of patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T. F.; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) and microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) in primary tumours from patients with stage II-IV colorectal cancer (CRC) and in paired samples of primary tumours, regional lymph node metastases and distant metastases. Methods: A total of 126 patients were included. Analyses were performed...

  20. A Risk Prediction Model for Sporadic CRC Based on Routine Lab Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursi, Ben; Mamtani, Ronac; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Haynes, Kevin; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Current risk scores for colorectal cancer (CRC) are based on demographic and behavioral factors and have limited predictive values. To develop a novel risk prediction model for sporadic CRC using clinical and laboratory data in electronic medical records. We conducted a nested case-control study in a UK primary care database. Cases included those with a diagnostic code of CRC, aged 50-85. Each case was matched with four controls using incidence density sampling. CRC predictors were examined using univariate conditional logistic regression. Variables with p value CRC prediction models which included age, sex, height, obesity, ever smoking, alcohol dependence, and previous screening colonoscopy had an AUC of 0.58 (0.57-0.59) with poor goodness of fit. A laboratory-based model including hematocrit, MCV, lymphocytes, and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) had an AUC of 0.76 (0.76-0.77) and a McFadden's R2 of 0.21 with a NRI of 47.6 %. A combined model including sex, hemoglobin, MCV, white blood cells, platelets, NLR, and oral hypoglycemic use had an AUC of 0.80 (0.79-0.81) with a McFadden's R2 of 0.27 and a NRI of 60.7 %. Similar results were shown in an internal validation set. A laboratory-based risk model had good predictive power for sporadic CRC risk.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of a multilevel intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening among Latino immigrants in a primary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragones, Abraham; Schwartz, Mark D; Shah, Nirav R; Gany, Francesca M

    2010-06-01

    Latino immigrants face a higher burden of colorectal cancer (CRC) and screening rates are low. To assess the effectiveness of a multilevel intervention in increasing the rate of CRC screening among Latino immigrants. A randomized controlled trial, with randomization at the physician level. Pairs of 65 primary care physicians and 65 Latino immigrant patients participated, 31 in the intervention and 34 in the control group. CRC educational video in Spanish on a portable personal digital video display device accompanied by a brochure with key information for the patient, and a patient-delivered paper-based reminder for their physician. Completed CRC screening, physician recommendation for CRC screening, and patient adherence to physician recommended CRC screening. The overall rate of completed screening for CRC was 55% for the intervention and 18% for the control group (p = 0.002). Physicians recommended CRC screening for 61% of patients in the intervention group versus 41% in the control group (p = 0.08). Of those that received a recommendation, 90% in the intervention group adhered to it versus 26% in the control group (p = 0.007). The intervention was successful in increasing rates of completed CRC screening primarily through increasing adherence after screening was recommended. Additional efforts should focus on developing new strategies to increase physician recommendation for CRC screening, while employing effective patient adherence interventions.

  2. The long non-coding RNA TUG1 indicates a poor prognosis for colorectal cancer and promotes metastasis by affecting epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junfeng; Ding, Chaohui; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xiefu; Zhao, Chunlin; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2016-02-08

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that are involved in gene expression regulation. Taurine up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) is a cancer progression related lncRNA in some tumor oncogenesis; however, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, we determined the expression patterns of TUG1 in CRC patients and explored its effect on CRC cell metastasis using cultured representative CRC cell lines. The expression levels of TUG1 in 120 CRC patients and CRC cells were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. HDACs and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related gene expression were determined using western blot. CRC cell metastasis was assessed by colony formation, migration assay and invasion assay. Our data showed that the levels of TUG1 were upregulated in both CRC cell lines and primary CRC clinical samples. TUG1 upregulation was closely correlated with the survival time of CRC patients. Overexpression of TUG1 in CRC cells increased their colony formation, migration, and invasion in vitro and promoted their metastatic potential in vivo, whereas knockdown of TUG1 inhibited the colony formation, migration, and invasion of CRC cells in vitro. It is also worth pointing out that TUG1 activated EMT-related gene expression. Our data suggest that tumor expression of lncRNA TUG1 plays a critical role in CRC metastasis. TUG1 may have potential roles as a biomarker and/or a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  3. Symptom presentations and other characteristics of colorectal cancer patients and the diagnostic performance of the Auckland Regional Grading Criteria for Suspected Colorectal Cancer in the South Auckland population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, John C; Bai, Wayne; Lal, Dinesh

    2013-09-13

    This study reviews the presenting symptoms of colorectal cancer in the ethnically diverse Middlemore Hospital referral population of South Auckland, New Zealand. The performance of the newly introduced Auckland Regional Grading Criteria as prediction tool for selecting colorectal cancer cases referred from primary care was evaluated in this group. Retrospective review of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases diagnosed between January 2006 and January 2011. Information extracted from case note review was used to grade patients using the Auckland Regional Grading Criteria. A total of 799 patients were included. The commonest symptoms were: rectal bleeding (25.5-42.3%) and change in bowel habit (20.6-26.8%). Low-risk symptoms including abdominal pain (16.3-46.8%) and weight loss (18.4-26.1%) were not uncommon. 64.4% of Maori and 64.9% of Pacific patients had stage III or IV cancers. Pacific patients had more stage IV disease, 37.7% (pAuckland Regional Grading Criteria would miss 24.7% of the patients with CRC in the referral population. While rectal bleeding and change in bowel habit are frequent presenting symptoms, low-risk atypical symptoms including constipation, weight loss and abdominal pain were not uncommon. Significant proportion of Pacific patients present with late-stage disease. The current Auckland Regional grading criteria would miss significant proportion of our study population with colorectal cancer.

  4. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, H F A; Möslein, G; Alonso, A

    2010-01-01

    of individuals at high risk for CRC prevents the development of advanced CRC. About 1 million individuals in Western Europe are at risk for Lynch syndrome. We performed a survey to evaluate the strategies currently used to identify individuals at high risk for CRC in 14 Western European countries. Questionnaires...... recommended as tools to select high-risk patients for genetic testing and are performed in most countries in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome. In one country, IHC was recommended in all new cases of CRC. In most countries there are no specific programs on cancer genetics in the teaching curriculum...... for medical doctors. In conclusion, the outcome of this survey and the discussions within an European expert group may be used to improve the strategies to identify individuals at high risk of CRC. More attention should be given to increasing the awareness of the general population of hereditary CRC...

  5. Changed adipocytokine concentrations in colorectal tumor patients and morbidly obese patients compared to healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillenbrand, Andreas; Fassler, Juliane; Huber, Nadine; Xu, Pengfei; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Templin, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Wolf, Anna Maria; Knippschild, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence of colorectal cancer. Adipose tissue dysfunction accompanied with alterations in the release of adipocytokines has been proposed to contribute to cancer pathogenesis and progression. The aim of this study was to analyze plasma concentrations of several adipose tissue expressed hormones in colorectal cancer patients (CRC) and morbidly obese (MO) patients and to compare these concentrations to clinicopathological parameters. Plasma concentrations of adiponectin, resistin, leptin, active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were determined in 67 patients operated on for CRC (31 rectal cancers, 36 colon cancers), 37 patients operated on for morbid obesity and 60 healthy blood donors (BD). Compared to BD, leptin concentrations were lowered in CRC patients whereas those of MO patients were elevated. Adiponectin concentrations were only lowered in MO patients. Concentrations of MCP-1, PAI-1, and IL-1 alpha were elevated in both CRC and MO patients, while resistin and TNF-alpha were similarly expressed in MO and CRC patients compared to BD. Resistin concentrations positively correlated with tumor staging (p<0.002) and grading (p=0.015) of rectal tumor patients. The results suggest that both MO and CRC have low-grade inflammation as part of their etiology

  6. Chronic disease management perspectives of colorectal cancer survivors using the Veterans Affairs healthcare system: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L; Goldstein, Karen M; Bosworth, Hayden B; Andrews, Sara M; Danus, Susanne; Jackson, George L; Provenzale, Dawn; Weinberger, Morris; Kelley, Michael J; Voils, Corrine I

    2018-03-09

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the US. CRC survivors may have complex healthcare needs requiring care from both specialists and primary care. Our objective was to understand how CRC survivors perceive their survivorship care, especially management of their cardiovascular-related chronic diseases. We identified patients diagnosed with non-metastatic CRC between 10/1/2007 and 12/31/2015 at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in North Carolina or Virginia. In 2016, we conducted telephone-based, semi-structured interviews to assess survivors' experiences with cancer survivorship and changes in health priorities. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded. The 25 participants were, on average, 64 years old and approximately 4 years post-CRC diagnosis at the time of interview; most were white (60%), male (92%), and diagnosed with colon cancer (64%) as opposed to rectal cancer. CRC survivors reported: (1) a shift in focus from surviving cancer to reducing cardiovascular disease risk (e.g., by managing weight); (2) challenges with taking medications for CVD-related conditions; (3) new recognition of the importance of engaging with primary care providers. Experiences with cancer shapes how survivors view their health. Management of cardiovascular-related chronic disease is important to veteran CRC survivors. There is a need to deliver cardiovascular disease risk reduction programs tailored for CRC survivors.

  7. Changed adipocytokine concentrations in colorectal tumor patients and morbidly obese patients compared to healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillenbrand Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been associated with increased incidence of colorectal cancer. Adipose tissue dysfunction accompanied with alterations in the release of adipocytokines has been proposed to contribute to cancer pathogenesis and progression. The aim of this study was to analyze plasma concentrations of several adipose tissue expressed hormones in colorectal cancer patients (CRC and morbidly obese (MO patients and to compare these concentrations to clinicopathological parameters. Methods Plasma concentrations of adiponectin, resistin, leptin, active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-1 alpha, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha were determined in 67 patients operated on for CRC (31 rectal cancers, 36 colon cancers, 37 patients operated on for morbid obesity and 60 healthy blood donors (BD. Results Compared to BD, leptin concentrations were lowered in CRC patients whereas those of MO patients were elevated. Adiponectin concentrations were only lowered in MO patients. Concentrations of MCP-1, PAI-1, and IL-1 alpha were elevated in both CRC and MO patients, while resistin and TNF-alpha were similarly expressed in MO and CRC patients compared to BD. Resistin concentrations positively correlated with tumor staging (p Conclusions The results suggest that both MO and CRC have low-grade inflammation as part of their etiology.

  8. Feasibility and response of helical tomotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun yun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Shin, Eung Jin; Lee, Moon Sung; Ryu, Chang Beom; Ko, Bong Min; Yun, Ji Na [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and the toxicity of helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients with 31 lesions from mCRC treated with HT between 2009 and 2013. The liver (9 lesions) and lymph nodes (9 lesions) were the most frequent sites. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 12 to 1,110 mL (median, 114 mL). The total doses ranged from 30 to 70 Gy in 10-30 fractions. When the alpha/beta value for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the total doses ranged from 39 to 119 Gy{sub 10} (median, 55 Gy{sub 10}). Nineteen lesions were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCRT). With a median follow-up time of 16 months, the median overall survival for 18 patients was 33 months. Eight lesions (26%) achieved complete response. The 1- and 3-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates for 31 lesions were 45% and 34%, respectively. On univariate analysis, significant parameters influencing LPFS rates were chemotherapy response before HT, aim of HT, CCRT, PTV, BED, and adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, PTV < or =113 mL and BED >48 Gy{sub 10} were associated with a statistically significant improvement in LFPS. During HT, four patients experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicities, each of whom had also received CCRT. The current study demonstrates the efficacy and tolerability of HT for mCRC. To define optimal RT dose according to tumor size of mCRC, further study should be needed.

  9. Influence of DPYD Genetic Polymorphisms on 5-Fluorouracil Toxicities in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our meta-analysis aggregated existing results from relevant studies to comprehensively investigate the correlations between genetic polymorphisms in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD gene and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU toxicities in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC. The MEDLINE (1966∼2013, the Cochrane Library Database (Issue 12, 2013, EMBASE (1980∼2013, CINAHL (1982∼2013, Web of Science (1945∼2013, and the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM (1982∼2013 were searched without language restrictions. Meta-analyses were conducted with the use of STATA software (Version 12.0, Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA. Seven clinical cohort studies with a total of 946 CRC patients met our inclusion criteria, and NOS scores of each of the included studies were ≥5. Our findings showed that DPYD genetic polymorphisms were significantly correlated with high incidences of 5-FU-related toxicity in CRC patients. SNP-stratified analysis indicated that there were remarkable connections of IVS14+1G>A, 464T>A, and 2194G>A polymorphisms with the incidence of marrow suppression in CRC patients receiving 5-FU chemotherapy. Furthermore, we found that IVS14+1G>A, 496A>G, and 2194G>A polymorphisms were correlated with the incidence of gastrointestinal reaction. Ethnicity-stratified analysis also revealed that DPYD genetic polymorphisms might contribute to the development of marrow suppression and gastrointestinal reaction among Asians, but not among Caucasians. The present meta-analysis suggests that DPYD genetic polymorphisms may be correlated with the incidence of 5-FU-related toxicity in CRC patients.

  10. Stool microbiome and metabolome differences between colorectal cancer patients and healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we used stool profiling to identify intestinal bacteria and metabolites that are differentially represented in humans with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to healthy controls to identify how microbial functions may influence CRC development. Stool samples were collected from healthy a...

  11. Prognostic value of baseline seric Syndecan-1 in initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a simple biological score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Marine; Lecomte, Thierry; Bouché, Olivier; Kim, Stefano; Dobi, Erion; Queiroz, Lise; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Etienne, Hélène; Léger, Julie; Godet, Yann; Balland, Jérémy; Lakkis, Zaher; Adotevi, Olivier; Bonnetain, Franck; Borg, Christophe; Vernerey, Dewi

    2016-11-15

    In first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), baseline prognostic factors allowing death risk and treatment strategy stratification are lacking. Syndecan-1 (CD138) soluble form was never described as a prognostic biomarker in mCRC. We investigated its additional prognostic value for overall survival (OS). mCRC patients with unresectable disease at diagnosis were treated with bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in two independent prospective clinical trials (development set: n = 126, validation set: n = 51, study NCT00489697 and study NCT00544011, respectively). Serums were collected at baseline for CD138 measurement. OS determinants were assessed and, based on the final multivariate model, a prognostic score was proposed. Two independent OS prognostic factors were identified: Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) high level (p = 0.0066) and log-CD138 high level (p = 0.0190). The determination of CD138 binary information (cutoff: 75 ng/mL) allowed the assessment of a biological prognostic score with CD138 and LDH values, identifying three risk groups for death (median OS= 38.9, 30.1 and 19.8 months for the low, intermediate and high risk groups, respectively; p value for OS, in mCRC patients. A simple biological scoring system is proposed including LDH and CD138 binary status values. © 2016 UICC.

  12. Current role of antibody therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Qvortrup, C; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2007-01-01

    progressive disease and unfortunately in patients with disease resistant to 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin, no effective cytotoxic therapy is known. The rapidly expanding knowledge in tumor biology has encouraged optimism for the possibility to find and target tumor...... arsenal in CRC to a great extent, but they will also add to the complexity of treatment of CRC. In this review, we summarize the current status of antibody therapy in patients with CRC. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-May-28...

  13. Predictive Value of Carcinoembryonic and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Related to Some Clinical, Endoscopic and Histological Colorectal Cancer Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Ratko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is an important oncological and public health problem worldwide, including Serbia. Unfortunately, half of the patients are recognized in an advanced stage of the disease, therefore, early detection through specific tumor biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic (CEA and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9, is the only way to cope with CRC expansion.

  14. Laparoskopisk ultralydskanning ved kolorektal cancer-resektion kan øge detektionsraten af små levermetastaser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebæk, Signe Bremholm; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2016-01-01

    Up to 20% of the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) will have liver metastases at the time of the diagnosis, and some of these metastases may be missed during preoperative evaluation. While intraoperative ultrasound is considered the gold standard for liver evaluation during primary open CRC...

  15. Lifestyle related factors in the self management of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer: : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, T.; Bours, M.J.; Mols, F.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC), negatively affecting the daily functioning and quality of life of CRC patients. Currently, there are no established treatments to prevent or reduce CIPN. The

  16. Microsatellite instability typing in serum and tissue of patients with colorectal cancer: comparing real time PCR with hybridization probe and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarram, P; Rismanchi, M; Alizadeh Naeeni, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Paryan, M; Alipour, A; Honardar, Z; Kavousipour, S; Naghibalhossaini, F; Mostafavi-Pour, Z; Monabati, A; Hosseni, S V; Shamsdin, S A

    2014-05-01

    Allelic variation of BAT-25 (a 25-repeat quasimonomorphic poly T) and BAT-26 (a 26-repeat quasimonomorphic polyA) loci as two mononucleotide microsatellite markers, were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) compared with Real-Time PCR using hybridization probes. BAT-26 and BAT-25 markers were used to determine an appropriate screening technique with high sensitivity and specificity to diagnose microsatellite instability (MSI) status in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the pathways in colorectal tumor genesis is microsatellite instability (MSI+). MSI is detected in about 15% of all CRCs; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features compared with microsatellite stable tumors. Due to the high percentage of MSI+ CRC in Iran, screening of this type of CRC is imperative. Two markers were analyzed in tissues and sera of 44 normal volunteers and tumor and matched normal mucosal tissues as well as sera of 44 patients with sporadic CRC. The sensitivity and specificity of BAT-26 with real time PCR method (Hybridization probe) were 100% in comparison with sequencing method as the gold standard, while HPLC had a lower sensitivity and specificity. According to HPLC data, BAT-26 was more sensitive than BAT-25 in identifying MSI tumors. Therefore, MSI typing using the BAT-26 hybridization probe method compared to HPLC could be considered as an accurate method for diagnosing MSI in CRC tumors but not in serum circulating DNAs.

  17. Evaluation of serum lysyl oxidase as a blood test for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S T; Weston, C J; Hepburn, E; Damery, S; Hejmadi, R K; Morton, D G; Middleton, G; Ismail, T; Adams, D H

    2014-06-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue and associated with disease progression. A blood test may form a more acceptable diagnostic test for CRC although LOX has not previously been measured in the serum. We therefore sought to determine the clinical usefulness of a serum LOX test for CRC in a symptomatic population. Adult patients referred to a hospital colorectal clinic with bowel symptoms completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample for serum LOX measurement. Associations between presenting symptoms, serum LOX concentrations and outcomes of investigations were tested by univariate and multivariate analyses to determine if serum LOX was clinically useful in the prediction of CRC. LOX expression in CRC and adjacent colon biopsies was evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Thirty-one cases of colorectal cancer and 16 high-risk polyps were identified from a total of 962 participants. There was no association between serum LOX concentration and the presence of CRC, high-risk polyps or cancers at any site. LOX expression was significantly increased in CRC tissue compared to adjacent colon. Despite overexpression of LOX in CRC tissue, elevated serum levels could not be demonstrated. Serum LOX measurement is therefore not a clinically useful test for CRC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cachexia among US cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Susan T; Van Doren, Bryce A; Roy, Debosree; Noone, Joshua M; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition and results in poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess hospitalization incidence, patient characteristics, and medical cost and burden of cancer cachexia in the US. This study used a cross-sectional analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for 2009. Five cancers reported to have the highest cachexia incidence were assessed. The hospitalization incidence related to cachexia was estimated by cancer type, cost and length of stay were compared, and descriptive statistics were reported for each cancer type, as well as differences being compared between patients with and without cachexia. Risk of inpatient death was higher for patients with cachexia in lung cancer (OR = 1.32; CI = 1.20-1.46) and in all cancers combined (OR = 1.76; CI = 1.67-1.85). The presence of cachexia increased length of stay in lung (IRR = 1.05; CI = 1.03-1.08), Kaposi's sarcoma (IRR = 1.47; CI = 1.14-1.89) and all cancers combined (IRR = 1.09; CI = 1.08-1.10). Additionally, cachectic patients in the composite category had a longer hospitalization stay compared to non-cachectic patients (3-9 days for those with cachexia and 2-7 days for those without cachexia). The cost of inpatient stay was significantly higher in cachexic than non-cachexic lung cancer patients ($13,560 vs $13 190; p Cachexia increases hospitalization costs and length of stay in several cancer types. Identifying the medical burden associated with cancer cachexia will assist in developing an international consensus for recognition and coding by the medical community and ultimately an effective treatment plans for cancer cachexia.

  19. The Crc/CrcZ-CrcY global regulatory system helps the integration of gluconeogenic and glycolytic metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Nogales, Juan; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In metabolically versatile bacteria, carbon catabolite repression (CCR) facilitates the preferential assimilation of the most efficient carbon sources, improving growth rates and fitness. In Pseudomonas putida, the Crc and Hfq proteins and the CrcZ and CrcY small RNAs, which are believed to antagonize Crc/Hfq, are key players in CCR. Unlike that seen in other bacterial species, succinate and glucose elicit weak CCR in this bacterium. In the present work, metabolic, transcriptomic and constraint-based metabolic flux analyses were combined to clarify whether P. putida prefers succinate or glucose, and to identify the role of the Crc protein in the metabolism of these compounds. When provided simultaneously, succinate was consumed faster than glucose, although both compounds were metabolized. CrcZ and CrcY levels were lower when both substrates were present than when only one was provided, suggesting a role for Crc in coordinating metabolism of these compounds. Flux distribution analysis suggested that, when both substrates are present, Crc works to organize a metabolism in which carbon compounds flow in opposite directions: from glucose to pyruvate, and from succinate to pyruvate. Thus, our results support that Crc not only favours the assimilation of preferred compounds, but balances carbon fluxes, optimizing metabolism and growth. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. COPD is a clear risk factor for increased use of resources and adverse outcomes in patients undergoing intervention for colorectal cancer: a nationwide study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baré, Marisa; Montón, Concepción; Mora, Laura; Redondo, Maximino; Pont, Marina; Escobar, Antonio; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Fernández de Larrea, Nerea; Briones, Eduardo; Quintana, Jose Maria

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) with COPD as a comorbidity would consume more resources and have worse in-hospital outcomes than similar patients without COPD. Therefore, we compared different aspects of the care process and short-term outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for CRC, with and without COPD. This was a prospective study and it included patients from 22 hospitals located in Spain - 472 patients with COPD and 2,276 patients without COPD undergoing surgery for CRC. Clinical variables, postintervention intensive care unit (ICU) admission, use of invasive mechanical ventilation, and postintervention antibiotic treatment or blood transfusion were compared between the two groups. The reintervention rate, presence and type of complications, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality were also estimated. Hazard ratio (HR) for hospital mortality was estimated by Cox regression models. COPD was associated with higher rates of in-hospital complications, ICU admission, antibiotic treatment, reinterventions, and mortality. Moreover, after adjusting for other factors, COPD remained clearly associated with higher and earlier in-hospital mortality. To reduce in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery for CRC and with COPD as a comorbidity, several aspects of perioperative management should be optimized and attention should be given to the usual comorbidities in these patients.

  1. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  2. Colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, Claus; Jensen, Michael Dam; Fallingborg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been highly debated as risk estimates from different studies vary greatly. The present national Danish guideline on colonoscopy surveillance for dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients......, in some subgroups of patients the risk is increased. These subgroups of patients, who should be offered colonoscopy surveillance, include patients with ulcerative colitis having extensive disease and a long disease duration (10-13 years); early age at onset (less than 19 years of age) of ulcerative...... colitis; and patients with ulcerative colitis as well as Crohn´s disease with a concomitant diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis. A colonoscopy surveillance program is recommended in these subgroups with intervals ranging from every 3-6 months to every 5 years, using chromoendoscopy with targeted...

  3. The effect of geriatric intervention in frail elderly patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Vistisen, K K; Dehlendorff, C

    2017-01-01

    patients are offered inclusion and are then randomized to two groups (the intervention group and the control group). Patients in the intervention group receive a full geriatric assessment of comorbidity, medication, psycho-cognitive function, physical, functional and nutrition status, and interventions......BACKGROUND: Better surgical techniques, chemotherapy and biological therapy have improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), most markedly in younger patients. About half of patients over 70 years receive dose reductions or early treatment discontinuation of the planned adjuvant...... or first-line treatment due to side effects. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary evaluation of an elderly individual's health status. This assessment in older patients with cancer can predict survival, chemotherapy toxicity and morbidity. METHODS: This randomized phase II...

  4. Therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition in CRC and NSCLC: 15 years of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Teresa; Napolitano, Stefania; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Martini, Giulia; Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in tumour evolution, proliferation and immune evasion, and is one of the most important targets for biological therapy, especially for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In the past 15 years, several EGFR antagonists have been approved for the treatment of NSCLC and metastatic CRC (mCRC). To optimise the use of anti-EGFR agents in clinical practice, various clinical and molecular biomarkers have been investigated, thus moving their indication from unselected to selected populations. Nowadays, anti-EGFR drugs represent a gold-standard therapy for metastatic NSCLC harbouring EGFR activating mutation and for RAS wild-type mCRC. Their clinical efficacy is limited by the presence of intrinsic resistance or the onset of acquired resistance. In this review, we provide an overview of the antitumour activity of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC and CRC and of mechanisms of resistance, focusing on the development of a personalised approach through 15 years of preclinical and clinical research.

  5. miR-345 in metastatic colorectal cancer: a non-invasive biomarker for clinical outcome in non-KRAS mutant patients treated with 3rd line cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jakob V; Rossi, Simona; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. METHODS: From 138 patients with mCRC in 3rd line therapy with cetuximab and irinotecan in a prospective phase II study, 738 pretreatment miRNAs were isolated and profiled from whole blood...... to treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-345 in whole blood as a potential biomarker for clinical outcome. MiR-345 was a single prognostic biomarker for both OS and PFS in all patients and also in the non-KRAS mutant population....

  6. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality.

  7. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...... and predictive significance in CRC patients. This review provides an overview of the intestinal stem cell markers leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), B cell–specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1), Musashi1 (MSI1), and sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9......) and their implications in human CRC. The exact roles of the intestinal stem cell markers in CRC development and progression remain unclear; however, high expression of these stem cell markers have a potential prognostic significance and might be implicated in chemotherapy resistance...

  8. Recruiting community health centers into pragmatic research: Findings from STOP CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Gloria D; Retecki, Sally; Schneider, Jennifer; Taplin, Stephen H; Burdick, Tim; Green, Beverly B

    2016-04-01

    Challenges of recruiting participants into pragmatic trials, particularly at the level of the health system, remain largely unexplored. As part of Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), we recruited eight separate community health centers (consisting of 26 individual safety net clinics) into a large comparative effectiveness pragmatic study to evaluate methods of raising the rates of colorectal cancer screening. In partnership with STOP CRC's advisory board, we defined criteria to identify eligible health centers and applied these criteria to a list of health centers in Washington, Oregon, and California affiliated with Oregon Community Health Information Network, a 16-state practice-based research network of federally sponsored health centers. Project staff contacted centers that met eligibility criteria and arranged in-person meetings of key study investigators with health center leadership teams. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to thematically analyze the content of discussions during these meetings to identify major facilitators of and barriers to health center participation. From an initial list of 41 health centers, 11 met the initial inclusion criteria. Of these, leaders at three centers declined and at eight centers (26 clinic sites) agreed to participate (73%). Participating and nonparticipating health centers were similar with respect to clinic size, percent Hispanic patients, and percent uninsured patients. Participating health centers had higher proportions of Medicaid patients and higher baseline colorectal cancer screening rates. Common facilitators of participation were perception by center leadership that the project was an opportunity to increase colorectal cancer screening rates and to use electronic health record tools for population management. Barriers to participation were concerns of center leaders about ability to provide fecal testing to and assure follow-up of

  9. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 promotes colorectal cancer metastasis via EMT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhao, Zhenxian; Feng, Weidong; Ye, Zhijun; Dai, Weigang; Zhang, Changhua; Peng, Jianjun; Wu, Kaiming

    2016-08-09

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in developed countries, and its incidence rate has been continuously increasing in developing countries over the past few decades. Taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) plays an important role in signal transduction, regulation of cell morphology, migration, proliferation and apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of TUG1 in CRC, and whether knockdown of TUG1 expression could affect cell proliferation, migration and invasion of CRC cell lines. Here, we reported that TUG1 was upregulated in CRC. Further experiments revealed that TUG1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion of CRC in vitro. Above all, knockdown of TUG1 may represent a rational therapeutic strategy for CRC patients in future.

  10. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Siesing

    Full Text Available High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3 has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy.Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.High RBM3 expression, both nuclear and cytoplasmic, was an independent prognostic factor for prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.90 and HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.91, respectively. PFS was significantly longer in patients with high RBM3 expression who had received first-line oxaliplatin based treatment, compared to those who had received irinotecan based treatment, both regarding nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (p-value 0.020 and 0.022 respectively.High RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy.

  11. Quality of life in Malaysian colorectal cancer patients: a preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrah, M S; Ezat, Sharifa W P; Syed, M A; Rizal, A M Mohd; Saperi, S

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly increasing colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in Malaysia and the introduction of cutting edge new treatments, which prolong survival, mean that treatment outcome measures meed to be evaluated, including consideration of patient's quality of life (QoL) assessment. There are limited data on QoL in CRC patients, especially in Malaysia. Therefore, this study was performed focusing on cancer stages and age groups. The cross sectional study was conducted from June to September 2011 at three public tertiary hospitals with the EORTC QLQ C-30 questionnaire in addition to face to face interview and review of medical records of 100 respondents. The mean age was 57.3 (SD 11.9) years with 56.0% are males and 44.0% females, 62% of Malay ethnicity, 30% Chinese, 7% Indian and 1% Sikh. Majority were educated up to secondary level (42%) and 90% respondents had CRC stages III and IV. Mean global health status (GHS) score was 79.1 (SD 21.4). Mean scores for functional status (physical, emotional, role, cognitive, social) rangeds between 79.5 (SD 26.6) to 92.2 (SD 13.7). Mean symptom scores (fatigue, pain, nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, insomnia, dyspnoea, loss of appetite) ranged between 4.00 (SD 8.58) to 20.7 (SD 30.6). Respondents role function significantly deteriorates with increasing stage of the disease (p=0.044). Females had worse symptoms of pain (p=0.022), fatigue (p=0.031) and dyspnoea (p=0.031). Mean insomnia (p=0.006) and diarrhea (p=0.024) demonstrated significant differences between age groups. QOL in CRC patients in this study was comparable to that in other studies done in developed countries. Pain, fatigue and dyspnoea are worse among female CRC patients. Given that functions deteriorates with advanced stage of the disease at diagnosis, a systematic screening programme to detect cases as early as possible is essential nationwide.

  12. KRAS polymorphisms are associated with survival of CRC in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiong; Wei, Hui Lian; Huang, Juan; Zhou, Tie Jun; Chai, Li; Yang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-04-01

    rs12245, rs12587, rs9266, rs1137282, rs61764370, and rs712 of KRAS oncogene are characterized in the 3'UTR. The study highlights the important role of these polymorphisms playing in the susceptibility, oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy sensitivity, progression, and prognosis of CRC. Improved multiplex ligation detection reaction (iMLDR) technique is used for genotyping. An unconditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the association of certain polymorphism and CRC risk. The Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox regression model were used to evaluate the effects of polymorphisms on survival analysis. Results demonstrated that TT genotype and T allele of rs712 were associated with the increased risk of CRC; the patients with GG genotype and G allele of rs61764370 had a shorter survival and a higher risk of relapse or metastasis of CRC. Our studies supported the conclusions that rs61764370 and rs712 polymorphisms of the KRAS are functional and it may play an important role in the development of CRC and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy efficiency and prognosis of CRC.

  13. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  14. Rates and predictors of colorectal cancer screening by race among motivated men participating in a prostate cancer risk assessment program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael J.; Ruth, Karen; Giri, Veda N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Screening by fecal occult blood test and lower endoscopy have lowered colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality, but compliance gaps persist. Of concern are possible disparities in uptake of CRC screening between White and African American (AA) men. Our goal was to assess for disparities in uptake of CRC screening among men participating in a high-risk prostate cancer clinic. If present, such disparities could support hypotheses for further research examining racial differences in awareness and patient preferences in undergoing CRC screening. Methods Baseline data on a racially diverse cohort of men age 50–69 at increased risk of prostate cancer collected via the prostate cancer risk assessment program (PRAP) at Fox Chase Cancer Center were analyzed. Predictors of uptake of CRC screening were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Compared to Whites, AA men had statistically significantly lower uptake of fecal occult blood testing (AA 49.0% vs White 60.7%, p=0.035), lower endoscopy (AA 44.1% vs White 58.5%, p=0.011), and any CRC screening (AA 66.2% vs White 76.3%, p=0.053). Predictors of uptake of lower endoscopy among AA men included older age (OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.87–6.97), family history of CRC (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.30–9.25), and insurance status (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.04–3.46). Conclusion Despite awareness of cancer risk and motivation to seek prostate cancer screening through a specialized prostate cancer risk assessment program, evidence supporting compliance gaps with CRC screening among men was found. Tailored messages to younger AA men with and without a family history of CRC are needed. PMID:21751189

  15. Stromal expression of heat-shock protein 27 is associated with worse clinical outcome in patients with colorectal cancer lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schweiger

    Full Text Available Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC. Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27 is upregulated in activated fibroblasts during wound healing and systemically elevated in various diseases. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are also thought to play a role as prognostic and predictive markers in various malignancies including CRC. Surprisingly, the expression of Hsp27 has never been assessed in CAFs. Therefore we aimed to investigate the expression level of Hsp27 in CAFs and its clinical implications in patients with CRC lung metastases.FFPE tissue samples from 51 pulmonary metastases (PMs and 33 paired primary tumors were evaluated for alpha-SMA, CD31, Hsp27 and vimentin expression by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathological variables. 25 liver metastases served as control group. Moreover, serum samples (n=10 before and after pulmonary metastasectomy were assessed for circulating phospho-Hsp27 and total Hsp27 by ELISA.Stromal expression of Hsp27 was observed in all PM and showed strong correlation with alpha-SMA (P<0.001 and vimentin (P<0.001. Strong stromal Hsp27 was associated with higher microvessel density in primary CRC and PM. Moreover, high stromal Hsp27 and αSMA expression were associated with decreased recurrence-free survival after pulmonary metastasectomy (P=0.018 and P=0.008, respectively and overall survival (P=0.031 and P=0.017, respectively. Serum levels of phospho- and total Hsp27 dropped after metastasectomy to levels comparable to healthy controls.Herein we describe for the first time that Hsp27 is highly expressed in tumor stroma of CRC. Stromal α-SMA and Hsp27 expressions correlate with the clinical outcome after pulmonary metastasectomy. Moreover, serum Hsp27 might pose a future marker for metastatic disease in CRC.

  16. Barriers to CRC Screening among Latino Adults in Pennsylvania: ACCN Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Wray, Linda A.; Parrott, Roxanne; Aumiller, Betsy; Kluhsman, Brenda; Renderos, Carlos; Dignan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe knowledge of and barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by sex and geography among Latino adults in Pennsylvania. Methods: Eighty-two Latinos greater than 50 years old engaged in one of 8 focus groups. Focus groups consisted of 4 components. Focus group data were audiotaped, transcribed, and grouped into thematic…

  17. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  18. Impact of postoperative complications on readmission and long-term survival in patients following surgery for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slankamenac, Ksenija; Slankamenac, Maja; Schlegel, Andrea; Nocito, Antonio; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Turina, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that specific postoperative complications such as stroke influence readmissions and overall survival (OS) after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). Whether overall hospital morbidity is associated with increased risk of readmission and poorer long-term survival is unknown. New tools are available to accurately quantify overall morbidity, such as the comprehensive complication index (CCI). The aim is to evaluate the impact of complications on readmission and overall survival (OS) in patients operated for colorectal cancer. Postoperative complications of patients undergoing surgery for CRC were assessed over a 5-year period using the Clavien-Dindo classification, and overall morbidity was assessed by using the CCI. Individual scores were analyzed regarding their association with readmission and OS by using the multivariate logistic and Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis, respectively. Two hundred eighty-four patients were operated for CRC, of which 22 (8%) were readmitted. One hundred five patients (37%) developed at least one postoperative complication during the hospital stay. While single complications or the use of severe complication only (grade ≥IIIb) was not associated with readmission, overall morbidity (CCI) predicted readmission (OR 1.02 (95% CI 1.0-1.04), p = 0.044). Similarly, morbidity assessed by the CCI had a significant negative predictive value on OS, e.g., patients with a CCI of 20 were 22% more likely to die within a 5-year follow-up, when compared to patients with a CCI of 10 (p = 0.022). Overall combined morbidity as assessed by the CCI leads to more frequent readmission, and is associated with poorer long-term survival after surgery for CRC.

  19. Dicer and miRNA in relation to clinicopathological variables in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao-Feng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dicer is aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers. Applying real-time PCR, we detected the expression of Dicer mRNA in normal mucosa (n = 162, primary colorectal cancer (CRC (n = 162 and liver metastasis (n = 37, and analysed the relationship between Dicer expression and clinicopathological features. We also correlated the expression of Dicer mRNA to the miRNA expression of miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200b, mir-200c and miR-429 in liver metastases. Methods RT-PCR and qPCR were used to analyse the Dicer expression in normal mucosa, primary tumour and liver metastasis by using the High Capacity cDNA Reverse Transcription Kit and TaqMan™® Gene Expression assays for Dicer and GAPDH. RT-PCR and qPCR were used to detect miRNA expression in liver metastases by utilizing TaqMan® MicroRNA Reverse Transcription Kit and TaqMan® miRNA Assays. Statistical analyses were performed with STATISTICA. Results Dicer expression in rectal cancer (3.146 ± 0.953 was higher than in colon cancer (2.703 ± 1.204, P = 0.018. Furthermore the Dicer expression was increased in primary tumours (3.146 ± 0.952 in comparison to that in normal mucosa from rectal cancer patients (2.816 ± 1.009, P = 0.034 but this is not evident in colon cancer patients. Dicer expression in liver metastases was decreased in comparison to that of either normal mucosa or primary tumour in both colon and rectal cancers (P Conclusion Dicer is up-regulated in the early development of rectal cancers. An increased expression of Dicer mRNA in normal mucosa from CRC patients is significantly related to poor survival independently of gender, age, tumour site, stage and differentiation.

  20. Risk modification of colorectal cancer susceptibility by interleukin-8 -251T>A polymorphism in Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mohd Aminudin; Shahpudin, Siti Nurfatimah Mohd; Aziz, Ahmad Aizat Abdul; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2012-06-07

    To investigate the allele and genotype frequencies and associated risk of interleukin (IL)-8 -251T>A polymorphism on colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility risk. Peripheral blood samples of 255 normal controls and 255 clinically and histopathologically confirmed CRC patients were genotyped for IL-8 -251T>A polymorphism employing allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. The relative association of variant allele and genotypes with CRC susceptibility risk was determined by calculating the odds ratios (ORs). Corresponding χ² tests on the CRC patients and controls were carried out and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using Fisher's exact test. The allele frequencies and its risk association were calculated using FAMHAP, haplotype association analysis software. On comparing the frequencies of genotypes of patients and controls, the homozygous variant AA was significantly higher in CRC patients (P = 0.002) compared to controls. Investigation on the association of the polymorphic genotypes with CRC susceptibility risk, showed that the homozygous variant IL-8 -251AA had a significantly increased risk with OR 3.600 (95% CI: 1.550-8.481, P = 0.001). In the case of allele frequencies, variant allele A of IL-8 -251 showed a significantly increased risk of CRC predisposition with OR 1.32 (95% CI: 1.03-1.69, P = 0.003). Variant allele and genotype of IL-8 (-251T>A) was significantly associated with CRC susceptibility risk and could be considered as a high-risk variant for CRC predisposition.

  1. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) on tumor-associated macrophages is a marker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Hasselby, Jane Preuss

    2014-01-01

    Patients were identified from a population-based prospective study of 4990 individuals with symptoms associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). A total of 244 CRC tissue samples were available for immunohistochemical staining of uPAR, semiquantitatively scored at the invasive front, and in the tumo...

  2. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...

  3. Social media and colorectal cancer: A systematic review of available resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellino, Gianluca; Simillis, Constantinos; Qiu, Shengyang; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Mills, Sarah; Warren, Oliver; Kontovounisios, Christos; Tekkis, Paris P

    2017-01-01

    Social media (SM) can provide information and medical knowledge to patients. Our aim was to review the literature and web-based content on SM that is used by Colorectal Cancer (CRC) patients, as well as surgeons' interaction with SM. Studies published between 2006 and 2016 were assessed. We also assessed the impact of several hashtags on Twitter with a freeware (Symplur). Nine studies were included assessing Twitter (78%), Forums/Cancer-survivor networks (33%), and Facebook (22%). Aims included use of SM by CRC patients (67%), cancer-specific usage of SM with different types of cancer (44%), content credibility (33%), and influence in CRC awareness (33%). Prevention was the most common information that CRC patients looked for, followed by treatment side-effects. Only 2% of CRC SM users are doctors. SM use by colorectal consultants was suboptimal. Only 38% of surgeons had a LinkedIn account (most with less than 50 connections), and 3% used Twitter. A steep increase of tweets was observed for searched Hashtags over time, which was more marked for #ColonCancer (+67%vs+38%, #Coloncancer vs #RectalCancer). Participants engaged with colon cancer increased by 85%, whereas rectal cancer ones increased by 29%. The hashtag '#RectalCancer' was mostly tweeted by colorectal surgeons. The official twitter account of American Society of Colorectal Surgeons (@fascrs_updates) was the most active account. CRC patients and relatives are increasingly engaging with SM. CRC surgeons' participation is poor, but we confirm a trend toward a greater involvement. Most SM lack of authoritative validation and the quality of shared content still is largely anecdotic and not scientifically evidenced-based. However, SM may offer several advantages over conventional information sharing sources for CRC patients and surgeons, and create connections with mutual enrichment.

  4. IGFBP3 methylation is a novel diagnostic and predictive biomarker in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Perez-Carbonell

    Full Text Available Aberrant hypermethylation of cancer-related genes has emerged as a promising strategy for the development of diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers in human cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic and comprehensive analysis of a panel of CRC-specific genes as potential diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers in a large, population-based CRC cohort.Methylation status of the SEPT9, TWIST1, IGFBP3, GAS7, ALX4 and miR137 genes was studied by quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing in a population-based cohort of 425 CRC patients.Methylation levels of all genes analyzed were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to normal mucosa (p<0.0001; however, cancer-associated hypermethylation was most frequently observed for miR137 (86.7% and IGFBP3 (83% in CRC patients. Methylation analysis using the combination of these two genes demonstrated greatest accuracy for the identification of colonic tumors (sensitivity 95.5%; specificity 90.5%. Low levels of IGFBP3 promoter methylation emerged as an independent risk factor for predicting poor disease free survival in stage II and III CRC patients (HR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.28-0.85, p = 0.01. Our results also suggest that stage II & III CRC patients with high levels of IGFBP3 methylation do not benefit from adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy.By analyzing a large, population-based CRC cohort, we demonstrate the potential clinical significance of miR137 and IGFBP3 hypermethylation as promising diagnostic biomarkers in CRC. Our data also revealed that IGFBP3 hypermethylation may serve as an independent prognostic and predictive biomarker in stage II and III CRC patients.

  5. Cancer patients and mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Rajer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUNDNowadays cancer patients tend to be more involved in the medical decision process. Active participation improves health outcomes and patient satisfaction. To participate effectively patients require a huge amount of information, but time limits make it impossible to satisfy all information needs at clinics. We tried to find out which kind of media cancer patients use when searching for information and how often. Lastly, we try to find out how popular the Internet is in this regard.METODSIn this research we invited cancer patients, who had regular clinic examinations at the Oncology Institute between 21st and 25th May in 2012. We carried out a prospective research by anonymous questionnaires. We were investigating which media were used and how often. We analysed results with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, the χ²-Test and the t-test.RESULTS478 of 919 questionnaires distributed among cancer patients were returned. Mean age was 59.9 years. 61 % of responders were female, and the most common level of education was high school (33 %. Most common cancer type was breast cancer (33 %, followed by gastrointestinal and lung cancer. Patients search for information most often on television (81.4% responders, followed by specialized brochures (78%, internet (70.8% and newspapers (67.6%. Patients who do not use media for information searching are older than average (62.5 years vs. 59.9 years; p<0,000.CONCLUSIONSAccording to our results patients search for information most often on television, followed by brochures, internet and newspapers. Older patients less often search for information. This data might help doctors in everyday clinical practice.

  6. Prognostic factors and a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Huttenlocher, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background: This study aimed to identify independent prognostic factors and to create a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Data from 121 patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven potential prognostic factors were investigated including tumor type, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score (ECOG-PS), number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status prior to radiotherapy (RT), other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, time of developing motor deficits prior to RT, and the RT schedule. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved motor function was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p = 0.011) and a slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001). Improved local control was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.043) and longer-course RT (p = 0.008). Improved survival was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p < 0.001), ambulatory status (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), and a slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.047). These four prognostic factors were included in a survival score. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate by 10. The prognostic score represented the sum of the factor scores. Four prognostic groups were designed; the 6-month survival rates were 0% for 8-12 points, 26% for 13-18 points, 62% for 20-23 points, and 100% for 24-27 points (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study identified several independent prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC. The survival prognosis of these patients can be estimated with a new score. (orig.)

  7. A randomized study comparing short-time infusion of oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine XELOX(30) and chronomodulated XELOX(30) as first-line therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, C; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Fokstuen, T

    2010-01-01

    Chronotherapy is one of the several approaches to increase efficacy and reduce toxicity of chemotherapy. In a phase II study in the second-line in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), we found that chronomodulated XELOX (XELOX(30Chron)) was a well-tolerated regimen with potentially...

  8. Women patients' preference for women physicians is a barrier to colon cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Stacy B; Inadomi, John M; Korsnes, Sheryl; Elta, Grace H

    2005-08-01

    The preference of women patients for women physicians has been shown in many specialties. Women patients awaiting a lower endoscopy have been shown to have a preference for women endoscopists. The reasons for this preference and the strength of this preference have not been studied in the primary care setting. A questionnaire was given to female patients who were waiting for primary care appointments at 4 offices. Patients reported sociodemographic characteristics, experiences with colorectal cancer (CRC), barriers to CRC screening, gender preference of their physician, the significance, and reasons for this preference. A total of 202 women patients aged 40 to 70 years (mean 53 years) completed the questionnaire. Of these patients, 43% preferred a woman endoscopist, and of these, 87% would be willing to wait >30 days for a woman endoscopist, and 14% would be willing to pay more for one. The most common reason (in 75%) for this gender preference was embarrassment. Univariate analysis revealed that gender of the primary care physician (PCP), younger patient age, current employment, and no previous history of colonoscopy were predictors of preference for a woman endoscopist. Of these variables, only female gender of the PCP (OR 2.84: 95% CI[1.49, 5.40]) and employment (OR 2.4: 95% CI[1.23, 4.67]) were positive predictors for a woman endoscopist preference by multivariable analysis; 5% stated that they would not undergo a colonoscopy unless guaranteed a woman endoscopist. The sole independent factor associated with adherence to screening was PCP recommendation (OR 2.93: 95% CI[1.63, 5.39]). Women patients frequently prefer a woman endoscopist, and this preference is reported as being strong enough to delay the procedure and to incur personal expense. It is an absolute barrier to endoscopy according to 5% in this subset of women surveyed. Interventions must be made in the primary care setting to address this issue and to increase the participation of women patients in

  9. Sending family history questionnaires to patients before a colonoscopy improves genetic counseling for hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Koen; Eisinger, Joey D; Letteboer, Tom G; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Siersema, Peter D; Moons, Leon M G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether sending a family history questionnaire to patients prior to undergoing colonoscopy results in an increased availability of family history and better genetic counseling. A questionnaire was mailed to patients before they underwent outpatient colonoscopy at a university hospital in 2013. These patients' additional characteristics and referral for genetic evaluation were retrieved from the electronic medical records. Patients undergoing inpatient coloboscopy, with confirmed hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. All study patients from 2010 to 2013 were matched with the database of the genetics department to determine who consulted a geneticist. A total of 6163 patients underwent colonoscopy from 2010 to 2013. Of 1421 who underwent colonoscopy in 2013, 53 (3.7%) consulted a geneticist, while 75 (1.6%) of 4742 patients undergoing colonoscopy between 2010 and 2012 did so (P history was not recorded in the electronic medical records of 393 (40.3%). In 129 (32.8%), family history was obtained from the completed questionnaire. In 2013, 49 (60.5%) out of 81 patients referred for genetic counseling were referred based on their family history. Eight (9.9%) patients were referred based on the completed questionnaire. Screening for hereditary CRC in a population undergoing outpatient colonoscopy with a questionnaire sent by mail resulted in an increased availability of family histories and genetic counseling. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. High SHIP2 Expression Indicates Poor Survival in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SH2-containing inositol 5′-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2, which generally regulates insulin signaling, cytoskeleton remodeling, and receptor endocytosis, has been suggested to play a significant role in tumor development and progression. However, the associations between SHIP2 expression and the clinical features to evaluate its clinicopathologic significance in colorectal cancer (CRC have not been determined yet. In the present study, one-step quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR test and immunohistochemistry (IHC analysis with CRC tissue microarrays (TMA were employed to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression of SHIP2 in CRC. The results showed that SHIP2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels was significantly higher in CRC tissues than that in corresponding noncancerous tissues (both P<0.05. The expression of SHIP2 protein in CRC was related to lymph node metastasis (P=0.036, distant metastasis (P=0.001, and overall survival (P=0.009. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox multifactor analysis suggested that high SHIP2 protein level (P=0.040 and positive distant metastasis (P=0.048 were critically associated with the unfavorable survival of CRC patients. The findings suggested that SHIP2 may be identified as a useful prognostic marker in CRC and targeting CRC may provide novel strategy for CRC treatment.

  11. Tumour vasculature immaturity, oxidative damage and systemic inflammation stratify survival of colorectal cancer patients on bevacizumab treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Petra; Biniecka, Monika; Ó'Meachair, Shane; Maguire, Aoife; Tosetto, Miriam; Nolan, Blathnaid; Hyland, John; Sheahan, Kieran; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid; Mulcahy, Hugh; Fennelly, David; O'Sullivan, Jacintha

    2018-01-01

    Despite treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy, response rates are modest and there are no biomarkers available that will predict response. The aim of this study was to assess if markers associated with three interconnected cancer-associated biological processes, specifically angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative damage, could stratify the survival outcome of this cohort. Levels of angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative damage markers were assessed in pre-bevacizumab resected tumour and serum samples of mCRC patients by dual immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. This study identified that specific markers of angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative damage stratify survival of patients on this anti-angiogenic treatment. Biomarkers of immature tumour vasculature (% IMM, p=0.026, n=80), high levels of oxidative damage in the tumour epithelium (intensity of 8-oxo-dG in nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, p=0.042 and 0.038 respectively, n=75) and lower systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL6 and IL8, p=0.053 and 0.049 respectively, n=61) significantly stratify with median overall survival (OS). In summary, screening for a panel of biomarkers for high levels of immature tumour vasculature, high levels of oxidative DNA damage and low levels of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines may be beneficial in predicting enhanced survival outcome following bevacizumab treatment for mCRC. PMID:29535825

  12. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  13. Colorectal cancer in Slovenia – differences in surgical treatment and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Norčič

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in Slovenia. Its incidence rises constantly in the last years while the outcome of treatment is poorer than in other developed countries.Methods: In a retrospective study we analysed 940 colorectal cancer patients diagnosed in Slovenia in 1997.Results: Differences in outcome between the Slovenian institutions are due to different stage-distributions and differences in surgical radicality. Differences in pathohistological staging and medical oncological treatment are probably less important. The same can be said regarding some of the examples from abroad.Conclusions: With constant and objective auditing, the improvement of all aspects of treatment can be achieved, resulting in better survival of all Slovenian colorectal cancer patients.

  14. The experiences of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifrangis, C; Koizia, L; Rozario, A; Rodney, S; Harrington, M; Somerville, C; Peplow, T; Waxman, J

    2011-12-01

    To assess the needs of cancer patients for information about their condition and to understand the psychological impact of their illness. The discussion of prognosis and treatment options in the palliative setting is an important and difficult part of oncology practice. To evaluate this, we examined the experiences of cancer patients of the physical and psychological impact of their disease on their life, and their opinions on the communication of end-of-life decisions and treatment options. A patient questionnaire was designed that encompassed communication regarding treatment and prognosis, quality-of-life attitudes subsequent to cancer diagnosis, end-of-life care and cancer drug funding. One hundred and twenty-five patients with a diagnosis of cancer were asked to participate and 96 questionnaires were completed and available for analysis. The questionnaire consisted of 63 questions and was completed in both an inpatient and outpatient setting. This survey brought to light a number of controversial issues in cancer service provision, highlighting the emotional and psychological changes brought about by a cancer diagnosis. Major concerns of our patients include fear of death and pain, changes in interpersonal relationships and financial constraints. Only 66% of the patients wanted to be given a prognosis by their clinicians and just 70% of the patients recalled being given a detailed prognosis. 11% of the patients were not prepared to undergo palliative treatment. In all, 7% were not prepared to accept treatment for 1 year and 2% for 5 years of life in exchange for the potential side effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy. 12% of the patients would not want to be in possession of the information that they were in the terminal phase of the illness with a short time to live and 16% would not want this discussed with their next of kin. This study informs medical professionals about the importance of tailoring information to the needs of the individual patient, and we

  15. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i...... detected in 7.5% of the patients and in 37% of these cases the metastatic spread was confined to the lungs. The prevalence of SPCM increased with the implementation of thoracic CT in CRC staging. SPCM impaired survival significantly and was associated with increasing age and rectal cancer. Resection...

  16. Evaluation of serum and tissue levels of VAP-1 in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Stephen T.; Weston, Christopher J.; Shepherd, Emma L.; Hejmadi, Rahul; Ismail, Tariq; Adams, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial adhesion molecule, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1, AOC3) promotes lymphocyte recruitment to tumours, although the contribution that VAP-1 makes to lymphocyte recruitment in human colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. VAP-1 exists in circulating soluble form (sVAP-1). A previous study demonstrated elevated sVAP-1 levels in CRC patients. The aim of this study was to confirm this finding and study the differences in tissue VAP-1 expression between CRC and healthy tissues. sVAP-1 levels were measured in the serum of 31 patients with CRC and 31 age- and sex-matched controls. Tissue VAP-1 levels were measured by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mean sVAP-1 level ± SD was significantly lower in the CRC group compared with the control group (399 ± 138 ng/ml versus 510 ± 142 ng/ml, P = 0.003). Tissue VAP-1 protein and mRNA levels were significantly lower in CRC compared with normal colon tissue. VAP-1 immunostaining was practically absent from CRC. VAP-1 is downregulated in human CRC and although the molecular basis of this down regulation is not yet known, we suggest it may be part of a mechanism used by the tumour to prevent the recruitment of anti-tumour immune cells. Our data contradicts the findings of others with regard sVAP-1 levels in patients with CRC. Possible reasons for this are discussed

  17. APC hypermethylation for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Hong-Xu; Zheng, Yan-Yan; Cao, Ying-Qing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Xin; Dong, Shu-Xiao

    2017-07-11

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) promoter hypermethylation has been frequently observed in colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between APC promoter methylation and clinicopathological significance in CRC is under investigation. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the significance of APC methylation in CRC. The study included a total of 24 articles and 2025 CRC patients. The frequency of APC promoter hypermethylation was significantly higher in colorectal adenoma than in normal colorectal tissue, OR was 5.76, 95% CI, 2.45-13.56; pAPC promoter more frequently hypermethylated in CRC stage I compared to normal colorectal tissue, OR was 13.42, 95% CI, 3.66-49.20; pAPC promoter hypermethylation, pooled OR was 9.80, 95%CI, 6.07-15.81; pAPC methylation was not associated with grade, stage of CRC as well as tumor location, patients' gender, and smoking behavior. The results indicate that APC promoter hypermethylation is an early event in carcinogenesis of CRC, could be a valuable diagnostic marker for early-stage CRC. APC methylation is not significantly associated with overall survival in patients with CRC. APC is a potential drug target for development of personalized treatment.

  18. Benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with T4 UICC II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Andreas; Gerken, Michael; Hartl, Janine; Itzel, Timo; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika

    2015-05-20

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care in patients with UICC stage III colon cancer after R0 resection. Adjuvant therapy was not shown to be beneficial in patients with UICC stage II colon cancer. However, there is an ongoing discussion as to whether adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial for a subgroup of UICC II patients in a "high-risk situation" (such as T4). We investigated a Bavarian population-based (2.1 million inhabitants) cohort of 1937 patients with UICC II CRC treated between 2002 and 2012 in regard of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for large (T4) tumors. Patients older than 80 years of age were excluded. Of 1937 patients, 240 had a T4 tumor (12%); 77 of all T4 patients received postoperative chemotherapy (33%). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Patients with a T4 tumor who received postoperative chemotherapy had a highly significant survival benefit in respect of overall survival (pbenefit from adjuvant treatment. Chemotherapy, age at diagnosis, and tumor grading remained independent risk factors in the multivariate cox regression analysis. Our retrospective study demonstrated the significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in the T4 subgroup of patients with UICC II colon cancer. Our data suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy should be seriously considered in these patients.

  19. Psychological aspects of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is accompanied by important psychological distress experienced by both patient and family. From the moment of the diagnosis on, the patient has to develop a great number of mechanisms and tasks of adjustment to the illness and its circumstances. The high prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders during the course of cancer increases in the end stage disea‐ se. Therefore, a global plan of intervention integrating somatic and psychological/ psychiatric care throughout all the phases of the illness is crucial in the treatment of these patients. Health professionals working on this field can also experience emotional reactions to their patients’ suffering. They should be aware of the emotional aspects involved and develop training to help them intervene adequately with the patient and the family. The articulation between oncologists, palliative care professionals, and mental health care teams can be of great help in providing good quality of care to cancer patients.

  20. Feasibility of an expressive-disclosure group intervention for post-treatment colorectal cancer patients: results of the Healthy Expressions study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Cindy L; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Yuan, Ying; Greisinger, Anthony; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Wolff, Robert A; Barker, Trina; Baum, George; Pennebaker, James W

    2011-11-01

    Adjusting to cancer requires effective cognitive and emotional processing. Written and verbal disclosure facilitate processing and have been studied independently in cancer survivors. Combined written and verbal expression may be more effective than either alone, particularly for patients with difficult to discuss or embarrassing side effects. Thus, the authors developed and tested the efficacy of a 12-session combined written and verbal expression group program for psychologically distressed colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Forty post-treatment patients with CRC (stages I-III) identified as psychologically distressed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) were randomized to an intervention group (Healthy Expressions; n = 25) or standard care (control group; n = 15). Assessments were completed at baseline, Month 2, and Month 4 (postintervention). Primary outcomes were psychological functioning and quality of life (QOL). Most participants were women (63%), white (63%), and non-Hispanic (75%). The Healthy Expressions group demonstrated significantly greater changes in distress compared with the control group at Month 2 on the BSI Global Severity Index (GSI) and the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) scores (P psychological functioning in CRC patients who reported experiencing distress. Findings demonstrate the program's feasibility and provide strong support for conducting a larger randomized trial. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  1. Hope in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Turan Kavradim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, which is one of the major health problems leading to despair, uncertainty, pain and suffering, is perceived as a serious and chronic disease. Cancer negatively affects individuals' quality of life due to the physical, psychological, and socio-economic problems. Today, despite inspiring advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancer and increase in survival rates of patients, appearance of physical and psycho-social disorders during cancer course disrupts the adaptation mechanisms of patients and undermines expectations for the future. Most of the time in clinical practice, clinicians focus on physical assessments and treatment planning of cancer patients primarily, ignoring social, psychological, economic and cultural factors related with the disease. This approach definitely influences patients' hope levels and their effective dealing with the disease. The aim of this article is to guide medical staff and increase awareness about the concept of hope in patients with cancer. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 154-164

  2. Dietary Modulation of Inflammation-Induced Colorectal Cancer through PPARγ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee B. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is dramatically increased for patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. For instance, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC have a 12–20% increased risk for developing CRC. Preventive strategies utilizing nontoxic natural compounds that modulate immune responses could be successful in the suppression of inflammation-driven colorectal cancer in high-risk groups. The increase of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ expression and its transcriptional activity has been identified as a target for anti-inflammatory efforts, and the suppression of inflammation-driven colon cancer. PPARγ down-modulates inflammation and elicits antiproliferative and proapoptotic actions in epithelial cells. All of which may decrease the risk for inflammation-induced CRC. This review will focus on the use of orally active, naturally occurring chemopreventive approaches against inflammation-induced CRC that target PPARγ and therefore down-modulate inflammation.

  3. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i...

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment and follow up were included. Patient ... and recurrence and the associated patient and disease ... The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the devel- ... therapy, disease stage and curative intent (table 3). ... through genetic and family analyses (4,6). ... Polite BN, Dignam JJ: A colorectal cancer model of health.

  5. Colorectal cancer screening | Schneider | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world, with an estimated incidence of 148 810 cases in the USA in 2008, and about 50 000 deaths from this disease. If detected early, patients with disease localised to the colonic wall have a 5-year survival of 90%. The 5-year survival for patients ...

  6. P53 and DCC polymorphisms and the risk for colorectal cancer in romanian patients – a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai TOMA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes p53 and DCC has been frequently observed in colorectal cancer. The aim of this case-control study was to test possible association between polymorphisms g.32008376A>G (rs714 of DCC gene and g.7175464A>G (rs1625895 of p53 gene and colorectal cancer risk in Romanian patients. We investigate these two polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP in individuals with colorectal cancer (n=120, M:W=74:46 and healthy persons (n=60, M:W=32:28. We observed that GG genotype of both genes confer protection for CRC (ORDCC 0.34, 95%CI 0.18-0.66, ORp53 0.28, 95%CI 0.14-0.55. The presence of DCC AA (OR 2.97, 95%CI 0.97-9.08 and p53 GA (OR 3.86, 95%CI 1.89-7.87 genotypes are associated with an increased risk for CRC. The alleles A of both markers are associated with the risk for disease (OR 2.87, 95%CI 1.49-5.50, respectively 3.54, 95%CI 1.81-6.91. We also observed that coinheritance of DCC GG genotype and p53 GG (OR 0.36 or p53 GA (OR 0.23 confer protection for CRC. These apparent discordant results obtained for the p53 gene may be the result of interaction with other markers or a selection bias. Our findings indicate that the p53 and DCC polymorphisms are associated with a risk of CRC in Romanian patients.

  7. PRODUCTION OF PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES AND ALPHA-2-MACROGLOBULIN BY PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS IN THE PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zorina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer worldwide, being quite complicated, with respect to diagnostics and postoperative prognosis. Proinflammatory cytokines are shown to be involved into CRC pathogenesis. However, the changes in alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2-MG, a known regulator of cytokine production, still remain unclear. The aim of this work was to compare contents and production of a2-MG and several pro-inflammatory cytokines in blood serum and supernates from short-term blood cell cultures. The samples were taken from the patients with CRC at initial terms and after surgical removal of the tumor.Studies of cytokines and a2-MG concentrations in serum and supernates of 24-h blood cell cultures from the patients with verified CRC (stages T2-3N0-1M0 and T4N0-1M0 have shown some sufficient differences from healthy volunteers (control group. Pre-surgery IL-6 and TNFα contents in blood of CRC patients was significantly increased agains healthy controls (respectively, 29.9±5.4 and 3.4±1.5 pg/mL versus control group (1.0±0.3 and 0 pg/mL, respectively. Following surgical treatment, the cytokine levels were decreased by 40- 60% after the operation, however, without significant differences from initial values.The supernates of blood cultures stimulated with polyclonal mitogens exhibited significant reduction of IFNγ levels prior to surgery (273±123 pg/ml versus 804±154 pg/mL, and elevated IL-6 levels (14412±2570 pg/mL versus 1970±457 pg/mL. The mean α2-MG concentrations before CRC surgery comprised 1.96±0.11 g/L for blood serum, 0.0304±0.0047 g/L, for non-stimulated blood cell cultures, and 0.0300±0.0052 g/L in mitogen-induced cultures. These parameters did not significantly differ from control values (2.21±0.17 g/L, 0.0328±0.0018 g/L, and 0.0314±0.0019 g/L, respectively. Similar results have been yielded with the samples obtained after surgical treatment of the CRC patients.The obtained data indicate that surgical

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeuli Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR Gene Copy Number (GCN. Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR, progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59% tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43. Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43 while it was 18% (10/56 in the group with previous lines of therapy (p Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status.

  9. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic spectrum within the context of cancer, emphasizing the close relationship between the origin of dissociative constituents which, according to the scientific literature, compose the traumatic experience. Our results have implications for understanding dissociative symptomatology in a cancer

  10. Skin cancers in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Cappellani, Alessandro; Berretta, Massimiliano; Malaguarnera, Michele; Perrotta, Rosario Emanuele

    2013-11-01

    Cancer in older people is a common problem worldwide. Among various types of cancer, skin cancers represent an important percentage. The principal risk factors are sun exposure, family history of skin cancer, fair skin color, but also the age plays an important role in the genesis of skin cancers. In older people there are a more prolonged exposure to carcinogenesis and a decreased functionality of reparation mechanisms of the cells so they acquire a selective advantage of growing and proliferating. At the same time age causes alteration in immune system by increasing NK-cells absolute number and decreasing both the endogenous and the lymphokine-induced lytic activities. The anti-tumor immune response is also mediated by the cytotoxic T- lymphocytes and in the elderly a strong reduction of T-cell function has been demonstrated. In elderly patients the diagnosis and the treatment of skin cancers can be different from younger counterpart. For example in older patients with melanoma is important to evaluate Breslow depth while higher mitotic rate has major value in younger patients. Moreover, the treatment should consider the performance status of patients and their compliance.

  11. Genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and the risk of CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwei; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 and the downstream Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway have previously been reported to be important in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), and several studies have shown the relationship between the polymorphisms of related genes in this pathway with the risk of CRC. However, the findings of these related studies are inconsistent. Moreover, there has no systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the relationship between polymorphisms in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway genes and CRC risk. Eighteen eligible studies with a total of 13,795 CRC cases and 18,043 controls were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases for the period up to September 15, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strength of the association. Our results indicated that IL-6 genetic variants in allele additive model (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI = 1.00, 1.09) and JAK2 genetic variants (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI = 1.15, 1.65) in genotype recessive model were significantly associated with CRC risk. Moreover, the pooled data revealed that IL-6 rs1800795 polymorphism significantly increased the risk of CRC in allele additive model in Europe (OR = 1.07, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.14). In conclusion, the present findings indicate that IL-6 and JAK2 genetic variants are associated with the increased risk of CRC while STAT3 genetic variants not. We need more well-designed clinical studies covering more countries and population to definitively establish the association between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility.

  12. Correlation between TBARS levels and glycolytic enzymes: the importance to the initial evaluation of clinical outcome of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Iria L G; Farias, Júlia G; Rossato, Liana; Araújo, Maria C S; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsh, Vera; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2011-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has been associated with high levels of lipid peroxidation, probably due to neoplasic tissue metabolism. Our objectives were to relate lipid peroxidation with the evolution of CRC and with various biomarkers (GGT, ALP, LDH, CEA) to assess its prognostic value. A longitudinal study was conducted with CRC patients (n=43), using FOLFOX4. At the end of the treatment, patients were grouped into two groups: poor outcome (PO) for those patients whose computed tomography showed signs of metastasis, not reduced or increased in the previous implants, and not reduced or increased in CEA levels and good outcome (GO) for the opposite trends. PO patients had a significant increase in TBARS levels, being different from other group in cycles 4, 5, and 6 of chemotherapy. After cycle 6 of chemotherapy, GO patients had higher SOD (27%) and catalase (33%) activity. TBARS levels showed a positive correlation with biomarkers at the beginning of the treatment, which disappeared after six cycles of chemotherapy, when TBARS levels of the PO group started to increase; the other parameters increased at a later time. Because the serum TBARS levels in GO patients did not increase after the beginning of chemotherapy, it is expected that the increase is not a result of the effects of chemotherapy but of sickness evolution. It is possible that the systemic assessment of lipid peroxidation might become an additional marker because it occurs earlier than other biomarkers and could therefore be useful in the prognosis of CRC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary Tumour Resection Could Improve the Survival of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Bevacizumab-Containing Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of primary tumour resection (PTR among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients remains controversial. Combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab could improve the clinical outcomes of these patients, which might change the importance of PTR in the multi-disciplinary treatment pattern. Methods: We performed a non-randomized prospective controlled study of mCRC pts whose performance status (PS scored ≤2 and who received bevacizumab combination chemotherapy (FOLFOX/XELOX/FOLFIRI as a first-line therapy. These patients were classified into the PTR group and the IPT (intact primary tumour group according to whether they underwent PTR before receiving the systemic therapy. The progression free survival (PFS time and overall survival (OS time, which were recorded from the start of the primary diagnosis until disease progression and death or last follow-up, were analysed. We also compared severe clinical events (such as emergency surgery, radiation therapy, and stent plantation between the two groups. Results: One hundred and nighty-one mCRC pts (108 male patients and 93 female patients were entered in this prospective observational study. The median age was 57.5 years old. The clinical characteristics (age, gender, performance status, primary tumour site, RAS status, and the number of metastatic organs did not significantly differ between the two groups. The median PFS and OS times of the PTR group were superior than those of the IPT group (10.0 vs 7.8 months, p Conclusions: The mCRC patients who received PTR and bevacizumab combination chemotherapy had better clinical outcomes than patients who did not receive PTR. PTR also decreased the incidence of severe clinical events and improved quality of life.

  14. Clinical course and outcome of patients with high-level microsatellite instability cancers in a real-life setting: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpern N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Naama Halpern,1 Yael Goldberg,2 Luna Kadouri,2 Morasha Duvdevani,2 Tamar Hamburger,2 Tamar Peretz,2 Ayala Hubert2 1Institute of Oncology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; 2Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah Medical Center, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel Background: The prognostic and predictive significance of the high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H phenotype in various malignancies is unclear. We describe the characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes of patients with MSI-H malignancies treated in a real-life hospital setting.Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of MSI-H cancer patient files was conducted. We analyzed the genetic data, clinical characteristics, and oncological treatments, including chemotherapy and surgical interventions.Results: Clinical data of 73 MSI-H cancer patients were available. Mean age at diagnosis of first malignancy was 52.3 years. Eight patients (11% had more than four malignancies each. Most patients (76% had colorectal cancer (CRC. Seventeen patients (23% had only extracolonic malignancies. Eighteen women (36% had gynecological malignancy. Nine women (18% had breast cancer. Mean follow-up was 8.5 years. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival of all MSI-H cancer patients from first malignancy were 86% and 74.6%, respectively. Five-year overall survival rates of stage 2, 3, and 4 MSI-H CRC patients were 89.5%, 58.4%, and 22.9%, respectively.Conclusion: Although the overall prognosis of MSI-H cancer patients is favorable, this advantage may not be maintained in advanced MSI-H CRC patients. Keywords: microsatellite instability, malignancy, treatment, outcome

  15. Prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations as a cause of Lynch syndrome in unselected versus selected consecutive series of patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Adela; Hernández-Illán, Eva; Rodriguez-Soler, María; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Egoavil, Cecilia; Barberá, Victor M; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Martínez-de-Dueñas, Eduardo; Juan, María-Jose; Sánchez-Heras, Ana-Beatriz; García-Casado, Zaida; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Juárez, Miriam; Bujanda, Luis; Clofent, Juan; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Alenda, Cristina; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Soto, José-Luis

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in the general population is unknown. We sought to analyse the prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected and selected series of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with diagnoses of CRC (n=2123) were included in the unselected group. For comparison, a group of 847 selected patients with CRC who fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines (rBG) were also included. Somatic and constitutional MLH1 methylation was assayed via methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of cases lacking MLH1 expression. Germline alterations in mismatch-repair (MMR) genes were assessed via Sanger sequencing and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Loss of MLH1 expression occurred in 5.5% of the unselected series and 12.5% of the selected series (pMLH1 were detected in the unselected population (0/62); five cases from the selected series were positive for MLH1 epimutations (15.6%, 5/32; p=0.004). Our results suggest a negligible prevalence of MLH1 constitutional epimutations in unselected cases of CRC. Therefore, MLH1 constitutional epimutation analysis should be conducted only for patients who fulfil the rBG and who lack MLH1 expression with methylated MLH1. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. ITGBL1 promotes migration, invasion and predicts a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao; Feng, Jue-Rong; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Lan; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Yu-Peng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Qiu

    2018-05-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide; its progression and prognosis are associated with oncogenes. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and explore the role and potential mechanism of integrin subunit β like 1 (ITGBL1) in CRC. The microarray dataset GSE41258 was used to screen DEGs involved in CRC. Survival analysis was performed to predict the prognosis of CRC patients. To validate ITGBL1 expression, immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were performed in CRC tissues and cells. Subsequently, the effects of ITGBL1 were evaluated through colony formation, cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays. Finally, we took advantage of Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) to explore potential function and mechanism of ITGBL1 in CRC. In our study, 182 primary CRC tissues and 54 normal colon tissues were contained in GSE41258 dataset. A total of 318 DEGs were screened, among which ITGBL1 was found to be significantly up-regulated in CRC, and its high expression was associated with shortened survival of CRC patients. Moreover, knockdown of ITGBL1 promoted CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Finally, GO analysis revealed that ITGBL1 was associated with cell adhesion. GSEA indicated that ITGBL1 was enriched in ECM receptor interaction and focal adhesion. In conclusion, a novel oncogene ITGBL1 was identified and demonstrated to be associated with the progression and prognosis of CRC, which might be a potential therapeutic target and prognostic biomarker for CRC patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Socioemotional selectivity in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Silbereisen, Rainer K

    2006-06-01

    This study analyzed the contact preferences of newly diagnosed cancer patients and healthy control group participants. In line with the theory of socioemotional selectivity, patients were more likely than control participants to prefer contact with familiar social partners, but this difference was stronger in younger and middle-aged patients than in older patients. Across a 6-month interval, patients' contact preferences changed according to the perceived success of therapy. For example, if therapy was perceived to be successful, patients showed an increasing interest in contacts with unfamiliar social partners. Results indicate that contact preferences are adapted to the perception of limited versus extended future lifetime. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Metformin Increases Overall Survival in Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransgaard, Tina; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    -Meier estimator and the Cox regression model adjusted for important clinical risk factors were used. RESULTS: A total of 30,493 patients were included in the study, of which 3391 were diagnosed with diabetes and 1962 were treated with metformin. The adjusted HR of all-cause mortality for the diabetes group was 1......BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that metformin decreases the risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients with diabetes, but only few studies have examined potential survival benefits after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of the study was to examine the association......'s National Clinical Database (DCCG). The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) records all hospital contacts in Denmark, and the diagnosis of diabetes was identified by combining NPR data with use of antidiabetic drugs identified through the Danish National Prescription Registry and DCCG. The Kaplan...

  19. Increased activity of the mannan-binding lectin complement activation pathway in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Christensen, I J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative bacterial infectious complications are frequent in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), with subsequent increased recurrence rates and poor prognosis. Deficiency of the mannan-binding lectin (MBL) complement activation pathway may cause increased risk of infection......: Serum MBL concentrations and MBL/MASP activity were determined using immunofluorometric assays. The levels are presented as the median, inter-quartile range and range. RESULTS: Serum MBL levels were significantly (P cancer (1384 (400-2188) ng/mL) (median...... in the colon or rectum, and disease stages according to Dukes' classification. No statistical difference (P=0.20) in frequency of MBL deficiency was found between the patients (20%) and the donors (27%). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the MBL complement activation pathway is significantly increased in patients...

  20. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocvirk, Janja; Moltara, Maja Ebert; Mesti, Tanja; Boc, Marko; Rebersek, Martina; Volk, Neva; Benedik, Jernej; Hlebanja, Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. The registry of patients with mCRC was designed to prospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy as well as selection of patients in routine clinical practice. Patient baseline clinical characteristics, pre-specified bevacizumab-related adverse events, and efficacy data were collected, evaluated and compared according to the age categories. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 210 patients with mCRC (median age 63, male 61.4%) started bevacizumab-containing therapy in the 1 st line setting. Majority of the 210 patients received irinotecan-based chemotherapy (68%) as 1 st line treatment and 105 patients (50%) received bevacizumab maintenance therapy. Elderly (≥ 70 years) patients presented 22.9% of all patients and they had worse performance status (PS 1/2, 62.4%) than patients in < 70 years group (PS 1/2, 35.8%). Difference in disease control rate was mainly due to inability to assess response in elderly group (64.6% in elderly and 77.8% in < 70 years group, p = 0.066). The median progression free survival was 10.2 (95% CI, 6.7–16.2) and 11.3 (95% CI, 10.2–12.6) months in elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.58). The median overall survival was 18.5 (95% CI, 12.4–28.9) and 27.4 (95% CI, 22.7–31.9) months for elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.03). Three-year survival rate was 26% and 37.6% in elderly vs. < 70 years group (p = 0.03). Overall rates of bevacizumab-related adverse events were similar in both groups: proteinuria 21

  1. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as an imaging biomarker in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with regorafenib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yoojoo; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Bang, Ji-In; Paeng, Jin Chul; Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Kim, Tae-You

    2017-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate whether fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) could predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Previously treated refractory mCRC patients were enrolled into a prospective biomarker study of regorafenib. For this sub-study, the results of FDG PET/CT scans at baseline and after two cycles of treatment were analyzed. Various metabolic parameters obtained from PET images were analyzed in relation to treatment outcome. A total of 40 patients were evaluable for PET image analysis. Among various PET parameters, total lesion glycolysis (TLG) measured in the same target lesions for RECIST 1.1 analysis were the most significant in predicting prognosis, with the lowest p-value observed in TLG calculated using the margin threshold of 40 % (TLG 40 % ). Further analysis using TLG 40 % showed significantly longer overall survival (OS) in patients with lower baseline TLG 40 % (<151.8) (p = 0.003, median 14.2 vs. 9.1 months in <151.8 and ≥151.8, respectively). Patients showing higher decrease in TLG 40 % after treatment showed significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.001, median 8.0 vs. 2.4 months in % ΔTLG 40 % < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively) and OS (p = 0.002, median 16.4 vs. 9.1 months in % ΔTLG 40 % < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively). The same cutoff could discriminate patients with longer survival among the patients who were under the stable disease category according to RECIST 1.1 (median PFS 8.4 vs. 6.8 months, p = 0.020; median OS 18.3 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.049). Measurement of TLG can predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in mCRC. (orig.)

  2. Relative validity of a short food frequency questionnaire assessing adherence to the Norwegian dietary guidelines among colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Hege Berg; Carlsen, Monica Hauger; Paur, Ingvild; Berntsen, Sveinung; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Skjetne, Anne Juul; Kværner, Ane Sørlie; Henriksen, Christine; Andersen, Lene Frost; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Blomhoff, Rune

    2018-01-01

    The Norwegian food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) aim at reducing the risk of developing chronic diseases and promote overall health. We studied the effect of the Norwegian FBDG in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. There is a need for a time-efficient dietary assessment tool measuring adherence to these guidelines in patients treated for dietary dependent cancer, such as CRC patients. To evaluate a new short food frequency questionnaire (NORDIET-FFQ), developed to estimate adherence to the Norwegian FBDG among CRC patients. Eighty-one CRC patients from both study groups in the Norwegian Dietary Guidelines and Colorectal Cancer Survival study, an ongoing dietary intervention, completed both the short 63-item NORDIET-FFQ and a 7-day weighed food record. The NORDIET-FFQ was on group level able to estimate intakes of fruits, vegetables, unsalted nuts, fish, fatty fish, high fat dairy products, unprocessed meat, processed meat, red meat, water, sugar-rich beverages, alcoholic drinks, and sugar- and fat-rich foods. Ranking of individuals according to intake was good ( r = 0.31-0.74) for fruits and vegetables, fruits, unsalted nuts, whole grain products, sugar-rich cereals, fish, fatty fish, dairy products, red meat, water, sugar-rich beverages, alcoholic beverages, and sugar- and fat-rich foods. The NORDIET-FFQ was able to identify the individuals who did not fulfil the recommendations of fruits, vegetables, unsalted nuts, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, processed meat, water, alcoholic beverages, and sugar- and fat-rich foods (sensitivity: 67-93%). The NORDIET-FFQ showed good ability in to estimate intakes of plant-based foods, fish, dairy products, meat, and energy-dense foods; adequate ranking of individuals according to intake of most recommendations except for unprocessed meat, processed meat, and vegetables; and importantly a good ability to identify those patients in need of dietary counselling for foods that are known to modulate the risk of CRC. National

  3. Relative validity of a short food frequency questionnaire assessing adherence to the Norwegian dietary guidelines among colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Berg Henriksen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Norwegian food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG aim at reducing the risk of developing chronic diseases and promote overall health. We studied the effect of the Norwegian FBDG in colorectal cancer (CRC patients. There is a need for a time-efficient dietary assessment tool measuring adherence to these guidelines in patients treated for dietary dependent cancer, such as CRC patients. Objective: To evaluate a new short food frequency questionnaire (NORDIET-FFQ, developed to estimate adherence to the Norwegian FBDG among CRC patients. Design: Eighty-one CRC patients from both study groups in the Norwegian Dietary Guidelines and Colorectal Cancer Survival study, an ongoing dietary intervention, completed both the short 63-item NORDIET-FFQ and a 7-day weighed food record. Results: The NORDIET-FFQ was on group level able to estimate intakes of fruits, vegetables, unsalted nuts, fish, fatty fish, high fat dairy products, unprocessed meat, processed meat, red meat, water, sugar-rich beverages, alcoholic drinks, and sugar- and fat-rich foods. Ranking of individuals according to intake was good (r = 0.31–0.74 for fruits and vegetables, fruits, unsalted nuts, whole grain products, sugar-rich cereals, fish, fatty fish, dairy products, red meat, water, sugar-rich beverages, alcoholic beverages, and sugar- and fat-rich foods. The NORDIET-FFQ was able to identify the individuals who did not fulfil the recommendations of fruits, vegetables, unsalted nuts, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, processed meat, water, alcoholic beverages, and sugar- and fat-rich foods (sensitivity: 67–93%. Conclusions: The NORDIET-FFQ showed good ability in to estimate intakes of plant-based foods, fish, dairy products, meat, and energy-dense foods; adequate ranking of individuals according to intake of most recommendations except for unprocessed meat, processed meat, and vegetables; and importantly a good ability to identify those patients in need of dietary

  4. Efficacy of A Fluoropyrimidine plus Mitomycin C in Pretreated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Eligible for Regorafenib: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Martorana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the placebo-controlled CORRECT study, individuals with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC receiving Regorafenib (RGR achieved significant benefits in both median overall survival (OS: 6.4 months and progression-free survival (PFS 1.9 months. Patients included in the study had previously failed all standard therapies, which must have included Fluoropyrimidines (FPDs, Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab or Panitumumab for K-RAS wild-type subjects. FPDs plus Mitomycin C (MMC represent one of the few treatment options for mCRC patients currently eligible for RGR. We wanted to investigate the therapeutic benefit of this pharmacological association in the same clinical setting defined for RGR. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the records of mCRC patients followed in our Institutions that would have fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria for the CORRECT trial and received instead the combination of FPDs and MMC. We therefore collected data from 87 patients: 61 fulfilled the criteria required for this analysis. Results: Median OS was 9.3 months (95% CI 9.0–15.4, with a median PFS of 3.3 months (95% CI 2.9–3.8. One third of the patients (29.5% achieved disease control. No significant differences in OS and PFS were found between K-RAS WT and K-RAS mutant individuals. Likewise, Performance Status (PS and the primary site of disease were not associated with differences in response rates. Conclusions: These results suggest the need for a prospective study assessing RGR cost-effectiveness compared to FPDs plus MMC for mCRC patients that progress after standard treatments.

  5. Aberrant methylation of GCNT2 is tightly related to lymph node metastasis of primary CRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazunori; Yamashita, Keishi; Sawaki, Hiromichi; Waraya, Mina; Katoh, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Nobukazu; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Nishimiya, Hiroshi; Ema, Akira; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    Glycoprotein expression profile is dramatically altered in human cancers; however, specific glycogenes have not been fully identified. A comprehensive real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system for glycogenes (CRPS-G) identified several outstanding glycogenes. GCNT2 was of particular interest after GCNT2 expression and epigenetics were rigorously investigated in primary colorectal cancer (CRC). The highlights of this work can be summarized as follows: (i) Expression of GCNT2 was remarkably suppressed. (ii) Silenced expression of GCNT2 was reactivated by combined demethylating agents. (iii) Promoter DNA methylation of GCNT2 was silenced in CRC cell lines and tissues. Hypomethylation of GCNT2 variant 2 is tightly associated with lymph node metastasis in primary CRC. (iv) GCNT2 methylation level in the normal tissues also showed a close association with that in the tumor tissues and reflected lymph node metastasis. We identified aberrant expression of GCNT2, which can be explained by promoter DNA hypermethylation. Hypomethylation of the GCNT2 variant 2 reflected lymph node metastasis of CRC in the tumor and normal tissues. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. The Frequency and Type of K-RAS Mutations in Mexican Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Ramos, Susana G; Alcázar-González, Gregorio; Reyes-Cortés, Luisa M; Torres-Grimaldo, Abdiel A; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Morales-Casas, José; Flores-Sánchez, Patricia; De León-Escobedo, Raúl; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; Moreno-Bringas, Carmen; Sánchez-Guillén, Jorge; Ramos-Salazar, Pedro; González-de León, César; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2017-06-01

    Current metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) therapy uses monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This treatment is only useful in the absence of K-RAS gene mutations; therefore the study of such mutations is part of a personalized treatment. The aim of this work is to determine the frequency and type of the most common K-RAS mutations in Mexican patients with metastatic disease by nucleotide sequencing. We studied 888 patients with mCRC from different regions of Mexico. The presence of mutations in exon 2, codons 12 and 13, of the K-RAS gene was determined by nucleotide sequencing. Patients exhibited K-RAS gene mutations in 35% (310/888) of cases. Mutation frequency of codons 12 and 13 was 71% (221/310) and 29% (89/310), respectively. The most common mutation (45.7%) in codon 12 was c.35G>A (p.G12D), whereas the one in codon 13 was c.38G>A (p.G13D) (78.7%). Given the frequency of K-RAS mutations in Mexicans, making a genetic study before deciding to treat mCRC patients with monoclonal antibodies is indispensable.

  7. Cancer disclosure: experiences of Iranian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Howard, Fuchsia; Nikanfar, Ali-Reza; Ferguson, Caleb

    2012-06-01

    This study explored Iranian patients' experiences of cancer disclosure, paying particular attention to the ways of disclosure. Twenty cancer patients were invited to participate in this qualitative inquiry by research staff in the clinical setting. In-depth, semistructured interview data were analyzed through content analysis. The rigor of the study was established by principles of credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. Four themes emerged: the atmosphere of non-disclosure, eventual disclosure, distress in knowing, and the desire for information. Non-disclosure was the norm for participants, and all individuals involved made efforts to maintain an atmosphere of non-disclosure. While a select few were informed of their diagnosis by a physician or another patient, the majority eventually became aware of their diagnosis indirectly by different ways. All participants experienced distress after disclosure. The participants wanted basic information about their prognosis and treatments from their treating physicians, but did not receive this information, and encountered difficulty accessing information elsewhere. These challenges highlight the need for changes in current medical practice in Iran, as well as patient and healthcare provider education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF146 promotes colorectal cancer by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via ubiquitination of Axin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiangli; Yu, Zhaohui; Li, Na

    2018-06-20

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase ring finger protein 146 (RNF146) has been implicated in tumor development. However, the role and clinical significance of RNF146 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unknown. In this study, we reported for the first time that RNF146 was upregulated in CRC tissues as well as in cell lines. Further, RNF146 expression was independent prognostic factor for poor outcome of CRC patients. RNF146 knockdown in cell lines inhibited cell growth, promoted cell apoptosis in vitro and suppressed colorectal tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RNF146 exerted oncogenic role through ubiquitination of Axin1 to activate β-catenin signalling. In addition, RNF146 expression was positively correlated with β-catenin expression in CRC tissues. Collectively, our data suggest that RNF146 might function as a oncogene in human CRC, and represent a promising prognostic factor and a valuable therapeutic target for CRC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Prognostic classification index in Iranian colorectal cancer patients: Survival tree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Saki Malehi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic index for separating homogenous subgroups in colorectal cancer (CRC patients based on clinicopathological characteristics using survival tree analysis. Methods: The current study was conducted at the Research Center of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Shahid Beheshti Medical University in Tehran, between January 2004 and January 2009. A total of 739 patients who already have been diagnosed with CRC based on pathologic report were enrolled. The data included demographic and clinical-pathological characteristic of patients. Tree-structured survival analysis based on a recursive partitioning algorithm was implemented to evaluate prognostic factors. The probability curves were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method, and the hazard ratio was estimated as an interest effect size. Result: There were 526 males (71.2% of these patients. The mean survival time (from diagnosis time was 42.46± (3.4. Survival tree identified three variables as main prognostic factors and based on their four prognostic subgroups was constructed. The log-rank test showed good separation of survival curves. Patients with Stage I-IIIA and treated with surgery as the first treatment showed low risk (median = 34 months whereas patients with stage IIIB, IV, and more than 68 years have the worse survival outcome (median = 9.5 months. Conclusion: Constructing the prognostic classification index via survival tree can aid the researchers to assess interaction between clinical variables and determining the cumulative effect of these variables on survival outcome.

  10. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  11. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

  12. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention by Mesalazine and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Stolfi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD face an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Independent factors associated with increased risk include long disease duration, extensive colonic involvement, young age at onset of IBD, severity of inflammation, primary sclerosing cholangitis, backwash ileitis, and a family history of CRC, thus emphasising the role of intestinal inflammation as an underlying mechanism. This notion is also supported by the demonstration that the use of certain drugs used to attenuate the ongoing mucosal inflammation, such as mesalazine, seems to associate with a reduced incidence of colitis-associated CRC. In the last decade, work from many laboratories has contributed to delineate the mechanisms by which mesalazine alters CRC cell behaviour. In this paper, we review the available experimental data supporting the ability of mesalazine and its derivatives to interfere with intracellular signals involved in CRC cell growth.

  13. ESMO Consensus Guidelines for management of patients with colon and rectal cancer. a personalized approach to clinical decision making