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Sample records for cancer control initiative

  1. Control of Tumor Initiation by NKG2D Naturally Expressed on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells may co-opt the NKG2D lymphocyte receptor to complement the presence of its ligands for autonomous stimulation of oncogenic signaling. Previous studies raise the possibility that cancer cell NKG2D may induce high malignancy traits, but its full oncogenic impact is unknown. Using epithelial ovarian cancer as model setting, we show here that ex vivo NKG2D+ cancer cells have stem-like capacities, and provide formal in vivo evidence linking NKG2D stimulation with the development and maintenance of these functional states. NKG2D+ ovarian cancer cell populations harbor substantially greater capacities for self-renewing in vitro sphere formation and in vivo tumor initiation in immunodeficient (NOD scid gamma mice than NKG2D− controls. Sphere formation and tumor initiation are impaired by NKG2D silencing or ligand blockade using antibodies or a newly designed pan ligand-masking NKG2D multimer. In further support of pathophysiological significance, a prospective study of 47 high-grade serous ovarian cancer cases revealed that the odds of disease recurrence were significantly greater and median progression-free survival rates higher among patients with above and below median NKG2D+ cancer cell frequencies, respectively. Collectively, our results define cancer cell NKG2D as an important regulator of tumor initiation in ovarian cancer and presumably other malignancies and thus challenge current efforts in immunotherapy aimed at enhancing NKG2D function.

  2. HSP DNAJB8 Controls Tumor-Initiating Ability in Renal Cancer Stem-like Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishizawa, Satoshi; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Akari; Tamura, Yasuaki; Mori, Takashi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Asanuma, Hiroko; Morita, Rena; Sokolovskaya, Alice; Matsuzaki, Junichi; Yamada, Ren; Fujii, Reona; Kampinga, Harm H.; Kondo, Toru; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Hara, Isao; Sato, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are a small population of cancer cells with superior tumor initiating, self-renewal, and differentiation properties. In this study, we show that the cancer-testis antigen and HSP40 family member DNAJB8 contributes to the CSC phenotype in renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

  3. Chest pain control with kinesiology taping after lobectomy for lung cancer: initial results of a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Andrea; Grande, Annamaria; Castiglioni, Massimo; Gasperini, Laura; Faini, Agnese; Spampatti, Sebastiano; Nardecchia, Elisa; Terzaghi, Lorena; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Rotolo, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Kinesiology taping (KT) is a rehabilitative technique performed by the cutaneous application of a special elastic tape. We tested the safety and efficacy of KT in reducing postoperative chest pain after lung lobectomy. One-hundred and seventeen consecutive patients, both genders, age 18-85, undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2013 and July 2015 were initially considered. Lobectomies were performed by the same surgical team, with thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) access. Exclusion criteria (n = 25 patients) were: previous KT exposure, recent trauma, pre-existing chest pain, lack of informed consent, >24-h postoperative intensive care unit treatment. After surgery, the 92 eligible patients were randomized to KT experimental group (n = 46) or placebo control group (n = 46). Standard postoperative analgesia was administered in both groups (paracetamol/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural analgesia including opioids), with supplemental analgesia boluses at patient request. On postoperative day 1 in addition, in experimental group patients a specialized physiotherapist applied KT, with standardized tape length, tension and shape, over three defined skin areas: at the chest access site pain trigger point; over the ipsilateral deltoid/trapezius; lower anterior chest. In control group, usual dressing tape mimicking KT was applied over the same areas, as placebo. Thoracic pain severity score [visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging 0-10] was self-assessed by all patients on postoperative days 1, 2, 5, 8, 9 and 30. The KT group and the control group had similar demographics, lung cancer clinico-pathological features and thoracotomy/VATS ratio. Postoperatively, the two groups also resulted similar in supplemental analgesia, complication rate, mean duration of chest drainage and length of stay. There were no adverse events with KT application. After tape application, KT patients reported overall less thoracic pain than the

  4. Confidence and uncertainty long after initial treatment for early prostate cancer: survivors' views of cancer control and the treatment decisions they made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jack A; Talcott, James A

    2006-09-20

    The many years most men diagnosed with early prostate cancer live after diagnosis allow evolving assessments of their cancer control and their treatment choices, but little is known of these outcomes or the factors that influence them. We surveyed an established, prospective cohort that had initiated treatment for early prostate cancer 4 to 8 years previously. We assessed perceived cancer control, quality of treatment decisions, and other domains of quality of life, along with treatment-related urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. Most men reported high confidence in cancer control and their treatment decisions, but many reported misgivings about one or both. The diagnostic, treatment, and quality-of-life factors associated with these two outcomes were distinct. Perceived cancer control was lower among those with adverse medical factors: higher pretreatment Gleason scores, subsequent rises in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and secondary androgen ablation therapy. Confidence in treatment decisions was unrelated to these factors and was higher in men who opted for radical prostatectomy or brachytherapy, reported close attention to current PSA, had high masculine self-esteem and little distress from sexual dysfunction, and were married. Although perceptions of cancer control and the quality of their treatment decisions are linked, men can distinguish between these two outcomes. They incorporate objective indicators of high risk and adverse outcomes when assessing their cancer control; confidence in treatment decisions represents a more complex psychosocial adjustment to the persistent uncertainty that originates with their diagnosis.

  5. Low-fat Dietary Pattern and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Chen, Liang; White, Donna L; Tinker, Lesley; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Van Horn, Linda V; Richardson, Peter; Lane, Dorothy; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2018-01-01

    Observational studies suggest that diet may influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated the effect of a low-fat dietary intervention on pancreatic cancer incidence. The Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (WHI-DM) trial is a randomized controlled trial conducted in 48 835 postmenopausal women age 50 to 79 years in the United States between 1993 and 1998. Women were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 19 541), with the goal of reducing total fat intake and increasing intake of vegetables, fruits, and grains, or to the usual diet comparison group (n = 29 294). The intervention concluded in March 2005. We evaluated the effect of the intervention on pancreatic cancer incidence with the follow-up through 2014 using the log-rank test and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. All statistical tests were two-sided. In intention-to-treat analyses including 46 200 women, 92 vs 165 pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained in the intervention vs the comparison group (P = .23). The multivariable hazard ratio (HR) of pancreatic cancer was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.67 to 1.11). Risk was statistically significantly reduced among women with baseline body mass indexes (BMIs) of 25 kg/m2 or higher (HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.96), but not among women with BMIs of less than 25 kg/m2 (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 0.97 to 2.71, Pinteraction = .01). A low-fat dietary intervention was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer incidence in women who were overweight or obese in the WHI-DM trial. Caution needs to be taken in interpreting the findings based on subgroup analyses.

  6. Significance of UICC Activities in Global Health Initiatives on Cancer Looking Towards the Future of Cooperative Networks for Cancer Care in Asia - A Dialogue with the Union for International Cancer Control(UICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Norie; Adams, Cary; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-09-01

    At the 24th Asia Pacific Cancer Conference held in Seoul, Korea from 22 to 24 June 2017, a dialogue with Dr.Cary Adams, CEO of the Union for International Cancer Control(UICC)was held to discuss the significance of UICC activities in global health initiatives on cancer and pathways for cooperation on cancer control and care.UICC is engaged in a wide range of capacity building, advocacy and convening initiatives and is increasingly focusing on multi-sectoral approaches.In Japan activities are still predominantly focused on scientific and clinical research and this dialogue provided an opportunity to discuss the possibilities for expanding cooperation in Asia, using the UICC Asia Regional Office(UICC-ARO)as a platform.Discussion also covered UICC's new C/Can 2025: City Cancer Challenge, a new multi-sectoral initiative that has the potential to bring multiple stakeholders together.

  7. The Quality Initiative in Rectal Cancer (QIRC trial: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabane Lehana

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two unfortunate outcomes for patients treated surgically for rectal cancer are placement of a permanent colostomy and local tumor recurrence. Total mesorectal excision is a new technique for rectal cancer surgery that can lead to improved patient outcomes. We describe a cluster randomized controlled trial that is testing if the above patient outcomes can be improved through a knowledge translation strategy called the Quality Initiative in Rectal Cancer (QIRC strategy. The strategy is designed to optimize the use of total mesorectal excision techniques. Methods and Design Hospitals were randomized to the QIRC strategy (experimental group versus normal practice environment (control group. Participating hospitals, and the respective surgeon group operating in them, are from Ontario, Canada and have an annual procedure volume for major rectal cancer resections of 15 or greater. Patients were eligible if they underwent major rectal surgery for a diagnosis of primary rectal cancer. The surgeon-directed QIRC interventions included a workshop, use of opinion leaders, operative demonstrations, a post-operative questionnaire, and, audit and feedback. For an operative demonstration participating surgeons invited a study team surgeon to assist them with a case of rectal cancer surgery. The intent was to demonstrate total mesorectal excision techniques. Control arm surgeons received no intervention. Sample size calculations were two-sided, considered the clustering of data at the hospital level, and were driven by requirements for the outcome local recurrence. To detect an improvement in local recurrence from 20% to 8% with confidence we required 16 hospitals and 672 patients – 8 hospitals and 336 patients in each arm. Outcomes data are collected via chart review for at least 30 months after surgery. Analyses will use an intention-to-treat principle and will consider the clustering of data. Data collection will be complete by the end of

  8. Recruiting and Surveying Catholic Parishes for Cancer Control Initiatives: Lessons Learned From the CRUZA Implementation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Tom, Laura S; Leyva, Bryan; Rustan, Sarah; Ospino, Hosffman; Negron, Rosalyn; Torres, Maria Idalí; Galeas, Ana V

    2015-09-01

    We describe activities undertaken to conduct organizational surveys among faith-based organizations in Massachusetts as part of a larger study designed to promote parish-based cancer control programs for Latinos. Catholic parishes located in Massachusetts that provided Spanish-language mass were eligible for study participation. Parishes were identified through diocesan records and online directories. Prior to parish recruitment, we implemented a variety of activities to gain support from Catholic leaders at the diocesan level. We then recruited individual parishes to complete a four-part organizational survey, which assessed (A) parish leadership, (B) financial resources, (C) involvement in Hispanic Ministry, and (D) health and social service offerings. Our goal was to administer each survey component to a parish representatives who could best provide an organizational perspective on the content of each component (e.g., A = pastors, B = business managers, C = Hispanic Ministry leaders, and D = parish nurse or health ministry leader). Here, we present descriptive statistics on recruitment and survey administration processes. Seventy-five percent of eligible parishes responded to the survey and of these, 92% completed all four components. Completed four-part surveys required an average of 16.6 contact attempts. There were an average of 2.1 respondents per site. Pastoral staff were the most frequent respondents (79%), but they also required the most contact attempts (M = 9.3, range = 1-27). While most interviews were completed by phone (71%), one quarter were completed during in-person site visits. We achieved a high survey completion rate among organizational representatives. Our lessons learned may inform efforts to engage and survey faith-based organizations for public health efforts. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Regional Tobacco Control Research Initiative (Latin America and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco control initiative. IDRC and Cancer Research UK are pleased to announce the launch of a new five-year initiative aimed at preventing tobacco-related diseases. View moreIDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco control initiative.

  10. Cancer control in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed Akram; Sullivan, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is predicted to be an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh in the next few decades. The estimated incidence of 12.7 million new cancer cases will rise to 21.4 million by 2030. More than two-thirds of the total expenditure on health is through out-of-pocket payments. According to the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, cancer is the sixth leading cause of death. International Agency for Research on Cancer has estimated cancer-related death rates in Bangladesh to be 7.5% in 2005 and 13% in 2030. The two leading causes are in males are lung and oral cancer and in females are breast cancer and cervical cancer. Bangladesh is now in severe shortage of radiation therapy machines, hospital bed, trained oncologists, medical radiation physicists and technologists. Bangladesh having different cancers associated with smoking and smokeless tobacco use, Human papilloma virus infection, Hepatitis B and C infection, Helicobacter Pylori infection, arsenic contaminated groundwater, availability of chemical carcinogens mainly formalin treated fruits, fish and vegetables at open market, tannery waste contaminated with chromium (which is used for poultry feed and fish feed preparation). A World Health Organization study revealed the annual cost of illnesses in Bangladesh attributable to tobacco usage is US$ 500 million and the total annual benefit from the tobacco sector is US$ 305 million as tax revenue. Bangladesh has developed a National Cancer Control Strategy and Action Plan with the aim of delivering a universal, quality-based and timely service. Cancer prevention through tobacco control, health promotion and vaccination program, cancer early detection program for oral cavity, breast and cervix has initiated. Cancer detection and diagnostic facilities will be made available at medical colleges and district- hospitals and establish a referral chain. National capacity development, more cancer research will allow Bangladesh to deal effectively

  11. Initial experience of robotic versus laparoscopic colectomy for transverse colon cancer: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de'Angelis, Nicola; Alghamdi, Salah; Renda, Andrea; Azoulay, Daniel; Brunetti, Francesco

    2015-10-09

    Robotic surgery for transverse colon cancer has rarely been described. This study reports our initial experience in robotic resection for transverse colon cancer, by comparing robotic transverse colectomy (RC) to laparoscopic transverse colectomy (LC) in terms of safety, feasibility, short-term outcomes, and the surgeon's psychological stress and physical pain. The study population included the first 22 consecutive patients who underwent RC between March 2013 and December 2014 for histologically confirmed transverse colon adenocarcinoma. These patients were compared with 22 matched patients undergoing LC between December 2010 and February 2013. Patients were matched based on age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage, and tumor location (ratio 1:1). Mortality, morbidity, operative, and short-term oncologic outcomes were compared between groups. The operating surgeon's stress and pain were assessed before and after surgery on a 0-100-mm visual analog scale. The demographic and preoperative characteristics were comparable between RC and LC patients. No group difference was observed for intraoperative complications, blood loss, postoperative pain, time to flatus, time to regular diet, and hospital stay. RC was associated with longer operative time than LC (260 min vs. 225 min; p = 0.014), but the overall operative and robotic time in the RC group decreased over time reflecting the increasing experience in performing this procedure. No conversion to laparotomy was observed in the RC group, while two LC patients were converted due to uncontrolled bleeding and technically difficult middle colic pedicle dissection. Postoperative complications (Dindo-Clavien grade I or II) occurred in 11.3 % of patients with no group difference. Mortality was nil. All resections were R0, with >12 lymph nodes harvested in 90.9 % of RC and 95.5 % of LC patients. The surgeon's stress was

  12. Breast cancer risk reduction--is it feasible to initiate a randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention programme (ActWell) within a national breast screening programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annie S; Macleod, Maureen; Mutrie, Nanette; Sugden, Jacqueline; Dobson, Hilary; Treweek, Shaun; O'Carroll, Ronan E; Thompson, Alistair; Kirk, Alison; Brennan, Graham; Wyke, Sally

    2014-12-17

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second cause of cancer deaths amongst women in the UK. The incidence of the disease is increasing and is highest in women from least deprived areas. It is estimated that around 42% of the disease in post-menopausal women could be prevented by increased physical activity and reductions in alcohol intake and body fatness. Breast cancer control endeavours focus on national screening programmes but these do not include communications or interventions for risk reduction. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of delivery, indicative effects and acceptability of a lifestyle intervention programme initiated within the NHS Scottish Breast Screening Programme (NHSSBSP). A 1:1 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the 3 month ActWell programme (focussing on body weight, physical activity and alcohol) versus usual care conducted in two NHSSBSP sites between June 2013 and January 2014. Feasibility assessments included recruitment, retention, and fidelity to protocol. Indicative outcomes were measured at baseline and 3 month follow-up (body weight, waist circumference, eating and alcohol habits and physical activity). At study end, a questionnaire assessed participant satisfaction and qualitative interviews elicited women's, coaches, and radiographers' experiences. Statistical analysis used Chi squared tests for comparisons in proportions and paired t tests for comparisons of means. Linear regression analyses were performed, adjusted for baseline values, with group allocation as a fixed effect. A pre-set recruitment target of 80 women was achieved within 12 weeks and 65 (81%) participants (29 intervention, 36 control) completed 3 month assessments. Mean age was 58 ± 5.6 years, mean BMI was 29.2 ± 7.0 kg/m(2) and many (44%) reported a family history of breast cancer. The primary analysis (baseline body weight adjusted) showed a significant between group difference favouring the intervention group of 2.04 kg

  13. Conceptual and practical challenges for implementing the communities of practice model on a national scale - a Canadian cancer control initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browman George P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer program delivery, like the rest of health care in Canada, faces two ongoing challenges: to coordinate a pan-Canadian approach across complex provincial jurisdictions, and to facilitate the rapid translation of knowledge into clinical practice. Communities of practice, or CoPs, which have been described by Etienne Wenger as a collaborative learning platform, represent a promising solution to these challenges because they rely on bottom-up rather than top-down social structures for integrating knowledge and practice across regions and agencies. The communities of practice model has been realized in the corporate (e.g., Royal Dutch Shell, Xerox, IBM, etc and development (e.g., World Bank sectors, but its application to health care is relatively new. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC is exploring the potential of Wenger's concept in the Canadian health care context. This paper provides an in-depth analysis of Wenger's concept with a focus on its applicability to the health care sector. Discussion Empirical studies and social science theory are used to examine the utility of Wenger's concept. Its value lies in emphasizing learning from peers and through practice in settings where innovation is valued. Yet the communities of practice concept lacks conceptual clarity because Wenger defines it so broadly and sidelines issues of decision making within CoPs. We consider the implications of his broad definition to establishing an informed nomenclature around this specific type of collaborative group. The CoP Project under CPAC and communities of practice in Canadian health care are discussed. Summary The use of communities of practice in Canadian health care has been shown in some instances to facilitate quality improvements, encourage buy in among participants, and generate high levels of satisfaction with clinical leadership and knowledge translation among participating physicians. Despite these individual success

  14. The impact of a bodyweight and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) initiated through a national colorectal cancer screening programme: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annie S; Craigie, Angela M; Caswell, Stephen; Treweek, Shaun; Stead, Martine; Macleod, Maureen; Daly, Fergus; Belch, Jill; Rodger, Jackie; Kirk, Alison; Ludbrook, Anne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Norwood, Patricia; Thompson, Joyce; Wardle, Jane; Steele, Robert J C

    2014-03-07

    .70 to 3.67). Differences between groups were significant for waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure, blood glucose level, diet, and physical activity. No reported adverse events were considered to be related to trial participation. Significant weight loss can be achieved by a diet and physical activity intervention initiated within a national colorectal cancer screening programme, offering considerable potential for risk reduction of disease in older adults. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN53033856.

  15. Could Cancer Initiate From Bone Marrow Progenitors?

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Nasr, Hmed; Hammami, Serria Turky; Zeghal, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Background Defining cancer stem cells and their origins is of much controversy,and constitutes a challenged knockout for cell targeting- anticancer drugs. Herein,we put forward a hypothetic model for cancer stem cells initiation from bone marrow stem cells. These later, will differentiate into an ancestral progenitor that activates a memorial program - the black box cassette- that is responsible of abnormal neo-organogenesis in the form of tumors and metastases. To approve this model, we assu...

  16. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer and other research.

  17. Correlation between Oxidative Stress, Nutrition, and Cancer Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Lee, Soo Bin; Won, Jihye; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Kyeongseok; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate or excessive nutrient consumption leads to oxidative stress, which may disrupt oxidative homeostasis, activate a cascade of molecular pathways, and alter the metabolic status of various tissues. Several foods and consumption patterns have been associated with various cancers and approximately 30–35% of the cancer cases are correlated with overnutrition or malnutrition. However, several contradictory studies are available regarding the association between diet and cancer risk, which remains to be elucidated. Concurrently, oxidative stress is a crucial factor for cancer progression and therapy. Nutritional oxidative stress may be induced by an imbalance between antioxidant defense and pro-oxidant load due to inadequate or excess nutrient supply. Oxidative stress is a physiological state where high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals are generated. Several signaling pathways associated with carcinogenesis can additionally control ROS generation and regulate ROS downstream mechanisms, which could have potential implications in anticancer research. Cancer initiation may be modulated by the nutrition-mediated elevation in ROS levels, which can stimulate cancer initiation by triggering DNA mutations, damage, and pro-oncogenic signaling. Therefore, in this review, we have provided an overview of the relationship between nutrition, oxidative stress, and cancer initiation, and evaluated the impact of nutrient-mediated regulation of antioxidant capability against cancer therapy. PMID:28714931

  18. Effects of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Phillips

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer anemia causes fatigue and correlates with poor treatment outcome. Erythropoietin has been introduced in an attempt to correct these defects. However, five recent clinical trials reported a negative impact of erythropoietin on survival and/or tumor control, indicating that experimental evaluation of a possible direct effect of erythropoietin on cancer cells is required. Cancer recurrence is thought to rely on the proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs. In breast cancer, CICs can be identified by phenotypic markers and their fate is controlled by the Notch pathway. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the effect of erythropoietin on CICs in breast cancer cell lines. Levels of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR, CD24, CD44, Jagged-1 expression, activation of Notch-1 were assessed by flow cytometry. Self-renewing capacity of CICs was investigated in sphere formation assays. RESULTS: EpoR expression was found on the surface of CICs. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo increased the numbers of CICs and self-renewing capacity in a Notch-dependent fashion by induction of Jagged-1. Inhibitors of the Notch pathway and P13-kinase blocked both effects. CONCLUSIONS: Erythropoietin functionally affects CICs directly. Our observation may explain the negative impact of recombinant Epo on local control and survival of cancer patients with EpoR-positive tumors.

  19. Towards coherent control of energetic material initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Direct optical initiation (DOI) of energetic materials using coherent control of localized energy deposition requires depositing energy into the material to produce a critical size hot spot, which allows propagation of the reaction and thereby initiation, The hot spot characteristics needed for growth to initiation can be studied using quantum controlled initiation (QCI). Achieving direct quantum controlled initiation (QCI) in condensed phase systems requires optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to coherently guide the energy flow along the desired paths. As a test of our quantum control capabilities we have successfully demonstrated our ability to control the reaction pathway of the chemical system stilbene. An acousto-optical modulator based pulse shaper was used at 266 nm, in a shaped pump/supercontinuum probe technique, to enhance and suppress th relative yields of the cis- to trans-stilbene isomerization. The quantum control techniques tested in the stilbene experiments are currently being used to investigate QCI of the explosive hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB).

  20. The Economics of Tobacco Control Research Initiative | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The initiative funds innovative fiscal policy research supporting tobacco control in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Aimed at preventing tobacco-related diseases and promoting public health, this is a five-year partnership between IDRC and the world's leading independent cancer charity dedicated to saving lives ...

  1. Research Ethics Considerations Regarding the Cancer Moonshot Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Marilyn J

    2016-07-01

    If the Precision Medicine Initiative was the launching pad, the Cancer Moonshot Initiative is the liftoff. A billion-dollar mission to "eliminate cancer as we know it," the Cancer Moonshot Initiative underscores the Precision Medicine Initiative's near-term focus in oncology research and translation. Spearheaded by Vice President Biden, the goal is to condense a decade of research into actionable results within five years.

  2. Daughter-Initiated Cancer Screening Appeals to Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavel, M; Genderson, M W

    2016-12-01

    Youth-initiated health interventions may provide a much needed avenue for intergenerational dissemination of health information among families who bear the greatest burden from unequal distribution of morbidity and mortality. The findings presented in this paper are from a pilot study of the feasibility and impact of female youth-initiated messages (mostly daughters) encouraging adult female relatives (mostly mothers) to obtain cancer screening within low-income African American families living in a Southern US state. Results are compared between an intervention and control group. Intervention group youth (n = 22) were exposed to a 60-min interactive workshop where they were assisted to prepare a factual and emotional appeal to their adult relative to obtain specific screening. The face-to-face workshops were guided by the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Control group girls (n = 18) were only provided with a pamphlet with information about cancer screening and specific steps about how to encourage their relative to obtain screening. Intervention youth (86 %) and adults (82 %) reported that the message was shared while 71 % in the control group reported sharing or receiving the message. Importantly, more women in the intervention group reported that they obtained a screen (e.g., mammogram, Pap smear) directly based on the youth's appeal. These findings can have major implications for youth-initiated health promotion efforts, especially among hard-to-reach populations.

  3. Choroidal metastases as the initial presentation of lung cancer: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical reports of symptomatic intraocular metastasis as the initial presentation of lung cancer are rare. We report the case of a 49-year-old female patient who presented with loss of vision due to choroidal metastases as the initial manifestation of her disseminated lung cancer. This particular patient was referred to us from ...

  4. Choroidal Metastases as the Initial Presentation of Lung Cancer: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical reports of symptomatic intraocular metastasis as the initial presentation of lung cancer are rare. We report the case of a 49-year-old female patient who presented with loss of vision due to choroidal metastases as the initial manifestation of her disseminated lung cancer. This particular patient was referred to us from.

  5. European Commission Initiative on Breast Cancer: Concept document

    OpenAIRE

    ULUTURK TEKIN ASLI; AMBROSIO MASSIMO; BOCCHI GIULIA; BRAMESFELD ANKE; DEANDREA SILVIA; DIMITROVA NADYA; LERDA DONATA; PYLKKANEN LIISA; SAZ PARKINSON ZULEIKA ESTHER; TORIGHELLI BEATRIZ

    2017-01-01

    The European Commission Initiative on Breast Cancer (ECIBC) is aimed at ensuring and harmonising breast cancer services quality across European countries. It is coordinated by Commission’s Joint Research Centre, under the supervision of the Directorate-General Health and Food Safety. This document describes the background of the initiative, its general goals and objectives, and its foreseen outcomes.

  6. Evidence-Based Cancer Survivorship Activities for Comprehensive Cancer Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, J Michael; Lakhani, Naheed; Finifrock, DeAnna; Pinkerton, Beth; Johnson, Krystal L; Mallory, Sharon H; Migliore Santiago, Patricia; Stewart, Sherri L

    2015-12-01

    One of six priorities of CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is to address the needs of cancer survivors within the local population served by individually funded states, tribes, and territories. This report examines cancer survivorship activities implemented in five NCCCP grantees, which have initiated evidence-based activities outlined in A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP). NCCCP action plans, submitted annually to CDC, from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed in February 2015 to assess implementation of cancer survivorship activities and recommended strategies consistent with the NAP. Four state-level and one tribal grantee with specific activities related to one of each of the four NAP strategies were chosen for inclusion. Brief case reports describing the initiation and impact of implemented activities were developed in collaboration with each grantee program director. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa programs each implemented activities in surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; programs, policies, and infrastructure; and access to quality care and services. This report provides examples for incorporating cancer survivorship activities within Comprehensive Cancer Control programs of various sizes, demographic makeup, and resource capacity. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band developed creative cancer survivorship activities that meet CDC recommendations. NCCCP grantees can follow these examples by implementing evidence-based survivorship interventions that meet the needs of their specific populations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. 77 FR 31358 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Counseling for Primary Prevention of Cancer, SIP12-053, Panel C, initial... Prevention of Cancer, SIP12-053, Panel C, initial review. In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and...

  8. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  9. African Tobacco Control Research Initiative Scoping Exercise ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Tobacco Situational Analysis (ATSA) supported by IDRC and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation investigated the critical determinants of success for tobacco control in 12 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. As the initiative evolved an additional goal was added, that of identifying, implementing and enforcing ...

  10. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    the skin surface to track breathing motion during a breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer treatment. Analysis would reveal the...Seattle VA which focuses on brachytherapy as treatment for prostate cancer. It seemed unlikely that patient accrual would substantially contribute to

  11. Impact on Loco-regional Control of Radiochemotherapeutic Sequence and Time to Initiation of Adjuvant Treatment in Stage II/III Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Postoperative Concurrent Radiochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haeyoung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Kyubo; Park, Won; Yoon, Won Sup; Huh, Seung Jae; Ha, Sung W

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of radiochemotherapeutic sequence and time to initiation of adjuvant treatment on loco-regional control for resected stage II and III rectal cancer. Treatment outcomes for rectal cancer patients from two hospitals with different sequencing strategies regarding adjuvant concurrent radiochemotherapy (CRCT) were compared retrospectively. Pelvic radiotherapy was administered concurrently on the first (early CRCT, n=180) or the third cycle of chemotherapy (late CRCT, n=180). During radiotherapy, two cycles of fluorouracil were provided to patients in both groups. In the early CRCT group, median six cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were prescribed during the post-CRCT period. In the late CRCT group, two cycles of fluorouracil were administered in the pre- and post-CRCT periods. No significant differences in the 5-year loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) (92.5% vs. 95.6%, p=0.43) or overall survival and disease-free survival were observed between groups. Patients who began receiving adjuvant treatment later than five weeks after surgery had lower LRRFS than patients who received adjuvant treatment within five weeks following surgery (79% vs. 91%, ploco-regional recurrence increased as the time to initiation of adjuvant treatment was delayed. In the current study, treatment outcomes were not significantly influenced by the sequence of adjuvant treatment but by the delay of adjuvant treatment for more than five weeks. Timely administration of adjuvant treatment is deemed important in achieving loco-regional tumor control for stage II/III rectal cancer patients.

  12. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  13. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0095 TITLE: Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR... person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1

  14. Cancer Control in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Akram; Sullivan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is predicted to be an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh in the next few decades. The estimated incidence of 12.7 million new cancer cases will rise to 21.4 million by 2030. More than two-thirds of the total expenditure on health is through out-of-pocket payments. According to the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, cancer is the sixth leading cause of death. International Agency for Research on Cancer has estimated cancer-related death rates in Banglade...

  15. Harmonisation Initiatives of Copernicus Data Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, F. D.; Lankester, T.; Coleman, E.; Ottavianelli, G.

    2015-04-01

    The Copernicus Space Component Data Access system (CSCDA) incorporates data contributions from a wide range of satellite missions. Through EO data handling and distribution, CSCDA serves a set of Copernicus Services related to Land, Marine and Atmosphere Monitoring, Emergency Management and Security and Climate Change. The quality of the delivered EO products is the responsibility of each contributing mission, and the Copernicus data Quality Control (CQC) service supports and complements such data quality control activities. The mission of the CQC is to provide a service of quality assessment on the provided imagery, to support the investigation related to product quality anomalies, and to guarantee harmonisation and traceability of the quality information. In terms of product quality control, the CQC carries out analysis of representative sample products for each contributing mission as well as coordinating data quality investigation related to issues found or raised by Copernicus users. Results from the product analysis are systematically collected and the derived quality reports stored in a searchable database. The CQC service can be seen as a privileged focal point with unique comparison capacities over the data providers. The comparison among products from different missions suggests the need for a strong, common effort of harmonisation. Technical terms, definitions, metadata, file formats, processing levels, algorithms, cal/val procedures etc. are far from being homogeneous, and this may generate inconsistencies and confusion among users of EO data. The CSCDA CQC team plays a significant role in promoting harmonisation initiatives across the numerous contributing missions, so that a common effort can achieve optimal complementarity and compatibility among the EO data from multiple data providers. This effort is done in coordination with important initiatives already working towards these goals (e.g. INSPIRE directive, CEOS initiatives, OGC standards, QA4EO

  16. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  17. CERN launches new cancer therapy initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The first meeting of a new European network for research in cancer therapy was held at CERN, in February 2002. ENLIGHT, the European Network for Research in Light Ion Therapy aims to coordinate the development of a variety of projects at European facilities for "light ion therapy" - a form of radiation therapy that uses beams of the nuclei of lightweight atoms" (1/2 page).

  18. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing...Oncology Biology Physics. Contributors to this article are: Avinash R. Chaurasia, Kelly J. Sun, Christopher Premo, Timothy Brand , Brent Tinnel...salvage radiation therapy.” Poster was presented at the ASCO/ASTRO 2013 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. • Chaurasia A, Sun K, Premo C, Brand T, Tinnel

  19. Pet Ownership and Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David O; Lander, Eric M; Wertheim, Betsy C; Manson, JoAnn E; Volpe, Stella L; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Stefanick, Marcia L; Lessin, Lawrence S; Kuller, Lewis H; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    Pet ownership and cancer are both highly prevalent in the United States. Evidence suggests that associations may exist between this potentially modifiable factor and cancer prevention, though studies are sparse. The present report examined whether pet ownership (dog, cat, or bird) is associated with lower risk for total cancer and site-specific obesity-related cancers. This was a prospective analysis of 123,560 participants (20,981 dog owners; 19,288 cat owners; 1,338 bird owners; and 81,953 non-pet owners) enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative observational study and clinical trials. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HR and 95% confidence intervals for the association between pet ownership and cancer, adjusted for potential confounders. There were no significant relationships between ownership of a dog, cat, or bird and incidence of cancer overall. When site-specific cancers were examined, no associations were observed after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Pet ownership had no association with overall cancer incidence. This is the first large epidemiologic study to date to explore relationships between pet ownership and cancer risk, as well as associated risks for individual cancer types. This study requires replication in other sizable, diverse cohorts. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(9); 1311-6. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  1. Metabolic, autophagic, and mitophagic activities in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Hjelmeland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex disease marked by uncontrolled cell growth and invasion. These processes are driven by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that promote cancer initiation and progression. Contributing to genome changes are the regulation of oxidative stress and reactive species-induced damage to molecules and organelles. Redox regulation, metabolic plasticity, autophagy, and mitophagy play important and interactive roles in cancer hallmarks including sustained proliferation, activated invasion, and replicative immortality. However, the impact of these processes can differ depending on the signaling pathways altered in cancer, tumor type, tumor stage, and/or the differentiation state. Here, we highlight some of the representative studies on the impact of oxidative and nitrosative activities, mitochondrial bioenergetics, metabolism, and autophagy and mitophagy in the context of tumorigenesis. We discuss the implications of these processes for cellular activities in cancer for anti-cancer-based therapeutics.

  2. Conceptual and practical challenges for implementing the communities of practice model on a national scale--a Canadian cancer control initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Colene; Browman, George P; Poole, Barbara

    2010-01-05

    Cancer program delivery, like the rest of health care in Canada, faces two ongoing challenges: to coordinate a pan-Canadian approach across complex provincial jurisdictions, and to facilitate the rapid translation of knowledge into clinical practice. Communities of practice, or CoPs, which have been described by Etienne Wenger as a collaborative learning platform, represent a promising solution to these challenges because they rely on bottom-up rather than top-down social structures for integrating knowledge and practice across regions and agencies. The communities of practice model has been realized in the corporate (e.g., Royal Dutch Shell, Xerox, IBM, etc) and development (e.g., World Bank) sectors, but its application to health care is relatively new. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is exploring the potential of Wenger's concept in the Canadian health care context. This paper provides an in-depth analysis of Wenger's concept with a focus on its applicability to the health care sector. Empirical studies and social science theory are used to examine the utility of Wenger's concept. Its value lies in emphasizing learning from peers and through practice in settings where innovation is valued. Yet the communities of practice concept lacks conceptual clarity because Wenger defines it so broadly and sidelines issues of decision making within CoPs. We consider the implications of his broad definition to establishing an informed nomenclature around this specific type of collaborative group. The CoP Project under CPAC and communities of practice in Canadian health care are discussed. The use of communities of practice in Canadian health care has been shown in some instances to facilitate quality improvements, encourage buy in among participants, and generate high levels of satisfaction with clinical leadership and knowledge translation among participating physicians. Despite these individual success stories, more information is required on how group

  3. Reaction Control Engine for Space Launch Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have begun a series of engine tests on a new breed of space propulsion: a Reaction Control Engine developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI). The engine, developed by TRW Space and Electronics of Redondo Beach, California, is an auxiliary propulsion engine designed to maneuver vehicles in orbit. It is used for docking, reentry, attitude control, and fine-pointing while the vehicle is in orbit. The engine uses nontoxic chemicals as propellants, a feature that creates a safer environment for ground operators, lowers cost, and increases efficiency with less maintenance and quicker turnaround time between missions. Testing includes 30 hot-firings. This photograph shows the first engine test performed at MSFC that includes SLI technology. Another unique feature of the Reaction Control Engine is that it operates at dual thrust modes, combining two engine functions into one engine. The engine operates at both 25 and 1,000 pounds of force, reducing overall propulsion weight and allowing vehicles to easily maneuver in space. The low-level thrust of 25 pounds of force allows the vehicle to fine-point maneuver and dock while the high-level thrust of 1,000 pounds of force is used for reentry, orbit transfer, and coarse positioning. SLI is a NASA-wide research and development program, managed by the MSFC, designed to improve safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of space travel for second generation reusable launch vehicles.

  4. Correlates of initiating colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karon L; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Ory, Marcia G; Hochhalter, Angie K

    2013-02-01

    This study examined (a) differences in rates of initiating colorectal cancer screening across age groups, and (b) factors associated with initiation of colorectal cancer screening among persons age 50-75. Data from 1,699 adults age 50-75 were analyzed from a random sample of households in an eight-county region surrounding the Brazos Valley in Texas. Bivariate descriptive analyses were performed. Logistic regression was employed to assess relationships between demographic, health status, and healthcare utilization variables and having initiated colorectal cancer examination. Having more than a high school education (OR = 1.48, p = 0.002), having insurance (OR = 1.76, p = 0.007), being obese (OR = 1.58, p = 0.015), and having a routine health check-up within the past 2 years (OR = 3.39, p < 0.001) were associated with an increased likelihood of having a colorectal cancer examination. The findings suggest that routine interactions with health care providers may encourage persons to initiate colorectal cancer screening according to guidelines.

  5. The 2011-2016 Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) initiative: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Colditz, Graham A; Hu, Frank B; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Ahima, Rexford S; Brownson, Ross C; Carson, Kenneth R; Chavarro, Jorge E; Chodosh, Lewis A; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M; Hovmand, Peter S; Irwin, Melinda L; Jacobs, Linda A; James, Aimee S; Jones, Lee W; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S; King, Irena B; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Proctor, Enola K; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D; Sesso, Howard D; Stampfer, Meir J; Subramanian, S V; Taveras, Elsie M; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Thornquist, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a center grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity, referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the centers. Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes three animal studies, three cohort studies, four randomized clinical trials, one cross-sectional study, and two modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk of cancer as well as cancer survivors.

  6. Familial breast cancer in Costa Rica: an initial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Monge, Adriana; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A; Loáiciga Vega, Kenneth

    2004-09-01

    Cancer is a worldwide problem because of its high rates of incidence and associated mortality. By 2000, more than 6.2 million people died from this illness worldwide. Among all types of cancer, breast cancer is one of the most studied. Each year, one million new cases are diagnosed around the world. We can classify breast cancer into two main kinds: sporadic cases and those which are a product of inherited genetic alterations. Approximately 5-10% of breast cancer cases are the result of inherited mutations, or alterations in breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Like other countries, Costa Rica possesses high rates of incidence and mortality for breast cancer. According to the "Registro Nacional de Tumores" (National Office of Tumor Records), in 2000 breast cancer had the highest rate of incidence and in 2002 it had the highest rate of mortality in comparison to other types of cancer. For this reason and the generalized lack of knowledge in the field we conducted an epidemiological research on breast cancer patients from Hospital San Juan de Dios, San José, Costa Rica, to find families with a history of breast cancer, and to determine the occurrence of familial cases within the population studied. So far, we have found 23 families, within which we discovered very informative cases that have rendered the identification of a pattern of inheritance. These findings allow us to announce that in Costa Rica there are several cases of inherited breast cancer and that we need more research is needed to improve the prevention, control, and treatment of this disease.

  7. Health initiatives for the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Rüdiger; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Mohr, Peter; Volkmer, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in white population worldwide. However, because the most prominent risk factor-solar UV-radiation and/or artificial UV from sunbeds-is known, skin cancer is highly preventable be primary prevention. This prevention needs, that the public is informed by simple and balanced messages about the possible harms and benefits of UV-exposure and how a person should behave under certain conditions of UV-exposure. For this purpose information and recommendations for the public must be age- and target-group specific to cover all periods of life and to reach all sub-groups of a population, continuously. There is a need that political institutions together with Health Institutions and Societies (e.g., European Commission, WHO, EUROSKIN, ICNIRP, etc.), which are responsible for primary prevention of skin cancer, find a common language to inform the public, in order not to confuse it. This is especially important in connection with the ongoing Vitamin D debate, where possible positive effects of UV have to be balanced with the well known skin cancer risk of UV. A continuously ongoing evaluation of interventions and programs in primary prevention is a pre-requisite to assess the effectiveness of strategies. There is surely no "no message fits all" approach, but balanced information in health initiatives for prevention of skin cancer, which use evidence-base strategies, will further be needed in the future to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality skin cancer.

  8. The characteristics and spatial distributions of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Won You

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers following 12-core transrectal biopsy. Methods: A total of 45 patients with prostate cancers detected on rebiopsy and 45 patients with prostate cancers initially detected on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were included in the study. For result analysis, the prostate was divided into six compartments, and the cancer positive rates, estimated tumor burden, and agreement rates between biopsy and surgical specimens, along with clinical data, were evaluated. Results: The largest mean tumor burden was located in the medial apex in both groups. There were significantly more tumors in this location in the rebiopsy group (44.9% than in the control group (30.1%, P=0.015. The overall sensitivity of biopsy was significantly lower in the rebiopsy group (22.5% vs. 43.4%, P<0.001. The agreement rate of cancer positive cores between biopsy and surgical specimens was significantly lower in the medial apex in the rebiopsy group compared with that of the control group (50.0% vs. 65.6%, P=0.035. The cancer positive rates of target biopsy cores and premalignant lesions in the rebiopsy group were 63.1% and 42.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers showed different spatial distribution and lower cancer detection rate of biopsy cores compared with initially diagnosed cancers. To overcome lower cancer detection rate, target biopsy of abnormal sonographic findings, premalignant lesions and medial apex which revealed larger tumor burden would be recommended when performing rebiopsy.

  9. The characteristics and spatial distributions of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Myung Won; Kim, Mi Hyun; Kim, Jeong Kon; Cho, Kyoung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of initially missed and rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers following 12-core transrectal biopsy. A total of 45 patients with prostate cancers detected on rebiopsy and 45 patients with prostate cancers initially detected on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were included in the study. For result analysis, the prostate was divided into six compartments, and the cancer positive rates, estimated tumor burden, and agreement rates between biopsy and surgical specimens, along with clinical data, were evaluated. The largest mean tumor burden was located in the medial apex in both groups. There were significantly more tumors in this location in the rebiopsy group (44.9%) than in the control group (30.1%, P=0.015). The overall sensitivity of biopsy was significantly lower in the rebiopsy group (22.5% vs. 43.4%, P<0.001). The agreement rate of cancer positive cores between biopsy and surgical specimens was significantly lower in the medial apex in the rebiopsy group compared with that of the control group (50.0% vs. 65.6%, P=0.035). The cancer positive rates of target biopsy cores and premalignant lesions in the rebiopsy group were 63.1% and 42.3%, respectively. Rebiopsy-detected prostate cancers showed different spatial distribution and lower cancer detection rate of biopsy cores compared with initially diagnosed cancers. To overcome lower cancer detection rate, target biopsy of abnormal sonographic findings, premalignant lesions and medial apex which revealed larger tumor burden would be recommended when performing rebiopsy.

  10. Spectral biopsy for skin cancer diagnosis: initial clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin J.; Feng, Xu; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-02-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States and is a recognized public health issue. Diagnosis of skin cancer involves biopsy of the suspicious lesion followed by histopathology. Biopsies, which involve excision of the lesion, are invasive, at times unnecessary, and are costly procedures ( $2.8B/year in the US). An unmet critical need exists to develop a non-invasive and inexpensive screening method that can eliminate the need for unnecessary biopsies. To address this need, our group has reported on the continued development of a noninvasive method that utilizes multimodal spectroscopy towards the goal of a "spectral biopsy" of skin. Our approach combines Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to collect comprehensive optical property information from suspicious skin lesions. We previously described an updated spectral biopsy system that allows acquisition of all three forms of spectroscopy through a single fiber optic probe and is composed of off-the-shelf OEM components that are smaller, cheaper, and enable a more clinic-friendly system. We present initial patient data acquired with the spectral biopsy system, the first from an extensive clinical study (n = 250) to characterize its performance in identifying skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma). We also present our first attempts at analyzing this initial set of clinical data using statistical-based models, and with models currently being developed to extract biophysical information from the collected spectra, all towards the goal of noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  11. Tubal Ligation and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Ira; Lehman, Amy; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Robinson, Randal; Simon, Michael; Cote, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral tubal ligation (BTL) is a common form of birth control in the United States. There are limited, contradictory data examining BTL and the risk of endometrial cancer and none examining type I and type II cancers separately. We investigated the association between BTL and endometrial cancer risk using the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Dietary Modification Studies. Demographic information and history of BTL were obtained from the baseline questionnaires from 76,483 WHI participants in the Observational and Dietary Modification Studies. Univariable and multivariable models were used to examine the association of BTL with type I and type II endometrial cancers. A total of 1137 women were diagnosed with incident endometrial cancer (972 type I and 128 type II) during a mean follow-up of 11.3 years. Overall, 14,499 (19%) women had undergone BTL. There were no statistically significant associations noted between BTL and age at BTL for type I or type II cancers. We examined the largest patient cohort to date in an effort to determine the impact of BTL on endometrial cancer risk. In the WHI trial, we observed no overall effect of BTL on the risk of type I or type II endometrial cancer, suggesting that patients undergoing this popular birth control method likely do not have an associated change in their baseline risk for endometrial cancer.

  12. Summary of semi-initiative and initiative control automobile engine vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Qu, Zhou

    2009-07-01

    Engine vibration accounts for around 55% of automobile vibration, separating the engine vibration from transmitting to automobile to the utmost extent is significant for improving NVH performance. Semi-initiative and initiative control of engine vibration is one of the hot spots of technical research in domestic and foreign automobile industry, especially luxury automobiles which adopt this technology to improve amenity and competitiveness. This article refers to a large amount of domestic and foreign related materials, fully introduces the research status of semi-initiative and initiative control suspension of engine vibration suspension and many kinds of structural style, and provides control policy and method of semi-initiative and initiative control suspension system. Compare and analyze the structural style of semi-initiative and initiative control and merits and demerits of current structures of semi-initiative and initiative control of mechanic electrorheological, magnetorheological, electromagnetic actuator, piezoelectric ceramics, electrostriction material, pneumatic actuator etc. Models of power assembly mounting system was classified.Calculation example indicated that reasonable selection of engine mounting system parameters is useful to reduce engine vibration transmission and to increase ride comfort. Finally we brought forward semi-initiative and initiative suspension which might be applied for automobiles, and which has a promising future.

  13. Mitochondrial ROS in cancer: initiators, amplifiers or an Achilles' heel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Simran S; Schumacker, Paul T

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria cooperate with their host cells by contributing to bioenergetics, metabolism, biosynthesis, and cell death or survival functions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria participate in stress signalling in normal cells but also contribute to the initiation of nuclear or mitochondrial DNA mutations that promote neoplastic transformation. In cancer cells, mitochondrial ROS amplify the tumorigenic phenotype and accelerate the accumulation of additional mutations that lead to metastatic behaviour. As mitochondria carry out important functions in normal cells, disabling their function is not a feasible therapy for cancer. However, ROS signalling contributes to proliferation and survival in many cancers, so the targeted disruption of mitochondria-to-cell redox communication represents a promising avenue for future therapy.

  14. Mitochondrial ROS in cancer: initiators, amplifiers or an Achilles’ heel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Simran S.; Schumacker, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria cooperate with their host cells by contributing to bioenergetics, metabolism, biosynthesis, and cell death or survival functions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria participate in stress signalling in normal cells but also contribute to the initiation of nuclear or mitochondrial DNA mutations that promote neoplastic transformation. In cancer cells, mitochondrial ROS amplify the tumorigenic phenotype and accelerate the accumulation of additional mutations that lead to metastatic behaviour. As mitochondria carry out important functions in normal cells, disabling their function is not a feasible therapy for cancer. However, ROS signalling contributes to proliferation and survival in many cancers, so the targeted disruption of mitochondria-to-cell redox communication represents a promising avenue for future therapy. PMID:25342630

  15. The Haiti Breast Cancer Initiative: Initial Findings and Analysis of Barriers-to-Care Delaying Patient Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Haiti, breast cancer patients present at such advanced stages that even modern therapies offer modest survival benefit. Identifying the personal, sociocultural, and economic barriers-to-care delaying patient presentation is crucial to controlling disease. Methods. Patients presenting to the Hôpital Bon Sauveur in Cange were prospectively accrued. Delay was defined as 12 weeks or longer from initial sign/symptom discovery to presentation, as durations greater than this cutoff correlate with reduced survival. A matched case-control analysis with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting delay. Results. Of N=123 patients accrued, 90 (73% reported symptom-presentation duration and formed the basis of this study: 52 patients presented within 12 weeks of symptoms, while 38 patients waited longer than 12 weeks. On logistic regression, lower education status (OR = 5.6, P=0.03, failure to initially recognize mass as important (OR = 13.0, P<0.01, and fear of treatment cost (OR = 8.3, P=0.03 were shown to independently predict delayed patient presentation. Conclusion. To reduce stage at presentation, future interventions must educate patients on the recognition of initial breast cancer signs and symptoms and address cost concerns by providing care free of charge and/or advertising that existing care is already free.

  16. Measuring Controller for Initial Information Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Skriabina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes to apply a combined measuring controller in order to solve a problem pertaining to redundancy of information transmitted from technical means which have passed  lifetime extension procedure at Atomic Power Stations (APS. The controller operates on the basis of digital and probabilistic forms of  information presentation that allows to obtain the best possible fit and combination of  accuracy, fast operation and hardware capacity.  

  17. Planning for cancer control programs: Leadership considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John; Sutcliffe, Simon B

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is a significant challenge globally. Reducing the impact of cancer requires a program and plans that address the main aspects of cancer from prevention through to end-of-life care. This article summarizes the requirements of a robust cancer control program and outlines the contextual and leadership considerations that are required to ensure that the planning and implementation of a control program can achieve improved cancer outcomes.

  18. THE 2011-2016 TRANSDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN ENERGETICS AND CANCER (TREC) INITIATIVE: RATIONALE AND DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hu, Frank B.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Gehlert, Sarah; Gill, Jeff; Glanz, Karen; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Herbst, Karen Louise; Hoehner, Christine M.; Hovmand, Peter S.; Irwin, Melinda L.; Jacobs, Linda A.; James, Aimee S.; Jones, Lee W.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Kibel, Adam S.; King, Irena B.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Natarajan, Loki; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Proctor, Enola K.; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L.; Rosner, Bernard; Sarwer, David B.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Sears, Dorothy D.; Sesso, Howard D.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Subramanian, S. V.; Taveras, Elsie M.; Tchou, Julia; Thompson, Beti; Troxel, Andrea B.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Thornquist, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recognition of the complex, multidimensional relationship between excess adiposity and cancer control outcomes has motivated the scientific community to seek new research models and paradigms. Methods The National Cancer Institute developed an innovative concept to establish a centers grant mechanism in nutrition, energetics, and physical activity; referred to as the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. This paper gives an overview of the 2011-2016 TREC Collaborative Network and the 15 research projects being conducted at the Centers. Results Four academic institutions were awarded TREC center grants in 2011: Harvard University, University of California San Diego, University of Pennsylvania, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is the Coordination Center. The TREC research portfolio includes 3 animal studies, 3 cohort studies, 4 randomized clinical trials, 1 cross-sectional study, and 2 modeling studies. Disciplines represented by TREC investigators include basic science, endocrinology, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavior, medicine, nutrition, physical activity, genetics, engineering, health economics, and computer science. Approximately 41,000 participants will be involved in these studies, including children, healthy adults, and breast and prostate cancer survivors. Outcomes include biomarkers of cancer risk, changes in weight and physical activity, persistent adverse treatment effects (e.g., lymphedema, urinary and sexual function), and breast and prostate cancer mortality. Conclusion The NIH Science of Team Science group will evaluate the value-added by this collaborative science. However, the most important outcome will be whether this transdisciplinary initiative improves the health of Americans at risk for cancer as well as cancer survivors. PMID:23378138

  19. Research Programs & Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH develops international initiatives and collaborates with other NCI divisions, NCI-designated Cancer Centers, and other countries to support cancer control planning, encourage capacity building, and support cancer research and research networks.

  20. EDITORIAL CERVICAL CANCER CAN BE CONTROLLED Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    palliative care of invasive cancer(9). But it must also be accepted that even these modest comparisons will mean little to countries where per capita annual expenditure on health is less than five US dollars. This is a realisation that has spurred the search for alternative approaches to cervical cancer screening.

  1. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm{sup 3}, 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm{sup 3} this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm{sup 3} 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm{sup 3} (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10{sup 10} cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm{sup 3} (∝1 cm in diameter with 10{sup 9} cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  2. Patterns of statin initiation and continuation in patients with breast or colorectal cancer, towards end-of-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amelia; Murphy, Laura; Bennett, Kathleen; Barron, Thomas I

    2017-05-01

    Cross-sectional studies show that statins, used in cardiovascular disease prevention, are often discontinued approaching death. Studies investigating associations between statin exposure and cancer outcomes, not accounting for these exposure changes, are prone to reverse causation bias. The aim of this study was to describe longitudinally the changes in statin initiation and continuation prior to death in patients with breast or colorectal cancer, thus establishing an appropriate exposure lag time. This study was carried out using linked cancer registry and prescribing data. We identified patients who died of their cancer (cases) and cancer survivors were used as controls. The probability of initiating or continuing statin use was estimated up to 5 years prior to death (or index date). Conditional binomial models were used to estimate relative risks and risk differences for associations between approaching cancer death and statin use. Compared to controls, the probability of continued statin use in breast cancer cases was significantly lower 3 months prior to death (RR 0.86 95% CI 0.79, 0.94). Similarly, in colorectal cancer cases, the probability of continued statin use was significantly lower 3 months prior to colorectal cancer death (RR 0.77 95% CI 0.68, 0.88). A significant proportion of patients will cease statin treatment in the months prior to a colorectal or breast cancer death.

  3. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To... Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is initiating a public private... biotechnology companies. This consortium will evaluate promising nanotechnology platforms and facilitate their...

  4. Cervical cancer control, priorities and new directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonego, J; Bosch, F.X.; Coursaget, P.; Cox, JT; Franco, E; Frazer, I; Sankaranarayanan, R; Schiller, J; Singer, A; Wright, TCJr; Kinney, W; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Linder, J

    2004-01-01

    99% of cervical cancer is initiated by HPV infection. The estimated lifetime risk of cervical cancer is nevertheless relatively low (less than 1 in 20 for most community based studies). Although sensitivity and specificity of the available diagnostic techniques are suboptimal, screening for

  5. Cancer control and prevention: nutrition and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mukesh

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate recent developments in nutritional epigenomics and related challenges, opportunities, and implications for cancer control and prevention. Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and understanding the factors that contribute to cancer development may facilitate the development of strategies for cancer prevention and control. Cancer development involves genetic and epigenetic alterations. Genetic marks are permanent, whereas epigenetic marks are dynamic, change with age, and are influenced by the external environment. Thus, epigenetics provides a link between the environment, diet, and cancer development. Proper food selection is imperative for better health and to avoid cancer and other diseases. Nutrients either contribute directly to cancer prevention or support the repair of genomic and epigenomic damage caused by exposure to cancer-causing agents such as toxins, free radicals, radiation, and infectious agents. Nutritional epigenomics provides an opportunity for cancer prevention because selected nutrients have the potential to reverse cancer-associated epigenetic marks in different tumor types. A number of natural foods and their bioactive components have been shown to have methylation-inhibitory and deacetylation-inhibitory properties. Natural foods and bioactive food components have characteristics and functions that are similar to epigenetic inhibitors and therefore have potential in cancer control and prevention.

  6. Cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation in patients with systemic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gelun; Chen, Li; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Lu, Qiuhong; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage as well as ischemic stroke is one of the common complications among patients with cancer. Ischemic stroke could be the initial manifestation in some patients with cancer. Meanwhile, some patients with cancer also could present cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation, and further studies are required to determine whether these patients have their unique clinical features. To investigate the clinical features and underlying pathogenesis of concealed systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation. The clinical data of patients with concealed systemic cancer who presented cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation registered at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University from January 2010 to December 2015 were prospectively collected and analyzed. Seventeen systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation (0.02%) were ultimately enrolled from 8,326 patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Three patients had traditional risk factors, but the other 14 patients did not. The common subtypes of malignancy were lung cancer, liver cancer, gastric carcinoma, rectal cancer and melanoma. Most patients (11/17, 64.7%) had elevated plasma levels of cancer biochemical markers, including cancer antigen (CA)125, CA153 and CA199, carcino-embryonic antigen, and alpha fetal protein. Coagulopathy was observed in 15 patients. The concealed systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation may lack conventional vascular risk factors but did present coagulopathy and elevated plasma levels of cancer biochemical markers. Coagulopathy might be responsible for the cerebral hemorrhage.

  7. Cancer control-A global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, I

    2017-01-01

    Disparities in cancer control exist in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many countries do not have cancer registries to record incidence, mortality and prevalence and are reliant on Globocan estimates of their cancer burden. Poorer cancer control within and between countries occurs in those living remotely from urban centres, those in a low socioeconomic group and some ethnic groups who have lifestyle and belief systems which impact on cancer control. High-income countries generally have population screening programmes for cervix, breast and bowel cancer. However, simpler forms of screening for cancer of the cervix like visual inspection with acetic acid have been shown to be feasible in developing nations. The widespread use of vaccines to prevent cancer has been achieved with the Hepatitis B vaccine but the human papilloma virus vaccine to prevent cancer of the cervix is largely only available in high-income countries. Access to and training of oncological surgeons in LMICs is limited, while 70% of patients in these countries cannot access radiotherapy. The World Health Organization has developed a list of essential medicines although access remains poor in LMICs. The United Nations has set targets for the control of non-communicable diseases to improve global cancer control. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Familial Breast Cancer in Costa Rica: An Initial Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ramírez Monge

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a worldwide problem because of its high rates of incidence and associated mortality. By 2000, more than 6.2 million people died from this illness worldwide. Among all types of cancer, breast cancer is one of the most studied. Each year, one million new cases are diagnosed around the world. We can classify breast cancer into two main kinds: sporadic cases and those which are a product of inherited genetic alterations. Approximately 5-10% of breast cancer cases are the result of inherited mutations, or alterations in breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Like other countries, Costa Rica possesses high rates of incidence and mortality for breast cancer. According to the "Registro Nacional de Tumores" (National Office of Tumor Records, in 2000 breast cancer had the highest rate of incidence and in 2002 it had the highest rate of mortality in comparison to other types of cancer. For this reason and the generalized lack of knowledge in the field we conducted an epidemiological research on breast cancer patients from Hospital San Juan de Dios, San José, Costa Rica, to find families with a history of breast cancer, and to determine the occurrence of familial cases within the population studied. So far, we have found 23 families, within which we discovered very informative cases that have rendered the identification of a pattern of inheritance. These findings allow us to announce that in Costa Rica there are several cases of inherited breast cancer and that we need more research is needed to improve the prevention, control, and treatment of this disease. Rev. Biol. Trop. 52(3: 531-536. Epub 2004 Dic 15.El cáncer es un problema a nivel mundial porque posee altas tasas de incidencia y mortalidad. Para el año 2000 más de 6.2 millones de personas murieron a causa de esta enfermedad. El cáncer de mama es uno de los tipos de cáncer más estudiados en el mundo por las mismas razones. Cada año, se diagnostican más de un mill

  9. Age of smoking initiation and risk of breast cancer in a sample of Ontario women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Margaret

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To examine the association between time of smoking initiation and both the independent and joint effects of active and passive tobacco smoke exposure and the risk of breast cancer in a sample of Ontario women. Methods Data from two large population-based case-control studies conducted among Ontario women aged 25–75 years were combined for analysis (n = 12,768. Results Women who had ever smoked and were exposed to passive smoke had a significant increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.01–1.25. A significant increased risk was also observed among women who initiated smoking: at age 26 or older (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.03–1.55; more than five years from menarche (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.12–1.42; and, after their first live birth (OR 1.25, 95%CI 1.02–1.52. Conclusion The results suggest that women who initiate smoking at an older age are at an increased risk of breast cancer.

  10. Endothelial cell-initiated extravasation of cancer cells visualized in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Zhang, Jinyan; Libo YAN; Sakurai, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    The extravasation of cancer cells, a key step for distant metastasis, is thought to be initiated by disruption of the endothelial barrier by malignant cancer cells. An endothelial covering-type extravasation of cancer cells in addition to conventional cancer cell invasion-type extravasation was dynamically visualized in a zebrafish hematogenous metastasis model. The inhibition of VEGF-signaling impaired the invasion-type extravasation via inhibition of cancer cell polarization and motility re...

  11. Pet Ownership and Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, David O; Lander, Eric M; Wertheim, Betsy C; Manson, JoAnn E; Volpe, Stella L; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Stefanick, Marcia L; Lessin, Lawrence S; Kuller, Lewis H; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Pet ownership and cancer are both highly prevalent in the United States. Evidence suggests that associations may exist between this potentially modifiable factor and cancer prevention, though studies are sparse...

  12. Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (Past Initiative)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project is a multistudy effort to investigate whether environmental factors are responsible for breast cancer in Suffolk and Nassau counties, NY, as well as in Schoharie County, NY, and Tolland County, CT.

  13. Narrowing Racial Gaps in Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Initiation: The Role of the Patient-Provider Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Isaacs, Claudine; Luta, George; Willey, Shawna C.; Boisvert, Marc; Harper, Felicity W. K.; Smith, Karen; Horton, Sara; Liu, Minetta C.; Jennings, Yvonne; Hirpa, Fikru; Snead, Felicia; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemotherapy improves breast cancer survival but is underused more often in black than in white women. We examined associations between patient-physician relationships and chemotherapy initiation and timeliness of initiation among black and white patients. Methods Women with primary invasive, non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited via hospitals (in Washington, DC and Detroit) and community outreach between July 2006 and April 2011. Data were collected via telephone interviews and medical records. Logistic regression models evaluated associations between chemotherapy initiation and independent variables. Since there were race interactions, analyses were race-stratified. Factors associated with time from surgery to chemotherapy initiation and delay of ≥ 90 days were evaluated with linear and logistic regressions, respectively. Results Among eligible women, 82.8% were interviewed and 359 (90.9%)of those had complete data. The odds of initiating chemotherapy were 3.26 times (95% CI: 1.51, 7.06) higher among black women reporting greater communication with physicians (vs. lesser), after considering covariates. In contrast, the odds of starting chemotherapy were lower for white women reporting greater communication (vs. lesser) (adjusted OR .22, 95% CI: .07, .73). The opposing direction of associations was also seen among the sub-set of black and white women with definitive clinical indications for chemotherapy. Among those initiating treatment, black women had longer mean time to the start of chemotherapy than whites (71.8 days vs. 55.0 days, p= .005), but race was not significant after considering trust in oncologists, where initiation time decreased as trust increased, controlling for covariates. Black women were also more likely to delay ≥ 90 days than whites (27% vs. 8.3%; p=.024), but this was not significant after considering religiosity. Conclusion The patient-physician dyad and sociocultural factors may represent leverage points to improve

  14. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme to

  15. Ocular metastasis as initial presentation in breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients presented to their ophthalmologists with vision disturbances. On ocular examination, retinopathic lesions were observed. On subsequent examination, these lesions were diagnosed as metastases of breast cancer. Neither patient had a history of breast cancer. In patients with breast cancer and multiple ...

  16. Gene networks controlling the initiation of flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Frank; Riechmann, José L

    2010-12-01

    The onset of flower formation is a key regulatory event during the life cycle of angiosperm plants, which marks the beginning of the reproductive phase of development. It has been shown that floral initiation is under tight genetic control, and deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms has been a main area of interest in plant biology for the past two decades. Here, we provide an overview of the developmental and genetic processes that occur during floral initiation. We further review recent studies that have led to the genome-wide identification of target genes of key floral regulators and discuss how they have contributed to an in-depth understanding of the gene regulatory networks controlling early flower development. We focus especially on a master regulator of floral initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1), but also outline what is known about the AP1 network in other plant species and the evolutionary implications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex w-plane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex w-plane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  18. Management Control System Support of Initiatives for Disruptive Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to investigate the management control system (MCS) support of school initiatives to develop the school climate and to re-engage disruptive students. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts an approach of critical action research interviews with management and document reviews informed by Habermasian…

  19. Controlling propulsive forces in gait initiation in transfemoral amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    During prosthetic gait initiation, transfemoral (TF) amputees control the spatial and temporal parameters that modulate the propulsive forces, the positions of the center of pressure (CoP), and the center of mass (CoM). Whether their sound leg or the prosthetic leg is leading, the TF amputees reach

  20. Focal laser ablation for localized prostate cancer: principles, clinical trials, and our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted; Mendhiratta, Neil; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Focal therapy of prostate cancer is an evolving treatment strategy that destroys a predefined region of the prostate gland that harbors clinically significant disease. Although long-term oncologic control has yet to be demonstrated, focal therapy is associated with a marked decrease in treatment-related morbidity. Focal laser ablation is an emerging modality that has several advantages, most notably real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility. This review presents the principles of laser ablation, the role of multiparametric MRI for delineating the site of significant prostate cancer, a summary of published clinical studies, and our initial experience with 23 patients, criteria for selecting candidates for focal prostate ablation, and speculation regarding future directions.

  1. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Abdelli, Omar; Buy, Xavier [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mathelin, Michel de [University of Strasbourg, Lsiit, Strasbourg (France); Jacqmin, Didier; Lang, Herve [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Urology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-08-15

    We report our initial experience and the technical feasibility of transperineal prostate cryoablation under MR guidance. Percutaneous MR-guided cryoablation was performed in 11 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma contraindicated for surgery (mean age: 72 years, mean Gleason score: 6.45, mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA): 6.21 ng/ml, T1-2c/N0/M0, mean: prostate volume 36.44 ml). Free-hand probe positioning was performed under real-time MR imaging. Four to seven cryoprobes were inserted into the prostate, depending on gland volume. The ice ball was monitored using real-time and high-resolution BLADE multi-planar imaging. Patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the procedure with serum PSA level and post-ablation MRI. Prostate cryoablation was technically feasible in 10/11 patients. The ice ball was clearly and sharply visualised in all cases as a signal-void area. Mean ice-ball volume was 53.3 ml. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range: 1-25). Mean PSA nadir was 0.33 ng/ml (range: 0.02-0.94 ng/ml). Mean hospitalisation was 5 days (range: 3-13). Complications included a urethro-rectal fistula, urinary infection, transient dysuria and scrotal pain. MR-guided prostate cryoablation is feasible and promising, with excellent monitoring of the ice ball. Future perspectives could include the use of MR guidance for focal prostate cancer cryotherapy. (orig.)

  2. The project data sphere initiative: accelerating cancer research by sharing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Angela K; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Corty, Robert W; Basch, Ethan; Milowsky, Mathew I; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Bennett, Antonia V; Wood, William A

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we provide background and context regarding the potential for a new data-sharing platform, the Project Data Sphere (PDS) initiative, funded by financial and in-kind contributions from the CEO Roundtable on Cancer, to transform cancer research and improve patient outcomes. Given the relatively modest decline in cancer death rates over the past several years, a new research paradigm is needed to accelerate therapeutic approaches for oncologic diseases. Phase III clinical trials generate large volumes of potentially usable information, often on hundreds of patients, including patients treated with standard of care therapies (i.e., controls). Both nationally and internationally, a variety of stakeholders have pursued data-sharing efforts to make individual patient-level clinical trial data available to the scientific research community. For researchers, shared data have the potential to foster a more collaborative environment, to answer research questions in a shorter time frame than traditional randomized control trials, to reduce duplication of effort, and to improve efficiency. For industry participants, use of trial data to answer additional clinical questions could increase research and development efficiency and guide future projects through validation of surrogate end points, development of prognostic or predictive models, selection of patients for phase II trials, stratification in phase III studies, and identification of patient subgroups for development of novel therapies. Data transparency also helps promote a public image of collaboration and altruism among industry participants. For patient participants, data sharing maximizes their contribution to public health and increases access to information that may be used to develop better treatments. Concerns about data-sharing efforts include protection of patient privacy and confidentiality. To alleviate these concerns, data sets are deidentified to maintain anonymity. To address industry

  3. Breast cancer prevention with Morinda citrifolia (noni at the initiation stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian-Ying Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: It has been reported that noni has multiple health benefits for over 2000 years. In this study, the cancer preventive effects of Tahitian noni® juice (TNJ at the initiation stage on DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female SD rats was investigated.Objective: We took advantage of the DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenic model to study the preventive effects of TNJ at the initiation stage of mammary carcinogenesis in female SD rats by using clinical observation, pathological examination, and 32P-postlabeling assay.Methods: One hundred and sixty female SD rats were divided into eight groups with 20 rats in each group. Three doses of TNJ or placebo was given to the animals at the age of 35 days until the end of the experiment. When the animals were 55 days old, 25 mg/kg DMBA was fed to the animals in the DMBA group, placebo, and TNJ groups. The 20 rats were kept at age-matched controls. Palpable tumors were examined twice a week after DMBA administration in each group by an experienced professional. The size of tumor was measured by a graduated caliper. A piece of tumor, vascularization area, and mammary glands in the thoracic and abdomen areas of each rat were dissected respectively and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for light microscope examination. The DMBA-DNA adduct formation in mammary tissues was detected by 32P-postlabeling assay.Results: The tumor latency in TNJ groups was delayed about 60-90 days when compared with positive controls. The number of palpable tumors per group was significantly reduced by 73%, 72% and 80% in 3%, 5%, and 10% TNJ groups respectively when compared with positive controls at the end of 330 days after DMBA administration. The number of palpable tumors in the placebo groups was slightly reduced in the early stage, but much less than that in the TNJ groups. The multiplicity and malignancy of lesions were significantly reduced and the survival rate of animals in the TNJ groups was

  4. Blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth and metastasis via disruption of Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuyan; Tan, Qinchun; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Chen, Kun; Qian, Cheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-04-18

    Mechanisms for cancer-related inflammation remain to be fully elucidated. Non-apoptotic functions of Fas signaling have been proposed to play an important role in promoting tumor progression. It has yet to be determined if targeting Fas signaling can control tumor progression through suppression of cancer-related inflammation. In the current study we found that breast cancer cells with constitutive Fas expression were resistant to apoptosis induction by agonistic anti-Fas antibody (Jo2) ligation or Fas ligand cross-linking. Higher expression of Fas in human breast cancer tissue has been significantly correlated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. To determine whether blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer could suppress tumor progression, we prepared an orthotopic xenograft mouse model with mammary cancer cells 4T1 and found that blockade of Fas signaling in 4T1 cancer cells markedly reduced tumor growth, inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. Mechanistically, blockade of Fas signaling in cancer cells significantly decreased systemic or local recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of Fas signaling markedly reduced IL-6, prostaglandin E2 production from breast cancer cells by impairing p-p38, and activity of the NFκB pathway. In addition, administration of a COX-2 inhibitor and anti-IL-6 antibody significantly reduced MDSC accumulation in vivo. Therefore, blockade of Fas signaling can suppress breast cancer progression by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production and MDSC accumulation, indicating that Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation in breast cancer cells may be a potential target for treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Meeting Report From the 2016 11th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium: Mechanisms of Initiation and Progression of Ovarian Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jeremy; Mehta, Geeta

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review the latest research advances on the mechanisms of initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. At the 11th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, which was held in Seattle, Washington in September 2016, leaders in ovarian cancer research convened to present and discuss current advances and future directions in ovarian cancer research. One session was dedicated to Mechanisms of Initiation and Progression of Ovarian Cancer, and included a keynote presentation from Dr Ronny Drapkin, MD (University of Pennsylvania), and an invited oral presentation from Laising Yen, PhD (Baylor College of Medicine). Nine additional oral presentations were selected from abstract submissions. Thirty-three abstracts were presented in poster format and were grouped into the categories of mechanisms of the genesis of genomic instability, tumor initiation, metastases of ovarian cancers, innate and acquired chemotherapy resistance, tumor progression, tumor-initiating cell and chemotherapy resistance, and immunomodulation. Eradication of ovarian cancers requires clear understanding of molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer initiation and progression. These mechanisms will not only drive the precision of early detection, but also discovery of new therapies to target precursor lesions and more advanced stage disease.

  6. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns of psychological symptoms between trajectories. This naturalistic study focused on 241 cancer patients receiving psychological care at psycho-oncology institutions. Data were collected before the initiation of psychological care, and 3 and 9 months thereafter. Latent class growth analysis was applied to identify personal control trajectories. Three personal control trajectories were identified: enduring improvement (41%), temporary improvement (50%), and deterioration (9%). Education and baseline physical symptoms distinguished these trajectories. In the whole group, improvements in personal control were associated with improvements in psychological symptoms. Patients at distinct trajectories reported different levels of psychological symptoms, but did not differ in their courses of psychological symptoms. Patients in the enduring and temporary control improvement groups experienced significant psychological symptoms reductions over time, whereas patients in the control deterioration group maintained high psychological symptoms. Improvements in personal control seem to depend on initial control level: those who start with the highest control levels show subsequent improvements, whereas those with the lowest control levels show subsequent deterioration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Elucidation of altered pathways in tumor-initiating cells of triple-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne G; Ehmsen, Sidse; Terp, Mikkel G

    2017-01-01

    A limited number of cancer cells within a tumor are thought to have self-renewing and tumor-initiating capabilities that produce the remaining cancer cells in a heterogeneous tumor mass. Elucidation of central pathways preferentially used by tumor-initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CSCs) may allow...... reduction was also observed using patient-derived primary cancer cells. Further, blocking NF-κB signaling in mice transplanted with tumor-initiating cells significantly reduced tumor outgrowth. Our study demonstrates that suppressed apoptosis, activation of pathways associated with cell viability and CSCs...... their exploitation as potential cancer therapy targets. We used single cell cloning to isolate and characterize four isogenic cell clones from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line; two exhibited mesenchymal-like and two epithelial-like characteristics. Within these pairs, one, but not the other, resulted...

  8. Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Men Initially Treated with Active Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Musunuru, Bindu; Vesprini, Danny; Zhang, Liying; Ghanem, Gabriella; Loblaw, Andrew; Klotz, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Active surveillance is an approach to low and low intermediate risk prostate cancer that is designed to decrease overtreatment. Despite close monitoring a small subset of patients progress to metastatic disease. We analyzed the clinical and pathological correlates of surveillance in patients who eventually experienced metastasis. This was a single center, prospective cohort study. Eligible patients were treated with an expectant approach. The main outcome measure was metastasis-free survival. Predictive factors for metastasis were identified. Metastasis developed in 30 of 980 patients, of whom 211 were classified at intermediate risk, including 14 who progressed to metastatic disease. Median followup was 6.3 years, median age was 70 years, median prostate specific antigen was 6.2 ng/ml and median time to metastasis was 8.9 years. Metastases developed in bone in 18 patients (60%) and in lymph nodes in 13 (43%). Prostate specific antigen doubling time less than 3 years (HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.4, p = 0.0006), Gleason score 7 (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.3, p = 0.0018) and a total of 3 or more positive cores (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.8, p = 0.0028) were independent predictors of metastasis. Although the intermediate risk group was at higher risk for metastasis, those with Gleason score 6 and prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml were not at increased risk for metastasis. Metastasis developed in only 2 patients with Gleason score 6 and neither had surgical pathology grading. Active surveillance appears safe in patients at low risk and in select patients at intermediate risk, particularly those with Gleason score 6 and prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml. Patients with elements of Gleason pattern 4 on diagnostic biopsy are at increased risk for eventual metastasis when treated with an initial conservative approach. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting deregulated epigenetic control in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2013-11-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted disease that involves acquisition of genetic mutations, deletions, and amplifications as well as deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms that fine-tune gene regulation. Key epigenetic mechanisms that include histone modifications, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing are often deregulated in a variety of cancers. Subnuclear localization of key proteins in the interphase nucleus and bookmarking of genes by lineage commitment factors in mitosis-a new dimension to epigenetic control of fundamental biological processes-is also modified in cancer. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of epigenetic control that are operative in a variety of cancers and their potential for risk assessment, early detection, targeted therapy, and personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Korea Brain Initiative: Integration and Control of Brain Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sung-Jin; Lee, Haejin; Hur, Eun-Mi; Choe, Youngshik; Koo, Ja Wook; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Lee, Kea Joo; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Sun, Woong; Moon, Cheil; Kim, Kyungjin

    2016-11-02

    This article introduces the history and the long-term goals of the Korea Brain Initiative, which is centered on deciphering the brain functions and mechanisms that mediate the integration and control of brain functions that underlie decision-making. The goal of this initiative is the mapping of a functional connectome with searchable, multi-dimensional, and information-integrated features. The project also includes the development of novel technologies and neuro-tools for integrated brain mapping. Beyond the scientific goals this grand endeavor will ultimately have socioeconomic ramifications that not only facilitate global collaboration in the neuroscience community, but also develop various brain science-related industrial and medical innovations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Control of Movement Initiation Underlies the Development of Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, David E; Schoppik, David

    2017-02-06

    Balance arises from the interplay of external forces acting on the body and internally generated movements. Many animal bodies are inherently unstable, necessitating corrective locomotion to maintain stability. Understanding how developing animals come to balance remains a challenge. Here we study the interplay among environment, sensation, and action as balance develops in larval zebrafish. We first model the physical forces that challenge underwater balance and experimentally confirm that larvae are subject to constant destabilization. Larvae propel in swim bouts that, we find, tend to stabilize the body. We confirm the relationship between locomotion and balance by changing larval body composition, exacerbating instability and eliciting more frequent swimming. Intriguingly, developing zebrafish come to control the initiation of locomotion, swimming preferentially when unstable, thus restoring preferred postures. To test the sufficiency of locomotor-driven stabilization and the developing control of movement timing, we incorporate both into a generative model of swimming. Simulated larvae recapitulate observed postures and movement timing across early development, but only when locomotor-driven stabilization and control of movement initiation are both utilized. We conclude the ability to move when unstable is the key developmental improvement to balance in larval zebrafish. Our work informs how emerging sensorimotor ability comes to impact how and why animals move when they do. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Metastatic breast cancer cells adhere strongly on varying stiffness substrates, initially without adjusting their morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalha, Sonbula; Weihs, Daphne

    2017-06-01

    We show that metastatic breast cancer cells are quantitatively identifiable from benign cells during adherence onto soft, elastic gels. We identify differences in time-dependent morphology and strength of adherence of single breast cells that are likely related to their malignancy and metastatic potential (MP). Specifically, we compare high and low MP breast cancer cells with benign cells as a control on collagen-coated, polyacrylamide gels with Young's modulus in the physiological range of 2.4-10.6 kPa. We observe that the evaluated metastatic breast cancer cells remain rounded, with small contact area, up to 6.5 h following seeding. In contrast, the benign cells spread and become more elongated on stiffer gels. We identify measurable differences in the two-dimensional, lateral, traction forces exerted by the cells, where the rounded, metastatic cells apply significantly larger, traction forces, as compared to the benign cells, on gels stiffer than 2.4 kPa. The metastatic cell lines exhibited gel-stiffness-dependent differences in traction forces, strain energies, and morphologies during the initial stages of adhesion, which may relate to their MP or invasiveness.

  13. Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion Oncogene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we generated a novel mouse model of human breast cancer based on a recurrent chromosomal translocation that produces the TEL-NTRK3 fusion oncogene, as the initiating mutation in human...

  14. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer:Initial experience of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the remaining 53 patients, 5 were excluded for technical reason, failure of fluorescence.Seventy five lesions were detected in the remaining 48 patients. Of these, 51 (68%) were detected by WLCand BLC both. BLC detected additional 24 (32%) lesions that were missed by WLC. Of these lesions, 15(20%) were cancer ...

  15. Association Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Initiation: The Breast Cancer Quality of Care (BQUAL) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Neugut, Alfred I; Falci, Laura; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Buono, Donna; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Roh, Janise M; Ergas, Isaac J; Kwan, Marilyn L; Lee, Marion; Tsai, Wei Yann; Shi, Zaixing; Lamerato, Lois; Kushi, Lawrence H; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-09-01

    Not all women initiate clinically indicated breast cancer adjuvant treatment. It is important for clinicians to identify women at risk for noninitiation. To determine whether complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is associated with decreased breast cancer chemotherapy initiation. In this multisite prospective cohort study (the Breast Cancer Quality of Care [BQUAL] study) designed to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation and adherence, 685 women younger than 70 years with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited from Columbia University Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, and Henry Ford Health System and enrolled between May 2006 and July 31, 2010. Overall, 306 patients (45%) were clinically indicated to receive chemotherapy per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Participants were followed for up to 12 months. Baseline interviews assessed current use of 5 CAM modalities (vitamins and/or minerals, herbs and/or botanicals, other natural products, mind-body self-practice, mind-body practitioner-based practice). CAM use definitions included any use, dietary supplement use, mind-body use, and a CAM index summing the 5 modalities. Chemotherapy initiation was assessed via self-report up to 12 months after baseline. Multivariable logistic regression models examined a priori hypotheses testing whether CAM use was associated with chemotherapy initiation, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, and delineating groups by age and chemotherapy indication. A cohort of 685 women younger than 70 years (mean age, 59 years; median age, 59 years) with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited and followed for up to 12 months to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation. Baseline CAM use was reported by 598 women (87%). Chemotherapy was initiated by 272 women (89%) for whom chemotherapy was indicated, compared with 135 women (36%) for whom chemotherapy was discretionary. Among

  16. Radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Hachiya, Kae; Okada, Sunaho; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Although the technical developments of radiotherapy have been remarkable, there are currently few reports on the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as initial treatment in this three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy era. Thus, we retrospectively evaluated the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment. Thirty-two patients who underwent radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The dose per fraction was 2.0–3.5 Gy. Because the treatment schedule was variable, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates from the completion of radiotherapy were calculated. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LC rates were 51.5%, 24.5%, 19.6%, 19.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. LC rates were significantly higher for the high BED group (≥75 Gy10) than for the lower BED group (<75 Gy10). All patients who reported pain achieved pain relief. The duration of pain relief was significantly higher for the high BED group than for the lower BED group. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 56.5%, 45.2%, 38.7%, and 23.2%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher OS rates in with higher BED group compared to lower BED group. For patients with unresectable locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone, radiotherapy is effective treatment. The prescribed BED should be more than 75 Gy10, if the dose to the organ at risk is within acceptable levels.

  17. Fibroblasts induce expression of FGF4 in ovarian cancer stem-like cells/cancer-initiating cells and upregulate their tumor initiation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Mariya, Tasuku; Asano, Takuya; Kuroda, Takafumi; Matsuzaki, Junichi; Ikeda, Kanae; Yamauchi, Makoto; Emori, Makoto; Asanuma, Hiroko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki

    2014-12-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as a small population of cells within cancer that contribute to cancer initiation and progression. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are stromal fibroblasts surrounding tumor cells, and they have important roles in tumor growth and tumor progression. It has been suggested that stromal fibroblasts and CSCs/CICs might mutually cooperate to enhance their growth and tumorigenic capacity. In this study, we investigated the effects of fibroblasts on tumor-initiating capacity and stem-like properties of ovarian CSCs/CICs. CSCs/CICs were isolated from the ovarian carcinoma cell line HTBoA as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 high (ALDH1(high)) population by the ALDEFLUOR assay. Histological examination of tumor tissues derived from ALDH1(high) cells revealed few fibrous stroma, whereas those derived from fibroblast-mixed ALDH1(high) cells showed abundant fibrous stroma formation. In vivo tumor-initiating capacity and in vitro sphere-forming capacity of ALDH1(high) cells were enhanced in the presence of fibroblasts. Gene expression analysis revealed that fibroblast-mixed ALDH1(high) cells had enhanced expression of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) as well as stemness-associated genes such as SOX2 and POU5F1. Sphere-forming capacity of ALDH1(high) cells was suppressed by small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of FGFR2, the receptor for FGF4 which was expressed preferentially in ALDH1(high) cells. Taken together, the results indicate that interaction of fibroblasts with ovarian CSCs/CICs enhanced tumor-initiating capacity and stem-like properties through autocrine and paracrine FGF4-FGFR2 signaling.

  18. Immunomodulating and Immunoresistance Properties of Cancer-Initiating Cells: Implications for the Clinical Success of Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccalli, Cristina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ferrone, Soldano

    2017-04-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) represent a relatively rare subpopulation of cells endowed with self-renewal, stemness properties, tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice, and resistance to standard therapies as well as to immunotherapy. Here, we review the biological and immunological characteristics of CICs with special focus on the immunomodulating mechanisms they utilize to escape from immunosurveillance. The recently developed immunotherapeutic strategies have yielded remarkable clinical results in many types of tumors, indicating that indeed a patient's immune system can mount an immune response, which is effective in controlling tumor growth. However, a high proportion of patients is resistant or acquires resistance to these therapeutic strategies. The latter findings may reflect, at least in some cases, the inability of the immunotherapeutic strategies used to eradicate CICs. The CICs that escape immune recognition and destruction may give rise to new tumors in the same organ site or through the metastatic colonization in other anatomic sites. Identification of novel therapeutic approaches that can eradicate CICs is a major challenge in the cancer therapy area. An improved understanding of the interactions of CICs with immune system and with tumor microenvironment may contribute to optimize the available therapies and to design novel combination treatments for cancer therapy. ALDH, aldehyde dehydrogenase; APC, antigen-presenting cells; APM, antigen-processing machinery; CAR: chimeric antigen receptor; CHK1, checkpoint serine/threonine protein kinase; CIC, cancer-initiating cell; CRC, colorectal cancer; CTLA-4, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4; GBM, glioblastoma multiforme; GDF-15, growth differentiation factor-15; CSPG4: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4; IFN, interferon; IL-4, interleukin-4; IL-10, interleukin-10; IL-13, interleukin-13; IL-13α2, α2 chain of IL-13 receptor; mAb, monoclonal antibody; MDSC, myeloid-derived suppressor cell; MHC, major

  19. Breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis--initial experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingberg, A; Förnvik, D; Mattsson, S; Svahn, T; Timberg, P; Zackrisson, S

    2011-09-01

    Experiences gained so far using tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening will be reported. A short summary of results from preparatory studies will also be presented. The sensitivity and specificity of breast tomosynthesis (BT) will be compared with conventional two-dimensional digital mammography (DM) for breast cancer screening in a population-based study. Over 2000 women have been examined so far with BT and DM. The BT reading is significantly more time-consuming than the DM reading. Preparatory studies have shown that BT has a higher diagnostic precision and higher accuracy of size measurements and stage determination than DM. There is potential to use lower compression force with BT compared with DM, without decreasing the diagnostic accuracy. BT might play an important role in clinical as well as screening mammography. A large-scale population-based study to investigate BT as a screening modality is underway.

  20. Urgent need to strengthen and expand screening and other cancer control programs in the CARICOM Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Renee A; Simeon, Donald T

    2017-11-01

    With high mortality in breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancers in Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries, we examined cancer control initiatives including screening as well as the implementation of relevant international and regional mandates. Secondary data were used to examine cancer control initiatives, which included the presence of national policies, programs, and screening services as well as the implementation of international and regional mandates. To identify the data, an on-line search was conducted using Google/Google Scholar. Data were available for 14 of the 15 full members of CARICOM. Although only six countries had distinct cancer control policies, strategies or action plans, all 14 had key elements of cancer control programs. Screening services were available in the 14 countries for cervical, in 12 countries for breast and in 11 for colorectal cancer. However, only four countries had screening policies. In addition, screening guidelines were available for cervical cancer in nine countries, in one country for breast and in none for colorectal cancer. Selected tobacco control policies were present in the 14 countries and immunization policies for human papillomavirus (HPV) in 13. Treatment services included chemotherapy in 10 countries and radiotherapy in six. Nine countries had palliative care services for patients with advanced disease. The countries were at different stages of implementation/compliance with international and regional mandates and frameworks. There is an urgent need to develop and implement comprehensive and customized cancer control policies addressing screening programs, treatment and palliative care.

  1. Initiation and Maintenance of Gastric Cancer: A Focus on CD44 Variant Isoforms and Cancer Stem CellsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Zavros

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death. Although the incidence of gastric cancer in the United States is relatively low, it remains significantly higher in some countries, including Japan and Korea. Interactions between cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment can have a substantial impact on tumor characteristics and contribute to heterogeneity. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining malignant cancer stem cells within the tumor microenvironment in human gastric cancer are largely unknown. Tumor cell and genetic heterogeneity contribute to either de novo intrinsic or the therapy-induced emergence of drug-resistant clones and eventual tumor recurrence. Although chemotherapy often is capable of inducing cell death in tumors, many cancer patients experience recurrence because of failure to effectively target the cancer stem cells, which are believed to be key tumor-initiating cells. Among the population of stem cells within the stomach that may be targeted during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and altered into tumor-initiating cells are those cells marked by the cluster-of-differentiation (CD44 cell surface receptor. CD44 variable isoforms (CD44v have been implicated as key players in malignant transformation whereby their expression is highly restricted and specific, unlike the canonical CD44 standard isoform. Overall, CD44v, in particular CD44v9, are believed to mark the gastric cancer cells that contribute to increased resistance for chemotherapy- or radiation-induced cell death. This review focuses on the following: the alteration of the gastric stem cell during bacterial infection, and the role of CD44v in the initiation, maintenance, and growth of tumors associated with gastric cancer. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, CD44v9, CD44v6, Inflammation

  2. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, H; Shen, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, S.; Xiao, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and ? ? integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24...

  3. Modeling the Aneuploidy Control of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneuploidy has long been recognized to be associated with cancer. A growing body of evidence suggests that tumorigenesis, the formation of new tumors, can be attributed to some extent to errors occurring at the mitotic checkpoint, a major cell cycle control mechanism that acts to prevent chromosome missegregation. However, so far no statistical model has been available quantify the role aneuploidy plays in determining cancer. Methods We develop a statistical model for testing the association between aneuploidy loci and cancer risk in a genome-wide association study. The model incorporates quantitative genetic principles into a mixture-model framework in which various genetic effects, including additive, dominant, imprinting, and their interactions, are estimated by implementing the EM algorithm. Results Under the new model, a series of hypotheses tests are formulated to explain the pattern of the genetic control of cancer through aneuploid loci. Simulation studies were performed to investigate the statistical behavior of the model. Conclusions The model will provide a tool for estimating the effects of genetic loci on aneuploidy abnormality in genome-wide studies of cancer cells.

  4. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis initially misdiagnosed as lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Campainha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA, which was formerly named Wegener's Granulomatosis (WG is a systemic disease characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis that primarily involves upper and lower respiratory tract, as well as kidneys. Diagnosing GPA on the basis of transthoracic fine needle aspiration (TFNA may be problematic, as it can be misdiagnosed as cancer. We describe a patient with a probable GPA which was originally diagnosed as malignancy, but who responded to lung cancer chemotherapy. Resumo: A granulomatose com poliangeíte (GPA, previamente denominada granulomatose de Wegener, é uma doença sistémica caracterizada por inflamação granulomatosa necrotizante e vasculite que envolve principalmente o trato respiratório superior e inferior, bem como os rins. O diagnóstico de GPA com base em biópsia por agulha fina (BAF transtorácica pode ser problemático, levando ao diagnóstico incorreto de cancro. Os autores descrevem o caso de um paciente com provável GPA, inicialmente diagnosticado como cancro do pulmão, que curiosamente respondeu à quimioterapia para cancro do pulmão. Keywords: Systemic vasculitis, Non-small-cell lung carcinoma, Fine-needle biopsy, Palavras-chave: Vasculite sistémica, Carcinoma não-pequenas células, Biópsia por agulha fina

  5. A hot L1 retrotransposon evades somatic repression and initiates human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma C.; Gardner, Eugene J.; Masood, Ashiq; Chuang, Nelson T.; Vertino, Paula M.; Devine, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Although human LINE-1 (L1) elements are actively mobilized in many cancers, a role for somatic L1 retrotransposition in tumor initiation has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we identify a novel somatic L1 insertion in the APC tumor suppressor gene that provided us with a unique opportunity to determine whether such insertions can actually initiate colorectal cancer (CRC), and if so, how this might occur. Our data support a model whereby a hot L1 source element on Chromosome 17 of the patient's genome evaded somatic repression in normal colon tissues and thereby initiated CRC by mutating the APC gene. This insertion worked together with a point mutation in the second APC allele to initiate tumorigenesis through the classic two-hit CRC pathway. We also show that L1 source profiles vary considerably depending on the ancestry of an individual, and that population-specific hot L1 elements represent a novel form of cancer risk. PMID:27197217

  6. [Strengthen the cancer surveillance to promote cancer prevention and control in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J

    2018-01-23

    Cancer is a major chronic disease threatening the people's health in China. We reviewed the latest advances on cancer surveillance, prevention and control in our country, which may provide important clues for future cancer control. We used data from the National Central Cancer Registry, to describe and analyze the latest cancer statistics in China. We summarized updated informations on cancer control policies, conducting network, as well as programs in the country. We provided important suggestions on the future strategies of cancer prevention and control. The overall cancer burden in China has been increasing during the past decades. In 2014, there were about 3 804 000 new cancer cases and 2 296 000 cancer deaths in China. The age-standardized cancer incidence and mortality rates were 190.63/100 000 and 106.98/100 000, respectively. China has formed a comprehensive network on cancer prevention and control. Nationwide population-based cancer surveillance has been built up. The population coverage of cancer surveillance has been expanded, and the data quality has been improved. As the aging population is increasing and unhealthy life styles persist in our country, there will be an unnegligible cancer burden in China. Based on the comprehensive rationale of cancer control and prevention, National Cancer Center of China will perform its duty for future precise cancer control and prevention, based on cancer surveillance statistics.

  7. [Effectiveness of nursing instruction in reducing uncertainty, anxiety and self-care in breast cancer women undergoing initial chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chin-Yen; Chen, Shu-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Pin; Chen, Kang-Min; Hsieh, Ya-I; Liang, Ying

    2010-12-01

    Level of uncertainty and anxiety may increase when breast cancer women experience unexpected side effects during chemotherapy. This longitudinal study explored the effectiveness of nursing instruction in reducing uncertainty, anxiety and self-care in breast cancer women undergoing initial chemotherapy. This study used a quasi-experimental design. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 75 women with breast cancer at a medical centre in northern Taiwan between January 2008 and September 2008. Participants were divided into either the control (n=37) or experimental (n=38) group. Control group patients received usual care. Experimental group patients were provided with nursing instructions that followed the evidence-based guidelines prescribed in the "Chemotherapy Self-Care for Breast Cancer" handbook and individualized education. Both groups received repeated questionnaires in the first, third and sixth chemotherapy cycles. Demographic data, Mishel's Uncertainty Illness Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Self-Care Scale were used for data collection and analysis. There were no significant differences in demographic data between the two groups. There were moderate to high levels of uncertainty and low levels of anxiety in both groups prior to the first chemotherapy cycle. There was a significant decrease in uncertainty and an elevation in self-care level (pcare in comparison with the control group. There was a significant decrease in complexity uncertainty in the experimental group (p=.02*) and no significant decrease in the control group. Study results indicate that nursing instruction can decrease uncertainty and elevate self-care levels. We suggest that nurses provide structured nursing instructions based on evidence-based guidelines to breast cancer women undergoing initial chemotherapy in order to promote self-care level and patient degree of control over their disease and treatment. This intervention may ameliorate patient and family

  8. California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives: Setting a research agenda for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, P; Kavanaugh-Lynch, M H E; Plumb, M; Yen, I H; Sarantis, H; Thomsen, C L; Campleman, S; Galpern, E; Dickenson, C; Woodruff, T J

    2015-07-01

    The environment is an underutilized pathway to breast cancer prevention. Current research approaches and funding streams related to breast cancer and the environment are unequal to the task at hand. We undertook the California Breast Cancer Prevention Initiatives, a four-year comprehensive effort to set a research agenda related to breast cancer, the environment, disparities and prevention. We identified 20 topics for Concept Proposals reflecting a life-course approach and the complex etiology of breast cancer; considering the environment as chemical, physical and socially constructed exposures that are experienced concurrently: at home, in the community and at work; and addressing how we should be modifying the world around us to promote a less carcinogenic environment. Redirecting breast cancer research toward prevention-oriented discovery could significantly reduce the incidence and associated disparities of the disease among future generations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Colon Cancer Tumorigenesis Initiated by the H1047R Mutant PI3K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Yueh

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is critical for multiple important cellular functions, and is one of the most commonly altered pathways in human cancers. We previously developed a mouse model in which colon cancers were initiated by a dominant active PI3K p110-p85 fusion protein. In that model, well-differentiated mucinous adenocarcinomas developed within the colon and initiated through a non-canonical mechanism that is not dependent on WNT signaling. To assess the potential relevance of PI3K mutations in human cancers, we sought to determine if one of the common mutations in the human disease could also initiate similar colon cancers. Mice were generated expressing the Pik3caH1047R mutation, the analog of one of three human hotspot mutations in this gene. Mice expressing a constitutively active PI3K, as a result of this mutation, develop invasive adenocarcinomas strikingly similar to invasive adenocarcinomas found in human colon cancers. These tumors form without a polypoid intermediary and also lack nuclear CTNNB1 (β-catenin, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumor initiation mediated by the PI3K pathway. These cancers are sensitive to dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition indicating dependence on the PI3K pathway. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment demonstrated reduction in cellular proliferation and inhibition of PI3K signaling.

  10. Capturing Changes in the Brain Microenvironment during Initial Steps of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorger, Mihaela; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde

    2010-01-01

    Brain metastases are difficult to treat and mostly develop late during progressive metastatic disease. Patients at risk would benefit from the development of prevention and improved treatments. This requires knowledge of the initial events that lead to brain metastasis. The present study reveals cellular events during the initiation of brain metastasis by breast cancer cells and documents the earliest host responses to incoming cancer cells after carotid artery injection in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mouse models. Our findings capture and characterize heterogeneous astrocytic and microglial reactions to the arrest and extravasation of cancer cells in the brain, showing immediate and drastic changes in the brain microenvironment on arrival of individual cancer cells. We identified reactive astrocytes as the most active host cell population that immediately localizes to individual invading tumor cells and continuously associates with growing metastatic lesions. Up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 associated with astrocyte activation in the immediate vicinity of extravasating cancer cells might support their progression. Early involvement of different host cell types indicates environmental clues that might codetermine whether a single cancer cell progresses to macrometastasis or remains dormant. Thus, information on the initial interplay between brain homing tumor cells and reactive host cells may help develop strategies for prevention and treatment of symptomatic breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:20382702

  11. A case cancer control study of reproductive in breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee B; Chaudhury S; Sengupta S

    1994-01-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as, parity, age at menarche, age at first child′s birth have been investigated in a hospital based case-control study, for their independent as well as combined influences on the incidence of female breast cancer. The study indicates that except for parity, these factors have no influence on the age at onset of the disease. Parity is positively correlated with age at onset. The patient and the control groups were found to be similar in respect of ...

  12. Gynecologic cancer prevention and control in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: progress, current activities, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L; Lakhani, Naheed; Brown, Phaeydra M; Larkin, O Ann; Moore, Angela R; Hayes, Nikki S

    2013-08-01

    Gynecologic cancer confers a large burden among women in the United States. Several evidence-based interventions are available to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these cancers. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is uniquely positioned to implement these interventions in the US population. This review discusses progress and future directions for the NCCCP in preventing and controlling gynecologic cancer.

  13. The role of radical prostatectomy as an initial approach for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunarena, J H; Villamil, W; Martínez, P F; Gueglio, G; Giudice, C R

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of high-risk prostate cancer requires a multimodal approach to improve control of the disease. There is still no consensus as to the initial strategy of choice. The aim of this study is to review the results of radical prostatectomy as first step in management of patients with high-risk disease. A search was conducted on PubMed of English and Spanish texts. We included those studies that reported the results of radical prostatectomy in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, as well as those that compared radical prostatectomy with other treatment alternatives. The last search was conducted in November 2015. The advantages of radical prostatectomy include a better pathological analysis, more accurate staging, better local control of the disease and better follow-up and adjuvant therapy strategies. When compared with external radiation therapy plus hormonal blockade, the patients who underwent prostatectomy had greater chances of healing and longer cancer-specific survival. The patients who most benefit from this approach are younger, have fewer comorbidities and no evidence of organ metastases. The available scientific evidence to date is not without bias and confounders; however, they appear to favour radical prostatectomy as the initial approach of choice for high-risk prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Colon cancer controls versus population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabroe Svend

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since updated population registers do not exist in many countries it is often difficult to sample valid population controls from the study base to a case-control study. Use of patient controls is an alternative option if the exposure experience under study for these patients are interchangeable with the experience for population controls. Patient controls may even be preferable from population controls under certain conditions. In this study we examine if colon cancer patients can serve as surrogates for proper population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors. Methods The study was conducted from 1995 to 1997. Incident colon cancer controls (N = 428 aged 35–69 years with a histological verified diagnosis and population controls (N = 583 were selected. Altogether 254 (59% of the colon cancer controls and 320 (55% of the population controls were interviewed about occupational, medical and life style conditions. Results No statistical significant difference for educational level, medical history or smoking status was seen between the two control groups. There was evidence of a higher alcohol intake, less frequent work as a farmer and less exposure to pesticides among colon cancer controls. Conclusions Use of colon cancer controls may provide valid exposure estimates in studies of many occupational risk factors for cancer, but not for studies on exposure related to farming.

  15. Pet Ownership and Cancer Risk in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David O.; Lander, Eric M.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Volpe, Stella L.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Lessin, Lawrence S.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pet ownership and cancer are both highly prevalent in the U.S. Evidence suggest associations may exist between this potentially modifiable factor and cancer prevention, though studies are sparse. The present report examined whether pet ownership (dog, cat, or bird) is associated with lower risk for total cancer and site-specific obesity-related cancers. Methods A prospective analysis of 123,560 participants (20,981 dog owners; 19,288 cat owners; 1,338 bird owners; and 81,953 non-pet owners) enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) observational study and clinical trials. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between pet ownership and cancer, adjusted for potential confounders. Results There were no significant relationships between ownership of a dog, cat, or bird and incidence of cancer overall. When site-specific cancers were examined, no associations were observed after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Pet ownership had no association with overall cancer incidence. Impact This is the first large epidemiological study to date to explore relationships between pet ownership and cancer risk, as well as associated risks for individual cancer types. This study requires replication in other sizable, diverse cohorts. PMID:27365150

  16. Factors controlling the initiation of Snowball Earth events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.

    2012-12-01

    During the Neoproterozoic glaciations tropical continents were covered by active glaciers that extended down to sea level. To explain these glaciers, the Snowball Earth hypothesis assumes that oceans were completely sea-ice covered during these glaciation, but there is an ongoing debate whether or not some regions of the tropical oceans remained open. In this talk, I will describe past and ongoing climate modelling activities with the comprehensive coupled climate model ECHAM5/MPI-OM that identify and compare factors that control the initiation of Snowball Earth events. I first show that shifting the continents from their present-day location to their Marinoan (635 My BP) low-latitude location increases the planetary albedo, cools the climate, and thereby allows Snowball Earth initiation at higher levels of total solar irradiance and atmospheric CO2. I then present simulations with successively lowered bare sea-ice albedo, disabled sea-ice dynamics, and switched-off ocean heat transport. These simulations show that both lowering the bare sea-ice albedo and disabling sea-ice dynamics increase the critical sea-ice cover in ECHAM5/MPI-OM, but sea-ice dynamics due to strong equatorward sea-ice transport have a much larger influence on the critical CO2. Disabling sea-ice transport allows a state with sea-ice margin at 10 deg latitude by virtue of the Jormungand mechanism. The accumulation of snow on land, in combination with tropical land temperatures below or close to freezing, suggests that tropical land glaciers could easily form in such a state. However, in contrast to aquaplanet simulations without ocean heat transport, there is no sign of a Jormungand hysteresis in the coupled simulations. Ocean heat transport is not responsible for the lack of a Jormungand hysteresis in the coupled simulations. By relating the above findings to previous studies, I will outline promising future avenues of research on the initiation of Snowball Earth events. In particular, an

  17. Animal models to study cancer-initiating cells from glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Boyoung; Charles, Nikki; Holland, Eric C

    2011-06-01

    Three main subtypes of gliomas with distinct molecular pathologies have been modeled in animals to better understand their biology. Genetically engineered mouse models that take advantage of genetic abnormalities observed in human gliomas have been instrumental in this process. These models better recapitulate signaling transduction pathways and the microenvironment that play crucial roles in glioma formation than in vitro systems or transplantation models. An increasing amount of data supports the existence of cells functionally defined by their self-renewal ability and tumor-initiating potential upon serial transplantation. As the issue of these cells with stem cell character in gliomagenesis becomes more illusive, animal models that provide an accurate experimental system where the stem cell character can be manipulated and studied are urgently needed. This review provides an overview of the current state of the literature with respect to animal models used in the study of gliomas and cells with stem cell character in their native environment.

  18. Recent trends in the initial therapy for newly diagnosed prostate cancer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Hinotsu, Shiro; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Oya, Mototsugu; Ogawa, Osamu; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Naito, Seiji; Namiki, Mikio; Nishimura, Kazuo; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the trends over time in the initial treatment of prostate cancer in Japan. A total of 8291 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer whose treatment started in 2010 were registered in a multi-institutional observational study undertaken nationwide across Japan by the Japan Prostate Cancer Study Group. Each patient's background characteristics and initial treatment were recorded. The median age at diagnosis was 71 years. The proportion of T1c disease was 40.5% and that of M1 disease was 10.4%. The prostate-specific antigen level was prostate cancer cases in Japan. Although androgen depletion therapy use was decreased, it was selected in a high proportion of the patients irrespective of the disease stage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Nurse's role in controlling cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfudh, Salma Said

    2011-10-01

    Nurses spend more time with patients than any other member of the healthcare team. They play a critical, active and very important part in controlling cancer patients' pain and alleviating suffering. In controlling cancer pain the nurse needs to understand the psychological state of the cancer patient, cancer pain, cancer pain treatment, deleterious effects of unrelieved cancer pain and patient's socio cultural background. She needs to understand that there are two types of pain, nociceptive and neuropathic pains and that 80% of the cancer patients in pain could have 2 or more than 4 different pains at the same time. Nurses' role in controlling cancer pain include believing the patient, assessing pain, identifying the root of the problem, planning the care, administering medication, evaluating effectiveness, ensuring good pain control and individualizing treatment. It also includes nursing interventions such as giving tender nursing care, preventing pain, educating, advocating, communicating, comforting, supporting, and counseling the patient. The nurse must use both pharmacological and non pharmacological treatments to individualize treatment, know all the drugs that are used for the treatment of Cancer Pain, how these drugs relieve pain and what their side effects are. She must use the WHO guidelines to treat pain and must choose the right drug, right dose, given at the right times, with the right intervals and to the right patient. She must evaluate effectiveness of treatment, give PRN doses for breakthrough pain and recommend for specific changes. The role of the nurse is to anticipate the patient's pain needs, advocate for the patient for what feels appropriate for him within his cultural context and incorporate the patient's belief. The nurse can physically relieve pain by promoting comfort, support painful area, gentleness in handling the patient and use nursing treatments. The nurse can recommend physiotherapy, (TENS)/Acupuncture, Occupational therapy

  20. Patient-provider discussions about colorectal cancer screening: who initiates elements of informed decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L; Broder-Oldach, Ben; Fisher, James L; King, Justin; Eubanks, Kathy; Fleming, Kelly; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain low among low-income minority populations. To evaluate informed decision making (IDM) elements about CRC screening among low-income minority patients. Observational data were collected as part of a patient-level randomized controlled trial to improve CRC screening rates. Medical visits (November 2007 to May 2010) were audio-taped and coded for IDM elements about CRC screening. Near the end of the study one provider refused recording of patients' visits (33 of 270 patients). Among all patients in the trial, agreement to be audio taped was 43.5 % (103/237). Evaluable patient (n = 100) visits were assessed for CRC screening discussion occurrence, IDM elements, and who initiated discussion of each IDM element. Patients were African American (72.2 %), female (63.7 %), with annual household incomes IDM elements was five; however, only two visits included five elements. The most common IDM element discussed in addition to the nature of the decision was the assessment of the patient's understanding in 16 (33.3 %) of the visits that included a CRC discussion. A patient activation intervention initiated CRC screening discussions with health care providers; however, limited IDM occurred about CRC screening during medical visits of minority and low-income patients.

  1. Prostate cancer detection at rebiopsy after an initial benign diagnosis: results using sextant extended prostate biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Ramos Moreira Leite; Luiz Heraldo Camara-Lopes; José Cury; Marcos F. Dall'Oglio; Adriana Sañudo; Miguel Srougi

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sextant prostate biopsy remains the standard technique for the detection of prostate cancer. It is well known that after a diagnosis of small acinar proliferation (ASAP) or high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the possibility of finding cancer is approximately 40% and 30%, respectively. OBJECTIVE: We aim to analyze follow-up biopsies on patients who initially received a benign diagnosis after exclusion of HGPIN and ASAP. METHODS: From July 2000 to December 2003...

  2. Obesity and risk of pancreatic cancer among postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative (United States)

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, J.; Margolis, K.L.; Adami, H-O; Lacroix, A.; Ye, W.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 138?503 women in the Women's Health Initiative in the United States were followed (for an average of 7.7 years) through 12 September 2005 to examine obesity, especially central obesity in relation to pancreatic cancer (n=251). Women in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio had 70% (95% confidence interval 10?160%) excess risk of pancreatic cancer compared with women in the lowest quintile.

  3. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    was the impact on society beyond science and technology ? Our findings suggest possible links between diet and reproduction as well as cancer...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0095 TITLE: Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Leonard P. Guarente CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 REPORT DATE: July 2017 TYPE OF REPORT

  4. A case of rectal cancer with sternal metastasis as initial presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, J. H.; Kim, S. J.; Oh, J. Y.; Ryu, S. R.; Shim, K. S.; Kim, K. H.; Baek, S. Y.; Choi, H. Y.; Lee, S. W.; Kim, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Colorectal cancer with bone metastasis as initial manifestation is a very rare event. We have reported a case of rectal cancer presenting with sternal metastasis. A 30 year-old man was evaluated due to pain in the sternal area with a bulging mass. History and physical examination did not suggest any specific disease. A radionuclide bone scan revealed increased uptake in the sternal area, right 6th rib, and sacrum. Microscopic examination of a biopsy specimen from the sternum showed metastatic...

  5. Surface and Interface Control on Photochemically Initiated Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Li; Engelhard, Mark H.; Yan, Mingdi

    2006-11-01

    Surface and interface properties are important in controlling the yield and efficiency of the photochemically initiated immobilization. Using a silane-functionalized perfluorophenylazide (PFPA-silane) as the photoactive crosslinker, the immobilization of polymers was studied by adjusting the density of the surface azido groups. Dilution of the photolinker resulted in a gradual decrease in the density of surface azido groups as well as the thickness of the immobilized film. When a non-photoactive silane was added to PFPA-silane, the film thickness decreased more rapidly, indicating that the additive competed with PFPA-silane and effectively reduced the density of the surface azido groups. The effect of surface topography was studied by adding a non-photoactive silane with either a shorter (n-propyltrimethoxysilane (PTMS)) or a longer spacer (n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODTMS)). In most cases the long chain ODTMS shielded the surface azido groups resulting in more rapid decrease in film thickness as compared to PTMS treated under the same conditions. As the density of the surface azido groups decreased, the immobilized polymer changed from smooth films to patched structures, and eventually single polymer molecules.

  6. Controlled initial surge despite high drug fraction and high solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar Das, Srilekha; Lucas, Anne D; Carlin, Alan S; Zheng, Jiwen; Patwardhan, Dinesh V; Saylor, David M

    2017-02-01

    Potential connections between release profiles and solvent evaporation rates alongside polymer chemistry were elucidated for the release of tetracycline hydrochloride from two different poly (d, l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) film matrices containing high drug fractions (50%, 30%, and 15%), and prepared at two distinct solvent evaporation rates. At highest tetracycline concentrations (50%), (i) the early release rates were ≤0.5 μg/min in all cases; (ii) release was linear from systems fabricated with lower lactic content and slower solvent evaporation rate and bimodal from systems fabricated with higher lactic content and faster evaporation rate; (iii) surface fractions covered by the drug were similar at both evaporation rates for 85:15 PLGA but very different for 50:50 PLGA, leading to unexpectedly reduced early release from 50:50 PLGA than from 85:15 PLGA when both the matrices were fabricated using a slower evaporation rate. These features remained unaffected in case of low drug concentration. Results suggested that during the formation of the drug-polymer microstructure, the combined effect of polymer chemistry and solvent evaporation rate sets apart the surface characteristics and the initial release profiles of systems containing high drug fraction, and an appropriate combination of these parameters may be utilized to control the early stage of drug release.

  7. Initial design of a stall-controlled wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, T.A. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway)

    1997-08-01

    A model intended for initial design of stall-controlled wind turbine rotors is described. The user specifies relative radial position of an arbitrary number of airfoil sections, referring to a data file containing lift-and drag curves. The data file is on the same format as used in the commercial blade-element code BLADES-/2/, where lift- and drag coefficients are interpolated from tables as function of Reynolds number, relative thickness and angle of attack. The user can set constraints on a selection of the following: Maximum power; Maximum thrust in operation; Maximum root bending moment in operation; Extreme root bending moment, parked rotor; Tip speed; Upper and lower bounds on optimisation variables. The optimisation variables can be selected from: Blade radius; Rotational speed; Chord and twist at an arbitrary number of radial positions. The user can chose linear chord distribution and a hyperbola-like twist distribution to ensure smooth planform and twist, or cubic spline interpolation for one or both. The aerodynamic model is based on classical strip theory with Prandtl tip loss correction, supplemented by empirical data for high induction factors. (EG)

  8. Reproductive and menstrual factors and colorectal cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Neil; Xu, Linzhi; Zervoudakis, Alice; Xue, Xiaonan; Kabat, Geoffrey; Rohan, Thomas E; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Thomson, Cynthia; Messina, Catherine; Strickler, Howard D; Gunter, Marc J

    2017-01-03

    Reproductive and menstrual factors have been evaluated as surrogates for long-term hormonal exposures in several prospective studies of colorectal cancer, yet findings have been conflicting. The relation of reproductive and menstrual factors (self-reported via a reproductive history questionnaire) with incident colorectal cancer was investigated among women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS), a longitudinal cohort of 93 676 postmenopausal women (aged 50-79 years at enrolment) in which 1149 incident cases of colorectal cancer occurred over a median follow-up of 11.9 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models that included established colorectal cancer risk factors were constructed to examine the association of colorectal cancer incidence with reproductive and menstrual factors. Having had two children (vs nulliparous: hazard ratio (HR)=0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64-0.99) was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. Compared with never users, ever use of oral contraceptives was associated with lower colorectal cancer risk (HR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.63-0.86); however, no relationship was observed for duration of oral contraceptives use (4 years vs 1 year: HR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.67-1.32). None of the remaining reproductive and menstrual factors was associated with colorectal cancer incidence. Parity and prior use of oral contraceptives were associated with lower colorectal cancer risk in this cohort of postmenopausal women.

  9. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-05

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tumour control probability in cancer stem cells hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Andrew; Kohandel, Mohammad; Hill, Richard; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2014-01-01

    The tumour control probability (TCP) is a formalism derived to compare various treatment regimens of radiation therapy, defined as the probability that given a prescribed dose of radiation, a tumour has been eradicated or controlled. In the traditional view of cancer, all cells share the ability to divide without limit and thus have the potential to generate a malignant tumour. However, an emerging notion is that only a sub-population of cells, the so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for the initiation and maintenance of the tumour. A key implication of the CSC hypothesis is that these cells must be eradicated to achieve cures, thus we define TCPS as the probability of eradicating CSCs for a given dose of radiation. A cell surface protein expression profile, such as CD44high/CD24low for breast cancer or CD133 for glioma, is often used as a biomarker to monitor CSCs enrichment. However, it is increasingly recognized that not all cells bearing this expression profile are necessarily CSCs, and in particular early generations of progenitor cells may share the same phenotype. Thus, due to the lack of a perfect biomarker for CSCs, we also define a novel measurable TCPCD+, that is the probability of eliminating or controlling biomarker positive cells. Based on these definitions, we use stochastic methods and numerical simulations parameterized for the case of gliomas, to compare the theoretical TCPS and the measurable TCPCD+. We also use the measurable TCP to compare the effect of various radiation protocols.

  11. Initial results of local grid control using wind farms with grid support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Iov, F.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes initial results with simulation of power system control using wind farms with grid support.......This report describes initial results with simulation of power system control using wind farms with grid support....

  12. Association Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Initiation The Breast Cancer Quality of Care (BQUAL) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Neugut, Alfred I.; Falci, Laura; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Buono, Donna; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Roh, Janise M.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Lee, Marion; Tsai, Wei Yann; Shi, Zaixing; Lamerato, Lois; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Not all women initiate clinically indicated breast cancer adjuvant treatment. It is important for clinicians to identify women at risk for noninitiation. OBJECTIVE To determine whether complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is associated with decreased breast cancer chemotherapy initiation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this multisite prospective cohort study (the Breast Cancer Quality of Care [BQUAL] study) designed to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation and adherence, 685 women younger than 70 years with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited from Columbia University Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, and Henry Ford Health System and enrolled between May 2006 and July 31, 2010. Overall, 306 patients (45%) were clinically indicated to receive chemotherapy per National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Participants were followed for up to 12 months. EXPOSURES Baseline interviews assessed current use of 5 CAM modalities (vitamins and/or minerals, herbs and/or botanicals, other natural products, mind-body self-practice, mind-body practitioner-based practice). CAM use definitions included any use, dietary supplement use, mind-body use, and a CAM index summing the 5 modalities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Chemotherapy initiation was assessed via self-report up to 12 months after baseline. Multivariable logistic regression models examined a priori hypotheses testing whether CAM use was associated with chemotherapy initiation, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, and delineating groups by age and chemotherapy indication. RESULTS A cohort of 685 women younger than 70 years (mean age, 59 years; median age, 59 years) with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer were recruited and followed for up to 12 months to examine predictors of breast cancer treatment initiation. Baseline CAM use was reported by 598 women (87%). Chemotherapy was initiated by 272 women (89%) for whom

  13. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manjusha Nair; Lidiya T Paul; P T Latha; Kusumakumary Parukkutty

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial couns...

  14. 78 FR 57391 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Capacity...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Times and Dates...

  15. 77 FR 5026 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational..., Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control SEP: Occupational Safety and Health Education and Research...

  16. Breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and cardiovascular events in participants who used vaginal estrogen in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Carolyn J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Stefanick, Marcia L; Lane, Dorothy S; Shifren, Jan; Chen, Chu; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Cauley, Jane A; Manson, JoAnn E

    2018-01-01

    To determine the association between use of vaginal estrogen and risk of a global index event (GIE), defined as time to first occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD), invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, or death from any cause. For this prospective observational cohort study, we used data from participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, who were recruited at 40 US clinical centers, aged 50 to 79 years at baseline and did not use systemic estrogen therapy during follow-up (n = 45,663, median follow-up 7.2 years). We collected data regarding incident CHD, invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, death, and self-reported use of vaginal estrogen (cream, tablet). We used Cox proportional-hazards regression models to adjust for covariates. Among women with an intact uterus, the risks of stroke, invasive breast cancer, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis were not significantly different between vaginal estrogen users and nonusers, whereas the risks of CHD, fracture, all-cause mortality, and GIE were lower in users than in nonusers (GIE adjusted hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.86). Among hysterectomized women, the risks of each of the individual GIE components and of the overall GIE were not significantly different in users versus nonusers of vaginal estrogen (GIE adjusted hazard ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.26). The risks of cardiovascular disease and cancer were not elevated among postmenopausal women using vaginal estrogens, providing reassurance about the safety of treatment.

  17. Historical analysis indicates seepage control on initiation of meandering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, J.P.C.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Makaske, B.

    2013-01-01

    In analytical and numerical models of river meandering, initiation of meandering typically occurs uniformly along the streamwise coordinate in the channel. Based on a historical analysis of the Nierskanaal, here we show how and under which circumstances meandering has initiated in isolated sections

  18. Immunomodulatory Factors Control the Fate of Melanoma Tumor Initiating Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuccitto, A.; Tazzari, M.; Beretta, V.; Rini, F.; Miranda, C.; Greco, A; Santinami, M.; Patuzzo, R.; Vergani, B.; Villa, A.; Manenti, G.; Cleris, L.; Giardiello, D.; Alison, M.; Rivoltini, L.; Castelli, C.; Perego, M.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly heterogeneous tumor for which recent evidence supports a model of dynamic stemness. Melanoma cells might temporally acquire tumor-initiating properties or switch from a status of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) to a more differentiated one depending on the tumor context. However,

  19. Amplification of the 20q Chromosomal Arm Occurs Early in Tumorigenic Transformation and May Initiate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buganim, Yosef; Solomon, Hilla; Goldfinger, Naomi; Hovland, Randi; Ke, Xi-Song; Oyan, Anne M.; Kalland, Karl-H.; Rotter, Varda; Domany, Eytan

    2011-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal arm 20q occurs in prostate, cervical, colon, gastric, bladder, melanoma, pancreas and breast cancer, suggesting that 20q amplification may play a causal role in tumorigenesis. According to an alternative view, chromosomal imbalance is mainly a common side effect of cancer progression. To test whether a specific genomic aberration might serve as a cancer initiating event, we established an in vitro system that models the evolutionary process of early stages of prostate tumor formation; normal prostate cells were immortalized by the over-expression of human telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT, and cultured for 650 days till several transformation hallmarks were observed. Gene expression patterns were measured and chromosomal aberrations were monitored by spectral karyotype analysis at different times. Several chromosomal aberrations, in particular duplication of chromosomal arm 20q, occurred early in the process and were fixed in the cell populations, while other aberrations became extinct shortly after their appearance. A wide range of bioinformatic tools, applied to our data and to data from several cancer databases, revealed that spontaneous 20q amplification can promote cancer initiation. Our computational model suggests that 20q amplification induced deregulation of several specific cancer-related pathways including the MAPK pathway, the p53 pathway and Polycomb group factors. In addition, activation of Myc, AML, B-Catenin and the ETS family transcription factors was identified as an important step in cancer development driven by 20q amplification. Finally we identified 13 "cancer initiating genes", located on 20q13, which were significantly over-expressed in many tumors, with expression levels correlated with tumor grade and outcome suggesting that these genes induce the malignant process upon 20q amplification. PMID:21297939

  20. Amplification of the 20q chromosomal arm occurs early in tumorigenic transformation and may initiate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available Duplication of chromosomal arm 20q occurs in prostate, cervical, colon, gastric, bladder, melanoma, pancreas and breast cancer, suggesting that 20q amplification may play a causal role in tumorigenesis. According to an alternative view, chromosomal imbalance is mainly a common side effect of cancer progression. To test whether a specific genomic aberration might serve as a cancer initiating event, we established an in vitro system that models the evolutionary process of early stages of prostate tumor formation; normal prostate cells were immortalized by the over-expression of human telomerase catalytic subunit hTERT, and cultured for 650 days till several transformation hallmarks were observed. Gene expression patterns were measured and chromosomal aberrations were monitored by spectral karyotype analysis at different times. Several chromosomal aberrations, in particular duplication of chromosomal arm 20q, occurred early in the process and were fixed in the cell populations, while other aberrations became extinct shortly after their appearance. A wide range of bioinformatic tools, applied to our data and to data from several cancer databases, revealed that spontaneous 20q amplification can promote cancer initiation. Our computational model suggests that 20q amplification induced deregulation of several specific cancer-related pathways including the MAPK pathway, the p53 pathway and Polycomb group factors. In addition, activation of Myc, AML, B-Catenin and the ETS family transcription factors was identified as an important step in cancer development driven by 20q amplification. Finally we identified 13 "cancer initiating genes", located on 20q13, which were significantly over-expressed in many tumors, with expression levels correlated with tumor grade and outcome suggesting that these genes induce the malignant process upon 20q amplification.

  1. Chemotherapy activates cancer-associated fibroblasts to maintain colorectal cancer-initiating cells by IL-17A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Fiorenza; Jarrar, Awad M.; Pai, Rish K.; Hitomi, Masahiro; Lathia, Justin; Mace, Adam; Gantt, Gerald A.; Sukhdeo, Kumar; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Vasanji, Amit; Leahy, Patrick; Hjelmeland, Anita B.

    2013-01-01

    Many solid cancers display cellular hierarchies with self-renewing, tumorigenic stemlike cells, or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) at the apex. Whereas CICs often exhibit relative resistance to conventional cancer therapies, they also receive critical maintenance cues from supportive stromal elements that also respond to cytotoxic therapies. To interrogate the interplay between chemotherapy and CICs, we investigated cellular heterogeneity in human colorectal cancers. Colorectal CICs were resistant to conventional chemotherapy in cell-autonomous assays, but CIC chemoresistance was also increased by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Comparative analysis of matched colorectal cancer specimens from patients before and after cytotoxic treatment revealed a significant increase in CAFs. Chemotherapy-treated human CAFs promoted CIC self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth associated with increased secretion of specific cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Exogenous IL-17A increased CIC self-renewal and invasion, and targeting IL-17A signaling impaired CIC growth. Notably, IL-17A was overexpressed by colorectal CAFs in response to chemotherapy with expression validated directly in patient-derived specimens without culture. These data suggest that chemotherapy induces remodeling of the tumor microenvironment to support the tumor cellular hierarchy through secreted factors. Incorporating simultaneous disruption of CIC mechanisms and interplay with the tumor microenvironment could optimize therapeutic targeting of cancer. PMID:24323355

  2. Leadership in Nigerian health system for cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbimi, R I

    2009-06-01

    Unacceptable health system outcomes are often related to problems with leadership because the ultimate responsibility for assigned work rests on leadership. In this paper, proper leadership at micro and macro-levels can have positive impact on the health and well being of citizens. While this may be readily obvious in other spheres, it has not been addressed adequately in the context of health care systems and its impact on health outcomes. In this paper, I discuss types of work and leadership systems in order to highlight the importance of leadership and leadership training in collaborative training and research for cancer management. The complexity of health systems highlight the expanded role of leadership in terms of capacity and capability to control the environmental risk factors for cancer, deploy adequate resources for the management of cancers, and ensure fruitful and productive post treatment life for citizens. Improved community awareness, better training of health care workers, improved working environment based on better interpersonal relationships between all cadres of health care workers, environmental health and safety initiatives and research on cancer are some of the areas where improved leadership can lead to better health outcomes. Effective leadership requires a set of skills that can be acquired with requisite operating environment, political will and adequate funding in order to generate the expected improvements in outcome.

  3. Contemporary use of initial active surveillance among men in Michigan with low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Paul R; Montie, James E; Ye, Zaojun; Linsell, Susan M; Lane, Brian R; Miller, David C

    2015-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been proposed as an effective strategy to reduce overtreatment among men with lower risk prostate cancers. However, historical rates of initial surveillance are low (4-20%), and little is known about its application among community-based urology practices. To describe contemporary utilization of AS among a population-based sample of men with low-risk prostate cancer. We performed a prospective cohort study of men with low-risk prostate cancer managed by urologists participating in the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC). The principal outcome was receipt of AS as initial management for low-risk prostate cancer including the frequency of follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, prostate biopsy, and local therapy. We examined variation in the use of surveillance according to patient characteristics and across MUSIC practices. Finally, we used claims data to validate treatment classification in the MUSIC registry. We identified 682 low-risk patients from 17 MUSIC practices. Overall, 49% of men underwent initial AS. Use of initial surveillance varied widely across practices (27-80%; p=0.005), even after accounting for differences in patient characteristics. Among men undergoing initial surveillance with at least 12 mo of follow-up, PSA testing was common (85%), whereas repeat biopsy was performed in only one-third of patients. There was excellent agreement between treatment assignments in the MUSIC registry and claims data (κ=0.93). Limitations include unknown treatment for 8% of men with low-risk cancer. Half of men in Michigan with low-risk prostate cancer receive initial AS. Because this proportion is much higher than reported previously, our findings suggest growing acceptance of this strategy for reducing overtreatment. We examined the use of initial active surveillance for the management of men with low-risk prostate cancer across the state of Michigan. We found that initial surveillance is used

  4. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4--a blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that autoantibodies directed to aberrantly glycosylated mucins, in particular MUC1 and MUC4, are found in patients with colorectal cancer. There is, however, limited information on the autoantibody levels before clinical diagnosis, and their utility in cancer screening...... of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where...... in the general population. In our study, we have generated O-glycosylated synthetic MUC1 and MUC4 peptides in vitro, to mimic cancer-associated glycoforms, and displayed these on microarrays. The assay's performance was tested through an initial screening of serum samples taken from patients at the time...

  5. Obesity in relation to endometrial cancer risk and disease characteristics in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katherine W; Carter, Gebra Cuyun; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Lane, Dorothy; McNeeley, S Gene; Stefanick, Marcia L; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    Obesity increases endometrial cancer risk, yet its impact on disease stage and grade is unclear. We prospectively examined the effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) on incidence, stage, and grade of endometrial cancer. We studied 86937 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline. Endometrial cancer cases were adjudicated by trained physicians and pathology reports were used to determine stage and grade. Cox proportional hazards models generated hazard ratios (HR) for associations between BMI and WHR and risk of endometrial cancer. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between BMI and WHR and disease stage and grade. During a mean 7.8 (standard deviation 1.6) years of follow-up, 806 women were diagnosed with endometrial cancer. Although incidence was higher among Whites, stage and grade were similar between Whites and Blacks. Elevated BMI (HR 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-2.19) and WHR (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.04-1.70) increased endometrial cancer risk when comparing women in the highest and lowest categories. No associations were observed between BMI or WHR and disease stage or grade. Obesity increases endometrial cancer risk independent of other factors but is not associated with stage or grade of disease. These findings support and validate previous reports. Future research should evaluate the impact of obesity on racial disparities in endometrial cancer survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  7. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with mCRPC w...

  8. Comparison of curative surgery and definitive chemoradiotherapy as initial treatment for patients with cervical esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Katsushi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Satoru; Kawamorita, Keisuke; Niihara, Masahiro; Tsushima, Takahiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Sato, Hiroshi; Onozawa, Yusuke; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Kamijo, Tomoyuki; Onitsuka, Tetsuro; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Yasui, Hirofumi

    2017-02-01

    Esophagectomy and definitive chemoradiotherapy are recognized standard initial treatment modalities for cervical esophageal cancer. The goal of this study was to compare the treatment outcomes of curative surgery with those of chemoradiotherapy in patients who had potentially resectable tumor and who were candidates for surgery. We evaluated the data from 49 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with potentially resectable cervical esophageal cancer and who were deemed candidates for surgery. Thirteen patients were included in the surgery group, and 36 patients were included in chemoradiotherapy group. Baseline characteristics were balanced between the two groups. In the chemoradiotherapy group, the complete response rate was 58.3%. There was no significant difference in 5-year overall survival when comparing the surgery group and the chemoradiotherapy group (surgery, 60.6%; chemoradiotherapy, 51.4%; P = 0.89). In the chemoradiotherapy group, of the 15 patients who failed to respond to initial treatment, 11 patients subsequently underwent salvage surgery. In conclusion, curative surgery and chemoradiotherapy as initial treatment for cervical esophageal cancer have comparable survival outcomes. Chemoradiotherapy should be selected as the initial larynx-preserving treatment for patients with cervical esophageal cancer although chemoradiotherapy non-responders require additional treatment, including salvage surgery. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Initial 10-year Experience of Sperm Cryopreservation Services for Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chiang Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Offering sperm cryopreservation to preserve the fertility of male cancer patients is a relatively recent service in Asia. This study analyzed the types of cancer, timing of collection, sperm quality, and utilization for reproductive services by patients during a 10-year period at a medical center in Taiwan. A total of 75 oncology patients elected to freeze sperm for fertility preservation at our medical center during the initial 10 years of the availability of this service. The mean age of the patients was 25.7 years. Storage was discontinued in 13 (17% patients and their survival duration was 13.1 ±11.1 months. The utilization rate of sperm cryo-preservation was 2.8% (75/2642. The types of cancer varied, with leukemia (35%, lymphoma (25%, and testicular cancer (13% comprising the largest groups. A significantly lower sperm count was found in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia, suggesting the need for earlier sperm collection after initiation of cancer treatment. Only three (4% patients utilized their specimens for reproductive purposes. There was no clinical pregnancy during the study period, although one biochemical pregnancy was achieved. The low rates of sperm cryostorage for fertility preservation in cancer patients in this study suggest that there is a need for greater emphasis of this option for male oncology patients whose fertility is likely to be affected by chemotherapeutic treatment.

  10. Advancing Transdisciplinary Research: The Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah; Hall, Kara; Vogel, Amanda; Hohl, Sarah; Hartman, Sheri; Nebeling, Linda; Redline, Susan; Schmitz, Kathryn; Thornquist, Mark; Patterson, Ruth; Thompson, Beti

    2014-09-01

    Strategies for constructing and maintaining cross-disciplinary teams are in their infancy. We outline strategies to support one form, transdisciplinary research, in a major initiative of the National Cancer Institute, the Transdisciplinary Research in Energetics and Cancer 2 (TREC2) initiative. Discussion of the TREC2 sites' experiences with transdisciplinarity is structured around a conceptual model that identifies four iterative phases of transdisciplinary research. An active coordination center, regular face-to-face meetings, and input from external advisors were instrumental in moving TREC2 to the translation phase. The possibilities for advancements in the science of energetics and cancer increased as investigator ties became denser. TREC2 can be seen as a flagship effort in transdisciplinary science that provides lessons on moving ideas from development to translation.

  11. A Case of Metastatic Rectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Initially Diagnosed as Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Zaw Win

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the rectum is extremely rare with a reported incidence of only 0.025-0.1% of all colorectal tumors. The patient was a 68-year-old man who presented with fatigue, dry cough, shortness of breath, and unintentional weight loss. A chest CT revealed a left suprahilar mass suspected to be lung cancer and an initial diagnosis of primary lung cancer was made. However, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT exam revealed an intensely hypermetabolic rectal mass which turned out to be rectal squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first report that shows FDG-PET/CT images of rectal squamous cell carcinoma metastasis to the skin, muscle, bone, and lung. Use of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis of non-resectable rectal cancers may avoid unnecessary surgery.

  12. A case of metastatic rectal squamous cell carcinoma initially diagnosed as lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Zaw; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the rectum is extremely rare with a reported incidence of only 0.025-0.1% of all colorectal tumors. The patient was a 68-year-old man who presented with fatigue, dry cough, shortness of breath, and unintentional weight loss. A chest CT revealed a left suprahilar mass suspected to be lung cancer and an initial diagnosis of primary lung cancer was made. However, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) exam revealed an intensely hypermetabolic rectal mass which turned out to be rectal squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first report that shows FDG-PET/CT images of rectal squamous cell carcinoma metastasis to the skin, muscle, bone, and lung. Use of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis of non-resectable rectal cancers may avoid unnecessary surgery.

  13. Is sphere assay useful for the identification of cancer initiating cells of the ovary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Serrano, María José; Caballero-Baños, Miguel; Vilella, Ramon; Vidal, Laura; Pahisa, Jaume; Martínez-Roman, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the presence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has a role in chemoresistance and relapse. Surface markers such as CD44(+)/CD24(-), CD117(+), and CD133(+) expression have been reported as potential markers for TICs related to ovarian cancer and tumorigenic cell lines. In this study, we have investigated if spheroid forms are TIC specific or whether they can also be produced by somatic stem cells from healthy tissue in vitro. In addition, we also investigated the specificity of surface markers to identify TICs from papillary serous EOC patients. Cells were obtained from fresh tumors from 10 chemotherapy-naive patients with EOC, and cells from ovarian and tubal epithelium were obtained from 5 healthy menopausal women undergoing surgery for benign pathology and cultured in standard and in selective medium. Cells forming nonadherent spheroids were considered TICs, and the adherent cells were considered as non-TIC-like. Percentages of CD24(+), CD44(+), CD117(+), CD133(+), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R)(+) cell surface markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Four of 10 EOC cell tissues were excluded from the study. Tumor cells cultured in selective medium developed spheroid forms after 1 to 7 weeks in 5 of 6 EOC patients. No spheroid forms were observed in cultures of cells from healthy women. Unlike previously published data, low levels of CD24(+), CD44(+), CD117(+), and VEGF-R(+) expression were observed in spheroid cells, whereas expression of CD133(+) was moderate but higher in adherent cells from papillary serous EOC cells in comparison with adherent cells from controls. Papillary serous EOC contains TICs that form spheroids with low expression of CD44(+), CD24(+), CD117(+) and VEGF-R(+). Further research is required to find specific surface markers to identify papillary serous TICs.

  14. Lycopene Supplementation in the Complementary Management of PSA Failure: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial for Prostate Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukoli, Flora A; Kucuk, Omer; Fowke, Jay H

    2007-01-01

    ...) or whole-food supplement (Lyc-O-Mato(Registered)) in control of biochemical (PSA) failure in 78 African-American prostate cancer survivors treated initially by radical prostatectomy or radiation...

  15. Prostate cancer detection at rebiopsy after an initial benign diagnosis: results using sextant extended prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira; Camara-Lopes, Luiz Heraldo; Cury, José; Dall'oglio, Marcos F; Sañudo, Adriana; Srougi, Miguel

    2008-06-01

    Sextant prostate biopsy remains the standard technique for the detection of prostate cancer. It is well known that after a diagnosis of small acinar proliferation (ASAP) or high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), the possibility of finding cancer is approximately 40% and 30%, respectively. We aim to analyze follow-up biopsies on patients who initially received a benign diagnosis after exclusion of HGPIN and ASAP. From July 2000 to December 2003, 1177 patients were submitted to sextant extended prostate biopsy in our hospital. The mean patient age was 65.5 years old, and the median number of fragments collected at biopsy was 13. HGPIN and ASAP were excluded from our study. We only considered patients who had a diagnosis of benign at the first biopsy and were subjected to rebiopsies up until May 2005 because of a maintained suspicion of cancer. Cancer was initially detected in 524 patients (44.5%), and the diagnosis was benign in 415 (35.3%). Rebiopsy was indicated for 76 of the latter patients (18.3%) because of a persistent suspicion of cancer. Eight cases of adenocarcinoma (10.5%) were detected, six (75%) at the first rebiopsy. Six patients were submitted to radical prostatectomy, and all tumors were considered clinically significant. Our data indicate that in extended prostate biopsy, the first biopsy detects more cancer, and the first, second, and third rebiopsies after an initial benign diagnosis succeed in finding cancer in 7.9% (6/55), 5.9% (1/15) and 20% (1/4) of patients, respectively.

  16. Prostate cancer detection at rebiopsy after an initial benign diagnosis: results using sextant extended prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Ramos Moreira Leite

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sextant prostate biopsy remains the standard technique for the detection of prostate cancer. It is well known that after a diagnosis of small acinar proliferation (ASAP or high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, the possibility of finding cancer is approximately 40% and 30%, respectively. OBJECTIVE: We aim to analyze follow-up biopsies on patients who initially received a benign diagnosis after exclusion of HGPIN and ASAP. METHODS: From July 2000 to December 2003, 1177 patients were submitted to sextant extended prostate biopsy in our hospital. The mean patient age was 65.5 years old, and the median number of fragments collected at biopsy was 13. HGPIN and ASAP were excluded from our study. We only considered patients who had a diagnosis of benign at the first biopsy and were subjected to rebiopsies up until May 2005 because of a maintained suspicion of cancer. RESULTS: Cancer was initially detected in 524 patients (44.5%, and the diagnosis was benign in 415 (35.3%. Rebiopsy was indicated for 76 of the latter patients (18.3% because of a persistent suspicion of cancer. Eight cases of adenocarcinoma (10.5% were detected, six (75% at the first rebiopsy. Six patients were submitted to radical prostatectomy, and all tumors were considered clinically significant. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that in extended prostate biopsy, the first biopsy detects more cancer, and the first, second, and third rebiopsies after an initial benign diagnosis succeed in finding cancer in 7.9% (6/55, 5.9% (1/15 and 20% (1/4 of patients, respectively.

  17. Nuclear-Shell Biopolymers Initiated by Telomere Elongation for Individual Cancer Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Zhu, Mengting; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-04-04

    Here, we propose a strategy for unique nuclear-shell biopolymers initiated by telomere elongation for telomerase activity detection and precise drug delivery to individual cancer cells. Telomerase-triggered DNA rolling-circle amplification (RCA) is used to assemble nuclear-shell biopolymers with signal molecules for selective cancer cell recognition and efficient drug delivery to targeted individual cells. This strategy not only should allow the creation of clustered 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-fluorescence spots in response to human-telomerase activity in individual cancer cells but also could efficiently deliver drugs to reduce the undesired death of healthy cells. These findings offer new opportunities to improve the efficacy of cancer cell imaging and therapy.

  18. History of periodontal disease diagnosis and lung cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiaodan; LaMonte, Michael J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Nwizu, Ngozi; Freudenheim, Jo L; Tezal, Mine; Scannapieco, Frank; Hyland, Andrew; Andrews, Christopher A; Genco, Robert J; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2014-08-01

    While some evidence suggests that periodontal disease (PD) might be positively associated with lung cancer, prospective studies in women are limited. Previous findings may reflect residual confounding by smoking. The study aims to determine whether history of PD diagnosis is associated with incident lung cancer in a large cohort of postmenopausal women. Prospective analyses were conducted in a cohort of 77,485 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. History of PD (prevalence of 26.1 %) was self-reported, and 754 incident lung cancer cases occurred during an average 6.8 (SD ± 2.6) years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, PD was positively associated with lung cancer risk after adjusting for detailed smoking history including smoking status and pack-years of smoking (HR 1.24, 95 % CI 1.07-1.45). There was a positive additive interaction between PD with pack-years of smoking (p = 0.02), suggesting a potential synergistic effect between PD and smoking intensity on lung cancer. The association between PD and lung cancer was stronger in former smokers. When restricted to never-smokers, PD was not associated with lung cancer (HR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.68-1.53). Periodontal disease was not independently associated with lung cancer in non-smoking postmenopausal women. However, smoking and PD jointly increased lung cancer risk beyond that expected from the sum of the each effect separately. The potential synergism between PD and smoking on lung cancer warrants further examination.

  19. Association between sleep and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtmann, Emily; Levitan, Emily B; Hale, Lauren; Shikany, James M; Shah, Neomi A; Endeshaw, Yohannes; Lewis, Cora E; Manson, Joann E; Chlebowski, Rowan T

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the duration of sleep, sleep quality, insomnia, or sleep disturbance was associated with incident breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Prospective cohort study. Women enrolled in one of the Clinical Trial (CT) arms or the Observational Study (OS) from the WHI conducted in the United States. This study included 110,011 women age 50 to 79 years with no history of cancer. Typical sleep duration, sleep quality, and other self-reported sleep measures over the past 4 weeks were assessed during the screening visits for both the CT and OS participants. The presence of insomnia and level of sleep disturbance was calculated from an index of the WHI Insomnia Rating Scale. The outcome for this study was primary, invasive breast cancer. A total of 5,149 incident cases of breast cancer were identified in this study. No statistically significant associations were found between sleep duration, sleep quality, insomnia, or level of sleep disturbance with the risk of breast cancer after multivariable adjustment. A positive trend was observed for increasing sleeping duration with the risk of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, but the association estimates for each sleep duration category were weak and nonsignificant. This study does not provide strong support for an association between self-reported sleep duration, sleep quality, insomnia, or sleep disturbance with the risk of breast cancer.

  20. Tight junctions: a barrier to the initiation and progression of breast cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that arises from epithelial cells lining the breast ducts and lobules. Correct adhesion between adjacent epithelial cells is important in determining the normal structure and function of epithelial tissues, and there is accumulating evidence that dysregulated cell-cell adhesion is associated with many cancers. This review will focus on one cell-cell adhesion complex, the tight junction (TJ), and summarize recent evidence that TJs may participate in breast cancer development or progression. We will first outline the protein composition of TJs and discuss the functions of the TJ complex. Secondly we will examine how alterations in these functions might facilitate breast cancer initiation or progression; by focussing on the regulatory influence of TJs on cell polarity, cell fate and cell migration. Finally we will outline how pharmacological targeting of TJ proteins may be useful in limiting breast cancer progression. Overall we hope to illustrate that the relationship between TJ alterations and breast cancer is a complex one; but that this area offers promise in uncovering fundamental mechanisms linked to breast cancer progression.

  1. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  2. Anterior prostate biopsy at initial and repeat evaluation: is it useful to detect significant prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Detection rate for anterior prostate cancer (PCa in men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy has been prospectively evaluated. Materials and Methods: From January 2013 to March 2014, 400 patients all of Caucasian origin (median age 63.5 years underwent initial (285 cases and repeat (115 cases prostate biopsy; all the men had negative digital rectal examination and the indications to biopsy were: PSA values > 10 ng/mL, PSA between 4.1-10 or 2.6-4 ng/mL with free/total PSA≤25% and ≤20%, respectively. A median of 22 (initial biopsy and 31 cores (repeat biopsy were transperineally performed including 4 cores of the anterior zone (AZ and 4 cores of the AZ plus 2 cores of the transition zone (TZ, respectively. Results: Median PSA was 7.9 ng/mL; overall, a PCa was found in 180 (45% patients: in 135 (47.4% and 45 (36% of the men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. An exclusive PCa of the anterior zone was found in the 8.9 (initial biopsy vs 13.3% (repeat biopsy of the men: a single microfocus of cancer was found in the 61.2% of the cases; moreover, in 7 out 18 AZ PCa the biopsy histology was predictive of significant cancer in 2 (28.5% and 5 (71.5% men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. Conclusions: However AZ biopsies increased detection rate for PCa (10% of the cases, the majority of AZ PCa with histological findings predictive of clinically significant cancer were found at repeat biopsy (about 70% of the cases.

  3. [Possible Significance of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Cytology at Initial Diagnosis and Follow-up of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewaldt, A; Hügel, C; Hermann, E; Wagner, T O F

    2017-02-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] is an important procedure in the diagnosis of a variety of lung diseases. While it has enormous value in the diagnostics of inflammatory parenchymal diseases, its significance in lung cancer is unclear. Keeping in mind that immune therapy (e. g. application of checkpoint inhibitors) is gaining importance in the management of lung carcinoma, it is important to know if there are typical cellular patterns in BAL of lung cancer patients. Methods In a retrospective proof of principle-study, we analyzed 38 patients who underwent BAL at the initial diagnosis of lung cancer. Results We observed an elevated level of CD25 lymphocytes as well as an increased expression of DR antigen, both signaling lymphocyte activation. We could not find a typical cytologic pattern of inflammatory cells in lung carcinoma patients. Sensitivity of BAL to malignant cells was rare, thus confirming earlier analysis. Conclusion We could not demonstrate typical cellular patterns in BAL of lung cancer patients. Evaluation of specific microRNA patterns might play a supporting role in the initial diagnosis as well as follow-up of lung cancer patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Selection of Brain Metastasis-Initiating Breast Cancer Cells Determined by Growth on Hard Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Langley, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44+ and CD133+ and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice. PMID:21514446

  5. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Schaal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  6. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Evaluating Progress in Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Pascal; Puckett, Mary; Neri, Antonio

    2017-04-04

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) funds every state, seven tribes, seven territories and the District of Columbia to develop formal cancer plans that focus efforts in cancer control. A 2010 review of cancer plans identified radon-related activities in 27 (42%) plans. Since then, 37 coalitions have updated their plans with new or revised cancer control objectives. There has also been recent efforts to increase awareness about radon among cancer coalitions. This study assesses NCCCP grantees current radon activities and changes since the 2010 review. We reviewed all 65 NCCCP grantee cancer plans created from 2005 to 2015 for radon related search terms and categorized plans by radon activities. The program's most recent annual progress report to CDC was also reviewed. We then compared the results from the updated plans with the findings from the 2010 review to assess changes in radon activities among cancer coalitions. Changes in state radon laws between 2010 and 2015 were also assessed. While a number of cancer plans have added or expanded radon-specific activities since 2010, approximately one-third of NCCCP grantees still do not include radon in their cancer plans. Cancer programs can consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs to further reduce the risk of lung cancer, especially among non-smokers.

  8. Controller evaluation of initial data link en route air traffic control services : ISSS design development : study 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the first Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) design : development study of an initial group of en route air traffic control (ATC) : services designed for transmission by Data Link technologies using the Initial : Sector Suite...

  9. Melatonin, a Full Service Anti-Cancer Agent: Inhibition of Initiation, Progression and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Acuna-Castroviejo, Dario; Qin, Lilan; Yang, Shun-Fa; Xu, Kexin

    2017-04-17

    There is highly credible evidence that melatonin mitigates cancer at the initiation, progression and metastasis phases. In many cases, the molecular mechanisms underpinning these inhibitory actions have been proposed. What is rather perplexing, however, is the large number of processes by which melatonin reportedly restrains cancer development and growth. These diverse actions suggest that what is being observed are merely epiphenomena of an underlying more fundamental action of melatonin that remains to be disclosed. Some of the arresting actions of melatonin on cancer are clearly membrane receptor-mediated while others are membrane receptor-independent and involve direct intracellular actions of this ubiquitously-distributed molecule. While the emphasis of melatonin/cancer research has been on the role of the indoleamine in restraining breast cancer, this is changing quickly with many cancer types having been shown to be susceptible to inhibition by melatonin. There are several facets of this research which could have immediate applications at the clinical level. Many studies have shown that melatonin's co-administration improves the sensitivity of cancers to inhibition by conventional drugs. Even more important are the findings that melatonin renders cancers previously totally resistant to treatment sensitive to these same therapies. Melatonin also inhibits molecular processes associated with metastasis by limiting the entrance of cancer cells into the vascular system and preventing them from establishing secondary growths at distant sites. This is of particular importance since cancer metastasis often significantly contributes to death of the patient. Another area that deserves additional consideration is related to the capacity of melatonin in reducing the toxic consequences of anti-cancer drugs while increasing their efficacy. Although this information has been available for more than a decade, it has not been adequately exploited at the clinical level. Even

  10. Cardiovascular disease and mortality after breast cancer in postmenopausal women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Jin Park

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among older postmenopausal women. The impact of postmenopausal breast cancer on CVD for older women is uncertain. We hypothesized that older postmenopausal women with breast cancer would be at a higher risk of CVD than similar aged women without breast cancer and that CVD would be a major contributor to the subsequent morbidity and mortality.In a prospective Women's Health Initiative study, incident CVD events and total and cause-specific death rates were compared between postmenopausal women with (n = 4,340 and without (n = 97,576 incident invasive breast cancer over 10 years post-diagnosis, stratified by 3 age groups (50-59, 60-69, and 70-79.Postmenopausal women, regardless of breast cancer diagnosis, had similar and high levels of CVD risk factors (e.g., smoking and hypertension at baseline prior to breast cancer, which were strong predictors of CVD and total mortality over time. CVD affected mostly women age 70-79 with localized breast cancer (79% of breast cancer cases in 70-79 age group: only 17% died from breast cancer and CVD was the leading cause of death (22% over the average 10 years follow up. Compared to age-matched women without breast cancer, women age 70-79 at diagnosis of localized breast cancer had a similar multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR of 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76-1.33 for coronary heart disease, a lower risk of composite CVD (HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.70-1.00, and a higher risk of total mortality (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.04-1.39.CVD was a major contributor to mortality in women with localized breast cancer at age 70-79. Further studies are needed to evaluate both screening and treatment of localized breast cancer tailored to the specific health issues of older women.

  11. Melatonin, a Full Service Anti-Cancer Agent: Inhibition of Initiation, Progression and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J.; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Acuna-Castroviejo, Dario; Qin, Lilan; Yang, Shun-Fa; Xu, Kexin

    2017-01-01

    There is highly credible evidence that melatonin mitigates cancer at the initiation, progression and metastasis phases. In many cases, the molecular mechanisms underpinning these inhibitory actions have been proposed. What is rather perplexing, however, is the large number of processes by which melatonin reportedly restrains cancer development and growth. These diverse actions suggest that what is being observed are merely epiphenomena of an underlying more fundamental action of melatonin that remains to be disclosed. Some of the arresting actions of melatonin on cancer are clearly membrane receptor-mediated while others are membrane receptor-independent and involve direct intracellular actions of this ubiquitously-distributed molecule. While the emphasis of melatonin/cancer research has been on the role of the indoleamine in restraining breast cancer, this is changing quickly with many cancer types having been shown to be susceptible to inhibition by melatonin. There are several facets of this research which could have immediate applications at the clinical level. Many studies have shown that melatonin’s co-administration improves the sensitivity of cancers to inhibition by conventional drugs. Even more important are the findings that melatonin renders cancers previously totally resistant to treatment sensitive to these same therapies. Melatonin also inhibits molecular processes associated with metastasis by limiting the entrance of cancer cells into the vascular system and preventing them from establishing secondary growths at distant sites. This is of particular importance since cancer metastasis often significantly contributes to death of the patient. Another area that deserves additional consideration is related to the capacity of melatonin in reducing the toxic consequences of anti-cancer drugs while increasing their efficacy. Although this information has been available for more than a decade, it has not been adequately exploited at the clinical level

  12. Melatonin, a Full Service Anti-Cancer Agent: Inhibition of Initiation, Progression and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russel J. Reiter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is highly credible evidence that melatonin mitigates cancer at the initiation, progression and metastasis phases. In many cases, the molecular mechanisms underpinning these inhibitory actions have been proposed. What is rather perplexing, however, is the large number of processes by which melatonin reportedly restrains cancer development and growth. These diverse actions suggest that what is being observed are merely epiphenomena of an underlying more fundamental action of melatonin that remains to be disclosed. Some of the arresting actions of melatonin on cancer are clearly membrane receptor-mediated while others are membrane receptor-independent and involve direct intracellular actions of this ubiquitously-distributed molecule. While the emphasis of melatonin/cancer research has been on the role of the indoleamine in restraining breast cancer, this is changing quickly with many cancer types having been shown to be susceptible to inhibition by melatonin. There are several facets of this research which could have immediate applications at the clinical level. Many studies have shown that melatonin’s co-administration improves the sensitivity of cancers to inhibition by conventional drugs. Even more important are the findings that melatonin renders cancers previously totally resistant to treatment sensitive to these same therapies. Melatonin also inhibits molecular processes associated with metastasis by limiting the entrance of cancer cells into the vascular system and preventing them from establishing secondary growths at distant sites. This is of particular importance since cancer metastasis often significantly contributes to death of the patient. Another area that deserves additional consideration is related to the capacity of melatonin in reducing the toxic consequences of anti-cancer drugs while increasing their efficacy. Although this information has been available for more than a decade, it has not been adequately exploited at the

  13. Code blue: chaos or control, an educational initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Paulette

    2011-01-01

    Participation in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation team can create pandemonium among novice as well as experienced healthcare providers. Staff development educators, faced with the challenge of providing continuous education to improve efficiency in code organization and management, may benefit from lessons learned in the field. This author describes an institution's initiative to address multidisciplinary code blue education using a creative acronym coupled with multilevel didactic and simulation exercises.

  14. Downregulation of SREBP inhibits tumor growth and initiation by altering cellular metabolism in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yang-An; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Napier, Dana L; Vallee, Emma; Li, Austin T; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Gao, Tianyan

    2018-02-15

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to a family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes required for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Three SREBP isoforms, SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2, have been identified in mammalian cells. SREBP1a and SREBP1c are derived from a single gene through the use of alternative transcription start sites. Here we investigated the role of SREBP-mediated lipogenesis in regulating tumor growth and initiation in colon cancer. Knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 decreased levels of fatty acids as a result of decreased expression of SREBP target genes required for lipid biosynthesis in colon cancer cells. Bioenergetic analysis revealed that silencing SREBP1 or SREBP2 expression reduced the mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, as well as fatty acid oxidation indicating an alteration in cellular metabolism. Consequently, the rate of cell proliferation and the ability of cancer cells to form tumor spheroids in suspension culture were significantly decreased. Similar results were obtained in colon cancer cells in which the proteolytic activation of SREBP was blocked. Importantly, knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo and decreased the expression of genes associated with cancer stem cells. Taken together, our findings establish the molecular basis of SREBP-dependent metabolic regulation and provide a rationale for targeting lipid biosynthesis as a promising approach in colon cancer treatment.

  15. Evaluation of transition zone and lateral sextant biopsies for prostate cancer detection after initial sextant biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Klaus G; Hutarew, Georg; Esterbauer, Brigitte; Pytel, Akos; Jungwirth, Andreas; Dietze, Otto; Schmeller, Nikolaus T

    2003-04-01

    To assess the value of transition zone and lateral sextant biopsies for the detection of prostate cancer after a previous sextant biopsy was negative. A total of 74 prostates after radical prostatectomy were used to perform biopsies ex vivo. First, a sextant biopsy was taken, then two different rebiopsy techniques were performed. Rebiopsy technique A consisted of a laterally placed sextant biopsy and two cores per side of the transition zones only. Rebiopsy technique B included a standard sextant biopsy and two cores per side from the lateral areas of the prostate. The biopsies were taken using ultrasound guidance to sample the areas of interest precisely. The initial sextant biopsy found 39 prostate cancers. Rebiopsy technique A found 12 cancers (34%). In this group, a laterally placed sextant biopsy found 12 cancers; transition zone biopsies revealed cancer in 5 cases, but no additional tumor was found. Rebiopsy technique B detected 23 prostate cancers (66%). Fourteen tumors were found after a second standard sextant biopsy, and nine additional tumors were found in the lateral areas. Sextant biopsy has a low sensitivity of only 53%. A biopsy including the transition zones is not the ideal technique for detecting the remaining tumors. Therefore, transition zone biopsies should be reserved for patients with multiple previous negative biopsies of the peripheral zone. A subsequent sextant biopsy with additional cores from the lateral areas of the prostate is favorable if rebiopsy is necessary after a negative sextant biopsy.

  16. Utilization of Cancer Information System for Breast Cancer Control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: there is a substantial increase in the incidence of breast cancer in Nigeria usually with the late stage presentations and subsequent poor rates of survival attributed mainly to a low level of cancer awareness and ignorance amongst patients. Cancer information system (CIS) is now assuming an emerging role in ...

  17. Cervical cancer control in HIV-infected women: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel G. Ghebre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the initial recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in 1981, an increased burden of cervical cancer was identified among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women. Introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART decreased risks of opportunistic infections and improved overall survival. HIV-infected women are living longer. Introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine, cervical cancer screening and early diagnosis provide opportunities to reduce cervical cancer associated mortality. In line with 2030 Sustainable Development Goals to reduce mortality from non-communicable diseases, increased efforts need to focus on high burden countries within sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Despite limitations of resources in SSA, opportunities exist to improve cancer control. This article reviews advancements in cervical cancer control in HIV-positive women.

  18. Bone Marrow Microenvironmental Control of Prostate Cancer Skeletal Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    implicate PTHrP derived from prostate cancer in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer metastasis to bone. This aspect of the project is complete...presented initial findings as an invited speaker at the Cancer Induced Bone Disease meeting in Chicago (abstract appended). There was a statistically...Affiliations: 1 Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI; 2 Departments of

  19. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  20. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  1. Exercise in Regulation of Inflammation-Immune Axis Function in Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Wennerberg, Erik; Demaria, Sandra; Jones, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic manipulation of the immune system is emerging as a viable and robust treatment for some cancer patients. Exercise-induced modulation of the immune system may be another adjunctive strategy for inhibiting tumor initiation and progression. In healthy individuals, exercise has been shown to modulate a number of cell subsets involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge pertaining to exercise modulation of the inflammation-immune axis in cancer. The current evidence suggests that exercise may be a promising adjunctive strategy that can favorably alter numerous components of the immune system, which, in turn, may modulate tumorigenesis. However, many important knowledge gaps are evident. To this end, we propose a framework to guide future research efforts investigating the immune effects of exercise in cancer. PMID:26676894

  2. A Quest for Initiating Cells of Head and Neck Cancer and Their Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital (China); Köberle, Beate [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-27

    The biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and other cancers have been related to cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Specific markers, which vary considerably depending on tumor type or tissue of origin, characterize CSC. CSC are cancer initiating, sustaining and mostly quiescent. Compared to bulk tumors, CSC are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy and may have low immunogenicity. Therapeutic targeting of CSC may improve clinical outcome. HNSCC has two main etiologies: human papillomavirus, a virus infecting epithelial stem cells, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. Here, current knowledge of HNSCC-CSC biology is reviewed and parallels to CSC of other origin are drawn where necessary for a comprehensive picture.

  3. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  4. Tumour control probability in cancer stem cells hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dhawan

    Full Text Available The tumour control probability (TCP is a formalism derived to compare various treatment regimens of radiation therapy, defined as the probability that given a prescribed dose of radiation, a tumour has been eradicated or controlled. In the traditional view of cancer, all cells share the ability to divide without limit and thus have the potential to generate a malignant tumour. However, an emerging notion is that only a sub-population of cells, the so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs, are responsible for the initiation and maintenance of the tumour. A key implication of the CSC hypothesis is that these cells must be eradicated to achieve cures, thus we define TCPS as the probability of eradicating CSCs for a given dose of radiation. A cell surface protein expression profile, such as CD44high/CD24low for breast cancer or CD133 for glioma, is often used as a biomarker to monitor CSCs enrichment. However, it is increasingly recognized that not all cells bearing this expression profile are necessarily CSCs, and in particular early generations of progenitor cells may share the same phenotype. Thus, due to the lack of a perfect biomarker for CSCs, we also define a novel measurable TCPCD+, that is the probability of eliminating or controlling biomarker positive cells. Based on these definitions, we use stochastic methods and numerical simulations parameterized for the case of gliomas, to compare the theoretical TCPS and the measurable TCPCD+. We also use the measurable TCP to compare the effect of various radiation protocols.

  5. A Targetable EGFR-Dependent Tumor-Initiating Program in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Savage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have variable and unpredictable responses in breast cancer. Screening triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, we identify a subset responsive to EGFR inhibition by gefitinib, which displays heterogeneous expression of wild-type EGFR. Deep single-cell RNA sequencing of 3,500 cells from an exceptional responder identified subpopulations displaying distinct biological features, where elevated EGFR expression was significantly enriched in a mesenchymal/stem-like cellular cluster. Sorted EGFRhi subpopulations exhibited enhanced stem-like features, including ALDH activity, sphere-forming efficiency, and tumorigenic and metastatic potential. EGFRhi cells gave rise to EGFRhi and EGFRlo cells in primary and metastatic tumors, demonstrating an EGFR-dependent expansion and hierarchical state transition. Similar tumorigenic EGFRhi subpopulations were identified in independent PDXs, where heterogeneous EGFR expression correlated with gefitinib sensitivity. This provides new understanding for an EGFR-dependent hierarchy in TNBC and for patient stratification for therapeutic intervention. : Savage et al. demonstrate that sensitivity to EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib, in triple-negative breast cancer is paradoxically associated with EGFR heterogeneity. Using single-cell RNA sequencing in conjunction with functional assays, they identify TNBC tumors in which EGFR expression identifies cells with tumor-initiating capacity whose proliferative expansion is sensitive to EGFR inhibition. Keywords: breast cancer, tumor heterogeneity, patient-derived xenograft, single-cell RNA sequencing, EGFR inhibition, therapeutic response, tumor-initiating cell, cell hierarchy, BRCA1 mutation

  6. The initial clinical interview--can it reduce cancer patients' fear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Sophie Elisabeth; Nitzsche, Anika; Gloede, Tristan D; Ansmann, Lena; Street, Richard; Pfaff, Holger; Neumann, Melanie; Wirtz, Markus; Baumann, Walter; Schmitz, Stephan; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    A common phenomenon among cancer patients is a fear of cancer recurrence or cancer progression (FOP). The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the oncologist is able to reduce patients' FOP at the initial clinical interview. A prospective, longitudinal study included patients who were consulting private-practice oncologists in Germany for the first time. Recruitment was carried out by 44 members of the Professional Organization of Office-Based Hematologists and Oncologists. In the patient surveys, data on colon cancer patients' perceptions of communications with their oncologist and on patient-reported outcomes were collected over a period of 6 months. The present study analyzed the patients' data before their first consultation (T 0) and within 3 days after the first consultation (T 1). A total of 169 patients agreed to participate in the study. Backwards multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine whether the change (T 0-T 1) in FOP is associated with demographic, medical, or psychosocial determinants, or with the physician-patient communication. A significant association was found between the change in FOP and interruptions to the conversation, the comprehensibility of the information provided, the extent of perceived empathy from the physician, and the patient's social support and family status. Private social support and the initial medical encounter can help reduce FOP. Particularly, oncologists should ensure that they facilitate the presentation of information in a comprehensible way while avoiding interruptions and that they take particular care of patients with poor social support.

  7. Predictors of initial levels and trajectories of anxiety in women before and for 6 months after breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyranou, Marianna; Puntillo, Kathleen; Dunn, Laura B; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Paul, Steven M; Cooper, Bruce A; Neuhaus, John; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of breast cancer, in combination with the anticipation of surgery, evokes fear, uncertainty, and anxiety in most women. Study purposes were to examine in patients who underwent breast cancer surgery how ratings of state anxiety changed from the time of the preoperative assessment to 6 months after surgery and to investigate whether specific demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychosocial adjustment characteristics predicted the preoperative levels of state anxiety and/or characteristics of the trajectories of state anxiety. Patients (n = 396) were enrolled preoperatively and completed the Spielberger State Anxiety inventory monthly for 6 months. Using hierarchical linear modeling, demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychosocial adjustment characteristics were evaluated as predictors of initial levels and trajectories of state anxiety. Patients experienced moderate levels of anxiety before surgery. Higher levels of depressive symptoms and uncertainty about the future, as well as lower levels of life satisfaction, less sense of control, and greater difficulty coping, predicted higher preoperative levels of state anxiety. Higher preoperative state anxiety, poorer physical health, decreased sense of control, and more feelings of isolation predicted higher state anxiety scores over time. Moderate levels of anxiety persist in women for 6 months after breast cancer surgery. Clinicians need to implement systematic assessments of anxiety to identify high-risk women who warrant more targeted interventions. In addition, ongoing follow-up is needed to prevent adverse postoperative outcomes and to support women to return to their preoperative levels of function.

  8. Weight Fluctuation and Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Women: The Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, Laura M; Beavers, Daniel P; Caan, Bette J; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Vitolins, Mara Z; Beavers, Kristen M

    2017-05-01

    Background: Weight cycling, defined by an intentional weight loss and subsequent regain, commonly occurs in overweight and obese women and is associated with some negative health outcomes. We examined the role of various weight-change patterns during early to mid-adulthood and associated risk of highly prevalent, obesity-related cancers (breast, endometrial, and colorectal) in postmenopausal women.Methods: A total of 80,943 postmenopausal women (age, 63.4 ± 7.4 years) in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study were categorized by self-reported weight change (weight stable; weight gain; lost weight; weight cycled [1-3, 4-6, 7-10, >10 times]) during early to mid-adulthood (18-50 years). Three site-specific associations were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models [age, race/ethnicity, income, education, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, hormone therapy, diet, and body mass index (BMI)].Results: A total of 7,464 (breast = 5,564; endometrial = 788; and colorectal = 1,290) incident cancer cases were identified between September 1994 and August 2014. Compared with weight stability, weight gain was significantly associated with risk of breast cancer [hazard ratio (HR), 1.11; 1.03-1.20] after adjustment for BMI. Similarly, weight cycling was significantly associated with risk of endometrial cancer (HR = 1.23; 1.01-1.49). Weight cycling "4 to 6 times" was most consistently associated with cancer risk, showing a 38% increased risk for endometrial cancer [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-1.76] compared with weight stable women.Conclusions: Weight gain and weight cycling were positively associated with risk of breast and endometrial cancer, respectively.Impact: These data suggest weight cycling and weight gain increase risk of prevalent cancers in postmenopausal women. Adopting ideal body-weight maintenance practices before and after weight loss should be encouraged to reduce risk of incident breast and endometrial cancers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers

  9. The adaptive effect of personal control when facing breast cancer : Cognitive and behavioural mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henselmans, Inge; Fleer, Joke; de Vries, J; Baas, Peter C; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V

    This prospective study examines the cognitive and behavioural mediators of the relation between personal control and the initial response to a breast cancer diagnosis as well as subsequent psychological adjustment. A total of 143 patients participated immediately after diagnosis (T1), after surgery

  10. Development of cancer-initiating cells and immortalized cells with genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Atsumi, Yuko; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2015-01-01

    Cancers that develop after middle age usually exhibit genomic instability and multiple mutations. This is in direct contrast to pediatric tumors that usually develop as a result of specific chromosomal translocations and epigenetic aberrations. The development of genomic instability is associated with mutations that contribute to cellular immortalization and transformation. Cancer occurs when cancer-initiating cells (CICs), also called cancer stem cells, develop as a result of these mutations. In this paper, we explore how CICs develop as a result of genomic instability, including looking at which cancer suppression mechanisms are abrogated. A recent in vitro study revealed the existence of a CIC induction pathway in differentiating stem cells. Under aberrant differentiation conditions, cells become senescent and develop genomic instabilities that lead to the development of CICs. The resulting CICs contain a mutation in the alternative reading frame of CDKN2A (ARF)/p53 module, i.e., in either ARF or p53. We summarize recently established knowledge of CIC development and cellular immortality, explore the role of the ARF/p53 module in protecting cells from transformation, and describe a risk factor for genomic destabilization that increases during the process of normal cell growth and differentiation and is associated with the downregulation of histone H2AX to levels representative of growth arrest in normal cells. PMID:25815132

  11. Syndecan-1 (CD138) contributes to prostate cancer progression by stabilizing tumour-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Keiji; Anai, Satoshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Konishi, Noboru

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that tumour-initiating cells (TICs) contribute to the development of prostate cancer. Here, we identified syndecan-1 as a key molecule maintaining the stability of prostate cancer TICs. Holoclones harbouring the biological properties of stemness were derived from single-cell cultures of the PC3 human prostate cancer cell line. These holoclones over-expressed syndecan-1, but showed reduced expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) and synthesis of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen radicals. Stable RNA-mediated silencing of syndecan-1 gene expression up-regulated NOX-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and reduced the survival of holoclones in vitro. Syndecan-1 down-regulation also strongly reduced the number of CD133(+)/CD44(+) primitive cancer cells and tumour growth in vivo. Interestingly, syndecan-1 gene knockdown significantly enhanced the tumour-suppressive effects of docetaxel by inhibiting the docetaxel-induced increase in CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells in vivo. In the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse model of prostate cancer, early intervention with a syndecan-1 inhibitor (OGT2115) or syndecan-1 RNAi reduced the incidence of adenocarcinoma and the number of c-kit(+)/CD44(+) cells in cancer foci. Finally, we found that syndecan-1 immunopositivity in prostate cancer cells was significantly associated with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Taken together, our results show that syndecan-1 contributes to prostatic carcinogenesis by maintaining TICs and may be a target molecule for therapy. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of postdiagnosis initiation of complementary and alternative medicine among patients at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Adam; Lontok, Oliver; Huhmann, Maureen; Parrott, J Scott; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Patrick-Miller, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in conjunction with conventional oncology treatments. Previous studies have not investigated postdiagnosis initiation of CAM therapies or independent correlates of use of individual CAM modalities. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of individual CAM modalities initiated after cancer diagnosis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of a random sample of adults with a cancer diagnosis (N = 1,228) seeking care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center within a 12-month period. The majority of patients were female (64.7%), white (86.9%), and married (72.8%).Three-quarters (75.2%) used at least one CAM modality, and 57.6% of those using CAM initiated use after cancer diagnosis. For all CAM therapies combined, women were 1.7 times more likely than men to initiate any CAM therapy after cancer diagnosis. However, when CAM modalities were differentiated by type, men and women were equally likely to initiate all therapies except for psychotherapy and mind-body approaches. Postdiagnosis initiation of every CAM modality, except mind-body therapies, differed by cancer type. A significant proportion of patients initiated CAM use after diagnosis. However, specific type of CAM initiated varied by demographics and cancer type, suggesting there is not a "typology" of CAM user. Optimal comprehensive cancer treatment, palliation, and survivorship care will require patient and provider education regarding CAM use by modality type; improved provider-patient communication regarding potential benefits, limitations, and risks; and institutional policies to support integrated conventional and CAM treatment.

  13. Effect of glycemic control on the risk of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Er, Kian-Ching; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Lee, Yi-Kung; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Su, Yung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer has been studied, the effects of glycemic control on pancreatic cancer have never been evaluated. This study investigates the relationship between glycemic control and pancreatic cancer. Data from 1 million National Health Insurance beneficiaries were screened. The study cohort consisted of 46,973 diabetic patients and 652,142 nondiabetic subjects. Of the patients with diabetes, 1114 who had been admitted for hyperglyce...

  14. Cancer in Angola, resources and strategy for its control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Conceição, Ana Vaz; Oliveira, João Blasques; Tavares, António; Domingos, Clarinha; Santos, Lucio Lara

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is an increasingly important health problem in Africa. The number of cancer cases in this region could double, ranging between 700 000 and 1 600 000 new cases in 2030. The mortality rate is higher than 80% and is explained, mainly, by a lack of early detection, diagnostics and treatment resources. In Angola, about 7,000 patients die of cancer every year. Data were derived from open-ended interviews conducted in 2010-11 with health authorities, clinicians, nurses and Administration of Hospitals. According Angola epidemiological data, results of interviews and international published advocacy for cancer control we develop a potential strategy for its control. The objectives are to identify existing resources for cancer control and describe the needs thereto, in order to establish an oncological program to guide the development of Angola cancer control strategies. Malaria remains the leading cause of illness and death in Angola, and other communicable diseases remain a public health problem. However, 9 000 new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year.The most common types of cancer are: cancer of the cervix, breast, prostate, esophagus, stomach and head and neck, as well as cancers with infectious origin, such as Kaposi's sarcoma and liver and bladder cancer. The foundation for developing national cancer control strategies includes: oncological data; investment and training; identifying and removing barriers; guidance and protection of the patient. Angolan National Cancer Centre, Sagrada Esperança Clinic and Girassol Clinic are now developing a cancer program. Improving the economic situation of Angola creates conditions for an increase in life expectancy which in itself is associated with an increased risk of oncological diseases. On the other hand, infectious diseases, associated with the risk of malignant tumors, are endemic. Thus, an increase in patients with malignant disease is expected. A plan is therefore necessary to organize the response to this old

  15. 78 FR 6329 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), FOA DD13-002, initial review.'' Contact Person for More... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Evaluation of Treatments and Services Provided to People with ] Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), FOA DD13-002, initial...

  16. Integration of Nuclear- and Extranuclear-Initiated Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madak Erdogan, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    Estrogenic hormones exert their effects through binding to Estrogen Receptors (ERs), which work in concert with coregulators and extranuclear signaling pathways to control gene expression in normal as well as cancerous states, including breast tumors. In this thesis, we have used multiple genome-wide analysis tools to elucidate various ways that…

  17. Cancer Prevention and Control Research Manpower Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    is conclusive evidence that screening will decrease morality . The methods used to screen for breast cancer include Self Breast Examination, Clinical...Raciathnic Pattern of Cancer in United States. MMWR. 1991;40:754-757. the United States, 1973-1993. Rockville, Md: National Cancer 11. Escobedo LG

  18. Mitochondrial control by DRP1 in brain tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M; Flavahan, William A; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N; Kashatus, David F; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N

    2015-04-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) co-opt the neuronal high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT3, to withstand metabolic stress. We investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology, in BTICs. BTIC mitochondria were fragmented relative to non-BTIC tumor cell mitochondria, suggesting that BTICs increase mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), showed activating phosphorylation in BTICs and inhibitory phosphorylation in non-BTIC tumor cells. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and targeting AMPK rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTIC tumor cells, suggesting that tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting that mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs.

  19. 78 FR 28221 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Youth Violence... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Time and Date: 12:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m...

  20. 78 FR 20319 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review. The meeting announced below concerns Research Grants...), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Time and Date...

  1. Health Beliefs and Locus of Control as Predictors of Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OR= 0.35, p < 0.05), internal locus of control (OR = 1.43, p < 0.05) and health risks behaviour (OR= 0.42, p < 0.05) all significantly predicted cervical cancer screening behaviour of women. Keywords: Health beliefs, Health locus of control, cancer ...

  2. Child Cancer Control. Report on a Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This World Health Organization (WHO) report on the proceedings of a Working Group on Child Cancer Control was prepared by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The working group met in Prague in April 1977 and was comprised of representatives from 14 European countries. Its task was to review existing methods of child cancer control, the efficacy of…

  3. Perceived control, adjustment, and communication problems in laryngeal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, G W; Dineen, M; Kauffman, S M; Raimondi, S C; Simpson, K C

    1993-12-01

    Health locus of control, adjustment to cancer, and communication experiences after a laryngectomy were investigated in 63 laryngeal cancer survivors. Survivors who showed internal control also scored as better adjusted and had fewer communication problems. Scales were intercorrelated (.68 to .92).

  4. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  5. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer-initiating cells by targeting Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here, we report that berbamine and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). Furthermore, berbamine inhibited the in vivo tumorigenicity of liver cancer cells in NOD/SCID mice and downregulated the self-renewal abilities of liver cancer-initiating cells. Chemical inhibition or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of CAMKII recapitulated the effects of berbamine, whereas overexpression of CAMKII promoted cancer cell proliferation and increased the resistance of liver cancer cells to berbamine treatments. Western blot analyses of human liver cancer specimens showed that CAMKII was hyperphosphorylated in liver tumors compared with the paired peritumor tissues, which supports a role of CAMKII in promoting human liver cancer progression and the potential clinical use of berbamine for liver cancer therapies. Our data suggest that berbamine and its derivatives are promising agents to suppress liver cancer growth by targeting CAMKII. Mol Cancer Ther; 12(10); 2067-77. ©2013 AACR.

  6. Evaluation of a Worksite Cervical Screening Initiative to Increase Pap Smear Uptake in Malaysia: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rorke, Michael; Murray, Liam; Su, Tin Tin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite the significant burden of cervical cancer, Malaysia like many middle-income countries relies on opportunistic cervical screening as opposed to a more organized population-based program. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of a worksite screening initiative upon Papanicolaou smear test (Pap test) uptake among educated working women in Malaysia. Methods. 403 female teachers who never or infrequently attended for a Pap test from 40 public secondary schools in Kuala Lumpur were recruited into a cluster randomized trial conducted between January and November 2010. The intervention group participated in a worksite cervical screening initiative whilst the control group received usual care from the existing cervical screening program. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the impact of the intervention program on Pap smear uptake after 24 weeks of followup. Results. The proportion of women attending for a Pap test was significantly higher in the intervention than in the control group (18.1% versus 10.1%, P value < 0.05) with the worksite screening initiative doubling the Pap smear uptake, adjusted odds ratio 2.44 (95% CI: 1.29–4.62). Conclusion. Worksite health promotion interventions can effectively increase cervical smear uptake rates among eligible workers in middle-income countries. Policy makers and health care providers in these countries should include such interventions in strategies for reducing cervical cancer burden. This trial is registered with IRCT201103186088N1. PMID:24073411

  7. Conventional arms control initiatives: Russia as a special case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khripunov, I. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The post-Cold War period has provided several spectacular breakthroughs in what seemed to be intractable arms control problems that were pushing the world to the brink of global disaster. One of the serious remaining gaps is the still largely unrestricted flow of conventional weapons, whose increasing sophistication and overkill potential is understandably a matter of growing concern. In addition to recognizing the continued priority of curbing the spread of weapons of mass destruction and drastically reducing their stockpiles, the time has come to engage major weapons exporters in developing new international understandings and mechanisms to stop the flood of conventional arms on the global market and to drastically curb conventional arms transfers.

  8. Bilious pericardial effusion at initial presentation in a patient with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoulas, Christophoros S; Foroulis, Christophoros; Letsas, Konstantinos; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Konstantinou, Marios

    2003-11-08

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac tamponade as the initial manifestation of metastatic cancer is a rare clinical entity. Furthermore, a thoraco-biliary fistula is another rare complication of echinococcosis due to rupture of hydatid cysts located at the upper surface of the liver to the pleural or pericardial cavity. We report a case of non-small cell lung cancer with a coexisting hepatic hydatid cyst presenting as a bilious pericardial effusion. CASE REPORT: A 66-year-old patient presented with cardiac tamponade of unknown origin. Chest CT-scan demonstrated a left central lung tumor, a smaller peripheral one, bilateral pleural effusions and a hydatid cyst on the dome of the liver in close contact to the diaphragm and pericardium. Pericardiotomy with drainage was performed, followed by bleomycin pleurodesis. The possible mechanism for the bilious pericardial effusion might be the presence of a pericardio-biliary fistula created by the hepatic hydatid cyst. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first case of a bilious pericardial effusion at initial presentation in a patient with lung cancer with coexisting hepatic hydatid cyst.

  9. Bilious pericardial effusion at initial presentation in a patient with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostikas Konstantinos

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac tamponade as the initial manifestation of metastatic cancer is a rare clinical entity. Furthermore, a thoraco-biliary fistula is another rare complication of echinococcosis due to rupture of hydatid cysts located at the upper surface of the liver to the pleural or pericardial cavity. We report a case of non-small cell lung cancer with a coexisting hepatic hydatid cyst presenting as a bilious pericardial effusion. Case report A 66-year-old patient presented with cardiac tamponade of unknown origin. Chest CT-scan demonstrated a left central lung tumor, a smaller peripheral one, bilateral pleural effusions and a hydatid cyst on the dome of the liver in close contact to the diaphragm and pericardium. Pericardiotomy with drainage was performed, followed by bleomycin pleurodesis. The possible mechanism for the bilious pericardial effusion might be the presence of a pericardio-biliary fistula created by the hepatic hydatid cyst. Conclusions This is the first case of a bilious pericardial effusion at initial presentation in a patient with lung cancer with coexisting hepatic hydatid cyst.

  10. Relationship between Uncertainty and Emotions in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients after Initial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Tomoko; Onishi, Chiemi

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between uncertainty and emotions in advanced lung cancer patients after initial therapy. Fourteen advanced lung cancer patients participated in this study. A survey was conducted using the Universal Uncertainty in Illness Scale (UUIS) and the Profile of Mood States-Brief Form (POMS-Brief Form), Japanese Version. The total UUIS score of each participant ranged from 42 to 109, with a mean±SD of 70.7±20.9. The T-scores for the 6 factors of the POMS-Brief Form were 50.2±11.9 (mean±SD) for tension-anxiety (T-A); 49.6±12.2 for depression-dejection (D); 40.4±4.9 for anger-hostility (A-H); 41.8±9.3 for vigor (V); 44.2±5.8 for fatigue (F); and 52.7±15.2 for confusion (C). In terms of the correlation between the total UUIS score and the respective T-scores of the six POMS-Brief Form factors, a strong correlation was seen between total UUIS score and D (r=0.735, p=0.003). A substantial correlation was also seen between total UUIS score and T-A (r=0.694, p=0.006). In advanced lung cancer patients after initial therapy, uncertainty had an effect on emotions. J. Med. Invest. 64: 96-100, February, 2017.

  11. Worksite Cancer Prevention Activities in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmias, Zachary; Townsend, Julie S; Neri, Antonio; Stewart, Sherri L

    2016-08-01

    Workplaces are one setting for cancer control planners to reach adults at risk for cancer and other chronic diseases. However, the extent to which Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded National Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs (NCCCP) implement interventions in the workplace setting is not well characterized. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of program action plans submitted by NCCCP grantees from 2013 to 2015 to identify and describe cancer prevention objectives and interventions in the workplace setting. Nearly half of NCCCP action reports contained at least one cancer prevention objective or intervention in the workplace setting. Common interventions included education about secondhand smoke exposure in the workplace, and the importance of obtaining colorectal cancer screening. Workplace interventions were relatively common among NCCCP action plans, and serve as one way to address low percentages of CRC screening, and reduce risk for obesity- and tobacco-related cancers.

  12. Health Behaviors and Associated Sociodemographic Factors in Cervical Cancer Survivors Compared with Matched Non-Cancer Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Kim, Se Ik; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Myong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    We explored the prevalence of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and obesity in cervical cancer survivors and examined associations between sociodemographic factors and each health behavior. We studied 448 cervical cancer survivors ≥2 years after their initial diagnosis who had completed treatment. The total sample consisted of these survivors, and 4,480 cancer-free controls who were grouped into 5-year age cohorts and matched to the survivors in terms of both education and monthly household income. The prevalence of current smoking, current alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and obesity in cervical cancer survivors (2.68, 23.88, 62.02, and 32.81%, respectively) did not differ significantly from those of matched non-cancer controls. Age (younger), marital status (married), and education (≥college) were associated with lower probabilities of current alcohol consumption (odds ratio [OR] = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88-0.95; OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.23-0.78; OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.25-0.97, respectively). A monthly household income ≥$2,000, being employed, and self-rated health status (less healthy) were associated with physical inactivity (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37-0.99; OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.36-3.42; OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.23-3.05, respectively). Both age and number of years since diagnosis were associated with obesity (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08; OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.20-0.72, respectively). The health behaviors of cervical cancer survivors did not differ from those of matched cancer-free controls. As health behaviors are modifiable, identification of cervical cancer survivors who are at risk of an unhealthy lifestyle would allow individual- and population-based intervention programs to more effectively use their limited resources.

  13. Initial Efficacy Testing of an Autobiographical Memory Intervention on Advance Care Planning for Patients With Terminal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohard, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    To test the efficacy of a novel intervention to facilitate advance care planning.
. Exploratory, quasiexperimental pilot study with two independent groups.
. A large hospice located in the southwestern United States. 
. A convenience sample of 50 participants with terminal cancer enrolled in hospice.
. An autobiographical memory (ABM) intervention used the participants' experiences with cancer and end of life for the purpose of directing advance care planning.
. Two domains of advance care planning, decision making and communication, were measured in relation to 11 variables. The ABM intervention was nonthreatening, short in duration, and easily completed with participants as they recalled, without hesitation, specific personal memories of family and friends who had died and their advance care plans. The Mann-Whitney nonparametric test revealed that participants in the experimental group had a higher average rank than those in the control group for communicating the decision about antibiotics, as well as exhibited a trend toward significance for five other advance care planning variables.
. Findings showed that directive ABMs may be effective in influencing the decision making and communication of advance care planning for terminally ill patients with cancer.
. The current level of understanding about using the ABM intervention suggests that nurses can initiate an advance care planning conversation using this approach.

  14. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE is a clinically critical disease, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of which can lead to increased rate of mortality. For prevention of recurrence of PTE, recognition of its risk factors or underlying diseases is of great importance. PTE is common in patients with cancer and has high morbidity and mortality rates. Although cancer is a lethal condition, PTE accelerates death in these patients. In the current study, we reported the case of a 50-year-old male presenting with dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, and non-massive hemoptysis indicating pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulant therapy was initiated, but after 12 days of treatment, new deep vein thromboses in the left upper and right lower limbs were diagnosed. However, no specific risk factors or laboratory abnormalities were detected. History of weight loss during the recent months encouraged further investigation for ruling out malignancy, which led a diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. He did not have any complaints of gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. A case of rectal cancer with sternal metastasis as initial presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J H; Kim, S J; Oh, J Y; Ryu, S R; Shim, K S; Kim, K H; Baek, S Y; Choi, H Y; Lee, S W; Kim, M J

    1995-08-01

    Colorectal cancer with bone metastasis as initial manifestation is a very rare event. We have reported a case of rectal cancer presenting with sternal metastasis. A 30 year-old man was evaluated due to pain in the sternal area with a bulging mass. History and physical examination did not suggest any specific disease. A radionuclide bone scan revealed increased uptake in the sternal area, right 6th rib, and sacrum. Microscopic examination of a biopsy specimen from the sternum showed metastatic adenocarcinoma. A barium enema and CT scan of the pelvis suggested carcinoma of the upper rectum. Adenocarcinoma of the rectosigmoid junction area was demonstrated by colonoscopic examination with biopsy. He received palliative transverse colostomy for obstruction without further treatment.

  17. Roles of caloric restriction, ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting during initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer in animal models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mengmeng; Zhu, Xingya; Wang, Hao; Wang, Feng; Guan, Wenxian

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary restriction regimens such as caloric restriction, ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting in development of cancers has been detected via abundant preclinical experiments. However, the conclusions are controversial. We aim to review the relevant animal studies systematically and provide assistance for further clinical studies. Literatures on associations between dietary restriction and cancer published in PubMed in recent twenty years were comprehensively searched. Animal model, tumor type, feeding regimen, study length, sample size, major outcome, conclusion, quality assessment score and the interferential step of cancer were extracted from each eligible study. We analyzed the tumor incidence rates from 21 studies about caloric restriction. Fifty-nine studies were involved in our system review. The involved studies explored roles of dietary restriction during initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. About 90.9% of the relevant studies showed that caloric restriction plays an anti-cancer role, with the pooled OR (95%CI) of 0.20 (0.12, 0.34) relative to controls. Ketogenic diet was also positively associated with cancer, which was indicated by eight of the nine studies. However, 37.5% of the related studies obtained a negative conclusion that intermittent fasting was not significantly preventive against cancer. Caloric restriction and ketogenic diet are effective against cancer in animal experiments while the role of intermittent fasting is doubtful and still needs exploration. More clinical experiments are needed and more suitable patterns for humans should be investigated.

  18. Roles of caloric restriction, ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting during initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer in animal models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Lv

    Full Text Available The role of dietary restriction regimens such as caloric restriction, ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting in development of cancers has been detected via abundant preclinical experiments. However, the conclusions are controversial. We aim to review the relevant animal studies systematically and provide assistance for further clinical studies.Literatures on associations between dietary restriction and cancer published in PubMed in recent twenty years were comprehensively searched. Animal model, tumor type, feeding regimen, study length, sample size, major outcome, conclusion, quality assessment score and the interferential step of cancer were extracted from each eligible study. We analyzed the tumor incidence rates from 21 studies about caloric restriction.Fifty-nine studies were involved in our system review. The involved studies explored roles of dietary restriction during initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. About 90.9% of the relevant studies showed that caloric restriction plays an anti-cancer role, with the pooled OR (95%CI of 0.20 (0.12, 0.34 relative to controls. Ketogenic diet was also positively associated with cancer, which was indicated by eight of the nine studies. However, 37.5% of the related studies obtained a negative conclusion that intermittent fasting was not significantly preventive against cancer.Caloric restriction and ketogenic diet are effective against cancer in animal experiments while the role of intermittent fasting is doubtful and still needs exploration. More clinical experiments are needed and more suitable patterns for humans should be investigated.

  19. Prostate Cancer Disparities throughout the Cancer Control Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J. Dalton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that 238,590 U.S. men will develop PCa and 29,720 men will die from the disease in 2013. PCa exhibits the most profound racial disparities of all cancers with African American men having a 70% higher incidence rate and more than two times higher mortality rate than Caucasian men. Published research on PCa disparities focuses on singular outcomes such as incidence, mortality or quality of life. The objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive summary of the racial disparities found at each stage of the PCa Care Continuum which includes prevention, detection, treatments, and outcomes and survival. It focuses primarily on disparities among Caucasian (white and African American men.

  20. The history and use of cancer registry data by public health cancer control programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C; Babcock, Frances; Hayes, Nikki S; Mariotto, Angela B; Wong, Faye L; Kohler, Betsy A; Weir, Hannah K

    2017-12-15

    Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer survival. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States, and illustrate the expanding ways in which cancer surveillance data are being made available and contributing to cancer control programs. The article describes the building of the cancer registry infrastructure and the successful coordination of efforts among the 2 federal agencies that support cancer registry programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The major US cancer control programs also are described, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. This overview illustrates how cancer registry data can inform public health actions to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes and may be instructional for a variety of cancer control professionals in the United States and in other countries. Cancer 2017;123:4969-76. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Alcohol Control Efforts in Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans and Alcohol Use Among Adults in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, S. Jane; Kanny, Dafna; Roland, Katherine B.; Grossman, Melissa; Peaker, Brandy; Liu, Yong; Gapstur, Susan M.; White, Mary C.; Plescia, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Aims To understand how US cancer control plans address alcohol use, an important but frequently overlooked cancer risk factor, and how many US adults are at risk. Methods We reviewed alcohol control efforts in 69 comprehensive cancer control plans in US states, tribes and jurisdictions. Using the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we assessed the prevalence of current alcohol use among US adults and the proportion of these drinkers who exceeded guidelines for moderate drinking. Results Most comprehensive cancer control plans acknowledged alcohol use as a cancer risk factor but fewer than half included a goal, objective or strategy to address alcohol use. More than half of US adults reported current alcohol use in 2011, and two of three drinkers exceeded moderate drinking guidelines at least once in the past month. Many states that did not address alcohol use in comprehensive cancer control plans also had a high proportion of adults at risk. Conclusion Alcohol use is a common cancer risk factor in the USA, but alcohol control strategies are not commonly included in comprehensive cancer control plans. Supporting the implementation of evidence-based strategies to prevent the excessive use of alcohol is one tool the cancer control community can use to reduce the risk of cancer. PMID:25313255

  2. Initiation of population-based mammography screening in Dutch municipalities and effect on breast-cancer mortality: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S.J.; Fracheboud, J.; Looman, C.W.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Boer, R.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Koning, H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than a decade ago, a mammography screening programme for women aged 50-69 years was initiated in the Netherlands. Our aim was to assess the effect of this programme on breast-cancer mortality rates. METHODS: We examined data for 27948 women who died of breast-cancer aged 55-74 years

  3. The initiator and timing of referral to breast cancer genetic counselling: an exploration of everyday person-centered practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, E. van; Hubers, A.J.; Witkamp, A.J.; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The referral process for genetic counselling in breast cancer patients may be compromised by patient-related factors, like patient’s age, referral initiative or cancer history. This study aimed to characterize this referral process in daily clinical practice. Methods: During genetic

  4. Protein markers of cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumor-initiating cells reveal subpopulations in freshly isolated ovarian cancer ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintzell My

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In ovarian cancer, massive intraperitoneal dissemination is due to exfoliated tumor cells in ascites. Tumor-initiating cells (TICs or cancer stem cells and cells showing epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT are particularly implicated. Spontaneous spherical cell aggregates are sometimes observed, but although similar to those formed by TICs in vitro, their significance is unclear. Methods Cells freshly isolated from malignant ascites were separated into sphere samples (S-type samples, n=9 and monolayer-forming single-cell suspensions (M-type, n=18. Using western blot, these were then compared for expression of protein markers of EMT, TIC, and of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. Results S-type cells differed significantly from M-type by expressing high levels of E-cadherin and no or little vimentin, integrin-β3 or stem cell transcription factor Oct-4A. By contrast, M-type samples were enriched for CD44, Oct-4A and for CAF markers. Independently of M- and S-type, there was a strong correlation between TIC markers Nanog and EpCAM. The CAF marker α-SMA correlated with clinical stage IV. This is the first report on CAF markers in malignant ascites and on SUMOylation of Oct-4A in ovarian cancer. Conclusions In addition to demonstrating potentially high levels of TICs in ascites, the results suggest that the S-type population is the less tumorigenic one. Nanoghigh/EpCAMhigh samples represent a TIC subset which may be either M- or S-type, and which is separate from the CD44high/Oct-4Ahigh subset observed only in M-type samples. This demonstrates a heterogeneity in TIC populations in vivo which has practical implications for TIC isolation based on cell sorting. The biological heterogeneity will need to be addressed in future therapeutical strategies.

  5. The Lancet Oncology's Cancer Control in Africa | Michael | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In April 2013 the Lancet Oncology published a series on cancer control in Africa comprising 7 papers (Lancet Oncology vol 14 number 4). The significance of these papers to Africa's attempts at tackling the rapidly rising prevalence of cancer cannot be over-emphasized. Potentially, these papers will form the basis of ...

  6. THE LANCET ONCOLOGY'S CANCER CONTROL IN AFRICA O.S. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In April 2013 the Lancet Oncology published a series on cancer control in Africa comprising 7 papers (Lancet Oncology vol 14 number 4). The significance of these papers to Africa's attempts at tackling the rapidly rising prevalence of cancer cannot be over-emphasized. Potentially, these papers will form the basis of ...

  7. Regional Cancer Control in South-Eastern Nigeria: A Proposal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an impending cancer epidemic in Africa. In Nigeria, this disease is causing untold devastation, and control measures are desperately needed. Breast, cervical, prostate, and liver cancers are the most common types in Nigerian adults. In children, the predominant malignant diseases are Burkitt's lymphoma, acute ...

  8. Control of breast cancer using health education | Nzarubara | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Todetermine theefficacy of massscreening in the control of primary breast cancer among a selected group of women from Mpigi district, Uganda. Design: Qualitative study by comparing the level of knowledge of risk factors, attitude and practice to breast cancer and the ability to carry out self breast examination ...

  9. Initiation of chemotherapy in cancer patients with poor performance status: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joan; Earle, Craig; Atzema, Clare; Liu, Ying; Howell, Doris; Seow, Hsien; Sutradhar, Rinku; Dudgeon, Deborah; Husain, Amna; Sussman, Jonathan; Barbera, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Practice guidelines indicate that patients who have months to weeks left to live should not be offered chemotherapy. We examined factors associated with clinician-reported poor performance status as determined by the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) and subsequent initiation of intravenous (IV) chemotherapy in an ambulatory cancer population in Ontario, Canada. In this retrospective study, patients who had at least one PPS assessment indicating poor performance status (a PPS score of 50 or lower) comprised the study cohort. Using linked administrative databases, we observed the cohort for initiation of IV chemotherapy within 30 days of the first (index) poor PPS assessment. We excluded patients for whom IV or oral chemotherapy was ongoing or recently completed or whose performance status improved following the index assessment. Of the remaining cohort, 9.3 percent (264/2,842) received IV chemotherapy within 30 days of the index PPS. A small number of cancer patients with poor performance status began IV chemotherapy in the month following assessment.

  10. Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells or Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Shin, Young Kee

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs), which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation, are thought to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, therapy resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Tumor recurrence and chemoresistance are major causes of poor survival rates of ovarian cancer patients, which may be due in part to the existence of CSC/TICs. Therefore, elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ovarian CSC/TICs is required to develop a cure for this malignancy. Recent studies have indicated that the properties of CSC/TICs can be regulated by microRNAs, genes and signaling pathways which also function in normal stem cells. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironments surrounding CSC/TICs are crucial for the maintenance of these cells. Similarly, efforts are now being made to unravel the mechanism involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs, although much work is still needed. This review considers recent advances in identifying the genes and pathways involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs. Furthermore, current approaches targeting ovarian CSC/TICs are described. Targeting both CSC/TICs and bulk tumor cells is suggested as a more effective approach to eliminating ovarian tumors. Better understanding of the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs might facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies for recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23528891

  11. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Kazuyo [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Hirohashi, Yoshihiko, E-mail: hirohash@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Kuroda, Takafumi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tadashi [Department of Surgical Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Saito, Tsuyoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Sato, Noriyuki [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan); Torigoe, Toshihiko, E-mail: torigoe@sapmed.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South-1 West-17, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8556 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH{sup high}) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH{sup high} population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs.

  12. Elimination of head and neck cancer initiating cells through targeting glucose regulated protein78 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly lethal cancer that contains cellular and functional heterogeneity. Previously, we enriched a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs from HNSCC. However, the molecular mechanisms by which to govern the characteristics of HN-CICs remain unclear. GRP78, a stress-inducible endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, has been reported to play a crucial role in the maintenance of embryonic stem cells, but the role of GRP78 in CICs has not been elucidated. Results Initially, we recognized GRP78 as a putative candidate on mediating the stemness and tumorigenic properties of HN-CICs by differential systemic analyses. Subsequently, cells with GRP78 anchored at the plasma membrane (memGRP78+ exerted cancer stemness properties of self-renewal, differentiation and radioresistance. Of note, xenotransplantation assay indicated merely 100 memGRP78+ HNSCCs resulted in tumor growth. Moreover, knockdown of GRP78 significantly reduced the self-renewal ability, side population cells and expression of stemness genes, but inversely promoted cell differentiation and apoptosis in HN-CICs. Targeting GRP78 also lessened tumorigenicity of HN-CICs both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, co-expression of GRP78 and Nanog predicted the worse survival prognosis of HNSCC patients by immunohistochemical analyses. Finally, depletion of GRP78 in HN-CICs induced the expression of Bax, Caspase 3, and PTEN. Conclusions In summary, memGRP78 should be a novel surface marker for isolation of HN-CICs, and targeting GRP78 signaling might be a potential therapeutic strategy for HNSCC through eliminating HN-CICs.

  13. Selective AKT Inhibition by MK-2206 Represses Colorectal Cancer-Initiating Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkomes, Patrizia; Lunger, Ilaria; Luetticke, Alexander; Oppermann, Elsie; Haetscher, Nadine; Serve, Hubert; Holzer, Katharina; Bechstein, Wolf Otto; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Growing evidence indicates that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are responsible for tumor growth and progression. Conventional chemotherapeutics do not sufficiently eliminate TICs, leading to tumor relapse. We aimed to gain insight into TIC biology by comparing the transcriptome of primary TIC cultures and their normal stem cell counterparts to uncover expression differences. We established colonosphere cultures derived from the resection of paired specimens of primary tumor and normal mucosa in patients with CRC. These colonospheres, enriched for TICs, were used for differential transcriptome analyses to detect new targets for a TIC-directed therapy. Effects of target inhibition on CRC cells were studied in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis of the regulated genes showed enrichment of genes central to PI3K/AKT and Wnt-signaling. We identified CD133 as a marker for a more aggressive CRC subpopulation enriched with TICs in SW480 CRC cells in an in vivo cancer model. Treatment of CRC cells with the selective AKT inhibitor MK-2206 caused a decrease in cell proliferation, particularly in the TIC fraction, resulting in a significant reduction of the stemness capacity to form colonospheres in vitro and to initiate tumor formation in vivo. Consequently, MK-2206 treatment of mice with established xenograft tumors exhibited a significant deceleration of tumor progression. Primary patient-derived tumorsphere growth was significantly inhibited by MK-2206. This study reveals that AKT signaling is critical for TIC proliferation and can be efficiently targeted by MK-2206 representing a preclinical therapeutic strategy to repress colorectal TICs.

  14. Risk of prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality in men with a benign initial transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Røder, M Andreas; Helgstrand, J Thomas

    2017-01-01

    . METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Prostate Cancer Registry-a population-based registry including all men undergoing histopathological assessment of prostate tissue. All men who were referred for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for assessment of suspected prostate cancer between Jan 1, 1995...... of causes of death on April 28, 2015, was 20 years. 10 407 (30%) of 35 159 men with malignant initial biopsy sets died from prostate cancer, compared with 541 (2%) of 27 181 men with benign initial biopsy sets. Estimated overall 20-year mortality was 76·1% (95% CI 73·0-79·2). In all men referred......BACKGROUND: The risk of missing prostate cancer in the transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic biopsies of the prostate in men with suspected prostate cancer is a key problem in urological oncology. Repeat biopsy or MRI-guided biopsies have been suggested to increase sensitivity for diagnosis...

  15. Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do, this booklet includes tips about managing your pain with medicine and other treatments. PDF Kindle ePub This booklet covers: The types and causes of cancer pain How to talk about your pain with your ...

  16. 78 FR 6329 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Birth Defects Study to Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS), FOA DD13-003, initial review. In accordance with... received in response to ``Birth Defects Study to Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS), FOA DD13-003...

  17. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home : A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is

  18. Cancer Prevention and Control Research Manpower Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Gestational Diabetes , Sickle Cell Anemia in the laboratories of Jayduff Vadgama, P.D. and of Steven Taylor, M.D. at Charles Drew University of Medicine...Ethnic differences in food consumption in the U-S:Relevance to cancer prevalence . In: Diet, Nutrition and Cancer, proceedings of the Fourth Annual...life events such as sick- nessanddeah (agaw-Siger 198).ment was found-the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Wes Acculturation Scale (Suinn, Ahuman, & Khoo

  19. 78 FR 66937 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This notice concerns...). This SEP, scheduled to convene on November 6, 2013, is canceled. Notice will be provided if the meeting...

  20. 78 FR 23768 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Developing... Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned SEP: Time and Date: 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., June 18, 2013 (Closed...

  1. 78 FR 66938 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This notice concerns...). This SEP, scheduled to convene on November 12-15, 2013, is canceled. Notice will be provided if the...

  2. 78 FR 24751 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Continuing... aforementioned SEP: Time and Date: 12:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m., June 13, 2013 (Closed). Place: Teleconference. Status...

  3. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  4. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  5. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoxu Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. Methods: A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences). Controls were equally matched and selected fro...

  6. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  7. Initial results of the oesophageal and gastric cancer registry from the Comunidad Valenciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrig, Javier; Mingol, Fernando; Martí, Roberto; Puche, José; Trullenque, Ramón; Barreras, José Antonio; Asencio, Francisco; Aguiló, Javier; Navarro, José Manuel; Alberich, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Lacueva, Francisco Javier

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the initial results of the oesophagogastric cancer registry developed for the Sociedad Valenciana de Cirugía and the Health Department of the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain). Fourteen of the 24 public hospitals belonging to the Comunidad Valenciana participated. All patients with diagnosis of oesophageal or gastric carcinomas operated from January 2013 to December 2014 were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and pathological data were analysed. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (120 oesophageal carcinomas and 314 gastric carcinomas) were included. Only two hospitals operated more than 10 patients with oesophageal cancer per year. Transthoracic oesophaguectomy was the most frequent approach (84.2%) in tumours localized within the oesophagus. A total gastrectomy was performed in 50.9% patients with gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) carcinomas. Postoperative 30-day and 90-day mortality were 8% and 11.6% in oesophageal carcinoma and 5.9 and 8.6% in gastric carcinoma. Before surgery, middle oesophagus carcinomas were treated mostly (76,5%) with chemoradiotherapy. On the contrary, lower oesophagus and GOJ carcinomas were treated preferably with chemotherapy alone (45.5 and 53.4%). Any neoadjuvant treatment was administered to 73.6% of gastric cancer patients. Half patients with oesophageal carcinoma or gastric carcinoma received no adjuvant treatment. This registry revealed that half patients with oesophageal cancer were operated in hospitals with less than 10 cases per year at the Comunidad Valenciana. Also, it detected capacity improvement for some clinical outcomes of oesophageal and gastric carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex disparities in diagnosis of bladder cancer after initial presentation with hematuria: a nationwide claims-based investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Joshua A.; Vekhter, Benjamin; Lyttle, Christopher; Steinberg, Gary D.; Large, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women have disproportionately higher mortality rates relative to incidence for bladder cancer. Multiple etiologies have been proposed, including delayed diagnosis and treatment. Guidelines recommend rule-out of malignancy in men and women presenting with hematuria. We aimed to determine the difference in timing from presentation with hematuria to diagnosis of bladder cancer in women versus men. Methods This is a retrospective population-based study examining the timing from presentation with hematuria to diagnosis of bladder cancer, based on data from the MarketScan databases, which include enrollees of more than 100 health insurances plans of approximately 40 large US employers from 2004 through 2010. All study patients presented with hematuria and were subsequently diagnosed with bladder cancer. The primary outcome measure was number of days between initial presentation with hematuria and diagnosis of bladder cancer by gender. Results 5416 men and 2233 women met inclusion criteria. Mean days from initial hematuria claim to bladder cancer claim was significantly longer in women (85.4 vs. 73.6 days, p6 month delays in bladder cancer diagnosis significantly higher (17.3% vs. 14.1%, phematuria and diagnosis of bladder cancer, with longer delays for women. This may be partly responsible for the gender-based discrepancy in outcomes associated with bladder cancer. PMID:24496869

  9. Radiology as the Point of Cancer Patient and Care Team Engagement: Applying the 4R Model at a Patient's Breast Cancer Care Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Christine B; Friedewald, Sarah M; Kulkarni, Swati A; Simon, Melissa A; Carlos, Ruth C; Strauss, Jonathan B; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Trosman, Julia R

    2016-12-01

    Radiologists aspire to improve patient experience and engagement, as part of the Triple Aim of health reform. Patient engagement requires active partnerships among health providers and patients, and rigorous teamwork provides a mechanism for this. Patient and care team engagement are crucial at the time of cancer diagnosis and care initiation but are complicated by the necessity to orchestrate many interdependent consultations and care events in a short time. Radiology often serves as the patient entry point into the cancer care system, especially for breast cancer. It is uniquely positioned to play the value-adding role of facilitating patient and team engagement during cancer care initiation. The 4R approach (Right Information and Right Care to the Right Patient at the Right Time), previously proposed for optimizing teamwork and care delivery during cancer treatment, could be applied at the time of diagnosis. The 4R approach considers care for every patient with cancer as a project, using project management to plan and manage care interdependencies, assign clear responsibilities, and designate a quarterback function. The authors propose that radiology assume the quarterback function during breast cancer care initiation, developing the care initiation sequence, as a project care plan for newly diagnosed patients, and engaging patients and their care teams in timely, coordinated activities. After initial consultations and treatment plan development, the quarterback function is transitioned to surgery or medical oncology. This model provides radiologists with opportunities to offer value-added services and solidifies radiology's relevance in the evolving health care environment. To implement 4R at cancer care initiation, it will be necessary to change the radiology practice model to incorporate patient interaction and teamwork, develop 4R content and local adaption approaches, and enrich radiology training with relevant clinical knowledge, patient interaction

  10. Contextualizing diversity and culture within cancer control interventions for Latinas: changing interventions, not cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Deborah O; Treviño, Michelle; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G; Rodriguez, Elisa M; Gage, Elizabeth; Jandorf, Lina

    2010-08-01

    While there is a growing interest in the development of cancer control intervention initiatives, there continues to be a need to understand how the nuances of different Latino cultures translate to opportunities and barriers for access to cancer screening and care. The diversity by country of origin for Latinas in the United States is often overlooked in cancer control initiatives, and the application of qualitative research can expose processes of inequity and cultural variation to improve these initiatives. This paper presents an interpretation of diverse Latina immigrants' perceptions, experiences and knowledge about breast and cervical cancer screening and demonstrates the use of the PEN-3 model to analyze these data to develop an effective outreach intervention. We conducted 13 focus groups consisting of a total of 112 Latinas in New York City (nine groups) and rural and urban sites in Arkansas (four groups) in 2003 through 2004. Through nonprobability theoretical sampling, we included women from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Mexico in New York and recent Mexican immigrants in Arkansas. Findings demonstrated that country of origin and current geographic residency in the U.S. were significant determinants of women's perspectives on community-based religious organizations, knowledge of anatomy, experiences with the medical system, and access to services which are essential factors to consider in developing effective cancer control interventions. Although breast and cervical cancer are considered women's health issues, they cannot be addressed outside the sociopolitical structures of local communities, especially for the most recent immigrant women. Applying the PEN-3 framework to these data demonstrated a valuable method to interpret and transform qualitative data into intervention content and structure that responds to characteristics and perspectives within diverse Latino communities, such as gender relations, religious affiliations and experiences

  11. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  12. Hexokinase 2 is required for tumor initiation and maintenance and its systemic deletion is therapeutic in mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Krushna C; Wang, Qi; Bhaskar, Prashanth T; Miller, Luke; Wang, Zebin; Wheaton, Will; Chandel, Navdeep; Laakso, Markku; Muller, William J; Allen, Eric L; Jha, Abhishek K; Smolen, Gromoslaw A; Clasquin, Michelle F; Robey, Brooks; Hay, Nissim

    2013-08-12

    Accelerated glucose metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells. Hexokinases catalyze the first committed step of glucose metabolism. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) is expressed at high level in cancer cells, but only in a limited number of normal adult tissues. Using Hk2 conditional knockout mice, we showed that HK2 is required for tumor initiation and maintenance in mouse models of KRas-driven lung cancer, and ErbB2-driven breast cancer, despite continued HK1 expression. Similarly, HK2 ablation inhibits the neoplastic phenotype of human lung and breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Systemic Hk2 deletion is therapeutic in mice bearing lung tumors without adverse physiological consequences. Hk2 deletion in lung cancer cells suppressed glucose-derived ribonucleotides and impaired glutamine-derived carbon utilization in anaplerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Disparities in Cancer Clinical Trials: An Analysis of Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Moniek Felder, Tisha; Pena, Gabriela D.; Chapital, Bridget F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Disparities in enrollment of adults in cancer clinical trials are well documented, but little is known about the attention given to this topic in comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans. We assessed the extent to which CCC plans address disparities in clinical trials and whether jurisdictions whose plans address disparities also mandate third-party reimbursement for clinical trial participation. Methods We analyzed 57 CCC plans identified from Cancer PLANET (Plan, Link, Act, Net...

  14. Anti-viral treatment and cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wei-Liang; Fang, Chi-Tai; Chen, Pei-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human papillomavirus (HPV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) contribute to about 10-15 % global burden of human cancers. Conventional chemotherapy or molecular target therapies have been used to treat virus-associated cancers. However, a more proactive approach would be the use of antiviral treatment to suppress or eliminate viral infections to prevent the occurrence of cancer in the first place. Antiviral treatments against chronic HBV and HCV infections have achieved this goal, with significant reduction in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in treated patients. Antiviral treatments for EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) had limited success in treating refractory EBV-associated lymphoma and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, KSHV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma in AIDS patients, and HTLV-1-associated acute, chronic, and smoldering subtypes of adult T-cell lymphoma, respectively. Therapeutic HPV vaccine and RNA-interference-based therapies for treating HPV-associated cervical cancers also showed some encouraging results. Taken together, antiviral therapies have yielded promising results in cancer prevention and treatment. More large-scale studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of antiviral therapy. Further investigation for more effective and convenient antiviral regimens warrants more attention.

  15. Tumor-Initiating and -Propagating Cells: Cells That We Would to Identify and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Bølge Tysnes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the cell types capable of initiating and sustaining growth of the neoplastic clone in vivo is a fundamental problem in cancer research. It is likely that tumor growth can be sustained both by rare cancer stem-like cells and selected aggressive clones and that the nature of the mutations, the cell of origin, and its environment will contribute to tumor propagation. Genomic instability, suggested as a driving force in tumorigenesis, may be induced by genetic and epigenetic changes. The feature of self-renewal in stem cells is shared with tumor cells, and deviant function of the stem cell regulatory networks may, in complex ways, contribute to malignant transformation and the establishment of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Understanding the nature of the more quiescent cancer stem-like cells and their niches has the potential to develop novel cancer therapeutic protocols including pharmacological targeting of self-renewal pathways. Drugs that target cancer-related inflammation may have the potential to reeducate a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Because most epigenetic modifications may be reversible, DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors can be used to induce reexpression of genes that have been silenced epigenetically. Design of therapies that eliminate cancer stem-like cells without eliminating normal stem cells will be important. Further insight into the mechanisms by which pluripotency transcription factors (e.g., OCT4, SOX2, and Nanog, polycomb repressive complexes and microRNA balance selfrenewal and differentiation will be essential for our understanding of both embryonic differentiation and human carcinogenesis and for the development of new treatment strategies.

  16. NFATc4 Regulates Sox9 Gene Expression in Acinar Cell Plasticity and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hessmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar transdifferentiation toward a duct-like phenotype constitutes the defining response of acinar cells to external stress signals and is considered to be the initial step in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite the requirement for oncogenic Kras in pancreatic cancer (PDAC development, oncogenic Kras is not sufficient to drive pancreatic carcinogenesis beyond the level of premalignancy. Instead, secondary events, such as inflammation-induced signaling activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGFR or induction of Sox9 expression, are required for tumor formation. Herein, we aimed to dissect the mechanism that links EGFR signaling to Sox9 gene expression during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in pancreatic tissue adaptation and PDAC initiation. We show that the inflammatory transcription factor NFATc4 is highly induced and localizes in the nucleus in response to inflammation-induced EGFR signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that NFATc4 drives acinar-to-ductal conversion and PDAC initiation through direct transcriptional induction of Sox9. Therefore, strategies designed to disrupt NFATc4 induction might be beneficial in the prevention or therapy of PDAC.

  17. Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Ebrahimi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction in breast cancer patients is considered as a common and distressing problem. Considering the increasing number of breast cancer survivors living for longer periods of time with the disease and the importance of their quality of life, we conducted the present study to compare the sexual functioning in breast cancer patients with their healthy counterparts.Methods: In this case-control study, breast cancer patients who completed their treatment protocol and were followed up for at least six months were included. The controls were healthy women with normal clinical breast examinations. All subjects filled-in the Persian version of Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire.Results: A total of 165 subjects including 71 breast cancer patients and 94 healthy women were studied. The frequency of sexual dysfunction in cases and controls was 52.6% and 47.4%, respectively (P = 0.09. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding domain scores, except for vaginal lubrication (P = 0.045. Logistic regression analysis indicated that significant determinants of sexual dysfunction in breast cancer group was patients' age (OR = 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3 – 11.5, P = 0.01 and age of the spouse (OR= 9.8, 95% CI: 1.8-51.9, P= 0.007, while in controls, only emotional relationship with the husband was the significant predictive factor (OR = 6.3, 95%CI: 1.9 – 20.5, P = 0.002.Conclusions: Our findings indicated that sexual dysfunction is prevalent in Iranian women regardless of their physical health status. The frequency of vaginal dryness in breast cancer patients was significantly higher than controls. Age of the patient and the spouse (>40 were the only significant predictors of sexual dysfunction among women with breast cancer. Preventive strategies, sexual education and access to effective treatment should be planned in supportive care of breast cancer patients.

  18. The Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Sandi L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Tinker, Lesley F; Shikany, James M; Snetselaar, Linda; Martinez, Jessica A; Kato, Ikuko; Beresford, Shirley A A; Chapkin, Robert S; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-11-30

    Combined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women's Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993-2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction (p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans.

  19. The Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Tinker, Lesley F.; Shikany, James M.; Snetselaar, Linda; Martinez, Jessica A.; Kato, Ikuko; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2016-01-01

    Combined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically) and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), specifically) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in the Women’s Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017). During a mean 11.7 years (1993–2010), 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08). An interaction (p = 0.01) was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans. PMID:27916893

  20. The Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Fat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi L. Navarro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Combined intakes of specific dietary fiber and fat subtypes protect against colon cancer in animal models. We evaluated associations between self-reported individual and combinations of fiber (insoluble, soluble, and pectins, specifically and fat (omega-6, omega-3, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, specifically and colorectal cancer (CRC risk in the Women’s Health Initiative prospective cohort (n = 134,017. During a mean 11.7 years (1993–2010, 1952 incident CRC cases were identified. Cox regression models computed multivariate adjusted hazard ratios to estimate the association between dietary factors and CRC risk. Assessing fiber and fat individually, there was a modest trend for lower CRC risk with increasing intakes of total and insoluble fiber (p-trend 0.09 and 0.08. An interaction (p = 0.01 was observed between soluble fiber and DHA + EPA, with protective effects of DHA + EPA with lower intakes of soluble fiber and an attenuation at higher intakes, however this association was no longer significant after correction for multiple testing. These results suggest a modest protective effect of higher fiber intake on CRC risk, but not in combination with dietary fat subtypes. Given the robust results in preclinical models and mixed results in observational studies, controlled dietary interventions with standardized intakes are needed to better understand the interaction of specific fat and fiber subtypes on colon biology and ultimately CRC susceptibility in humans.

  1. Radon control activities for lung cancer prevention in national comprehensive cancer control program plans, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Antonio; Stewart, Sherri L; Angell, William

    2013-08-08

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalitions recognize radon as an important carcinogen. We reviewed 65 cancer plans created from 2005 through 2011 for the terms "radon," "radiation," or "lung." Plan activities were categorized as radon awareness, home testing, remediation, supporting radon policy activities, or policy evaluation. We also reviewed each CCC program's most recent progress report. Cancer plan content was reviewed to assess alignment with existing radon-specific policies in each state. Twenty-seven of the plans reviewed (42%) had radon-specific terminology. Improving awareness of radon was included in all 27 plans; also included were home testing (n=21), remediation (n=11), support radon policy activities (n=13), and policy evaluation (n=1). Three plans noted current engagement in radon activities. Thirty states had radon-specific laws; most (n=21) were related to radon professional licensure. Eleven states had cancer plan activities that aligned with existing state radon laws. Although several states have radon-specific policies, approximately half of cancer coalitions may not be aware of radon as a public health issue. CCC-developed cancer coalitions and plans should prioritize tobacco control to address lung cancer but should consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs.

  2. Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Angell, William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalitions recognize radon as an important carcinogen. Methods We reviewed 65 cancer plans created from 2005 through 2011 for the terms “radon,” “radiation,” or “lung.” Plan activities were categorized as radon awareness, home testing, remediation, supporting radon policy activities, or policy evaluation. We also reviewed each CCC program’s most recent progress report. Cancer plan content was reviewed to assess alignment with existing radon-specific policies in each state. Results Twenty-seven of the plans reviewed (42%) had radon-specific terminology. Improving awareness of radon was included in all 27 plans; also included were home testing (n = 21), remediation (n = 11), support radon policy activities (n = 13), and policy evaluation (n = 1). Three plans noted current engagement in radon activities. Thirty states had radon-specific laws; most (n = 21) were related to radon professional licensure. Eleven states had cancer plan activities that aligned with existing state radon laws. Conclusion Although several states have radon-specific policies, approximately half of cancer coalitions may not be aware of radon as a public health issue. CCC-developed cancer coalitions and plans should prioritize tobacco control to address lung cancer but should consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs. PMID:23928457

  3. ABCG2 is a potential marker of tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicchieri, Renata Danielle; da Silveira, Willian Abraham; Mandarano, Larissa Raquel Mouro; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    The existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) within solid tumors has been hypothesized to explain tumor heterogeneity and resistance to cancer therapy. In breast cancer, the expression of CD44 and CD24 and the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) can be used to selectively isolate a cell population enriched in TICs. However, the ideal marker to identify TICs has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of novel potential markers for TIC in breast carcinoma. We prospectively analyzed the expression of CD44, CD24, ABCG2, and CXCR4, and the activity of ALDH1 by using flow cytometry in 48 invasive ductal carcinomas from locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients who were administered primary chemotherapy. A mammosphere assay was employed in 30 samples. The relationship among flow cytometric analyses, ABCG2 gene expression, and clinical and pathological responses to therapy was analyzed. The GSE32646 database was analyzed in silico to identify genes associated with tumors with low and high ABCG2 expression. We observed that the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor was the only marker to predict the formation of mammospheres in vitro (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.029). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed a positive correlation between ABCG2 expression and the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor. The expression of ABCG2 was predictive of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our experiments and in the GSE32646 dataset (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). The in silico analysis demonstrated that ABCG2(Up) breast cancer samples have a slower cell cycle and a higher expression of membrane proteins but a greater potential for chromosomal instability, metastasis, immune evasion, and resistance to hypoxia. Such genetic characteristics are compatible with highly aggressive and resistant tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that the presence of ABCG2

  4. Control of cervical cancer: women's options and rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Joanna M; Ngan, Hextan; Garland, Suzanne; Wright, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Cervical cancer takes the lives of more than 250,000 women each year globally, particularly in under-resourced areas of low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Options for cancer control and treatment have reached a point that there are interventions for control that could be adopted for virtually every resource and demographic situation. Women die despite the availability of attractive control options, which means that educating policy makers, women's health professionals, as well as women themselves, must become a major focus for ongoing control of this disease. The human right to life, to prevention of suffering, and to education are all key rights linked to improving the control of cervical cancer and saving the lives of women, particularly in resource-poor parts of the world.

  5. Geospatial Approaches to Cancer Control and Population Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schootman, Mario; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Henry, Kevin A; Paskett, Electra D; Ellison, Gary L; Oh, April; Taplin, Stephen H; Tatalovich, Zaria; Berrigan, David A

    2017-04-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality display strong geographic patterns worldwide and in the United States (1, 2). The environment where individuals live, work, and play is increasingly being recognized as important across the cancer control continuum, including the risk of cancer development, detection, diagnosis, treatment, mortality, and survivorship (3-5). At the same time, emergent technological capacity in geographic information systems (GIS) and mapping, along with increasing sophistication in applied spatial methods, has resulted in a growing research community developing and applying geospatial approaches in health research (5). Through collaborative, transdisciplinary efforts, and continued data collection efforts, there is great potential to apply these emerging geospatial approaches to various aspects of cancer prevention and control to inform etiology and target interventions and implementation of efficacious risk-reducing strategies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 472-5. ©2017 AACRSee all the articles in this CEBP Focus section, "Geospatial Approaches to Cancer Control and Population Sciences." ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Liver resection after chemotherapy and tumour downsizing in patients with initially unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, Nicolas; Kanji, Zaheer S; Dhani, Neesha; Grant, Robert C; Shoushtari, Hassan; Serrano, Pablo E; Nanji, Sulaiman; Greig, Paul D; McGilvray, Ian; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Wei, Alice; Gallinger, Steven; Cleary, Sean P

    2014-05-01

    Among patients with initially unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM), a subset are rendered resectable following the administration of systemic chemotherapy. This study reports the results achieved in liver resections performed at a single hepatobiliary referral centre after downsizing chemotherapy in patients with initially unresectable CLM. All liver resections for CLM performed over a 10-year period at the Toronto General Hospital were considered. Data on initially non-resectable patients who received systemic therapy and later underwent surgery were included for analysis. Between January 2002 and July 2012, 754 liver resections for CLM were performed. A total of 24 patients were found to meet the study inclusion criteria. Bilobar CLM were present in 23 of these 24 patients. The median number of tumours was seven (range: 2-15) and median tumour size was 7.0 cm (range: 1.0-12.8 cm) before systemic therapy. All patients received oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Fourteen patients received combined treatment with bevacizumab. Negative margin (R0) resection was accomplished in 21 of 24 patients. There was no perioperative mortality. Ten patients suffered perioperative morbidity. Eighteen patients suffered recurrence of disease within 9 months. Rates of disease-free survival at 1, 2 and 3 years were 47.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 30.4-74.6%], 23.8% (95% CI 11.1-51.2%) and 19.0% (95% CI 7.9-46.0%), respectively. Overall survival at 1, 2 and 3 years was 91.5% (95% CI 80.8-100%), 65.3% (95% CI 48.5-88.0%) and 55.2% (95% CI 37.7-80.7%), respectively. Liver resection in initially unresectable CLM can be performed with low rates of morbidity and mortality in patients who respond to systemic chemotherapy, although these patients do experience a high frequency of disease recurrence. © 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  7. 78 FR 61743 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations: Initial Implementation of Export Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... reforming the export control system. The final rule implements the initial ECR changes by adding a structure... aircraft, gas turbine engines, and related items. The final rule was published in conjunction with a... Controlled section, ``Military gas turbine engines and related articles that are enumerated in USML Category...

  8. 77 FR 61756 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational...

  9. 77 FR 19018 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 61 (Thursday, March 29, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 19018] [FR Doc No: 2012-7545] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The...

  10. 78 FR 1212 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Natural History...

  11. 77 FR 30015 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Characterizing...

  12. 78 FR 37542 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns NIOSH...

  13. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: A notice was published in the...

  14. 78 FR 17410 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial review The meeting announced below concerns Epi-Centers for...

  15. 76 FR 28790 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member Conflict...

  16. 78 FR 75923 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Clinical...

  17. 78 FR 732 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Identification...

  18. 76 FR 52330 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member Conflict...

  19. 77 FR 4048 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Evaluation of...

  20. 77 FR 5257 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Detecting...

  1. 77 FR 14806 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Epidemiology...

  2. 76 FR 18766 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Epidemiologic...

  3. 77 FR 36544 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Coordinating...

  4. 77 FR 7164 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member Conflict...

  5. 77 FR 28393 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research to...

  6. 78 FR 25743 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member Conflict...

  7. 77 FR 25180 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Conducting...

  8. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Medicaid...

  9. 78 FR 35035 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial review The meeting announced below concerns Centers for...

  10. 76 FR 24031 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Strategies to...

  11. 77 FR 12844 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Detecting...

  12. 78 FR 19490 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Monitoring...

  13. 78 FR 60879 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns National Center...

  14. 77 FR 48986 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Member Conflict...

  15. 77 FR 27460 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Conducting...

  16. 76 FR 39879 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Human...

  17. 76 FR 28438 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns ``Affordable...

  18. 78 FR 19269 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review Notice of Cancellation: This document corrects a...

  19. 77 FR 44618 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns the World Trade...

  20. 77 FR 22326 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Extension of the...

  1. 78 FR 62636 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Cooperative...

  2. 78 FR 60878 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Health Promotion...

  3. 76 FR 45575 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Human...

  4. 76 FR 71568 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns National HIV...

  5. 77 FR 25181 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research...

  6. 78 FR 17412 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Strengthening...

  7. 78 FR 78964 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns The Cooperative...

  8. 77 FR 28392 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Alcohol-related...

  9. 77 FR 25485 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research Grants...

  10. 78 FR 78966 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Epidemiology...

  11. 77 FR 21778 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Development and...

  12. 77 FR 39497 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Special Interest...

  13. 78 FR 17411 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Monitoring and...

  14. 76 FR 56461 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Emerging...

  15. 78 FR 19489 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Evaluating the...

  16. 77 FR 39498 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Special Interest...

  17. 77 FR 20822 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Detecting...

  18. 76 FR 33305 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Program to...

  19. 77 FR 4047 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Epidemiology...

  20. 76 FR 33304 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Strategies to...

  1. 76 FR 18555 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Virologic...

  2. 78 FR 15015 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Epidemiology...

  3. 76 FR 49771 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Special Interest...

  4. 78 FR 56236 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns NIOSH Member...

  5. 78 FR 36785 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Centers for...

  6. 78 FR 60877 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational...

  7. 77 FR 31018 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 101 (Thursday, May 24, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 31018-31019] [FR Doc No: 2012-12675] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial...

  8. 76 FR 29756 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Centers for...

  9. 76 FR 78263 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational...

  10. 78 FR 13677 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Monitoring...

  11. 78 FR 60875 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Occupational...

  12. 76 FR 67458 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Emerging..., Georgia 30337, Telephone: (770) 997-1100. Contact Person For More Information: Amy Yang, Ph.D., Scientific...

  13. 77 FR 291 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns National HIV...., February 29, 2012 (Closed). Contact Person For More Information: Amy Yang, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer...

  14. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Cooperative...: Nina Turner, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1095 Willowdale Road, Mailstop G800, Morgantown...

  15. Dynamic sentinel node biopsy for penile cancer: an initial experience in an Irish Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, P E; Nic An Riogh, A; O'Kelly, F; Lundon, D J; O'Sullivan, D; O'Connell, M; Hegarty, P K

    2017-11-01

    The presence of nodal metastases is the single most important prognostic factor in penile cancer. However, reliable assessment of nodal status in clinically node-negative (cN0) patients poses a challenge. Approximately 20% of these patients harbour occult nodal metastases. Currently available non-invasive radiological investigations are unreliable in excluding micrometastatic disease. Dynamic sentinel node biopsy (DSNB) is a minimally invasive procedure for assessing lymph node involvement. We report our initial experience with DSNB in assessing the status of regional lymph nodes in cN0 penile cancer patients. DSNB was performed in penile cancer patients with at least one cN0 groin. All patients undergoing DSNB at our institution were included. Lymphoscintigraphic images were obtained from all patients, after intradermal, peritumoral injection of a Technetium-99m nanocolloid. The sentinel nodes were defined as the nodes identified on lymphoscintigraphy, which were also radioactive intraoperatively using a gamma probe. In total, 18 groins from 11 patients underwent DSNB. Of these, 11 patients underwent bilateral DSNB and 4 had unilateral DSNB. The mean (range) age of patients at the time of presentation of their primary tumour was 63 (39-78) years. A mean of 1.2 nodes per groin was retrieved. One lymph node was positive in one patient, who subsequently underwent a bilateral inguinal lymph node dissection. Overall, the median (range) follow-up was 12.8 (2.7-31.3) months with no local or regional recurrences. Further cases and longer follow-up will define the accuracy of this technique in the Irish population.

  16. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using {sup 23}Na-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, T.; Apfaltrer, P.; Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Schmid-Bindert, G.; Manegold, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Interdisciplinary Thoracic Oncology; Wenz, F. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    {sup 23}Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI with {sup 1}H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. {sup 23}Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All {sup 23}Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI images with {sup 1}H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 {+-} 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 {+-} 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. {sup 23}Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  17. Undesirable financial effects of head and neck cancer radiotherapy during the initial treatment period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Egestad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare cost and reforms are at the forefront of international debates. One of the current discussion themes in oncology is whether and how patients’ life changes due to costs of cancer care. In Norway, the main part of the treatment costs is supported by general taxpayer revenues. Objectives: The objective of this study was to clarify whether head and neck cancer patients (n=67 in northern Norway experienced financial health-related quality of life (HRQOL deterioration due to costs associated with treatment. Design: HRQOL was examined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30 in the beginning and in the end of radiation treatment in patients treated at the University Hospital in Northern Norway. Changes in financial HRQOL were calculated and compared by paired sample T-tests. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine correlations among gender, marital status, age and treatment with or without additional chemotherapy and changes in the HRQOL domain of financial difficulties. Results: The majority of score results at both time points were in the lower range (mean 15–25, indicating limited financial difficulties. We observed no statistically significant differences by gender, marital status and age. Increasing financial difficulties during treatment were reported by male patients and those younger than 65, that is, patients who were younger than retirement age. The largest effect was seen in singles. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: During the initial phase of the disease trajectory, no significant increase in financial difficulties was found. This is in line with the aims of the Norwegian public healthcare model. However, long-term longitudinal studies should be performed, especially with regard to the trends we observed in single, male and younger patients.

  18. Diet Quality and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ashley J; Neuhouser, Marian L; George, Stephanie M; Thomson, Cynthia A; Ho, Gloria Y F; Rohan, Thomas E; Kato, Ikuko; Nassir, Rami; Hou, Lifang; Manson, JoAnn E

    2016-07-01

    Diet quality index scores on Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), Alternative HEI-2010, alternative Mediterranean Diet Index, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) index have been inversely associated with all-cause and cancer-specific death. This study assessed the association between these scores and colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence as well as CRC-specific mortality in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (1993-2012), a US study of postmenopausal women. During an average of 12.4 years of follow-up, there were 938 cases of CRC and 238 CRC-specific deaths. We estimated multivariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for relationships between quintiles of diet scores (from baseline food frequency questionnaires) and outcomes. HEI-2010 score (hazard ratios were 0.81, 0.77, and 0.73 with P values of 0.04, 0.01, and DASH score (hazard ratios were 0.72, 0.74, and 0.78 with P values of diet scores, were associated with a lower risk of CRC in adjusted models. No diet scores were significantly associated with CRC-specific mortality. Closer adherence to HEI-2010 and DASH dietary recommendations was inversely associated with risk of CRC in this large cohort of postmenopausal women. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  1. Relation between hypermetabolism, cachexia, and survival in cancer patients: a prospective study in 390 cancer patients before initiation of anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazeille, Clara; Jouinot, Anne; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Neveux, Nathalie; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Huillard, Olivier; Alexandre, Jérôme; Cynober, Luc; Goldwasser, François

    2017-05-01

    Background: Cachexia is a major cause of death in cancer patients. The role of hypermetabolism in cancer cachexia remains unclear.Objective: We studied the relation between resting energy expenditure (REE), the estimated energy balance, clinical and biological markers of cachexia, and survival.Design: REE was measured with the use of indirect calorimetry in cancer patients before the initiation of anticancer therapies. Hypermetabolic, normometabolic, and hypometabolic patients were identified with the use of Boothby's standard. Weight loss, performance status (PS), C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, the nutritional risk index, daily energy intake, energy balance (equal to daily energy intakes minus the REE), and survival were recorded.Results: Of 390 enrolled patients, 49% of subjects were hypermetabolic, 30% of subjects were normometabolic, and 21% of subjects were hypometabolic. Mean daily energy intakes did not differ significantly between the 3 groups. Hypermetabolic patients, compared with normometabolic patients, were more likely to have a negative energy balance [45% compared with 32%, respectively; OR: 1.74 (95% CI: 1.05, 2.91); P = 0.024], weight loss >5% [48% compared with 34%, respectively; OR: 1.83 (95% CI: 1.11, 3.04); P = 0.013], PS ≥2 [40% compared with 29%, respectively; OR: 1.70 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.88); P = 0.038], and CRP concentrations ≥10 mg/L [52% compared with 33%, respectively; OR: 2.2 (95% CI: 1.33, 3.66); P = 0.001]. In metastatic patients, compared with normometabolism, hypermetabolism was associated with a reduced median survival [14.6 compared with 21.4 mo, respectively; OR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.17); P = 0.044].Conclusions: Hypermetabolism is correlated with clinical and biological markers of cancer cachexia and is associated with a shorter survival in metastatic cancer patients. The development of therapeutic strategies that aim to blunt hypermetabolism appears warranted. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as

  2. Case-control study of fetal microchimerism and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakrishna K Gadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior pregnancy is known to protect against development of breast cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that pregnancy has the capacity to establish small numbers of immunologically active fetal-derived cells in the mother, a phenomenon known as fetal microchimerism (FMc. We asked whether presence of FMc, routinely acquired during pregnancy, is a protective factor for breast cancer.DNA extracts from peripheral blood specimens were obtained from a population-based case-control study of risk factors for breast cancer in women 21 to 45 years old. Specimens were tested with quantitative PCR for presence and concentrations of male DNA presumed to derive from prior pregnancies with a male fetus. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated with consideration of multiple established reproductive and environmental risk factors for breast cancer. FMc results were generated on 99 parous women, 54 with primary invasive breast cancer and 45 general population controls. FMc prevalence was 56% (25/45 and 26% (14/54 in controls and cases, respectively. Women harboring FMc were less likely to have had breast cancer (OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.83; p = 0.02, adjusting for age, number of children, birth of a son, history of miscarriage, and total DNA tested. In addition, FMc concentrations were higher in controls versus cases (p = 0.01. Median concentrations were 2 (0-78 and 0 (0-374 fetal genomes/10(6 maternal genomes in controls and cases, respectively.Results suggest that the enigma of why some parous women are not afforded protection from breast cancer by pregnancy might in part be explained by differences in FMc. Mechanistic studies of FMc-derived protection against breast cancer are warranted.

  3. Chaos and optimal control of cancer self-remission and tumor system steady states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gohary, Awad [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)], E-mail: aigohary@ksu.edu.sa

    2008-09-15

    This paper is devoted to study the problem of optimal control of cancer self-remission and tumor unstable steady-states. The stability analysis of the biologically feasible equilibrium states is presented using a local stability approach. The system appears exhibit a chaotic behavior for some ranges of the system parameters. The necessary optimal control inputs for the asymptotic stability of the positive equilibrium states and minimizes the require performance measure are obtained as nonlinear function of the system densities. Analysis and extensive numerical examples of the uncontrolled and controlled systems were carried out for various parameters values and different initial densities.

  4. Influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control of chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujeong; Baek, Seunghee; Shin, Bomi; Yoon, Sun-young; Park, So Young; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Yoon Su; Bae, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Hyouk Soo; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom; Kim, Tae-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is a common cutaneous disorder but the influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical features, and the influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control. 641 CIU patients were enrolled from the allergy clinic in a tertiary referral hospital. Disease duration, aggravating factors and treatment modality at each visit were evaluated. Times required to reach a controlled state were analyzed according to initial treatment modality, using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, the Cox proportional-hazards model, and propensity scores. Female to male ratio was 1.7: 1; mean age at onset was 40.5 years. The most common aggravating factors were food (33.5%), stress (31.5%) and fatigue (21.6%). Most patients (82.2%) used H1-antihistamines alone as initial treatment while 17% used a combination treatment with oral corticosteroids. There was no significant difference in the time taken to reach a controlled state between patients treated with single vs multiple H1-antihistamines or between those who received H1-antihistamine monotherapy vs. a combination therapy with oral corticosteroids. The time required to control CIU is not reduced by use of multiple H1-antihistamines or oral corticosteroids in the initial treatment.

  5. Influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control of chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeong Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU is a common cutaneous disorder but the influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical features, and the influence of initial treatment modality on long-term control. METHODS AND RESULTS: 641 CIU patients were enrolled from the allergy clinic in a tertiary referral hospital. Disease duration, aggravating factors and treatment modality at each visit were evaluated. Times required to reach a controlled state were analyzed according to initial treatment modality, using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, the Cox proportional-hazards model, and propensity scores. Female to male ratio was 1.7: 1; mean age at onset was 40.5 years. The most common aggravating factors were food (33.5%, stress (31.5% and fatigue (21.6%. Most patients (82.2% used H1-antihistamines alone as initial treatment while 17% used a combination treatment with oral corticosteroids. There was no significant difference in the time taken to reach a controlled state between patients treated with single vs multiple H1-antihistamines or between those who received H1-antihistamine monotherapy vs. a combination therapy with oral corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: The time required to control CIU is not reduced by use of multiple H1-antihistamines or oral corticosteroids in the initial treatment.

  6. Community capacity for cancer control collaboration: Weaving an islander network for cancer awareness, research and training for Pacific Islanders in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjasiri, Sora Park; Tran, Jacqueline H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Addressing cancer health disparities constitutes a national priority in this country, with funding for Pacific Islander efforts initiated seven years ago by the National Cancer Institute. In 2005, the Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (WINCART) was launched in Southern California by a collaboration of community and university organizations to build upon past efforts to decrease cancer health disparities for Chamorros, Native Hawaiians, Marshallese, Samoans and Tongans. Methods To assess community organizational capacity to participate in collaborative cancer control for Pacific Islanders, a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis was undertaken. Two staff members per community organization (CBO) performed the SWOT analyses, with grids analyzed for commonalities and differences between all organizations. Results Staff informants provided many examples of what they perceived as organizational strengths and weaknesses with regards to promoting cancer control for their respective Pacific Islander populations. CBO strengths included strong leadership and extensive community experience. Challenges included limited resources, lack of staff skills in some areas, and difficulty recruiting volunteers. In addition, many external opportunities and threats to cancer control promotion were identified. Conclusion Results from the SWOT analyses have been used to identify topics for community organizational trainings and supports within WINCART, with the goals of increasing their participation in the development and implementation of collaborative, community-university driven efforts to decrease cancer disparities for Pacific Islanders in Southern California. PMID:18359580

  7. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  8. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xu, H; Shen, J; Yang, Y; Wu, S; Xiao, J; Xu, Y; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αν integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24 sphere cells. OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP had enhanced infection ability and cytotoxic effect on T24 cells and T24 sphere cells, but little cytoxicity on normal urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells compared with the unmodified virus OncoAd.hTERT-EGFP. Notably, OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-TRAIL induced apoptosis in T24 cells and T24 sphere cells. Furthermore, it completely inhibited xenograft initiation established by the oncolytic adenovirus-pretreated T24 sphere cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth by intratumoral injection. These results provided a promising therapeutic strategy for CAR-negative bladder cancer through targeting CICs. PMID:25973680

  9. Dietary Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M.; Redden, David T.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Simon, Michael S.; Liu, Simin; Lane, Dorothy S.; Tinker, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women’s Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were confirmed by medical records review. Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to breast cancer within quintiles of GL, GI, and carbohydrate. There were 6,115 total breast cancers after a median follow-up of 8.0 yr. We observed no associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total incident breast cancer, with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the highest vs. lowest quintiles of 1.08, 0.92–1.29 (P for trend = 0.27); 1.01, 0.91–1.12 (P = 0.74); and 0.95, 0.80–1.14 (P = 0.98), respectively. There was a trend toward significance for the positive association between GL and in situ cancers (1.40, 0.94–2.13; P = 0.07). Although there was no evidence of associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total breast cancer risk in WHI participants, the suggestion of an association between GL and risk of in situ cancers requires further investigation. PMID:21714685

  10. Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to lung cancer incidence and mortality in older women: The Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ange; Qin, FeiFei; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Chlebowski, Rowan; Gomez, Scarlett; Eaton, Charles B; Johnson, Karen C; Qi, Lihong; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Womack, Catherine; Wakelee, Heather A; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2016-11-15

    Physical activity has been associated with lower lung cancer incidence and mortality in several populations. We investigated these relationships in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) and Clinical Trial (WHI-CT) prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. The WHI study enrolled 161,808 women aged 50-79 years between 1993 and 1998 at 40 U.S. clinical centers; 129,401 were eligible for these analyses. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of baseline physical activity levels [metabolic equivalent (MET)-min/week: none cancer incidence and mortality. Over 11.8 mean follow-up years, 2,148 incident lung cancer cases and 1,365 lung cancer deaths were identified. Compared with no activity, higher physical activity levels at study entry were associated with lower lung cancer incidence [p = 0.009; hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each physical activity category: low, HR: 0.86 (0.76-0.96); medium, HR: 0.82 (0.73-0.93); and high, HR: 0.90 (0.79-1.03)], and mortality [p cancer incidence (p = 0.01), with a stronger association in women with BMI cancer subtype, higher total physical activity levels were associated with lower lung cancer mortality for both overall NSCLC and adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, physical activity may be protective for lung cancer incidence and mortality in postmenopausal women, particularly in non-obese women. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Baldness and testicular cancer: the EPSAM case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirano, G; Zugna, D; Grasso, C; Lista, P; Ciuffreda, L; Segnan, N; Merletti, F; Richiardi, L

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of testicular cancer is largely unexplained. Research has mainly focused on prenatal exposures, especially to sex hormones, while less attention has been paid to exposures that may act also postnatally. As baldness has been previously associated with testicular cancer risk we focused on baldness and body hairiness, which are both associated with androgen activity. We used data of the Postnatal Exposures and Male Health (EPSAM) study, a case-control study on testicular cancer conducted in the Province of Turin, Italy, involving cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires. Analyses included 255 cases and 459 controls. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs to estimate testicular cancer risk among those who developed baldness and among those with body hairiness. We found an inverse association between testicular cancer and baldness (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and body hairiness (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.53-1.16), although the latter had wider CIs. The inverse association between baldness and testicular cancer is consistent with the results from previous studies. These results suggest that androgens activity may influence testicular cancer risk. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for the initial management of primary epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaback, Kenneth; Johnson, Nick; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer tends to be chemosensitive and confine itself to the surface of the peritoneal cavity for much of its natural history. These features have made it an obvious target for intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy. Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer is usually given as an intravenous (IV) infusion repeatedly over five to eight cycles. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is given by infusion of the chemotherapeutic agent directly into the peritoneal cavity. There are biological reasons why this might increase the anticancer effect and reduce some systemic adverse effects in comparison to IV therapy. Objectives To determine if adding a component of the chemotherapy regime into the peritoneal cavity affects overall survival, progression-free survival, quality of life (QOL) and toxicity in the primary treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. Search methods We searched the Gynaecological Cancer Review Group’s Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2011, MEDLINE (1951 to May 2011) and EMBASE (1974 to May 2011). We updated these searches in February 2007, August 2010 and May 2011. In addition, we handsearched and cascade searched the major gynaecological oncology journals. Selection criteria The analysis was restricted to randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing women with a new diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer, of any FIGO stage, following primary cytoreductive surgery. Standard IV chemotherapy was compared with chemotherapy that included a component of IP administration. Data collection and analysis We extracted data on overall survival, disease-free survival, adverse events and QOL and performed meta-analyses of hazard ratios (HR) for time-to-event variables and relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcomes using RevMan software. Main results Nine randomised trials studied 2119 women receiving primary treatment for ovarian cancer. We considered six trials to be of high quality. Women were less

  13. Supplier Outreach and Process Control (SOPC) and Supplier Rating Initiative (SRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Harrel

    2003-01-01

    The viewgraph presentation presents an overview of NASA's Supplier Outreach and Process Control (SOPC) and Supplier Risk Initiatives. The discussion of the SOPC examines its importance, current groups who are involved, provides a mission statement, and describes outreach activities and how suppliers are selected. The discussion of the Supplier Risk Initiative examines the variety of ways that integrity, availability, and assurance factor in to supplier risk and describes a new supplier rating program.

  14. Optimal control for systems governed by parabolic equations without initial conditions with controls in the coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Bokalo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider an optimal control problem for systems described by a Fourier problem for parabolic equations. We prove the existence of solutions, and obtain necessary conditions of the optimal control in the case of final observation when the control functions occur in the coefficients.

  15. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  16. Effects of estrogen plus progestin on gynecologic cancers and associated diagnostic procedures: the Women's Health Initiative randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Garnet L; Judd, Howard L; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Barad, David H; Beresford, Shirley A A; Pettinger, Mary; Liu, James; McNeeley, S Gene; Lopez, Ana Maria

    2003-10-01

    The effects of continuous combined hormone therapy on gynecologic cancers have not been investigated previously in a randomized trial setting. To determine the possible associations of estrogen plus progestin on gynecologic cancers and related diagnostic procedures. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 16 608 postmenopausal women, who had not had a hysterectomy at baseline and who had been recruited from 40 US clinical centers between September 1993 and October 1998 (average follow-up, 5.6 years). One tablet per day containing 0.625 mg of conjugated equine estrogens plus 2.5 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate (n = 8506) or placebo (n = 8102). Incident invasive cancer of the ovary and endometrium. In 5.6 years of follow-up, there were 32 cases of invasive ovarian cancer, 58 cases of endometrial cancer, 1 case of nonendometrial uterine cancer, 13 cases of cervical cancer, and 7 cases of other gynecologic cancers. The hazard ratio (HR) for invasive ovarian cancer in women assigned to estrogen plus progestin compared with placebo was 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77-3.24). The HR for endometrial cancer was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.48-1.36). No appreciable differences were found in the distributions of tumor histology, stage, or grade for either cancer site. The incidence of other gynecologic cancers was low and did not differ by randomization assignment. More women taking estrogen plus progestin required endometrial biopsies (33% vs 6%; P<.001). This randomized trial suggests that continuous combined estrogen plus progestin therapy may increase the risk of ovarian cancer while producing endometrial cancer rates similar to placebo. The increased burden of endometrial biopsies required to assess vaginal bleeding further limits the acceptability of this regimen. These data provide additional support for caution in the use of continuous combined hormones.

  17. Analysis of monotherapy prostate brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer. Initial PSA and Gleason are important for recurrence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Galego

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcome of a cohort of localized prostate cancer patients treate with 125-I permanent brachytherapy at the São José Hospital – CHLC, Lisbon. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on 429 patients with low and intermediate-risk of prostate adenocarcinoma, according to the recommendations of the EORTC, who underwent 125I brachytherapies in intraoperative dosimetry “real-time” system between September 2003 and September 2013. Results The mean follow-up was 71.98 months. Biochemical relapse of disease by rising PSA (Phoenix criterion was observed in 18 patients (4.2%. Through the application of Kaplan-Meier survival curves in this sample, the rate of survival at 6 years without biochemical relapse was higher than 95%. By Iog rank test comparing biochemical relapse with initial PSA (15-10 and <10 and Gleason values (7 and <7, there was no statistical difference (P=0.830 of the initial PSA in the probability of developing biochemical relapse. In relation to Gleason score, it was noted a statistical difference (P<0.05, demonstrating that patients with Gleason 7 are more likely to develop biochemical relapse. Conclusions Brachytherapy as monotherapy is at present an effective choice in the treatment of localized prostate adenocarcinoma. Biochemical relapses are minimal. The initial PSA showed no statistically difference in the rate of relapses, unlike the value Gleason, where it was demonstrated that patients with Gleason 7 have a higher probability of biochemical relapse. Cases with PSA bounce should be controlled before starting a salvage treatment.

  18. Nutrition and Physical Activity Strategies for Cancer Prevention in Current National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Mary; Neri, Antonio; Underwood, J Michael; Stewart, Sherri L

    2016-10-01

    Obesity, diet and physical inactivity are risk factors for some cancers. Grantees of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) in US states, tribes, and territories develop plans to coordinate funding and activities for cancer prevention and control. Including information and goals related to nutrition and physical activity (NPA) is a key opportunity for primary cancer prevention, but it is currently unclear to what extent NCCCP plans address these issues. We reviewed 69 NCCCP plans and searched for terms related to NPA. Plans were coded as (1) knowledge of NPA and cancer link; (2) goals to improve NPA behaviors; and (3) strategies to increase healthy NPA activities, environments, or systems changes. NPA content was consistently included in all cancer plans examined across all years. Only 4 (6 %) outlined only the relationship between NPA and cancer without goals or strategies. Fifty-nine plans (89 %) contained goals or strategies related to NPA, with 53 (82 %) including both. However, numbers of goals, strategies, and detail provided varied widely. All programs recognized the importance of NPA in cancer prevention. Most plans included NPA goals and strategies. Increasing the presence of NPA strategies that can be modified or adapted appropriately locally could help with more widespread implementation and measurement of NPA interventions.

  19. An Initial Look at the Associations of a Variety of Health-Related Online Activities With Cancer Fatalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Chae, Jiyoung

    2016-11-01

    It has been an important public health goal to remove cancer fatalism because of its negative influence on both cancer screening and preventive behaviors. The present study examines roles of the Internet, as an emerging, crucial source of cancer information, in the effect of education on cancer fatalism. Based on our secondary analysis of a nationally representative survey (i.e., Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 1), we found that people with low levels of education are less likely than their more educated counterparts to engage in online health information seeking that is negatively linked to fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. In addition, the effect of education on online health information seeking was detected only among people who trust online health information. The implications of these findings for cancer control and for research on the digital divide and communication inequalities are discussed.

  20. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  1. FOLFOXIRI Plus Bevacizumab as Conversion Therapy for Patients With Initially Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Petrelli, Fausto; Ghidini, Michele; Russo, Alessandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Barni, Sandro

    2017-07-13

    The combination of fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-Bev) is an established and effective first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resection rates of metastases and overall survival with this schedule have never been systematically evaluated in published studies including, but not limited to, the TRIBE (TRIplet plus BEvacizumab) trial. To assess the clinical efficacy of FOLFOXIRI-Bev, including outcomes and rates of surgical conversions. A systematic review was conducted in October 2016 in concordance with the PRISMA guidelines of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, Ovid, and EMBASE using the terms FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab and (colorectal cancer). Clinical trials, retrospective case series, and prospective case series that used FOLFOXIRI-Bev for the treatment of initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer in humans were included. Individual case reports and retrospective case series with fewer than 10 patients were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 reviewers on a predesigned, standardized form. Ultimately, data were aggregated to obtain the pooled effect size of efficacy, according to the random-effects model and weighted for the number of patients included in each trial. Median overall survival and progression-free survival, overall response rates, and rates of R0 surgical conversions and overall surgical conversions. Eleven FOLFOXIRI-Bev studies published between 2010 and 2016 met the inclusion criteria and were pooled for analysis. The studies included 889 patients, with 877 patients clinically evaluable for overall response rates. The objective response rate to FOLFOXIRI-Bev was 69% (95% CI, 65%-72%; I2 = 25%). The rate of overall surgical conversions was 39.1% (95% CI, 26.9%-52.8%), and the rate of R0 surgical conversions was 28.1% (95% CI, 18.1%-40.8%). Median pooled overall survival was 30

  2. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-07-29

    innovative element of this intervention is the timing of the occupational rehabilitation which is much earlier initiated than usual and the active involvement of the workplace. We anticipate that vulnerable cancer survivors will benefit from this approach and reduce the effects of social inequality on workability. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50753764 . Registered August 21(st), 2014.

  3. Impact of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network: Accelerating the Translation of Research Into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribisl, Kurt M; Fernandez, Maria E; Friedman, Daniela B; Hannon, Peggy A; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky M; Williams, Rebecca S; Weiner, Bryan J

    2017-03-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control practices in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating network center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration is often advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN's multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health impact of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. This paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A prospective analysis of diet quality and endometrial cancer among 84,415 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Ballard, Rachel; Shikany, James M; Crane, Tracy E; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2015-10-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer, but no convincing dietary risk factors for this cancer have been identified. Among postmenopausal women, we examined how four key a priori diet quality indices--the Healthy Eating Index-2010, Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010, alternate Mediterranean Diet, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension are related to the risk of endometrial cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Trials and Observational Study. Our prospective cohort study included 84,415 postmenopausal women with a uterus who completed a food frequency questionnaire at enrollment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer associated with increasing quintiles of diet quality index scores. During 13.3 years of follow-up, 1392 endometrial cancer cases occurred. After adjustment for known risk factors, having better diet quality (Q5 vs. Q1) was not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer, as evidenced using Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.93-1.33), Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.82-1.17), alternate Mediterranean Diet (HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.82-1.17), or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (HR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.84-1.19). Diet quality was not associated with endometrial cancer risk in this large cohort of postmenopausal women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Long-chain ω-3 fatty acid intake and endometrial cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasky, Theodore M; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Liu, Jingmin; Kurta, Michelle L; Wise, Lauren A; Orchard, Tonya S; Cohn, David E; Belury, Martha A; White, Emily; Manson, JoAnn E; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation may be important in endometrial cancer development. Long-chain ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCω-3PUFAs) may reduce inflammation and, therefore, reduce cancer risk. Because body mass is associated with both inflammation and endometrial cancer risk, it may modify the association of fat intake on risk. We examined whether intakes of LCω-3PUFAs were associated with endometrial cancer risk overall and stratified by body size and histologic subtype. Women were n = 87,360 participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and Clinical Trials who were aged 50-79 y, had an intact uterus, and completed a baseline food-frequency questionnaire. After 13 y of follow-up, n = 1253 incident invasive endometrial cancers were identified. Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for the association of intakes of individual ω-3 fatty acids and fish with endometrial cancer risk. Intakes of individual LCω-3PUFAs were associated with 15-23% linear reductions in endometrial cancer risk. In women with body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) endometrial cancer risk (HR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.82; P-trend = 0.001), whereas there was little evidence of an association in overweight or obese women. The reduction in risk observed in normal-weight women was further specific to type I cancers. Long-chain ω-3 intake was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk only in normal-weight women. Additional studies that use biomarkers of ω-3 intake are needed to more accurately estimate their effects on endometrial cancer risk. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Prospective evaluation of an extended 21-core biopsy scheme as initial prostate cancer diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Nicolaiew, Nathalie; Marchand, Charles; Terry, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; Vordos, Dimitri; Allory, Yves; Abbou, Claude-Clément; Salomon, Laurent; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the optimal number of prostate biopsy core samples that should be taken as an initial strategy is open. To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic yield of a 21-core biopsy protocol as an initial strategy for prostate cancer (PCa) detection. During 10 yr, 2753 consecutive patients underwent a 21-core biopsy scheme for their first set of biopsy specimens. All patients underwent a standardized 21-core protocol with cores mapped for location. The PCa detection rate of each biopsy scheme (6, 12, or 21 cores) was compared using a McNemar test. Predictive factors of the diagnostic yield achieved by a 21-core scheme were studied using logistic regression analyses. PCa detection rates using 6 sextant biopsies, 12 cores, and 21 cores were 32.5%, 40.4%, and 43.3%, respectively. The 12-core procedure improved the cancer detection rate by 19.4% (p=0.004), and the 21-biopsy scheme improved the rate by 6.7% overall (p10% in prostates with volume >70 ml, in men with a prostate-specific antigen level<4 ng/ml, with a prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) <0.20 ng/ml per gram. A PSAD <0.20 ng/ml per gram was the strongest independent predictive factor of the diagnostic yield offered by the 21-core scheme (p<0.001). The 21-core protocol significantly increased the rate of PCa eligible for active surveillance (62.5% vs 48.4%; p=0.036) than those detected by a 12-core scheme without statistically increasing the rate of insignificant PCa (p=0.503). A 21-core biopsy scheme improves significantly the PCa detection rate compared with a 12-core protocol. We identified a cut-off PSAD (0.20 ng/ml per gram) below which an extended 21-core scheme might be systematically proposed to significantly improve the overall detection rate without increasing the rate of detected insignificant PCa. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, A. L. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  8. Increased plasma soluble uPAR level is a risk marker of respiratory cancer in initially cancer-free individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Anne A; Ladelund, Steen; Andersen, Ove

    2011-01-01

    codes and suPAR levels were measured using a commercially available ELISA. The association of suPAR levels with incident cancer during follow-up was analyzed using Cox regression, adjusted for established risk factors and the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocyte numbers...... with respiratory, gastrointestinal and other cancer types, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Elevated suPAR levels were associated with increased risk of incident respiratory cancer and other types of cancer, but not gastrointestinal cancers, independently of established risk factors, CRP and leukocyte numbers. Impact......:These findings suggest that inflammation is involved in cancer development. Risk algorithms based on established risk factors and risk-associated biomarkers should be developed and evaluated in large general population-based studies. We suggest suPAR as a candidate for evaluation in cancer risk algorithms....

  9. On TCP-based Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Server Overload Control

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Charles; Schulzrinne, Henning

    2010-01-01

    The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) server overload management has attracted interest since SIP is being widely deployed in the Next Generation Networks (NGN) as a core signaling protocol. Yet all existing SIP overload control work is focused on SIP-over-UDP, despite the fact that TCP is increasingly seen as the more viable choice of SIP transport. This paper answers the following questions: is the existing TCP flow control capable of handling the SIP overload problem? If not, why and how c...

  10. The characteristics of national health initiatives promoting earlier cancer diagnosis among adult populations: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanzani, Natalia; Weller, David; Campbell, Christine

    2017-07-10

    The increasing burden of cancer morbidity and mortality has led to the development of national health initiatives to promote earlier cancer diagnosis and improve cancer survival. This protocol describes a systematic review aiming to identify the evidence about such initiatives among the adult population. We will describe their components, stakeholders and target populations, and summarise their outcomes. We will search databases and websites for peer-reviewed publications and grey literature on national health initiatives in high-income countries as defined by the World Bank. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies will be included and assessed for their methodological quality. Study selection, quality assessment and data extraction will be carried out independently by two reviewers. Narrative synthesis will be used to analyse the findings. This systematic review analyses secondary data and ethical approval is not required. Review findings will be helpful to researchers, policy makers, governments and other key stakeholders developing similar initiatives and assessing cancer outcomes. The results will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal in order to reach a diverse group of healthcare professionals, researchers and policy makers. This systematic review protocol is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42016047233). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Serum alpha fetoprotein surge after the initiation of chemotherapy for non-seminomatous testicular cancer has an adverse prognostic significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R; Collette, L; Sylvester, R; de Mulder, PHM; Sleijfer, DT; Huinink, WWT; Kaye, SB; van Oosterom, AT; Boven, E; Stoter, G

    1998-01-01

    It has been recognized that the tumour markers alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) may show a transient elevation after the initiation of chemotherapy in non-seminomatous testicular cancer. We investigated the prognostic importance of these so-called marker surges in a

  12. Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

  13. 78 FR 20319 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Health Interventions in Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13... Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13- 006, initial review... and Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases in Africa, FOA GH13-002; Detecting Etiologies of Emerging...

  14. PHOSPHATE BINDER THERAPY AND SERUM PHOSPHATE CONTROL FOLLOWING INITIATION OF HAEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Farrand

    2012-06-01

    Serum P can be difficult to control following initiation of HD. Patients with elevated serum P were younger, and most had higher P binder use than the reference group. Overall, binder use was lower than in other studies of HD patients. Dietary education and higher doses of the most effective P binders may be needed to improve P management.

  15. Adaptive radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: initial clinical outcomes from a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David L; Garden, Adam S; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  17. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. Results: 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Conclusion: Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  18. Parents' Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Their Child's Cancer and Effectiveness of Initial Disease Counseling in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manjusha; Paul, Lidiya T; Latha, P T; Parukkutty, Kusumakumary

    2017-01-01

    To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  19. Impact of initial time to prostate-specific antigen nadir on survival in prostate cancer with bone metastasis initially treated with maximum androgen blockade therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study is to provide certain data on clinical outcomes and their predictors of traditional maximum androgen blockade (MAB in prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Methods: Subjects were patients with prostate adenocarcinoma with bone metastasis initiated to treat with MAB as a primary treatment without any local therapy at our hospital between January 2003 and December 2010. Time to prostate specific antigen (PSA progression, overall survival (OS time, and association of clinical factors and outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 57 patients were evaluable. The median age was 70 years. The median primary PSA was 203 ng/ml. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists had been administered in 96.5% of the patients. Bicalutamide had been chosen in 89.4 % of the patients as the initial antiandrogen. The median time to PSA progression with MAB was 11.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.4 to 13.0. The median OS was 47.3 months (95% CI, 30.7 to 81.0. Gleason score 9 or greater, decline of PSA level equal to or higher than 1.0 ng/ml with MAB, and time to PSA nadir equal to or shorter than six months after initiation of MAB were independent risk factors for time to PSA progression (P=0.010, P=0.005, and P=0.001; respectively. Time to PSA nadir longer than six months was the only independent predictor for longer OS (HR, 0.255 [95% CI, 0.109 to 0.597]; P=0.002. Conclusions: Initial time to PSA nadir should be emphasized for clinical outcome analyses in future studies on prostate cancer with bone metastasis.

  20. Novel population of small tumour-initiating stem cells in the ovaries of women with borderline ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Stimpfel, Martin

    2016-10-05

    Small stem cells with diameters of up to 5 μm previously isolated from adult human ovaries indicated pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially primordial germ cells, and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells in vitro. Here, we show that a comparable population of small stem cells can be found in the ovarian tissue of women with borderline ovarian cancer, which, in contrast to small stem cells in "healthy" ovaries, formed spontaneous tumour-like structures and expressed some markers related to pluripotency and germinal lineage. The gene expression profile of these small putative cancer stem cells differed from similar cells sorted from "healthy" ovaries by 132 upregulated and 97 downregulated genes, including some important forkhead box and homeobox genes related to transcription regulation, developmental processes, embryogenesis, and ovarian cancer. These putative cancer stem cells are suggested to be a novel population of ovarian tumour-initiating cells in humans.

  1. Genetic subclone architecture of tumor clone-initiating cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessler, Klara M; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Huebschmann, Daniel; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Dubash, Taronish D; Dieter, Sebastian M; Siegl, Christine; Herbst, Friederike; Weber, Sarah; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Fronza, Raffaele; Buchhalter, Ivo; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Eils, Roland; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Brors, Benedikt; Schlesner, Matthias; Ball, Claudia R; Glimm, Hanno

    2017-07-03

    A hierarchically organized cell compartment drives colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. Genetic barcoding allows monitoring of the clonal output of tumorigenic cells without prospective isolation. In this study, we asked whether tumor clone-initiating cells (TcICs) were genetically heterogeneous and whether differences in self-renewal and activation reflected differential kinetics among individual subclones or functional hierarchies within subclones. Monitoring genomic subclone kinetics in three patient tumors and corresponding serial xenografts and spheroids by high-coverage whole-genome sequencing, clustering of genetic aberrations, subclone combinatorics, and mutational signature analysis revealed at least two to four genetic subclones per sample. Long-term growth in serial xenografts and spheroids was driven by multiple genomic subclones with profoundly differing growth dynamics and hence different quantitative contributions over time. Strikingly, genetic barcoding demonstrated stable functional heterogeneity of CRC TcICs during serial xenografting despite near-complete changes in genomic subclone contribution. This demonstrates that functional heterogeneity is, at least frequently, present within genomic subclones and independent of mutational subclone differences. © 2017 Giessler et al.

  2. Decreasing Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3C (EIF3C) Suppresses Proliferation and Stimulates Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cell Lines Through Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weipeng; Li, Xichuan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen; Jia, Yongsheng; Yuan, Shunzong; Huang, Yong; Shi, Yehui; Tong, Zhongsheng

    2017-08-30

    BACKGROUND Translation initiation is the rate limiting step of protein synthesis and is highly regulated. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3C (EIF3C), an oncogene overexpressed in several human cancers, plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cell proliferation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of EIF3C in breast cancer tissues from 42 patients. We investigated whether EIF3C silencing decreases breast cancer cell proliferation as assessed by colony formation assay, and whether EIF3C gene knockdown induces apoptosis as assessed by flow cytometry analysis. We utilized the stress and apoptosis signaling antibody array kit, while p-ERK1/2, p-Akt, p-Smad2, p-p38 MAPK, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-7 were explored between EIF3C-siRNA and controls. Furthermore, the effects of EIF3C gene knockdown in mTOR pathway were analyzed by western blotting for different cell lines. RESULTS In EIF3C-positive tumors, 32 out of 42 showed significantly higher frequencies of high grade group by immunoreactivity (p=0.0016). BrdU incorporation after four days of cell plating was significantly suppressed in MDA-MB-231 cells by EIF3C knockdown compared with controls, with average changes of 7.8-fold (p<0.01). Clone number was significantly suppressed in MDA-MB-231 cells by EIF3C knockdown compared with controls (p<0.05). Cell apoptosis was significantly increased in the EIF3C-siRNA group when compared with the cells that were transfected with scrambled siRNA (3.51±0.0842 versus 13.24±0.2307, p<0.01). The mTOR signaling pathway was involved in decreasing EIF3C translational efficiency. CONCLUSIONS Unveiling the mechanisms of EIF3 action in tumorigenesis may help identify attractive targets for cancer therapy.

  3. Are U.S. cancer screening test patterns consistent with guideline recommendations with respect to the age of screening initiation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadiyala Srikanth

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U.S. cancer screening guidelines communicate important information regarding the ages for which screening tests are appropriate. Little attention has been given to whether breast, colorectal and prostate cancer screening test use is responsive to guideline age information regarding the age of screening initiation. Methods The 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Social Survey and the 2003 National Health Interview Surveys were used to compute breast, colorectal and prostate cancer screening test rates by single year of age. Graphical and logistic regression analyses were used to compare screening rates for individuals close to and on either side of the guideline recommended screening initiation ages. Results We identified large discrete shifts in the use of screening tests precisely at the ages where guidelines recommend that screening begin. Mammography screening in the last year increased from 22% [95% CI = 20, 25] at age 39 to 36% [95% CI = 33, 39] at age 40 and 47% [95% CI = 44, 51] at age 41. Adherence to the colorectal cancer screening guidelines within the last year increased from 18% [95% CI = 15, 22] at age 49 to 19% [95% CI = 15, 23] at age 50 and 34% [95% CI = 28, 39] at age 51. Prostate specific antigen screening in the last year increased from 28% [95% CI = 25, 31] at age 49 to 33% [95% CI = 29, 36] and 42% [95% CI = 38, 46] at ages 50 and 51. These results are robust to multivariate analyses that adjust for age, sex, income, education, marital status and health insurance status. Conclusion The results from this study suggest that cancer screening test utilization is consistent with guideline age information regarding the age of screening initiation. Screening test and adherence rates increased by approximately 100% at the breast and colorectal cancer guideline recommended ages compared to only a 50% increase in the screening test rate for prostate cancer screening. Since information regarding the age of cancer screening

  4. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Their Putative Role in Potentiating the Initiation and Development of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Isaiah G; Sood, Anil K; Mok, Samuel; Liu, Jinsong

    2011-01-01

    The progression of ovarian cancer, from cell transformation through invasion of normal tissue, relies on communication between tumor cells and their adjacent stromal microenvironment. Through a natural selection process, an autocrine-paracrine communication loop establishes reciprocal reinforcement of growth and migration signals. Thus, the cancer-activated stromal response is similar to an off-switch-defective form of the normal, universal response needed to survive insult or injury. It is becoming clearer within the cancer literature base that tumor stroma plays a bimodal role in cancer development: it impedes neoplastic growth in normal tissue while encouraging migration and tumor growth in a co-opted desmoplastic response during tumor progression. In this review, we discuss this reciprocal influence that ovarian cancer epithelial cells may have on ovarian stromal cell-reactive phenotype, stromal cell behavior, disrupted signaling networks, and tumor suppressor status in the stroma, within the context of cancer fibroblast studies from alternate cancer tissue settings. We focus on the exchange of secreted factors, in particular interleukin 1β and SDF-1α, between activated fibroblasts and cancer cells as a key area for future investigation and therapeutic development. A better understanding of the bidirectional reliance of early epithelial cancer cells on activated stromal cells could lead to the identification of novel diagnostic stromal markers and targets for therapy. PMID:21532880

  5. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Their Putative Role in Potentiating the Initiation and Development of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaiah G. Schauer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The progression of ovarian cancer, from cell transformation through invasion of normal tissue, relies on communication between tumor cells and their adjacent stromal microenvironment. Through a natural selection process, an autocrine-paracrine communication loop establishes reciprocal reinforcement of growth and migration signals. Thus, the cancer-activated stromal response is similar to an off-switch-defective form of the normal, universal response needed to survive insult or injury. It is becoming clearer within the cancer literature base that tumor stroma plays a bimodal role in cancer development: it impedes neoplastic growth in normal tissue while encouraging migration and tumor growth in a co-opted desmoplastic response during tumor progression. In this review, we discuss this reciprocal influence that ovarian cancer epithelial cells may have on ovarian stromal cell-reactive phenotype, stromal cell behavior, disrupted signaling networks, and tumor suppressor status in the stroma, within the context of cancer fibroblast studies from alternate cancer tissue settings. We focus on the exchange of secreted factors, in particular interleukin 1β and SDF-1α, between activated fibroblasts and cancer cells as a key area for future investigation and therapeutic development. A better understanding of the bidirectional reliance of early epithelial cancer cells on activated stromal cells could lead to the identification of novel diagnostic stromal markers and targets for therapy.

  6. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. Methods We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93. For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83 and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74 for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61 and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47 for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94 and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82 for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63 and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79 for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. Conclusions The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  7. Blocking protein quality control to counter hereditary cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmeyer, Caroline; Nielsen, Sofie V.; Clausen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    imbalance, which makes them more dependent on protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms than normal cells. Accordingly, blocking PQC, e.g. by proteasome inhibitors, may cause a lethal proteotoxic crisis in cancer cells, while leaving normal cells unaffected. Evidence, however, suggests that the PQC system...

  8. Cervical cancer control and prevention in Malawi: need for policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents finding on a qualitative study which carried out to determine the suitability of the national sexual and reproductive health and rights [SRHR] in mitigating challenges in cervical cancer control and prevention. Methods: a desk review of the Malawi National Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights ...

  9. Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy for Pain Control in Irresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavassoli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Severepain is a major problem in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy (TS on pain control in these patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods:Between years 2000 to 2011, 20 patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent TS due to severe pain. They were studied in terms of age, sex, location of pancreas tumor, history of previous surgery, response to treatments for pain control (assessed with VAS scoring system and complications of surgery. Results:M/F = 14/6 with a mean age of 63 years. The most common tumour site was at the pancreas head (in 8 patients. The most cause of unresectability was local expansion to critical adjacent elements (in 10 patients. Surgery was performed successfully in all patients. Post-operative complication included only pleural effusion on the left side which was cured by proper treatment. There were no post-op mortalities.  15 patients had acceptable levels of pain at the end of a six month follow-up period. ConclusionTS provides good pain control, little side effects and minimal invasiveness, the technique is recommended for pain control in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  10. Periodontal Disease and Incident Cancer Risk among Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwizu, Ngozi N; Marshall, James R; Moysich, Kirsten; Genco, Robert J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Mai, Xiaodan; LaMonte, Michael J; Freudenheim, Jo L; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2017-08-01

    Background: Periodontal pathogens have been isolated from precancerous and cancerous lesions and also shown to promote a procarcinogenic microenvironment. Few studies have examined periodontal disease as a risk factor for total cancer, and none have focused on older women. We examined whether periodontal disease is associated with incident cancer among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods: Our prospective cohort study comprised 65,869 women, ages 54 to 86 years. Periodontal disease information was obtained via self-report questionnaires administered between 1999 and 2003, whereas ascertainment of cancer outcomes occurred through September 2013, with a maximum follow-up period of 15 years. Physician-adjudicated incident total cancers were the main outcomes and site-specific cancers were secondary outcomes. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. All analyses were conducted two-sided. Results: During a mean follow-up of 8.32 years, 7,149 cancers were identified. Periodontal disease history was associated with increased total cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.08-1.20); findings were similar in analyses limited to 34,097 never-smokers (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22). Associations were observed for breast (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23), lung (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.14-1.51), esophagus (HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.64-6.53), gallbladder (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.01-2.95), and melanoma skin (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48) cancers. Stomach cancer was borderline (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.94-2.67). Conclusions: Periodontal disease increases risk of total cancer among older women, irrespective of smoking, and certain anatomic sites appear to be vulnerable. Impact: Our findings support the need for further understanding of the effect of periodontal disease on cancer outcomes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1255-65. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer

  11. Lessons from applied ecology: cancer control using an evolutionary double bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Brown, Joel; Vincent, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Because the metastatic cascade is largely governed by the ability of malignant cells to adapt and proliferate at the distant tissue site, we propose that disseminated cancers are analogous in many important ways to the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of exotic species. Although pests can be decimated through the application of chemical toxins, this strategy virtually never achieves robust control as evolution of resistant phenotypes typically permits population recovery to pretreatment levels. In general, biological strategies that introduce predators, parasitoids, or pathogens have achieved more durable control of pest populations even after emergence of resistant phenotypes. From this we propose that long term outcome from any treatment strategy for invasive pests, including cancer, is not limited by evolution of resistance, but rather by the phenotypic cost of that resistance. If a cancerous cell's adaptation to therapy is achieved by upregulating xenobiotic metabolism or a redundant signaling pathway, the required investment in resources is small, and the original malignant phenotype remains essentially intact. As a result, the cancer cells' initial high level of fitness is little changed and unconstrained proliferation will resume once resistance evolves. Robust population control is possible if resistance to therapy requires a substantial and costly phenotypic adaptation that also significantly reduces the organism's fitness in its original niche: an evolutionary double bind.

  12. Receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control messages and adolescent smoking initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Kristen T; Messer, Karen; Vera, Lisa; Ojeda, Norma; Elder, John P; Usita, Paula; Pierce, John P

    2015-01-01

    Background Tobacco industry cigarette advertising is associated with increased adolescent smoking, while counter tobacco advertising is associated with reduced smoking. As these campaigns compete for influence, there is a need to understand their inter-relationship on youth smoking. Methods This study reports data from a national population of families (n=1036) with an oldest child aged 10–13 years, identified by random digit dialling. Parent and child dyads completed baseline questionnaires in 2003. Adolescents were resurveyed in 2007–2008 (response rate 74%). Adjusted logistic regression explores associations between receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control advertising and adolescent smoking initiation. Results In 2007–2008, 57.9% of adolescents reported a favourite tobacco control advertisement and 43.3% reported being receptive to cigarette advertisements. Thirty per cent reported receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control advertisements. Among those receptive to cigarette advertising, having a favourite anti-smoking advertisement had a borderline significant association with a 30% lower smoking rate. Anti-industry tobacco control messages were three times more likely to be favourites of those who were receptive to cigarette advertising than other tobacco control advertising. Conclusions Receptivity to tobacco control advertising appeared to ameliorate the promotion of initiation from cigarette advertising. Anti-industry advertising appears to be the most effective counter for tobacco control and should be considered for wider use. A larger longitudinal study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24503771

  13. Reproductive Risk Factors for Breast Cancer: A Case Control Study

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    Meshram II

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is second most important cancer among Indian women. Although risk factors are not much prevalent as in western countries, incidence rate is increasing in India. The study was undertaken to study various risk factors associated with breast cancer. Methods: A hospital based group matched case control study was undertaken to identify risk factors. The study consisted of 105 hospitalized cases confirmed on histopathology and 210 group matched controls selected from urban field practice area, Sadar, without any malignancy. Bivariate analyses included odds ratio (OR, 95% confidence interval (CI for odds ratio. Results: Earlier age at menarche ≤ 12 years of age, late age at first full term delivery, nulliparity, Lack of breast-feeding were found to be significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer in both pre menopausal & post menopausal women while age at menopause at or after 50 years was significantly associated with the risk in post menopausal women. Conclusions: Study suggests that the changes in menstrual and reproductive patterns among women i.e. early age at menarche and late age at first childbirth and some environmental factors in Central India may have contributed to the increase in breast cancer risk, particularly among younger women.

  14. [Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Sergio Guerra; Eluf-Neto, José; Travier, Noemie; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Arcuri, Arline Sydneia Abel; Kowalski, Luís Paulo; Boffetta, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The most solidly established risk factors for laryngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol. As for occupational factors, the only established carcinogen is exposure to strong inorganic acid mists. However, asbestos, pesticides, paints, gasoline, diesel engine emissions, dusts, and other factors have been reported in the literature as occupational agents that increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to investigate occupational risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Detailed data on smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history were collected for 122 laryngeal cancers and 187 controls matched by frequency (according to sex and age). Laryngeal cancer was associated with exposure to respirable free crystalline silica (OR = 1.83; 95%CI: 1.00-3.36), soot (from coal, coke, fuel oil, or wood) (odds ratio - OR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval - 95%CI: 1.03-3.03), fumes (OR = 2.55; 95%CI: 1.14-5.67), and live animals (OR = 1.80; 95%CI: 1.02-3.19).

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global Cancer Research Key Initiatives The RAS Initiative Cancer ... Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives Cancer Moonshot Genomic Data Commons ...

  16. A randomised controlled trial of meloxicam, a Cox-2 inhibitor, to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after initial curative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yuko; Eguchi, Susumu; Tateishi, Masaki; Ryu, Tomoki; Mikagi, Kazuhiro; Wada, Yoshiyuki; Saitsu, Hideki

    2016-09-01

    Because the recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is high, even after curative treatments such as hepatic resection and microwave ablation, chemopreventive agents that can effectively suppress HCC recurrence are required. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) was recently found to be overexpressed in HCC. Therefore, Cox-2 inhibitors may offer a chemopreventive therapy for HCC. This randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigated the potential for meloxicam, a clinically used Cox-2 inhibitor, to prevent HCC recurrence after initial curative treatment. A total of 232 consecutive patients underwent hepatic resection and/or microwave ablation as initial therapy for HCC at our institute between July 2008 and April 2011. Eight patients were excluded because of poor renal function, history of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related ulceration, or multiple cancers. The remaining 224 patients were randomised to a control group (n = 113) or a meloxicam group (n = 111). To patients in the meloxicam group, meloxicam was administered at 15 mg daily (5 mg three times a day) as long as possible. The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were determined. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rates of the meloxicam group were 95.4, 82.4, and 70.1 %, respectively. Those of the control group were 98.2, 85.1, and 71.5 %, respectively (p = 0.9549). The corresponding DFS rates of the meloxicam group were 89.2, 53.9, and 44.0 % and those of control group were 86.5, 57.0, and 43.4 %, respectively (p = 0.6722). In the OS and DFS of subsets including patients with hepatitis B or C virus infection, we could not find significant differences between the meloxicam and control groups. However, in the subgroup of analysis of patients without viral hepatitis (NBNC-HCC), significant differences were observed in the DFS between the meloxicam group (1-year DFS, 92.3 %; 3-year DFS, 75.8 %; 5-year DFS, 70.4 %) and control group (1-year DFS, 83.3 %; 3-year DFS, 48.1 %; 5

  17. Spatial analysis of childhood cancer: a case/control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Ramis

    Full Text Available Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL. Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors.The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge.We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05.We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters.The variations in the estimated empirical D(s for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of the population; however, according to the

  18. The voice of experience: results from Cancer Control New Zealand's first national cancer care survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Inga; Britton, Emma; Sarfati, Diana; Naylor, Wayne; Borman, Barry; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Simpson, Andrew; Tamblyn, Craig; Atkinson, Chris

    2010-11-05

    The 2009 Cancer Care Survey aimed to gather information from patients about their experiences receiving outpatient cancer care. In mid-2009, Cancer Control New Zealand sent an NRC+Picker postal survey to a stratified sample of 3251 eligible adults, who had received outpatient cancer care between October 2008 and March 2009. Eight cancer treatment facilities across New Zealand provided patient lists from which potential respondents were selected. The final response rate to the survey was 68%. Most of the patients surveyed responded very positively to questions related to specialist care coordination (91% positive response; 95%CI: 90-93), the level of privacy (87% positive response; 95%CI: 85-89), and the dignity and respect provided by healthcare professionals (86% positive response; 95%CI: 85-88). However, patients tended to be much less positive about the level of information they received on the effects of cancer treatment on their day-to-day life (responses ranging between 30% and 40% positive) and the level of emotional support provided (36% positive response; 95%CI: 33-39). Responses from different cancer services tended to follow similar patterns, although for twelve questions there was at least a 20% difference in response between services. Overall, patients rated their outpatient cancer care experiences as positive, but important gaps exist in the provision of information, emotional support, and treating patients within the context of their living situation. Cancer patient experience surveys can achieve high response rates and generate useful information on patient perceptions of their care. This data can be used to inform quality improvement efforts at both national and cancer treatment service levels.

  19. The Chances of Subsequent Cancer Detection in Patients with a PSA > 20 ng/ml and an Initial Negative Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Shaida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS–guided prostate biopsy is known to carry a significant false-negative rate, leading some patients to have multiple biopsies. We investigated cancer detection rates in patients with a PSA >20 ng/ml and a negative initial biopsy. We reviewed our database of 2396 TRUS-guided biopsies done between 1997 and 2002 in order to give a follow-up of at least 6 years. PSA, PSA density (PSAD, PSA velocity (PSAV, prostate volume, and DRE findings were analysed in relation to cancer status. Of the patients, 388 (16% had a PSA >20 ng/ml, including 99 (26% with benign biopsies. Of those, 67 were rebiopsied, including 19 (28% with cancer on the first rebiopsy and four (6% on further biopsies. PSAD, DRE, and volume significantly differed between rebiopsied patients with and without cancer (p 20 ng/ml and have an initial negative biopsy have a high chance of malignancy being detected on a second biopsy. However, if a second biopsy is also negative, then the chances of subsequent biopsies showing signs of cancer are very low if the DRE is normal and particularly if the PSAD is >0.35 ng/ml/cm3.

  20. Initial experiments on the end-point control of a flexible one-link robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Schmitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with initial experiments regarding a specific unsolved control problem which appeared to be central to advances in the art of robotics. This problem involves the control of a flexible member (one link of a robot system). The position of the end-effector, called the end point or tip, is controlled by measuring that position and using the measurement as a basis for applying control torque to the other end of the flexible member, as for instance, the robot's elbow joint. A description is presented of the features of the first experimental arm which has been made, and an outline is provided of the general strategy for controlling it using its tip sensor and shoulder torquer.

  1. Surgical resection after downsizing chemotherapy for initially unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer: a retrospective single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshidome, Hiroyuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takeuchi, Dan; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kimura, Fumio; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only method for curative treatment of biliary tract cancer (BTC). Recently, an improved efficacy has been revealed in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced BTC to improve the prognosis by the advent of useful cancer chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of downsizing chemotherapy in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced BTC. Initially unresectable locally advanced cases were defined as those in which therapeutic resection could not be achieved even by proactive surgical resection. Gemcitabine was administered intravenously once a week for 3 weeks followed by 1 week's respite. Patients whose disease responded to chemotherapy were reevaluated to determine whether their tumor was resectable. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was provided to 22 patients with initially unresectable locally advanced BTC. Tumor was significantly downsized in nine patients, and surgical resection was performed in 8 (36.4%) of 22 patients. Surgical resection resulted in R0 resection in four patients and R1 resection in four patients. Patients who underwent surgical resection had a significantly longer survival compared with those unable to undergo surgery. Preoperative chemotherapy enables the downsizing of initially unresectable locally advanced BTC, with radical resection made possible in a certain proportion of patients. Downsizing chemotherapy should be proactively carried out as a multidisciplinary treatment strategy for patients with initially unresectable locally advanced BTC with the aim of expanding the surgical indication.

  2. Pain Control In Cancer Patients By Opiate Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohagheghi M A

    2003-07-01

    current barriers, WHO stepwise model for cancer pain control and palliative care is recommended. Publishing Standard Treatment Guidelines for different levels of health care system is another recommended approach to optimize cancer pain."n 

  3. New frontiers in translational control of the cancer genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, Morgan L.; Ruggero, Davide

    2017-01-01

    The past several years have seen dramatic leaps in our understanding of how gene expression is rewired at the translation level during tumorigenesis to support the transformed phenotype. This work has been driven by an explosion in technological advances and is revealing previously unimagined regulatory mechanisms that dictate functional expression of the cancer genome. In this Review we discuss emerging trends and exciting new discoveries that reveal how this translational circuitry contributes to specific aspects of tumorigenesis and cancer cell function, with a particular focus on recent insights into the role of translational control in the adaptive response to oncogenic stress conditions. PMID:27112207

  4. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia for non-small cell lung cancer patient after thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Huang, Jin-Xi; Lu, Xi-Hua; Zhang, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) in non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSLCPs) after thoracotomy. From January 2014 to March 2015, 40 patients of non-small cell lung cancer were recruited in this study and divided into two groups, (PCIA) group and control group with 20 patients in each group. The patients in the PCIA group were connected to intravenous self-control analgesia pump which contains 2 μg/ml of sufentanil and 8 mg of ondansetron diluting to 100 ml of 0.9% saline after surgery. Initial loading dose was 2 ml, background dose was 2 ml/h, single PCIA dose was 0.5 ml, and locking time 15 min. 10 mg of morphine was intramuscular injected, if necessary. Patients in the control group use an intramuscular injection of morphine 10 mg singly. The visual analog scale (VAS) score of the two groups were recorded in the time point of 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h, and 24 h. The morphine consumption of the two groups was also compared. Patients in PCIA group after surgery, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h, and 24 h VAS score were obviously lower than those in control group (P control group (P control group (P controlled intravenous analgesia can significantly decrease the VAS score without increasing the toxicity in NSLCP after thoracotomy.

  5. Urinary bladder cancer risk factors: a Lebanese case- control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobeissi, Loulou Hassan; Yassine, Ibrahim Adnan; Jabbour, Michel Elias; Moussa, Mohamad Ahmad; Dhaini, Hassan Rida

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most incident malignancy among Lebanese men. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential risk factors associated with this observed high incidence. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002-2008. Controls were conveniently selected from the same settings. Data were collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. Exposure data were collected using a structured face-to-face interview questionnaire. Blood samples were collected to determine N-acetyltransferase1 (NAT1) genotype by PCR-RFLP. Analyses revolved around univariate, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, along with checks for effect modification. The odds of having bladder cancer among smokers was 1.02 times significantly higher in cases vs. controls. The odds of exposure to occupational diesel or fuel combustion fumes were 4.1 times significantly higher in cases vs controls. The odds of prostate-related morbidity were 5.6 times significantly higher in cases vs controls. Cases and controls showed different clustering patterns of NAT1 alleles. No significant differences between cases and controls were found for consumption of alcohol, coffee, tea, or artificial sweeteners. This is the first case-control study investigating bladder cancer risk factors in the Lebanese context. Results confirmed established risk factors in the literature, particularly smoking and occupational exposure to diesel. The herein observed associations should be used to develop appropriate prevention policies and intervention strategies, in order to control this alarming disease in Lebanon.

  6. Call for a Computer-Aided Cancer Detection and Classification Research Initiative in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzal, Andri; Chaudhry, Shafique Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in Oman. It is reported that cancer incidence in Oman is the second highest after Saudi Arabia among Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, Oman is predicted to face an almost two-fold increase in cancer incidence in the period 2008-2020. However, cancer research in Oman is still in its infancy. This is due to the fact that medical institutions and infrastructure that play central roles in data collection and analysis are relatively new developments in Oman. We believe the country requires an organized plan and efforts to promote local cancer research. In this paper, we discuss current research progress in cancer diagnosis using machine learning techniques to optimize computer aided cancer detection and classification (CAD). We specifically discuss CAD using two major medical data, i.e., medical imaging and microarray gene expression profiling, because medical imaging like mammography, MRI, and PET have been widely used in Oman for assisting radiologists in early cancer diagnosis and microarray data have been proven to be a reliable source for differential diagnosis. We also discuss future cancer research directions and benefits to Oman economy for entering the cancer research and treatment business as it is a multi-billion dollar industry worldwide.

  7. Bladder cancer discussed on the internet: a systematic analysis of gender differences of initial posters on an online discussion board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippka, Yannick; Patschan, Oliver; Todenhöfer, Tilmann; Schwentner, Christian; Gutzeit, Andreas; Merseburger, Axel S; Horstmann, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate gender differences of initial posters in threads dealing with bladder cancer on an online discussion board. 529 threads opened between 09/2005 and 03/2012 were screened on the largest German speaking bladder cancer online discussion board. 366 threads fulfilled the requirements for this study. Gender, age, number, status of concern and oncological situation of initiating posters as well as their motives and language style were analyzed following a standardized protocol. Threads were initiated in 45% (164/366) by men and in 55% (202/366) by women. Mean age of male initiating posters was 50 years and of female posters 44 years (p posters asked for medical information or therapeutic recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. However, women significantly more often expressed their wish for emotional support (p = 0.034) and in tendency wanted to share their experiences with others (p = 0.057). Language analysis revealed that women significantly more often used a tentative language style than men (p = 0.003). Even though women are less often affected by bladder cancer, they are more active -especially for their concerned family members - on the evaluated discussion board than men. Whereas both genders equally often ask for medical information, women more often want to share their experiences and look for emotional support.

  8. Abortion and breast cancer: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Milena; Vlajinac, Hristina; Marinkovic, Jelena; Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine if certain aspects of a woman's experience of abortion might be associated with the risk of breast cancer. The case-control study was conducted in Kragujevac (Serbia) during the period 2004-2005. The case group (191 women) consisted of patients with newly diagnosed first primary breast cancer, which was histologically confirmed. The control group (191 women), individually matched by age (± 2 years), hospital admittance and place of residence (rural/urban) to the respective cases, was selected from female patients admitted for other diseases. The analysis was restricted to parous women (168 cases and 171 controls). Breast cancer risk was reduced among women who had a history of any abortion (adjusted OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.24-0.88). The protective effect was found for both induced abortion (adjusted OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.25-0.90) and spontaneous abortion (adjusted OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.10-0.98). It seems that these associations did not depend on the number of abortions, age at first abortion, or gestational age at first aborted pregnancy. Our study suggests that even short pregnancies ending in abortion add to the protection against breast cancer.

  9. Practical use of cancer control promoters in municipalities in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yako-Suketomo, Hiroko; Katanoda, Kota; Sobue, Tomotaka; Imai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Control Act in Japan became effective in 2006. In Ibaraki, Toyama, and Hyogo prefectures, the Cancer Control Promoter (CCP) plan was created to strengthen partnerships for cancer prevention. This study aimed to examine the curre nt status of CCP utilization and analyze relationships with intersectoral collaboration, both within the government and with outside partners. In 2008, we mailed questionnaires to 100 administrators responsible for disease prevention and health promotion in municipal governments of the three prefectures. Ninety-one administrators responded (response rate, 91.0%). We analyzed responses to questions regarding whether or not the municipalities had used CCPs. Items assessing intersectoral collaboration examined municipality characteristics and relationships with outside partners and sectors specializing in areas other than community health. Among 90 administrators with valid data, 33 municipalities (36.7%) used CCPs while 57 (63.3%) did not. The Fisher's exact test revealed that intersectoral collaboration for using CCPs was associated with communication with all of the municipal government sectors not related to health. The present study indicated that CCPs were not consistently used in municipalities. However, we found that intersectoral collaborations, especially within the local government, may be related to the practical use of CCPs. This, in turn, may result in effective cancer control and prevention, as well as improvement in community health.

  10. Automatic initialization and quality control of large-scale cardiac MRI segmentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albà, Xènia; Lekadir, Karim; Pereañez, Marco; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair A; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2017-10-16

    Continuous advances in imaging technologies enable ever more comprehensive phenotyping of human anatomy and physiology. Concomitant reduction of imaging costs has resulted in widespread use of imaging in large clinical trials and population imaging studies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), in particular, offers one-stop-shop multidimensional biomarkers of cardiovascular physiology and pathology. A wide range of analysis methods offer sophisticated cardiac image assessment and quantification for clinical and research studies. However, most methods have only been evaluated on relatively small databases often not accessible for open and fair benchmarking. Consequently, published performance indices are not directly comparable across studies and their translation and scalability to large clinical trials or population imaging cohorts is uncertain. Most existing techniques still rely on considerable manual intervention for the initialization and quality control of the segmentation process, becoming prohibitive when dealing with thousands of images. The contributions of this paper are three-fold. First, we propose a fully automatic method for initializing cardiac MRI segmentation, by using image features and random forests regression to predict an initial position of the heart and key anatomical landmarks in an MRI volume. In processing a full imaging database, the technique predicts the optimal corrective displacements and positions in relation to the initial rough intersections of the long and short axis images. Second, we introduce for the first time a quality control measure capable of identifying incorrect cardiac segmentations with no visual assessment. The method uses statistical, pattern and fractal descriptors in a random forest classifier to detect failures to be corrected or removed from subsequent statistical analysis. Finally, we validate these new techniques within a full pipeline for cardiac segmentation applicable to large-scale cardiac MRI databases. The

  11. Possible anti-tumor activity of initial treatment with zoledronic acid with hormonal therapy for bone-metastatic prostate cancer in multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Hiroji; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Ikeda, Ichirou; Fujinami, Kiyoshi; Iwasaki, Akira; Noguchi, Sumio; Noguchi, Kazumi; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-06-01

    To ascertain the anti-tumor effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer, we examined the effect of ZOL started simultaneously with hormonal therapy as initial treatment in these patients. Forty-seven patients with bone-metastatic prostate cancer who received a luteinizing hormone releasing-hormone (LHRH) analogue and an anti-androgen [maximal androgen blockade (MAB)] were assigned to receive ZOL (4 mg intravenous administration every month for 2 years). The time to progression (TTP) of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), the overall survival (OS), and the rate of PSA decrease in patients with MAB and ZOL treatment (ZOL group) were compared with these parameters in patients who received only MAB at one institute as a control group (non-ZOL group). Although the nadir PSA level and the rate of PSA normalization showed no significant differences between the ZOL and non-ZOL groups, the time to nadir PSA in the ZOL group was significantly shorter than that in the non-ZOL group (P prostate cancer patients. Initial treatment with ZOL has the possibility of anti-tumor activity to delay disease progression.

  12. Initial investigation using statistical process control for quality control of accelerator beam steering

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    Able Charles M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study seeks to increase clinical operational efficiency and accelerator beam consistency by retrospectively investigating the application of statistical process control (SPC to linear accelerator beam steering parameters to determine the utility of such a methodology in detecting changes prior to equipment failure (interlocks actuated. Methods Steering coil currents (SCC for the transverse and radial planes are set such that a reproducibly useful photon or electron beam is available. SCC are sampled and stored in the control console computer each day during the morning warm-up. The transverse and radial - positioning and angle SCC for photon beam energies were evaluated using average and range (Xbar-R process control charts (PCC. The weekly average and range values (subgroup n = 5 for each steering coil were used to develop the PCC. SCC from September 2009 (annual calibration until two weeks following a beam steering failure in June 2010 were evaluated. PCC limits were calculated using the first twenty subgroups. Appropriate action limits were developed using conventional SPC guidelines. Results PCC high-alarm action limit was set at 6 standard deviations from the mean. A value exceeding this limit would require beam scanning and evaluation by the physicist and engineer. Two low alarms were used to indicate negative trends. Alarms received following establishment of limits (week 20 are indicative of a non-random cause for deviation (Xbar chart and/or an uncontrolled process (R chart. Transverse angle SCC for 6 MV and 15 MV indicated a high-alarm 90 and 108 days prior to equipment failure respectively. A downward trend in this parameter continued, with high-alarm, until failure. Transverse position and radial angle SCC for 6 and 15 MV indicated low-alarms starting as early as 124 and 116 days prior to failure, respectively. Conclusion Radiotherapy clinical efficiency and accelerator beam consistency may be improved by

  13. Initial investigation using statistical process control for quality control of accelerator beam steering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able, Charles M; Hampton, Carnell J; Baydush, Alan H; Munley, Michael T

    2011-12-28

    This study seeks to increase clinical operational efficiency and accelerator beam consistency by retrospectively investigating the application of statistical process control (SPC) to linear accelerator beam steering parameters to determine the utility of such a methodology in detecting changes prior to equipment failure (interlocks actuated). Steering coil currents (SCC) for the transverse and radial planes are set such that a reproducibly useful photon or electron beam is available. SCC are sampled and stored in the control console computer each day during the morning warm-up. The transverse and radial - positioning and angle SCC for photon beam energies were evaluated using average and range (Xbar-R) process control charts (PCC). The weekly average and range values (subgroup n = 5) for each steering coil were used to develop the PCC. SCC from September 2009 (annual calibration) until two weeks following a beam steering failure in June 2010 were evaluated. PCC limits were calculated using the first twenty subgroups. Appropriate action limits were developed using conventional SPC guidelines. PCC high-alarm action limit was set at 6 standard deviations from the mean. A value exceeding this limit would require beam scanning and evaluation by the physicist and engineer. Two low alarms were used to indicate negative trends. Alarms received following establishment of limits (week 20) are indicative of a non-random cause for deviation (Xbar chart) and/or an uncontrolled process (R chart). Transverse angle SCC for 6 MV and 15 MV indicated a high-alarm 90 and 108 days prior to equipment failure respectively. A downward trend in this parameter continued, with high-alarm, until failure. Transverse position and radial angle SCC for 6 and 15 MV indicated low-alarms starting as early as 124 and 116 days prior to failure, respectively. Radiotherapy clinical efficiency and accelerator beam consistency may be improved by instituting SPC methods to monitor the beam steering process

  14. Trastuzumab Inhibits Growth of HER2-Negative Gastric Cancer Cells Through Gastrin-Initialized CCKBR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Li, Shao-Bo; Peng, Xing-Chun; Wu, Jun; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Administration of trastuzumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody targeted to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, p185), has improved outcomes for patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer (GC), but some relevant issues remain to be investigated and will emerge with new anti-GC drugs. Gastrin is a major gastrointestinal hormone proven to have an inhibitory effect on GC in vitro and in vivo. To explore the sympathetic role of trastuzumab and gastrin on inhibition of GC. The HER2-positive and HER2-negative GC cell lines were treated with trastuzumab, gastrin, or their combination in vitro and in xenograft model. The synergistical role of trastuzumab and gastrin and related mechanisms were investigated. We found the synergistic inhibitory effects of trastuzumab and gastrin on HER2-negative GC cells through the gastrin/cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR) pathway. Trastuzumab upregulated CCKBR protein levels but could not initiate its signal transduction, whereas gastrin increased the levels and activation of CCKBR. Molecular experiments indicated that trastuzumab and gastrin co-treatment synergistically enhanced the stability of CCKBR. Moreover, their combined treatment synergistically arrested GC cells at G0/G1 phase, down-regulated levels of GC-related proteins, including anion exchanger 1 (AE1), cyclin D1, β-catenin, and cytoplasmic p16, and promoted nuclear translocation of p16. In addition, combination treatment upregulated AE2 levels, which are reduced in GC tissues. The in vivo synergistic anti-GC effect of combined treatment was confirmed in xenograft experiments. Trastuzumab plus gastrin inhibit growth of Her2-negative GC by targeting cytoplasmic AE1 and p16.

  15. Robot-assisted intracorporeal ileal conduit: Marionette technique and initial experience at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Khurshid; Seixas-Mikelus, Stéfanie A; Hussain, Abid; Blumenfeld, Aaron J; Nyquist, John; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Wilding, Gregory E

    2010-10-01

    To present our technique and initial experience with patients who underwent robot-assisted intracorporeal creation of ileal conduit and to compare them with patients who underwent extracorporeal ileal diversion after robot-assisted radical cystectomy. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder underwent a robot-assisted radical cystectomy with bilateral extended pelvic lymphadenectomy with ileal conduit diversion. Total intracorporeal ileal conduit creation was performed in the last 13 patients. Operative data and short-term outcomes between the 2 groups were assessed. The novel surgical technique for intracorporeal ileal conduit will be presented. The intracorporeal group (IC) included 2 female and 11 male patients (mean age 71 years). The extracorporeal group (EC) included 4 female and 9 male patients (mean age 66 years). No significant differences were noted between the groups in terms of patient age, BMI, sex, prior surgery, or pathologic stage. Overall operative time and intraoperative complications were similar. No significant differences were noted between the 2 groups in terms of diversion time or estimated blood loss. There were 4 complications recorded in IC patients, including nonspecific colitis, small bowel obstruction requiring exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions, a urine leak that eventually resolved but required a temporary nephrostomy tube, and a fever of unknown origin that resolved without intervention. Robot-assisted intracorporeal ileal conduit can be accomplished safely with acceptable operative times even during early experience. Larger series with favorable results will be required to add this new paradigm to minimally invasive surgery for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The nucleoid occlusion factor Noc controls DNA replication initiation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ting; Wang, Xindan; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G; Rudner, David Z

    2017-07-01

    Successive division events in the spherically shaped bacterium Staphylococcus aureus are oriented in three alternating perpendicular planes. The mechanisms that underlie this relatively unique pattern of division and coordinate it with chromosome segregation remain largely unknown. Thus far, the only known spatial regulator of division in this organism is the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc that inhibits assembly of the cytokinetic ring over the chromosome. However, Noc is not essential in S. aureus, indicating that additional regulators are likely to exist. To search for these factors, we screened for mutants that are synthetic lethal with Noc inactivation. Our characterization of these mutants led to the discovery that S. aureus Noc also controls the initiation of DNA replication. We show that cells lacking Noc over-initiate and mutations in the initiator gene dnaA suppress this defect. Importantly, these dnaA mutations also partially suppress the division problems associated with Δnoc. Reciprocally, we show that over-expression of DnaA enhances the over-initiation and cell division phenotypes of the Δnoc mutant. Thus, a single factor both blocks cell division over chromosomes and helps to ensure that new rounds of DNA replication are not initiated prematurely. This degree of economy in coordinating key cell biological processes has not been observed in rod-shaped bacteria and may reflect the challenges posed by the reduced cell volume and complicated division pattern of this spherical pathogen.

  17. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-05-04

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC{sub 50} for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC{sub 50} around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  18. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs. Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS, we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 µM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 µM for SUM-149 and around 2 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  19. Photosynthetic control of Arabidopsis leaf cytoplasmic translation initiation by protein phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Boex-Fontvieille

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation is the carbon source for plant anabolism, including amino acid production and protein synthesis. The biosynthesis of leaf proteins is known for decades to correlate with photosynthetic activity but the mechanisms controlling this effect are not documented. The cornerstone of the regulation of protein synthesis is believed to be translation initiation, which involves multiple phosphorylation events in Eukaryotes. We took advantage of phosphoproteomic methods applied to Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes harvested under controlled photosynthetic gas-exchange conditions to characterize the phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal proteins (RPs and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs. The analyses detected 14 and 11 new RP and eIF phosphorylation sites, respectively, revealed significant CO2-dependent and/or light/dark phosphorylation patterns and showed concerted changes in 13 eIF phosphorylation sites and 9 ribosomal phosphorylation sites. In addition to the well-recognized role of the ribosomal small subunit protein RPS6, our data indicate the involvement of eIF3, eIF4A, eIF4B, eIF4G and eIF5 phosphorylation in controlling translation initiation when photosynthesis varies. The response of protein biosynthesis to the photosynthetic input thus appears to be the result of a complex regulation network involving both stimulating (e.g. RPS6, eIF4B phosphorylation and inhibiting (e.g. eIF4G phosphorylation molecular events.

  20. Initial evaluation of Nabilone in the control of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priestman, T.J.; Priestman, S.G. (Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Nabilone is a cannabinoid anti-emetic which has been extensively evaluated in control of chemotherapy-induced vomiting. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of Nabilone in controlling radiotherapy-induced vomiting resistant to a conventional anti-emetic (metoclopramide). Thirty patents receiving wide-field upper abdominal irradiation were prospectively monitored. Fourteen developed no significant nausea or vomiting and in 10 symptoms were controlled by metoclopramide. All six patients who failed to respond to this agent responded to Nabilone. Toxicity with both drugs was minimal. Although patient numbers were small, this initial assessment suggests that Nabilone may be a useful agent in the control of resistant radiation-induced sickness.

  1. Direct Method for Resolution of Optimal Control Problem with Free Initial Condition

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    Louadj Kahina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of control analyzes the proprieties of commanded systems. Problems of optimal control (OC have been intensively investigated in the world literature for over forty years. During this period, series of fundamental results have been obtained, among which should be noted the maximum principle (Pontryagin et al., 1962 and dynamic programming (Bellman, 1963. For many of the problems of the optimal control theory (OCT, adequate solutions are found (Bryson and Yu-chi, 1969, Lee and Markus, 1967, Gabasov and Kirillova, 1977, 1978, 1980. Results of the theory were taken up in various fields of science, engineering, and economics. The present paper aims at extending the constructive methods of Balashevich et al., (2000 that were developed for the problems of optimal control with the bounded initial state is not fixed are considered.

  2. Active and passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study prospective cohort†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.; Kubo, J.; Luo, J.; Desai, M.; Hedlin, H.; Henderson, M.; Chlebowski, R.; Tindle, H.; Chen, C.; Gomez, S.; Manson, J. E.; Schwartz, A. G.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Cote, M.; Patel, M. I.; Stefanick, M. L.; Wakelee, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of worldwide cancer deaths. While smoking is its leading risk factor, few prospective cohort studies have reported on the association of lung cancer with both active and passive smoking. This study aimed to determine the relationship between lung cancer incidence with both active and passive smoking (childhood, adult at home, and at work). Patients and methods The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) was a prospective cohort study conducted at 40 US centers that enrolled postmenopausal women from 1993 to 1999. Among 93 676 multiethnic participants aged 50–79, 76 304 women with complete smoking and covariate data comprised the analytic cohort. Lung cancer incidence was calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by smoking status. Results Over 10.5 mean follow-up years, 901 lung cancer cases were identified. Compared with never smokers (NS), lung cancer incidence was much higher in current [hazard ratio (HR) 13.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 10.80–16.75] and former smokers (FS; HR 4.20, 95% CI 3.48–5.08) in a dose-dependent manner. Current and FS had significantly increased risk for all lung cancer subtypes, particularly small-cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Among NS, any passive smoking exposure did not significantly increase lung cancer risk (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.52–1.49). However, risk tended to be increased in NS with adult home passive smoking exposure ≥30 years, compared with NS with no adult home exposure (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.00–2.58). Conclusions In this prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, active smoking significantly increased risk of all lung cancer subtypes; current smokers had significantly increased risk compared with FS. Among NS, prolonged passive adult home exposure tended to increase lung cancer risk. These data support continued need for smoking prevention and cessation interventions, passive smoking research, and further study of lung cancer risk factors

  3. Active and passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A; Kubo, J; Luo, J; Desai, M; Hedlin, H; Henderson, M; Chlebowski, R; Tindle, H; Chen, C; Gomez, S; Manson, J E; Schwartz, A G; Wactawski-Wende, J; Cote, M; Patel, M I; Stefanick, M L; Wakelee, H A

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of worldwide cancer deaths. While smoking is its leading risk factor, few prospective cohort studies have reported on the association of lung cancer with both active and passive smoking. This study aimed to determine the relationship between lung cancer incidence with both active and passive smoking (childhood, adult at home, and at work). The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) was a prospective cohort study conducted at 40 US centers that enrolled postmenopausal women from 1993 to 1999. Among 93 676 multiethnic participants aged 50-79, 76 304 women with complete smoking and covariate data comprised the analytic cohort. Lung cancer incidence was calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by smoking status. Over 10.5 mean follow-up years, 901 lung cancer cases were identified. Compared with never smokers (NS), lung cancer incidence was much higher in current [hazard ratio (HR) 13.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 10.80-16.75] and former smokers (FS; HR 4.20, 95% CI 3.48-5.08) in a dose-dependent manner. Current and FS had significantly increased risk for all lung cancer subtypes, particularly small-cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Among NS, any passive smoking exposure did not significantly increase lung cancer risk (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.52-1.49). However, risk tended to be increased in NS with adult home passive smoking exposure ≥30 years, compared with NS with no adult home exposure (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.00-2.58). In this prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, active smoking significantly increased risk of all lung cancer subtypes; current smokers had significantly increased risk compared with FS. Among NS, prolonged passive adult home exposure tended to increase lung cancer risk. These data support continued need for smoking prevention and cessation interventions, passive smoking research, and further study of lung cancer risk factors in addition to smoking. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT00000611.

  4. Effectiveness of endoscopic gastric cancer screening in a rural area of Linzhou, China: results from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiong; Yu, Liang; Hao, Chang-Qing; Wang, Jin-Wu; Liu, Shu-Zheng; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Shao-Kai; Guo, Lan-Wei; Quan, Pei-Liang; Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Ya-Wei; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-09-01

    In China, a large burden of gastric cancer has remained, and endoscopic screening was expected to reduce gastric cancer mortality. Therefore, a population-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the screening effect. The gastric cancer screening program was initiated in Linzhou in the year 2005, and endoscopic examination with indicative biopsy, for residents aged 40-69 years, was used to detect early cancer and precancerous lesion. In this study, cases were defined as individuals who had died of gastric cancer, which were selected from Linzhou Cancer Registry database. Controls were residents (six per case), who had not died of gastric cancer, from the same area as the case, and matched by gender and age (±2 years). The exposure status, whether cases and controls ever attended the screening or not, was acquired by inspecting the well-documented screening records. Conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A total of 313 cases and 1876 controls were included in our analysis. Compared with subjects who never participated in screening, the overall OR for individuals who ever participated in screening was 0.72(95% CI: 0.54-0.97). The OR for lag time 4 years or longer was 0.68(95% CI: 0.47-0.98) and the OR for those who were aged 50-59 years were 0.56 (0.37-0.85). The results suggest a 28% reduction in risk of gastric cancer mortality by endoscopic screening, which may have significant implications for gastric cancer screening in rural areas of China. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Developing cancer services strategy in primary care in England: primary care trust managers' views of the primary care cancer leads initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Brenda; Heywood, Phil; Allgar, Victoria; Walker, Reg; Darr, Aamra; Din, Ikhlaq

    2006-01-01

    Primary care cancer lead clinicians (PCCLs) act strategically in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England to improve communication and understanding of cancer across primary and secondary care and provide a link between Cancer Networks and primary care. The aim is to evaluate the first three years of the initiative. A postal questionnaire was sent to all PCT chief executives in all PCTs in England and some were passed on to other PCT managers for completion. The response rate was 61 per cent. PCT directors of public health were the largest group of respondents (29 per cent). Most (74 per cent) PCCLs were GPs and 22 per cent were nurses. PCCLs were most likely to focus on palliative care and preventive services. Key achievements were identified as raising awareness of cancer, developing relationships and promoting primary care. The personal skills of the PCCLs were important as was support of colleagues at all levels. Lack of time was a major barrier to achievement, as was a lack of understanding of the role from others. Links with the Cancer Networks were being developed. About 85 per cent of managers wanted the role to continue. The paper illustrates that PCCLs are at the forefront of improving cancer services in primary care. They are particularly important in view of the priority of reducing premature deaths and promotion of healthy lifestyles.

  6. Risk factors for lung cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, I; Hamada, G S; Zamboni, M M; Cordeiro, P de B; Watanabe, S; Tsugane, S

    1994-09-01

    The association between the risk of lung cancer and tobacco smoking, dietary factors and occupational exposures was examined in a hospital-based case-control study. The study involved 123 consecutive cases and 123 controls, matched by age (+/- 3), sex, and race. In this first study of lung cancer risk in Brazil, we found that tobacco smoking is the strongest risk factor with an odds ratio (OR) for current and former smokers of 22 (CI, 6.5-76) and 7.7 (CI, 2.2-27), respectively. An OR of 2.8 (CI, 1.0-7.7) was found for users of black tobacco in the form of hand-rolled cigarettes) in combination with conventional cigarettes, after adjustment for life-time consumption of any kind of tobacco; users of conventional cigarettes only were considered as a reference group. Cessation of smoking had an important influence in reducing the lung cancer risk, whereas early initiation of smoking increased the risk. Among dietary factors, frequent consumption of meat (P study confirmed the association of lung cancer with smoking as the most important predictor of risk. It also indicates the increase in risk associated with the use of black tobacco in combination with conventional cigarettes.

  7. OBESITY IN RELATION TO ENDOMETRIAL CANCER RISK AND DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS IN THE WOMEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katherine W.; Carter, Gebra Cuyun; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Lane, Dorothy; McNeeley, S. Gene; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Obesity increases endometrial cancer risk, yet its impact on disease stage and grade is unclear. We prospectively examined the effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) on incidence, stage, and grade of endometrial cancer. Methods We studied 86,937 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative. Height, weight, and waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline. Endometrial cancer cases were adjudicated by trained physicians and pathology reports were used to determine stage and grade. Cox proportional hazards models generated hazard ratios (HR) for associations between BMI and WHR and risk of endometrial cancer. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between BMI and WHR and disease stage and grade. Results During a mean 7.8 (standard deviation 1.6) years of follow-up, 806 women were diagnosed with endometrial cancer. Though incidence was higher among Whites, stage and grade were similar between Whites and Blacks. Elevated BMI (HR 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-2.19) and WHR (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.04-1.70) increased endometrial cancer risk when comparing women in the highest and lowest categories. No associations were observed between BMI or WHR and disease stage or grade. Conclusions Obesity increases endometrial cancer risk independent of other factors, but is not associated with stage or grade of disease. These findings support and validate previous reports. Future research should evaluate the impact of obesity on racial disparities in endometrial cancer survival. PMID:21324514

  8. Patterns of care for the initial management of cervical cancer in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Barbera, L; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Urbach, D; Simunovic, M

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for cervical cancer. Women with an incident diagnosis of cervical cancer were identified from 1 April, 2003 to 31 March, 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. There were 513 incident cases. Disease-specific rates of cancer were higher in rural areas and those from lower income quintiles. Forty-three percent of women had no surgery. Use of surgery did not appear to vary by SEC, urban/rural residence or LHIN. Women of younger age were more like to receive surgery for cervical cancer. Gynecologists conducted 63% of the operations. Gynecologics were most likely to complete a lymphadenectomy (70.3%). All women were assessed by CXR. Only 22% of women had a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Radiation consults were performed in half of the women with cervix cancer but treatment was only delivered to half of those seen. Medical oncologists saw about 10% of women with cervical cancers. There appear to be variations in incidence rates of cervical cancer, with cancers being more frequent in rural areas. In two-thirds of the population, surgery is performed in the region where the patient lives. Subspecialty care from gynecologic oncologists was provided to one-third of women. These preliminary data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage.

  9. Increased Risk of Depression Recurrence after Initiation of Prescription Opioids in Non-Cancer Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Salas, Joanne; Copeland, Laurel A.; Stock, Eileen M.; Schneider, F. David; Sullivan, Mark; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Burroughs, Thomas; Lustman, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated chronic opioid analgesic use is associated with increased risk of new onset depression. It is not known if patients with remitted depression are at increased risk of relapse following exposure to opioid analgesics. A retrospective cohort design using patient data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA; n=5,400), and Baylor Scott & White Health (BSWH; n=842) was performed with an observation period 2002–2012 in VHA and 2003–2012 in BSWH. Eligible patients had a diagnosis of depression at baseline and experienced a period of remission. Risk of depression recurrence was modeled in patients that either started an opioid or remained without opioid prescriptions before or during remission. Cox-proportional hazard models measured the association between opioid use and depression recurrence controlling for pain, and other confounders. Patients exposed to an opioid compared to those unexposed had a significantly greater risk of depression recurrence in both patient populations (VHA: HR=2.17; 95% CI:2.01–2.34; BSWH: HR=1.77; 95% CI:1.42–2.21). These results suggest opioid use doubles the risk of depression recurrence even after controlling for pain, psychiatric disorders and opioid misuse. Further work is needed to determine if risk increases with duration of use. Repeated screening for depression after opioid initiation may be warranted. PMID:26884282

  10. Identification of a population of blood circulating tumor cells from breast cancer patients that initiates metastasis in a xenograft assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccelli, Irène; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Riethdorf, Sabine; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Schillert, Anja; Vogel, Vanessa; Klein, Corinna; Saini, Massimo; Bäuerle, Tobias; Wallwiener, Markus; Holland-Letz, Tim; Höfner, Thomas; Sprick, Martin; Scharpff, Martina; Marmé, Frederik; Sinn, Hans Peter; Pantel, Klaus; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that carcinoma metastasis is initiated by a subpopulation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) found in the blood of patients. However, although the presence of CTCs is an indicator of poor prognosis in several carcinoma entities, the existence and phenotype of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) among CTCs has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here we developed a xenograft assay and used it to show that primary human luminal breast cancer CTCs contain MICs that give rise to bone, lung and liver metastases in mice. These MIC-containing CTC populations expressed EPCAM, CD44, CD47 and MET. In a small cohort of patients with metastases, the number of EPCAM(+)CD44(+)CD47(+)MET(+) CTCs, but not of bulk EPCAM(+) CTCs, correlated with lower overall survival and increased number of metastasic sites. These data describe functional circulating MICs and associated markers, which may aid the design of better tools to diagnose and treat metastatic breast cancer.

  11. TPO-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming Drives Liver Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer CD110+ Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, ZhengMing; Wei, Dong; Gao, WenChao; Xu, YuTing; Hu, ZhiQian; Ma, ZhenYu; Gao, ChunFang; Zhu, XiaoYan; Li, QingQuan

    2015-07-02

    Liver metastasis is a leading cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer. We previously found that colorectal cancer tumor-initiating cells (TICs) expressing CD110, the thrombopoietin (TPO)-binding receptor, mediate liver metastasis. Here, we show that TPO promotes metastasis of CD110+ TICs to the liver by activating lysine degradation. Lysine catabolism generates acetyl-CoA, which is used in p300-dependent LRP6 acetylation. This triggers tyrosine phosphorylation of LRP6, ultimately activating Wnt signaling to promote self-renewal of CD110+ TICs. Lysine catabolism also generates glutamate, which modulates the redox status of CD110+ TICs to promote liver colonization and drug resistance. Mechanistically, TPO-mediated induction of c-myc orchestrates recruitment of chromatin modifiers to regulate metabolic gene expression. Our findings, therefore, establish TPO as a component of the physiological environment critical for metastasis of colorectal cancer to the liver. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Case-control study of gastric cancer screening in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, P; Oliver, W E; Parkin, D M; Alvarez, N; Vivas, J

    1994-06-01

    A screening programme for early gastric cancer was introduced in the state of Tachira, Venezuela, in 1980. Screening was performed by photofluorography, using two mobile units. The efficacy of this programme in reducing mortality from stomach cancer was evaluated by means of a case-control study. Cases were 241 individuals who died from stomach cancer in the period 1985-89. Ten live controls per case were drawn from the electoral rolls, matched by sex, age and residence. Exposure to the screening examination of cases and controls was assessed through individual linkage with the programme's centralised database. After the exclusion of examinations occurring within the 6 months preceding the case's diagnosis, the odds ratio (OR) of dying from stomach cancer for those screened was 1.26 (CI 0.83-1.91) and the OR in females was lower than in males: 0.77 (CI 0.33-1.78) and 1.52 (CI 0.94-2.47) respectively. Odds ratios associated with years since last test and number of tests did not differ significantly from 1. These results show the inefficacy of the programme in reducing mortality from gastric cancer in the area. In an attempt to determine whether this result was due to selection bias, an analysis restricted to subjects who had been screened at least once was performed. When examinations occurring after an index date at various intervals before the case's diagnosis were excluded, the screening test appeared to protect from death, although confidence intervals of the odds ratios are large, for example OR = 0.47 (CI 0.24-0.98) when excluding tests within 1 month.

  13. Bivalent Epigenetic Control of Oncofetal Gene Expression in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Frietze, Seth E; Gordon, Jonathan A; Heath, Jessica L; Messier, Terri; Hong, Deli; Boyd, Joseph R; Kang, Mingu; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms of epigenetic control that include DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNAs, and mitotic gene bookmarking play pivotal roles in stringent gene regulation during lineage commitment and maintenance. Experimental evidence indicates that bivalent chromatin domains, i.e., genome regions that are marked by both H3K4me3 (activating) and H3K27me3 (repressive) histone modifications, are a key property of pluripotent stem cells. Bivalency of developmental genes during the G 1 phase of the pluripotent stem cell cycle contributes to cell fate decisions. Recently, some cancer types have been shown to exhibit partial recapitulation of bivalent chromatin modifications that are lost along with pluripotency, suggesting a mechanism by which cancer cells reacquire properties that are characteristic of undifferentiated, multipotent cells. This bivalent epigenetic control of oncofetal gene expression in cancer cells may offer novel insights into the onset and progression of cancer and may provide specific and selective options for diagnosis as well as for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Thoracoscopic lobectomy as salvage surgery for local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer after carbon ion radiotherapy in an initially operable patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi; Suzawa, Ken; Ichimura, Kouichi; Fujii, Osamu; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has recently provided favorable local control with very few toxic reactions. Because CIRT for NSCLC has been mostly performed for elderly or inoperable patients, salvage surgery for NSCLC after CIRT has rarely been reported. We describe a case of complete thoracoscopic right upper lobectomy with mediastinal lymphadenectomy performed as salvage surgery for local recurrence of stage IA NSCLC after CIRT in an initially operable patient who had refused surgery 27 months previously. Pleural adhesions caused by CIRT were localized to the pulmonary apex and the central pulmonary structures were intact at the time of the salvage surgery, which allowed us to successfully perform thoracoscopic lobectomy without any complications. Thus, salvage surgery for NSCLC after CIRT may be feasible in an initially operable patient, as CIRT appears to be unlikely to cause any difficulties in the salvage surgery.

  15. Family History as a Risk for Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer: A Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    A Safaee; Moghimi Dehkordi, B; Fatemi, SR; Maserat, E; Ghafarnejad, F; Zali, MR

    2011-01-01

    Background Although, family history of cancer is an important risk factor for upper gastrointestinal cancers development, but limited information is available on the upper gastrointestinal cancers associated with family history in Iran. The purpose of this study was to define upper gastrointestinal cancers risk associated with family history of cancer. Methods This study was conducted as a case control study. A total number of 1,010 cases of upper gastrointestinal cancer and 1,010 healthy con...

  16. Risk Factors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Recurrence Following Initial Treatment: A 5-year Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Fararouei, Mohammad; Zohourinia, Shadi; Daneshi, Nima; Dianatinasab, Mostafa

    2017-09-27

    Purpose: Recurrence is one of the most important factors influencing survival of colorectal cancer patients. Subjects and Methods: In this cohort study, clinical and demographic characteristics of 561 patients with colorectal cancer were collected from 2010 to 2015. Medical records and telephone interviews were used to define the patient’s clinical status including the date of any recurrence during the study period. The multivariate Cox model was used as the main strategy for analyzing data. Results: Some 239 (42.6%) patients experienced cancer recurrence during the 5-year follow-up period. Those with an older age at diagnosis had a higher risk of cancer recurrence than their younger counterparts [Hazard Ratio (HR) >70 y /<50 y= 1.65, P=0.01]. Rectal cancer had a greater risk of disease recurrence compared with other tumor sites [HR colon/ rectum=1.53, P=0.02]. Stage 3 cancer had a higher risk than stage 1 cancer [HR stage 3/ stage 1=4.30, P<0.001], and positive lympho-vascular invasion was also a risk factor [HR yes/ no=2.03, P<0.001]. Finally, tumor size , number of dissected lymph nodes, proportion of positive lymph nodes, perineural invasion and type of treatment did not significantly predict recurrence. Conclusion: Access to enhanced medical services including cancer diagnosis at an early stage and optimal treatment is needed to improve the survival and quality of life of CRC patients. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Understanding community beliefs of Chinese-Australians about cancer: initial insights using an ethnographic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Soo See; Meiser, Bettina; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Goldstein, David; Tucker, Katherine; Eisenbruch, Maurice

    2005-03-01

    Ethnography was employed to investigate the hypothesis that the cultural meaning of cancer is one of the possible barriers to access of cancer services. The objectives were to identify indigenous terminologies, taxonomies and illness explanatory models of cancer in a community-based sample of 15 Chinese-Australians and a sample of 16 informants who had been recruited through two Sydney familial cancer clinics. Many of the informants included in their narrative terms that seemed to match Western biomedical explanations for cancer. The majority of informants also maintained traditional Chinese beliefs, despite high acculturation and beliefs in biomedical explanations about cancer. Explanations of illness including cancer, referred to the following concepts: (i) karma (yeh), (ii) retribution (bao ying), (iii) fate (ming yun) or Heaven's or God's will, (iv) geomancy (feng-shui), (v) touched evil (zhong chia), (vi) misfortune or bad luck (shui wan, dong hark); (vii) offending the gods or deities requiring prayers or offerings for appeasement; and (viii) kong-tau (spells invoked through human intervention). Taking into consideration the heterogeneity of the Chinese population, the findings provide an insight into Chinese illness conceptualization that may assist health professionals to develop an understanding of how the cultural explanatory models affect access to screening services, communication of diagnosis of cancer and management of treatment regimen. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  19. Ligand-dependent Notch signaling is involved in tumor initiation and tumor maintenance in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullendore, Michael E.; Koorstra, Jan-Bart; Li, Yue-Ming; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Fan, Xing; Henderson, Clark M.; Matsui, William; Eberhart, Charles G.; Maitra, Anirban; Feldmann, Georg

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aberrant activation of the Notch signaling pathway is commonly observed in human pancreatic cancer, although the mechanism(s) for this activation has not been elucidated. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A panel of 20 human pancreatic cancer cell lines was profiled for the expression of Notch

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of breast cancer control interventions in peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, S.G.; Vidaurre, T.; Abugattas, J.E.; Manrique, J.E.; Sarria, G.; Jeronimo, J.; Seinfeld, J.N.; Lauer, J.A.; Sepulveda, C.R.; Venegas, D.; Baltussen, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Peru, a country with constrained health resources, breast cancer control is characterized by late stage treatment and poor survival. To support breast cancer control in Peru, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of different breast cancer control interventions relevant

  1. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of breast cancer control interventions in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, S.G.; Vidaurre, T.; Abugattas, J.E.; Manrique, J.E.; Sarria, G.; Jeronimo, J.; Seinfeld, J.N.; Lauer, J.A.; Sepulveda, C.R.; Venegas, D.; Baltussen, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Peru, a country with constrained health resources, breast cancer control is characterized by late stage treatment and poor survival. To support breast cancer control in Peru, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of different breast cancer control interventions relevant

  3. The adaptive role of perceived control before and after cancer diagnosis : A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranchor, A.V.; Wardle, J.; Steptoe, A.; Henselmans, I.; Ormel, J.; Sanderman, R.

    Cancer is generally considered a low-control situation. Stability of perceptions of control before and after cancer was examined, as well as the adaptive value of maintenance versus relinquishment of control in the psychological adjustment to cancer. This study, conducted in the northern

  4. Enhancing a cancer prevention and control curriculum through interactive group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L P; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B M; Kent, E E; Lai, G Y; Lin, S W; Luhn, P; Faupel-Badger, J M

    2012-06-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This 4-week postgraduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g., epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, cancer prevention fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking among the course participants and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current cancer prevention fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87 and 8/10, respectively) reported a high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in a greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated that they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses.

  5. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S.M.; Hamilton, J.G.; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G.Y.; Lin, S.W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, Cancer Prevention Fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking amongst the course participants, and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current Cancer Prevention Fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87, and 8/10, respectively), reported high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses. PMID:22661264

  6. Raising the awareness of undergraduate nurses to the psychosocial impact of living with cancer: A consumer engagement in teaching initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Zannettino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the development and implementation of a consumer engagement in teaching initiative by the authors. The authors highlight the challenges of engaging undergraduate nursing students on the psychosocial aspects of living with cancer and other chronic illnesses when students have very limited personal and professional experiences to draw on. The authors discuss how they have responded to these challenges by integrating the voices of consumers into their classrooms. Speakers from consumer advocacy organization, Cancer Voices SA, participated in a series of tutorials in a 1 st year topic in the Undergraduate Nursing Program at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University. Student feedback from the implementation of the initiative indicated that students found consumers′ stories and experiences of living with cancer, "moving and powerful" and that they encouraged students to question their assumptions about the psychosocial impacts of cancer on individuals and families. The importance of good communication in reducing patient distress was identified by students as an important element of consumers′ experiences of the health care system as was the need for transparency and information sharing between health care providers across the health care system. For many students, consumers′ stories and experiences had reinforced students′ commitment to studying nursing and pursuing a career in nursing. The article concludes that involving consumers in the education of health care professionals encourages a much deeper understanding of and empathy for how patients experience disease, which is integral to the provision of patient-centered and holistic care.

  7. Cancer control and the communication innovation in South Korea: implications for cancer disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in South Korea has reached nearly one million with a survival rate of 49.4%. However, integrated supportive care for cancer survivors is lagging. One area in which the current cancer control policy needs updating is in the utilization of information and communication technology (ICT). The remarkable progress in the field of ICT over the past 10 years presents exciting new opportunities for health promotion. Recent communication innovations are conducive to the exchange of meta-information, giving rise to a new service area and transforming patients into active medical consumers. Consequently, such innovations encourage active participation in the mutual utilization and sharing of high-quality information. However, these benefits from new ICTs will almost certainly not be equally available to all, leading to so-called communication inequalities where cancer survivors from lower socioeconomic classes will likely have more limited access to the best means of making use of the health information. Therefore, most essentially, emphasis must be placed on helping cancer survivors and their caregivers utilize such advances in ICT to create a more efficient flow of health information, thereby reducing communication inequalities and expanding social support. Once we enhance access to health information and better manage the quality of information, as a matter of fact, we can expect an alleviation of the health inequalities faced by cancer survivors.

  8. Receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control messages and adolescent smoking initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Kristen T; Messer, Karen; Vera, Lisa; Ojeda, Norma; Elder, John P; Usita, Paula; Pierce, John P

    2015-05-01

    Tobacco industry cigarette advertising is associated with increased adolescent smoking, while counter tobacco advertising is associated with reduced smoking. As these campaigns compete for influence, there is a need to understand their inter-relationship on youth smoking. This study reports data from a national population of families (n=1036) with an oldest child aged 10-13 years, identified by random digit dialling. Parent and child dyads completed baseline questionnaires in 2003. Adolescents were resurveyed in 2007-2008 (response rate 74%). Adjusted logistic regression explores associations between receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control advertising and adolescent smoking initiation. In 2007-2008, 57.9% of adolescents reported a favourite tobacco control advertisement and 43.3% reported being receptive to cigarette advertisements. Thirty per cent reported receptivity to cigarette and tobacco control advertisements. Among those receptive to cigarette advertising, having a favourite anti-smoking advertisement had a borderline significant association with a 30% lower smoking rate. Anti-industry tobacco control messages were three times more likely to be favourites of those who were receptive to cigarette advertising than other tobacco control advertising. Receptivity to tobacco control advertising appeared to ameliorate the promotion of initiation from cigarette advertising. Anti-industry advertising appears to be the most effective counter for tobacco control and should be considered for wider use. A larger longitudinal study is needed to confirm these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. A Matched Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Risk in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, J.; Le, Q. H.; Duong, B. H.; Sun, P.; Pham, H. T.; Ta, V. T.; Kotsopoulos, J.; Narod, S. A.; Ginsburg, O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vietnam has a low age-standardized incidence of breast cancer, but the incidence is rising rapidly with economic development. We report data from a matched case-control study of risk factors for breast cancer in the largest cancer hospital in Vietnam. Methods. 492 incident breast cancer cases unselected for family history or age at diagnosis and 1306 control women age 25–75 were recruited from the National Cancer Hospital (BVK), Hanoi. Structured interviews were conducted and path...

  10. Association between Alcohol Consumption, Folate Intake, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Winta Yellow; Bamlet, William R.; Ann L Oberg; Anderson, Kristin E.; Olson, Janet E.; Rashmi Sinha; Petersen, Gloria M.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Jansen, Rick J.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal common cancers affecting both men and women, representing about 3% of all new cancer cases in the United States. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of pancreatic cancer risk with alcohol consumption as well as folate intake. We performed a case-control study of 384 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from May 2004 to December 2009 and 983 primary care healthy controls in a largely white population (>96%). Our findings sho...

  11. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, M; Risch, H A; Bosetti, C; Anderson, K E; Petersen, G M; Bamlet, W R; Cotterchio, M; Cleary, S P; Ibiebele, T I; La Vecchia, C; Skinner, H G; Strayer, L; Bracci, P M; Maisonneuve, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Zaton Ski, W; Lu, L; Yu, H; Janik-Koncewicz, K; Polesel, J; Serraino, D; Neale, R E

    2015-08-01

    The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus vitamin A intake. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Random start ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation appears unlikely to delay initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Joseph M; Sinha, Nikita; Wald, Kaitlyn; Harris, Eve; Quinn, Molly; Imbar, Tal; Mok-Lin, Evelyn; Chien, A Jo; Rosen, Mitchell

    2017-10-01

    Is random start ovarian stimulation associated with delays in initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer? Among women who complete fertility preservation (FP) consultation, random start ovarian stimulation is unlikely to delay time to initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy start. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is now a widely accepted treatment modality for operable breast cancer and random start ovarian stimulation is an increasingly-utilized modality for FP. While conventional ovarian stimulation does not appear to delay starting adjuvant chemotherapy, the relationship between random start ovarian stimulation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy start is not well-understood. Cross-sectional study of all women seen between from January 2011 to April 2017 for FP consultation prior to starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A chart-review was performed. Study inclusion criteria were female sex; age 18-45; non-metastatic breast cancer diagnosis; underwent FP consultation; underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Referrals for FP evaluation came from a regional referral base of oncology clinics. Various time-points related to cancer diagnosis, FP or chemotherapy were obtained from medical record review. We compared time-points between those who underwent ovarian stimulation for FP versus those who did not using T-tests and linear modeling. A total of 89 women who had FP consultation prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were identified. Sixty-seven percent underwent ovarian stimulation prior to cancer treatment and 33% did not. Women who underwent ovarian stimulation were similar in parity and clinical cancer stage to those who did not. Overall, the average time from cancer diagnosis to chemotherapy start was similar between the group that did undergo ovarian stimulation and those who did not (38.1 ± 11.3 versus 39.4 ± 18.5 days, P = 0.672). Those that underwent ovarian stimulation were referred 9.4 ± 6.8 days after diagnosis versus 17.9 ± 15.3 days for those

  13. The "Win-Win" initiative: a global, scientifically based approach to resource sparing treatment for systemic breast cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzawawy Ahmed

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among females. Its incidence shows a trend towards an increase in the next decade, particularly in developing countries where less than of 5% of resources for cancer management are available. In most breast cancer cases systemic cancer treatment remains a primary management strategy. With the increasing costs of novel drugs, amidst the growing breast cancer rate, it can be safely assumed that in the next decade, newly developed cancer drugs will become less affordable and therefore will be available to fewer patients in low and middle income countries. In light of this potentially tragic situation, a pressing need emerges for science-based innovative solutions. Methods In this article, we cite examples of recently published researches and case management approaches that have been shown to lower overall treatment costs without compromising patient outcomes. The cited approaches are not presented as wholly inclusive or definitive solutions but are offered as effective examples that we hope will inspire the development of additional evidence-based management approaches that provide both efficient and effective breast cancer treatment Results We propose a "win-win" initiative, borne in the year of 2008 of strategic information sharing through preparatory communications, publications and our conference presentations. In the year 2009, ideas developed through these mechanisms can be refined through focused small pilot meetings with interested stakeholders, including the clinical, patient advocate, and pharmaceutical communities, and as appropriate (as proposed plans emerge, governmental representatives. The objective is to draw a realistic road map for feasible and innovative scientific strategies and collaborative actions that could lead to resource sparing; i.e. cost effective and tailored breast cancer systemic treatment for low and middle income countries. Conclusion The

  14. Transcriptome analysis of basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells in ErbB2-driven breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Borcherding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality for females worldwide [1]. Improving early screening strategies and understanding the events that lead to tumor initiation have led to demonstrable improvements in clinical outcome. Our previous work revealed a variance in the tumorigenic capacity between different mammary epithelial cell populations in an MMTV-ErbB2 mouse model. In order to greater understand how different mammary epithelial cells influence the tumorigenic capacity in ErbB2-induced breast cancer, we transplanted different cell populations from pre-neoplastic MMTV-ErbB2 female mice into recipient mice for tumorigenic study. We found that different mammary epithelial cells bear different tumorigenic potentials even when induced by the same ErbB2 proto-oncogene. To understand the difference in tumors formed from different epithelial cells, we performed gene expression profiling using these tumors (GSE64487. Several genes were further validated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Here we provide further details on the experimental methods and microarray analysis. This data provides a resource to further understanding how different mammary cell populations can initiate ErbB2-driven tumors and the role of these cell populations as putative tumor-initiating cells (TICs.

  15. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ye Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients.

  16. Cellular glutathione level does not predict ovarian cancer cells' resistance after initial or repeated exposure to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikounezhad, Nastaran; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2017-05-01

    Cisplatin resistance development is a major obstacle in ovarian cancer treatment. One of the most important mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance is drug detoxification by glutathione. In the present study, the importance of initial or repeated exposure to cisplatin in glutathione dependent resistance was investigated. To this purpose, some cisplatin sensitive and resistant variants of human ovarian cancer cell lines providing an appropriate range of cisplatin sensitivity were selected. Clonogenic survival assay was performed to evaluate cisplatin resistance and intracellular contents of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione were analyzed using an HPLC method. Our results indicated that the intracellular GSH and GSSG concentrations were nearly equal in A2780 and A2780CP cells, while the A2780CP cells showed 14 times more resistance than the A2780 cells after initial exposure to cisplatin. A2780-R1 and A2780-R3 cells which have been repeatedly exposed to cisplatin also showed no significant difference in glutathione content, even though A2780-R3 was about two times more resistant than A2780-R1. Moreover, intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio decreased in the resistant cells, reflecting a shift towards a more oxidizing intracellular environment indicative of oxidative stress. As a conclusion, it seems that although the intracellular glutathione concentration increases after repeated exposure to cisplatin, there is no clear correlation between the intracellular GSH content in ovarian cancer cells and their resistance to cisplatin neither after initial nor after repeated exposure to this drug.

  17. New advances of TMEM88 in cancer initiation and progression, with special emphasis on Wnt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yun-Xuan; Wang, Chang-Hui; Hu, Fu-Yong; Pan, Lin-Xin; Min, Jie; Niu, Kai-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jun; Xu, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 88 (TMEM88), a newly discovered protein localized on the cell membrane. Recent studies showed that TMEM88 was involved in the regulation of several types of cancer. TMEM88 was expressed at significantly higher levels in breast cancer (BC) cell line than in normal breast cell line with co-localized with Dishevelled (DVL) in the cytoplasm of BC cell line. TMEM88 silencing in the ovarian cancer cell line CP70 resulted in significant upregulation of Wnt downstream genes (c-Myc, cyclin-D1) and other Wnt target genes including JUN, PTIX2, CTNNB1 (β-catenin), further supporting that TMEM88 inhibits canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Wnt signaling pathway has been known to play important roles in many diseases, especially in cancer. For instance, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become one of the most common tumors harboring mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. As the inhibitor of Wnt signaling, TMEM88 has been considered to act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor. Up-regulated TMEM88 or gene therapy approaches could be an effective therapeutic approach against tumor as TMEM88 inhibits Wnt signaling through direct interaction with DVL. Here, we review the current knowledge on the functional role and potential clinical application of TMEM88 in the control of various cancers. Highlights Wnt signaling displays an important role in several pathogenesis of cancer. Wnt signaling pathway is activated during cancer development. TMEM88 has an impact on cancer by inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. We discuss the importance and new applications of TMEM88 in cancer therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Eleven-year outcome of patients with prostate cancers diagnosed during screening after initial negative sextant biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Fritz H; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; Wolters, Tineke; van Leeuwen, Pim J; Bangma, Chris H; van der Kwast, Theo H; Roobol, Monique J

    2010-02-01

    The appropriate way of biopsying a prostate remains controversial. Is sextant biopsy still adequate with repeat screening? Within the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), lateralized sextant biopsies were applied. In this analysis we use distant end points to study the fate of prostate cancers (PCa) potentially missed by initial biopsies. This retrospective study included 19 970 men ages 55-74 identified from the Rotterdam population registry and screened repeatedly for PCa between 1993 and 2005. PCa detected later in men with initially negative biopsies were considered as missed. Rescreening every 4 yr and a complete follow-up of 11 yr allowed an inventory of progressive and deadly disease in these men. Sextant biopsies initially, later lateralized, in screen-positive men. The fate of PCa potentially missed by initial sextant biopsies in terms of progression-free and PCa-specific survival were the main outcome measures. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate differences between subgroups. In 3056 men with negative biopsies at the first screen, 287 PCa were subsequently detected. Of these 287 cases, 26 developed progressive disease and 7 died of PCa. Poor outcomes were encountered mainly in 20 interval cases. The seven PCa deaths in men with initially negative biopsies amounted to only 0.03% compared to the 0.35% PCa death rate in the whole population of 19 970 men. Limitations include the retrospective character of this analysis. The number of potentially missed cancers with a poor outcome in terms of progression-free survival and deaths from PCa is very low. Despite some limitations, our data show that lateralized sextant biopsy is not obsolete if repeated screening is applied. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance Control Strategies: A Coordinated Research Initiative Experience in the Asia Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Lisette; Asenjo, Gabriela; Vergara, Constanza; Cornejo, Javiera

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to gather information on the status of antimicrobial surveillance in the Asia Pacific region and suggest control strategies. Twenty-one economies of the Asia Pacific region participated in this initiative. A survey was conducted on antimicrobial use and surveillance throughout the region. A workshop was carried out to create awareness about the issue and discuss the implementation of control strategies. Based on the survey results and workshop conclusions, it can be established that there is better understanding of the implications of antimicrobial resistance in the human medicine area. Only few economies take actions to control antimicrobial resistance on a veterinary/agricultural level. To confront antimicrobial resistance, it is critical to raise awareness; cooperation between all countries is needed to apply international standards, to be able to have harmonized public policies. Countries must align and improve their systems for surveillance and monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in human, animals, and the environment.

  20. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  1. A blended knowledge translation initiative to improve colorectal cancer staging [ISRCTN56824239

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan David P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant gap has been documented between best practice and the actual practice of surgery. Our group identified that colorectal cancer staging in Ontario was suboptimal and subsequently developed a knowledge translation strategy using the principles of social marketing and the influence of expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer. Methods/Design Opinion leaders were identified using the Hiss methodology. Hospitals in Ontario were cluster-randomized to one of two intervention arms. Both groups were exposed to a formal continuing medical education session given by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer. In the treatment group the local Opinion Leader for colorectal cancer was detailed by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer and received a toolkit. Forty-two centres agreed to have the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer come and give a formal continuing medical education session that lasted between 50 minutes and 4 hours. No centres refused the intervention. These sessions were generally well attended by most surgeons, pathologists and other health care professionals at each centre. In addition all but one of the local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer met with the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer for the academic detailing session that lasted between 15 and 30 minutes. Discussion We have enacted a unique study that has attempted to induce practice change among surgeons and pathologists using an adapted social marketing model that utilized the influence of both expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer in a large geographic area with diverse practice settings.

  2. Patterns of care in the initial management of women with vulvar cancers in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Barbera, L; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Simunovic, M; Urbach, D

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of future resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for vulvar cancer. Women with an incident diagnosis of vulvar malignancy were identified from 1, April 2003 to 31 March, 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Vulvar cancers affected 148 women. Disease specific rates of cancer were higher in rural areas and in women in the lower income quintiles. No surgery occurred in 17.6% of women. Use of surgery did not appear to vary by urban/rural residence or LHIN. Ontario's 17 gynecologic oncologists performed 75% of the surgeries. Groin lymphadenectomy rate was 52.8%. Surgery was performed in the LHIN of residence for 41% of women. All women were assessed by CXR. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis occurred in 77%. MRIs were done infrequently. Radiation consults were preformed in half of the women with vulvar cancer but treatment was only delivered in half of those seen. Medical oncologists saw about 10% of women with gynecologic cancers. There appear to be variations in incidence rates of vulvar cancer with disease being more frequent in rural areas. Subspecialty care from gynecologic oncologists was provided to 75% of women. Rates of lymphadenectomy as part of a surgical attempt occurred in 52.8% of women. These data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage.

  3. Advances in the diagnosis of hereditary kidney cancer: Initial results of a multigene panel test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Espenschied, Carin R; LaDuca, Holly; Bhagat, Ansh M; Suarez-Sarmiento, Alfredo; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Brierley, Karina L; Hofstatter, Erin W; Shuch, Brian

    2017-11-15

    Panel testing has been recently introduced to evaluate hereditary cancer; however, limited information is available regarding its use in kidney cancer. The authors retrospectively reviewed test results and clinical data from patients who underwent targeted multigene panel testing of up to 19 genes associated with hereditary kidney cancer from 2013 to 2016. The frequency of positive (mutation/variant likely pathogenic), inconclusive (variant of unknown significance), and negative results was evaluated. A logistic regression analysis evaluated predictive factors for a positive test. Patients (n = 1235) had a median age at diagnosis of 46 years, which was significantly younger than the US population of individuals with kidney cancer (P genes included folliculin (FLCN) and fumarate hydratase (FH), which were altered in 1.8% and 1.3% of patients, respectively. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2), mesenchymal epithelial transition factor proto-oncogene (MET), and PMS1 homolog 2 (PMS2) had the highest rates of variants of unknown significance, which were identified in 2.7%, 2.2%, and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Early age of onset was the only factor that was identified as predictive of a positive test on multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 0.975; P = .0052) and may be the only identifying characteristic of low-penetrant syndromes, such as those associated with MITF (melanogenesis-associated transcription factor) mutations, which do not have singular histology or a family history of kidney cancer. Panel tests may be particularly useful for patients who lack distinguishing clinical characteristics of known hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. The current results support the use of early age of onset for genetic counseling and/or testing. Cancer 2017;123:4363-71. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Hypoxia-inducing factors as master regulators of stemness properties and altered metabolism of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α, are key regulators of the adaptation of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells and their differentiated progenies to oxygen and nutrient deprivation during cancer progression under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Particularly, the sustained stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor KIT, transforming growth factor-β receptors (TGF-βRs) and Notch and their downstream signalling elements such as phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) may lead to an enhanced activity of HIFs. Moreover, the up-regulation of HIFs in cancer cells may also occur in the hypoxic intratumoral regions formed within primary and secondary neoplasms as well as in leukaemic cells and metastatic prostate and breast cancer cells homing in the hypoxic endosteal niche of bone marrow. The activated HIFs may induce the expression of numerous gene products such as induced pluripotency-associated transcription factors (Oct-3/4, Nanog and Sox-2), glycolysis- and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme-associated molecules, including CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), snail and twist, microRNAs and angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These gene products in turn can play critical roles for high self-renewal ability, survival, altered energy metabolism, invasion and metastases of cancer cells, angiogenic switch and treatment resistance. Consequently, the targeting of HIF signalling network and altered metabolic pathways represents new promising strategies to eradicate the total mass of cancer cells and improve the efficacy of current therapies against aggressive and metastatic cancers and prevent disease relapse. PMID:23301832

  5. Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Shikany, James M.; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Caan, Bette; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of individual diets, and risk of developing colorectal cancer among 158,800 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We used a GI/GL database developed specifically for the WHI food-frequency questionnaire. Over an average of 7.8 years of follow-up, 1,476 incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between dietary factors classified by quintiles and risk of colorectal cancer, with adjustment for covariates. Total carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and intake of sugars and fiber showed no association with colorectal cancer. Analyses by cancer subsite yielded null results, with the exception of a borderline positive association between glycemic load and rectal cancer (HR for the highest vs. lowest quintile 1.84, 95% confidence interval 0.95–3.56, p for trend 0.05). Analyses stratified by tertiles of body mass index and physical activity showed no evidence of effect modification by these factors. Results of this large study do not support of a role of a diet characterized by a high glycemic index or load in colorectal carcinogenesis in postmenopausal women. PMID:18618276

  6. Galectin-3 augments tumor initiating property and tumorigenicity of lung cancer through interaction with β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ling-Yen; Tang, Shye-Jye; Wu, Yi-Ching; Sun, Guang-Huan; Liu, Huan-Yun; Sun, Kuang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are comprised of a rare sub-population of cells in tumors that have been proposed to be responsible for high recurrence rates and resistance to chemotherapy. Galectins are highly expressed in cancers that correlate with the aggressiveness of tumors. Galectins may also promote the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. However, the role of galectins in CSCs remains unknown. In this study, sphere formation was used to enrich H1299 human lung CSCs that had self-renewal ability, advanced tumorigenic potential, and that highly expressed stem/progenitor cell markers such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and CD133. A novel candidate molecule, galectin-3, for stemness was found in lung CSCs. The expression of galectin-3 robustly increased in lung cancer spheres over serial passages, but its suppression in the H1299 monolayer or spheres resulted in reduced expression of stemness-related genes, sphere-forming ability, tumorigenicity, chemoresistance, and tumor initiation in mice. Notably, the overexpression of galectin-3 in A549 lung cancer cells, which have low capability to grow as tumor spheres, promoted CSC formation. β-catenin activity was increased in H1299 spheres and counteracted by galectin-3 suppression. Thus, galectin-3 may act as a cofactor by interacting with β-catenin to augment the transcriptional activities of stemness-related genes. Furthermore, galectin-3 expression correlated with tumor progression and expressions of β-catenin and CSC marker CD133 in lung cancer tissues. Targeting galectin-3 signaling may provide a new strategy for lung cancer treatment by inhibiting stem-like properties. PMID:25669973

  7. A Transdisciplinary Training Program for Behavioral Oncology and Cancer Control Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Anna M.; Champion, Victoria L.; Kroenke, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Transdisciplinary health research training has been identified as a major initiative to achieve the vision for research teams of the future as articulated in the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. To address the need for scientists who can integrate diverse scientific approaches and work in transdisciplinary teams to solve complex health problems, Indiana University has designed an innovative training program that will provide the didactic and research experiences to enable trainees to establish productive careers in behavioral oncology and cancer control research. Development of a successful transdisciplinary training program requires mentorship, research, and a specialized curriculum that encompass a broad range of disciplines. The program capitalizes on a unique set of existing and emerging training opportunities resulting from the collaborative activities of the Indiana University (IU) Simon Cancer Center, the IU Schools of Nursing and Medicine, and multiple research institutes and academic centers located in Indiana and neighboring states. PMID:18501750

  8. Neural Prescribed Performance Control for Uncertain Marine Surface Vessels without Accurate Initial Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Si

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problems concerned with the trajectory tracking control with prescribed performance for marine surface vessels without velocity measurements in uncertain dynamical environments, in the presence of parametric uncertainties, unknown disturbances, and unknown dead-zone. First, only the ship position and heading measurements are available and a high-gain observer is used to estimate the unmeasurable velocities. Second, by utilizing the prescribed performance control, the prescribed tracking control performance can be ensured, while the requirement for the initial error is removed via the preprocessing. At last, based on neural network approximation in combination with backstepping and Lyapunov synthesis, a robust adaptive neural control scheme is developed to handle the uncertainties and input dead-zone characteristics. Under the designed adaptive controller for marine surface vessels, all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB, and the prescribed transient and steady tracking control performance is guaranteed. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Postural control during gait initiation and termination of adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Jean-François; Duclos, Cyril; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-06-01

    Gait initiation and termination are potentially challenging tasks for balance due to the transition from a quasi-static bipedal phase to a dynamic single-support phase. The purpose of this study was to compare the bipedal and single-support phases of gait initiation and termination in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). Twelve individuals with ISCI were evaluated on the dynamic and postural components of balance using the stabilizing and destabilizing forces during gait initiation, termination and natural gait. Phase comparisons were made using non parametric tests. Visual inspection of the force profile of the factors explaining the forces was also conducted. Gait termination challenged more the postural control during the single-support phase than the bipedal phase for the dynamic component of the stabilizing/destabilizing forces model (p=.002). For gait initiation, the most challenging phase varied with the components analyzed (single-support phase for the dynamic component, bipedal phase for the postural component) (p⩽.008). The single support phase is more challenged during gait termination (both components) (p⩽.015) while the bipedal phase is more challenged during gait initiation (dynamic components) (p=.012). The stabilizing force and the speed of the center of mass on the one hand, and destabilizing force and the distance between the center of pressure and the base of support on the other hand, had a similar profile. The single-support phase of gait termination was the most challenging among all phases evaluated, being as challenging as the single-support phase of level natural gait. This phase should be targeted in rehabilitation in order to improve balance and decrease the risk of falling in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. How Darwinian models inform therapeutic failure initiated by clonal heterogeneity in cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, M; Swanton, C

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an evolutionary process that establishes the ‘hallmarks of cancer' by natural selection of cell clones that have acquired advantageous heritable characteristics. Evolutionary adaptation has also been proposed as a mechanism that promotes drug resistance during systemic cancer therapy. This review summarises the evidence for the evolution of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted anti-cancer drugs according to Darwinian models and highlights the roles of genomic instability and high intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity as major accelerators of this evolutionary process. Clinical implications and strategies that may prevent the evolution of resistance or target the origins of genetic heterogeneity are discussed. New technologies to measure intra-tumour heterogeneity and translational research on serial biopsies of cancer lesions during and after therapeutic intervention are identified as key areas to further the understanding of determinants and mechanisms of the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:20877357

  11. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoxu; Zheng, Rongshou; He, Yutong; Sun, Xibin; Wang, Ning; Chen, Tianhui; Chen, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences). Controls were equally matched and selected from family members of non-pancreatic cancer patients in the same hospitals. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained staff using questionnaires. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confident intervals (CIs). Among 646 recruited participants, 323 were pancreatic cancer patients and 323 were controls. Multivariate logistic analysis suggested that pancreatic cancer family history (adjusted OR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11-3.70), obesity (adjusted OR 1.77; 95% CI, 1.22-2.57), diabetes (adjusted OR 2.96; 95% CI, 1.48-5.92) and smoking (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02-3.10) were risk factors for pancreatic cancer, but that drinking tea (adjusted OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.84) was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoking, family history, obesity, and diabetes are risk factors of pancreatic cancer, which is important information for designing early intervention and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer and may be beneficial to pancreatic cancer control in China.

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  13. Early rehabilitation of cancer patients - a randomized controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arving, Cecilia; Thormodsen, Inger; Brekke, Guri; Mella, Olav; Berntsen, Sveinung; Nordin, Karin

    2013-01-07

    Faced with a life-threatening illness, such as cancer, many patients develop stress symptoms, i.e. avoidance behaviour, intrusive thoughts and worry. Stress management interventions have proven to be effective; however, they are mostly performed in group settings and it is commonly breast cancer patients who are studied. We hereby present the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an individual stress-management intervention with a stepped-care approach in several cancer diagnoses. Patients (≥ 18 years) with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, prostate cancer or testicle cancer and scheduled for adjuvant/curative oncology treatment, will consecutively be included in the study. In this prospective longitudinal intervention study with a stepped-care approach, patients will be randomized to control, treatment as usual, or an individual stress-management intervention in two steps. The first step is a low-intensity stress-management intervention, given to all patients randomized to intervention. Patients who continue to report stress symptoms after the first step will thereafter be given more intensive treatment at the second step of the programme. In the intervention patients will also be motivated to be physically active. Avoidance and intrusion are the primary outcomes. According to the power analyses, 300 patients are planned to be included in the study and will be followed for two years. Other outcomes are physical activity level, sleep duration and quality recorded objectively, and anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress in daily living, and patient satisfaction assessed using valid and standardized psychometric tested questionnaires. Utilization of hospital services will be derived from the computerized patient administration systems used by the hospital. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention will be evaluated through a cost-utility analysis. This RCT

  14. Robotic radical prostatectomy-a minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer: results of initial 530 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tewari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In 2000, the number of new cases of prostate cancer was estimated at 5 13 000 worldwide [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. In next 15 years, prostate cancer is predicted to be the most common cancer in men [Eur J Cancer 2001; 37 (Suppl 8: S4]. Radical prostatectomy is one of the most common surgical treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer. In spite of its excellent oncological results, due to the fear of pain, risk for side effects, and inconvenience (Semin Urol Oncol 2002; 20: 55, many patients seek alternative treatments for their prostate cancer. At Vattikuti Urology institute, we have developed a minimally invasive technique for treating prostate cancer, which achieves oncological results of surgical treatment without causing significant pain, large surgical incision, and side effects (BJU Int, 2003; 92: 205. This technique involves a da Vinci™ (Intuitive Surgical ®, Sunnyvale, CA surgical robot with 3-D stereoscopic visualization and ergonomic multijointed instruments. Presented herein are our results after treating 750 patients. Methods: We prospectively collected baseline demographic data such as age, race, body mass index (BMI, serum prostate specific antigen, prostate volume, Gleason score, percentage cancer, TNM clinical staging, and comorbidities. Urinary symptoms were measured with the international prostate symptom score (IPSS, and sexual health with the sexual health inventory of males (SHIM. In addition, the patients were mailed the expanded prostate inventory composite at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after the procedure. Results: Gleason seven or more cancer grade was noted in 33.5% of patients. The average BMI was high (27.7 and 87% patients had pathological stage PT2a-b. The mean operative time was 160 min and the mean blood loss was 153 cm3. No patient required blood transfusion. At 6 months 82% of the men who were younger and 75% of those older than 60 years had return of sexual

  15. Cancer modelling in the NGS era - Part I: Emerging technology and initial modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovigatti, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    It is today indisputable that great progresses have been made in our molecular understanding of cancer cells, but an effective implementation of such knowledge into dramatic cancer-cures is still belated and yet desperately needed. This review gives a snapshot at where we stand today in this search for cancer understanding and definitive treatments, how far we have progressed and what are the major obstacles we will have to overcome both technologically and for disease modelling. In the first part, promising 3rd/4th Generation Sequencing Technologies will be summarized (particularly IonTorrent and OxfordNanopore technologies). Cancer modelling will be then reviewed from its origin in XIX Century Germany to today's NGS applications for cancer understanding and therapeutic interventions. Developments after Molecular Biology revolution (1953) are discussed as successions of three phases. The first, PH1, labelled "Clonal Outgrowth" (from 1960s to mid 1980s) was characterized by discoveries in cytogenetics (Nowell, Rowley) and viral oncology (Dulbecco, Bishop, Varmus), which demonstrated clonality. Treatments were consequently dominated by a "cytotoxic eradication" strategy with chemotherapeutic agents. In PH2, (from the mid 1980s to our days) the description of cancer as "Gene Networks" led to targeted-gene-therapies (TGTs). TGTs are the focus of Section 3: in view of their apparent failing (Ephemeral Therapies), alternative strategies will be discussed in review part II (particularly cancer immunotherapy, CIT). Additional Pitfalls impinge on the concepts of tumour heterogeneity (inter/intra; ITH). The described pitfalls set the basis for a new phase, PH3, which is called "NGS Era" and will be also discussed with ten emerging cancer models in the Review 2nd part. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast cancer management in middle-resource countries (MRCs): consensus statement from the Breast Health Global Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Har; Cazap, Eduardo; Anderson, Benjamin O; Bright, Kristin L; Caleffi, Maira; Cardoso, Fatima; Elzawawy, Ahmed M; Harford, Joe B; Krygier, Gabriel D; Masood, Shahla; Murillo, Raul; Muse, Ignacio M; Otero, Isabel V; Passman, Leigh J; Santini, Luiz A; da Silva, Ronaldo Corrêa Ferreira; Thomas, David B; Torres, Soledad; Zheng, Ying; Khaled, Hussein M

    2011-04-01

    In middle resource countries (MRCs), cancer control programs are becoming a priority as the pattern of disease shifts from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases such as breast cancer, the most common cancer among women in MRCs. The Middle Resource Scenarios Working Group of the BHGI 2010 Global Summit met to identify common issues and obstacles to breast cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment in MRCs. They concluded that breast cancer early detection programs continue to be important, should include clinical breast examination (CBE) with or without mammography, and should be coupled with active awareness programs. Mammographic screening is usually opportunistic and early detection programs are often hampered by logistical and financial problems, as well as socio-cultural barriers, despite improved public educational efforts. Although multidisciplinary services for treatment are available, geographical and economic limitations to these services can lead to an inequity in health care access. Without adequate health insurance coverage, limited personal finances can be a significant barrier to care for many patients. Despite the improved availability of services (surgery, pathology, radiology and radiotherapy), quality assurance programs remain a challenge. Better access to anticancer drugs is needed to improve outcomes, as are rehabilitation programs for survivors. Focused and sustained government health care financing in MRCs is needed to improve early detection and treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of reporting randomized controlled trials in cancer nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia-Wen; Sward, Katherine A; Beck, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide high-level evidence for evidence-based practice (EBP). The quality of RCTs has a substantial influence on providing reliable knowledge for EBP. Little is known about the quality of RCT reporting in cancer nursing. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of reporting in published cancer nursing RCTs from 1984 to 2010. A total of 227 RCTs in cancer nursing published in English-language journals and indexed in PubMed or Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were reviewed using the Jadad scale, key methodologic index (KMI), and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist to assess the quality of reporting methodological aspects of research and the overall quality of reporting RCTs. Adherence to reporting metrics was relatively low, based on the Jadad score (M = 1.94 out of 5, SD = 1.01), KMI scores (M = 0.84 out of 3, SD = .87), and adherence to CONSORT checklist items (M =16.92 out of 37, SD = 4.03). Only 11 of 37 items in the CONSORT checklist were reported in 80% or more of the studies reviewed. The quality of reporting showed some improvement over time. Adherence to reporting metrics for cancer nursing RCTs was suboptimal, and further efforts are needed to improve both methodology reporting and overall reporting. Journals are encouraged to adopt the CONSORT checklist to influence the quality of RCT reports.

  18. Technique for histological control of surgical margins in lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Satoru; Hata, Hiroo; Homma, Erina; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    To preserve oral function and achieve acceptable cosmetic results, intraoperative control of surgical margins with frozen section evaluation may help to determine surgical technique in lip cancer. However, frozen section analysis is usually limited to suspicious areas and has not been systematically performed among surgeons. The accuracy of such analysis for detecting histological surgical margins is highly dependent on the methods used to obtain and analyze the margins. Improving the pathodiagnostic reliability of conventional intraoperative frozen section evaluation is the most important goal of surgical management in our method. We describe the successful use of the "double-blade method" in lip cancer treatment. The technique we describe has the advantage of histologically confirming clear margins in lip cancer. This method appears to be time-saving and easy to apply with existing surgical systems. In addition, this method may be used as an alternative to complete evaluation of lateral surgical margins that is important in planning a suitable surgical reconstruction procedure in lip cancer at many institutions where Mohs micrographic surgery is difficult to perform. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Initiators and promoters for the occurrence of screen-detected breast cancer and the progression to clinically-detected interval breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying; Tabar, Laszlo; Duffy, Stephen W; Smith, Robert A; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2017-03-01

    The risk factors responsible for breast cancer have been well documented, but the roles of risk factors as initiators, causing the occurrence of screen-detected breast cancer, or promoters, responsible for the progression of the screen-detected to the clinically-detected breast cancer, have been scarcely evaluated. We used data from women in a cohort in Kopparberg (Dalarna), Sweden between 1977 and 2010. Conventional risk factors, breast density, and tumor-specific biomarkers are superimposed to the temporal course of the natural history of the disease. The results show that older age at first full-term pregnancy, dense breast, and a family history of breast cancer increased the risk of entering the preclinical screen-detectable phase of breast cancer by 23%, 41%, and 89%, respectively. Overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 ) was a significant initiator (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.33), but was inversely associated with the role of promoter (aRR 0.65; 95% CI, 0.51-0.82). Dense breast (aRR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.12-1.91), triple-negative (aRR 2.07; 95% CI, 1.37-3.15), and Ki-67 positivity (aRR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.19-2.30) were statistically significant promoters. When the molecular biomarkers were considered collectively as one classification, the basal-like subtype was the most influential subtype on promoters (aRR 4.24; 95% CI, 2.56-7.02) compared with the Luminal A subtype. We ascertained state-dependent covariates of initiators and promoters to classify the risk of the two-step progression of breast cancer. The results of the current study are useful for individually-tailored screening and personalized clinical surveillance of patients with breast cancer that was detected at an early stage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CDC Grand Rounds: Family History and Genomics as Tools for Cancer Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juan L; Thomas, Cheryll C; Massetti, Greta M; Duquette, Debra; Avner, Lindsay; Iskander, John; Khoury, Muin J; Richardson, Lisa C

    2016-11-25

    Although many efforts in cancer prevention and control have routinely focused on behavioral risk factors, such as tobacco use, or on the early detection of cancer, such as colorectal cancer screening, advances in genetic testing have created new opportunities for cancer prevention through evaluation of family history and identification of cancer-causing inherited mutations. Through the collection and evaluation of a family cancer history by a trained health care provider, patients and families at increased risk for a hereditary cancer syndrome can be identified, referred for genetic counseling and testing, and make informed decisions about options for cancer risk reduction (1). Although hereditary cancers make up a small proportion of all cancers, the number of affected persons can be large, and the level of risk among affected persons is high. Two hereditary cancer syndromes for which public health professionals have worked to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality are hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome.

  1. Zoledronic acid initiated during the first year of androgen deprivation therapy increases bone mineral density in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Christopher W; Huo, Dezheng; Demers, Laurence M; Beer, Tomasz M; Lacerna, Leo V

    2006-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy in patients with prostate cancer is associated with bone loss and an increased risk of fractures. Zoledronic acid protects against bone mineral density loss when initiated concurrently with androgen deprivation therapy. We evaluated the effect of zoledronic acid initiated subsequent to androgen deprivation therapy on bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone turnover. Patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases who had received androgen deprivation therapy for 12 months or less were randomized to 4 mg zoledronic acid or placebo intravenously every 3 months for 1 year. Patients were stratified according to androgen deprivation therapy duration (less than 6 vs 6 to 12 months). The primary end point was the change in femoral neck and lumbar spine bone mineral density in the 2 groups. The secondary end point was the change in serum bone specific alkaline phosphatase and urine N-telopeptide levels. Total hip bone mineral density was also measured. The 120 patients with prostate cancer received zoledronic acid (61) or placebo (59). Compared with placebo, zoledronic acid increased femoral neck, total hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density yearly by 3.6% (p = 0.0004), 3.8% (p bone mineral density at these 3 sites were not differentiated according to androgen deprivation therapy duration. Additionally, mean bone specific alkaline phosphatase and N-telopeptide levels were decreased in the zoledronic acid group (each p bone mineral density and suppressed bone turnover markers in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases when initiated during year 1 of androgen deprivation therapy.

  2. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallenberg, E M; Dromain, C; Diekmann, F; Engelken, F; Krohn, M; Singh, J M; Ingold-Heppner, B; Winzer, K J; Bick, U; Renz, D M

    2014-01-01

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. • Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is slowly being introduced into clinical practice. • Access to breast MRI is limited by availability and lack of reimbursement. • Initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI than conventional mammography. • CESM showed a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. • Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography offers promise, seemingly providing information comparable to MRI.

  3. Initial perceptions of palliative care: An exploratory qualitative study of patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anna; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Philip, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Despite evidence for early integration of palliative care for people with advanced cancer and their families, patterns of late engagement continue. Prior research has focused on health professionals' attitudes to palliative care with few studies exploring the views of patients and their carers. To explore initial perceptions of palliative care when this is first raised with patients with advanced cancer and their families in Australian settings. Cross-sectional, prospective, exploratory qualitative design, involving narrative-style interviews and underpinned by an interpretative phenomenological framework. Purposively sampled, English-speaking, adult patients with advanced cancer ( n = 30) and their nominated family caregivers ( n = 25) recruited from cancer services at a tertiary metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Three major themes evolved which represent the common initial perceptions of palliative care held by patients with advanced cancer and their carers when this concept is first raised: (1) diminished care, (2) diminished possibility and (3) diminished choice. Palliative care was negatively associated with a system of diminished care which is seen as a 'lesser' treatment alternative, diminished possibilities for hope and achievement of ambitions previously centred upon cure and diminished choices for the circumstances of one's care given all other options have expired. While there is an increasing move towards early integration of palliative care, this study suggests that patient and caregiver understandings have not equally progressed. A targeted public health campaign is warranted to disentangle understandings of palliative care as the 'institutional death' and to reframe community rhetoric surrounding palliative care from that of disempowered dying to messages of choice, accomplishment and possibility.

  4. Controlled/living radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate using γ-radiation as an initiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Xiulin; Cheng, Zhenping

    2006-04-01

    A controlled/living radical polymerization, initiated by γ-radiation and followed by a post-polymerization process, of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was carried out in the presence of 2-cyanoprop-2-yl 1-dithionaphthalate. The polymerization showed first-order kinetics. The molecular weights of the corresponding polymers increased linearly with conversion. The molecular weight distributions ( M/M) of the polymers decreased with the conversion (minimal M/M value: 1.09). The polymers were characterized by 1H NMR and gel-permeation chromatograph. Chain-extension reaction was also successfully carried out to obtain higher molecular weight PMMA with narrow molecular weight distribution.

  5. Initial contamination control considerations for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA's Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), a 6 m to 8 m diameter device, is described. The NGST will be radiatively cooled to 30 K to 60 K in order to carry out extremely deep exposures at near infrared wavelengths, for 5 years to 10 years lifetime. Initial contamination control design options include strict materials selection and baking out of both hardware down to the component level, minimizing or eliminating the exposure to the optical telescope assembly to sunlight or earth albedo during deployment and early in-orbit operations.

  6. The effects of cancer and racial disparities in health-related quality of life among older Americans: a case-control, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Laura C; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Chen, Ronald C; Mayer, Deborah K; Lyons, Jessica C; Reeve, Bryce B

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the impact of the cancer care system on racial/ethnic disparities in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly important as the number of cancer survivors in the United States grows. The authors prospectively assessed changes in HRQOL before and after a first cancer diagnosis among non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), African Americans (AAs), Hispanics, and Asians in a cohort of Medicare beneficiaries with and without cancer. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results linked with the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey were used to identify 1778 individuals aged ≥65 years with prostate, breast, or colorectal cancer from 1998 to 2007. The Medical Outcomes Trust Short Form 36 (SF-36) instrument was used to measure HRQOL. By using propensity scores, each patient with cancer (case) was matched to 5 individuals without cancer (noncancer controls), and differences in HRQOL according to race/ethnicity were assessed. Mixed effects analysis of covariance models was used to assess differences in HRQOL, adjusting for baseline HRQOL, demographics, and self-reported comorbid conditions while controlling for each individual's managed care plan. Stratified analyses were used to assess racial/ethnic disparities between cases and noncancer controls. Before cancer diagnosis, NHWs had better HRQOL scores than AAs and Hispanics on the Role-Physical and Role-Emotional SF-36 subscales. Cancer diagnosis/treatment negatively impacted individuals' lives regardless of race/ethnicity. However, among cases, gaps between racial/ethnic groups narrowed (compared with controls) before and after cancer diagnosis for some SF-36 HRQOL measures. Racial/ethnic HRQOL gaps exist among cancer survivors but may narrow because of exposure to the cancer care system. Further research to understand why this occurs will help inform initiatives to manage the impact of cancer on HRQOL among elderly cancer survivors. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. A targetable HB-EGF-CITED4 axis controls oncogenesis in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C-H; Chou, Y-T; Kuo, M-H; Tsai, H-P; Chang, J-L; Wu, C-W

    2017-05-25

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signaling contributes to neoplastic initiation and progression in lung. Mutated EGFR has become as an important therapeutic target in lung cancer, whereas targeted treatment is not available for wild-type EGFR or its ligands. In this study, we found that heparin-binding (HB)-EGF, a member of the EGF family, was highly expressed in a subset of lung cancer, proliferation of which was dependent on HB-EGF signaling. Silencing of HB-EGF with RNA interference inhibited cell cycle progression in lung cancer cells. We observed that, upon HB-EGF induction, CITED4 was induced through a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, regulating cell proliferation. CITED4 interacted with MYC and potentiated MYC-mediated transactivation of the CCND1 promoter, leading to cell cycle progression. Correlation analysis revealed that HB-EGF and CITED4 were significantly positively associated in primary lung tumors, and expression of HB-EGF predicted a poor survival outcome in patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that pharmacological inhibition of HB-EGF with CRM197 significantly attenuated tumor cell growth. Thus, CITED4 functions as a molecular switch in HB-EGF-induced growth control, and HB-EGF provides a novel therapeutic target for lung cancer intervention.

  8. Patterns of care in the initial management of women with ovarian cancer in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Simunovic, M; Urbach, D

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of future resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for ovarian cancers. The affected population was characterized in terms of age, location of residence, and SES. Operative care delivery was described in terms of inpatient verses outpatient access, LHIN of treatment, surgical specialist providing treatment, and specific operative procedures. The investigations and consults around the time of diagnosis are described. Women with an incident diagnosis of an ovarian malignancy were identified from 1 April 2003 to 31 March 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. We report on 963 women with ovarian cancer. The incidence of disease was related to increasing age. Access to surgery correlated with the highest income quintile, urban residence and LHIN. Twenty-seven percent of women did not have surgery for their ovarian cancer. Women of younger age were more like to receive surgery for ovarian cancer. Use of a laparotomy for biopsy was most common in community hospital (40%). Lymphadenectomy rates were low overall; rates for gynecologic oncologists were 13.2%. All women were assessed by CXR. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis occurred in 77% of women. MRIs were done infrequently. Medical oncology were involved in 26.6% of the patients. These pilot data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage. However, there are clear referral patterns to academic centres which means a need for manpower and hospital resources to deal with this population.

  9. A joint Nordic interdisciplinary education programme in infection control: a successful, but short-lived initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jette; Sorknes, Nina K; Povlsen, Lene

    2014-11-01

    Prevention of healthcare-associated infections and a restrictive antibiotics policy in the Nordic countries have contributed to a low prevalence of multi-drug resistant microorganisms, compared to many other countries. This requires professional competences acquired through education in infection control, both in hospitals and in primary health care. This paper describes a joint Nordic Interdisciplinary Education Programme in infection control, established at the Nordic School of Public Health NHV (NHV) in 2007. The education programme was considered highly relevant and successful by students and their employers. The paper describes the background and contents of the programme, which may serve as inspiration in the development of future educational initiatives in other countries. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  10. Initial results on fault diagnosis of DSN antenna control assemblies using pattern recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, P.; Mellstrom, J.

    1990-01-01

    Initial results obtained from an investigation using pattern recognition techniques for identifying fault modes in the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70 m antenna control loops are described. The overall background to the problem is described, the motivation and potential benefits of this approach are outlined. In particular, an experiment is described in which fault modes were introduced into a state-space simulation of the antenna control loops. By training a multilayer feed-forward neural network on the simulated sensor output, classification rates of over 95 percent were achieved with a false alarm rate of zero on unseen tests data. It concludes that although the neural classifier has certain practical limitations at present, it also has considerable potential for problems of this nature.

  11. Single-cell control of initial spatial structure in biofilm development using laser trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Jaime B; Rodesney, Christopher A; Kaushik, Karishma S; Le, Henry H; Hurwitz, Daniel A; Irie, Yasuhiko; Gordon, Vernita D

    2014-04-22

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microbes that are spatially structured by an embedding matrix. Biofilm infections are notoriously intractable. This arises, in part, from changes in the bacterial phenotype that result from spatial structure. Understanding these interactions requires methods to control the spatial structure of biofilms. We present a method for growing biofilms from initiating cells whose positions are controlled with single-cell precision using laser trapping. The native growth, motility, and surface adhesion of positioned microbes are preserved, as we show for model organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that laser-trapping and placing bacteria on surfaces can reveal the effects of spatial structure on bacterial growth in early biofilm development.

  12. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  13. Overweight, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Invasive Breast Cancer Risk: A Secondary Analysis of the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhouser, Marian L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Prentice, Ross L; Manson, JoAnn E; Chlebowski, Rowan; Carty, Cara L; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Thomson, Cynthia A; Caan, Bette J; Tinker, Lesley F; Urrutia, Rachel Peragallo; Knudtson, Jennifer; Anderson, Garnet L

    2015-08-01

    More than two-thirds of US women are overweight or obese, placing them at increased risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. To investigate in this secondary analysis the associations of overweight and obesity with risk of postmenopausal invasive breast cancer after extended follow-up in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials. The WHI clinical trial protocol incorporated measured height and weight, baseline and annual or biennial mammography, and adjudicated breast cancer end points in 67 142 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79 years at 40 US clinical centers. The women were enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with a median of 13 years of follow-up through 2010; 3388 invasive breast cancers were observed. Height and weight were measured at baseline, and weight was measured annually thereafter. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, and personal habits (smoking, physical activity). Women underwent annual or biennial mammograms. Breast cancers were verified by medical records reviewed by physician adjudicators. Women who were overweight and obese had an increased invasive breast cancer risk vs women of normal weight. Risk was greatest for obesity grade 2 plus 3 (body mass index [BMI], calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, >35.0) (hazard ratio [HR] for invasive breast cancer, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.40-1.79). A BMI of 35.0 or higher was strongly associated with risk for estrogen receptor-positive and progesterone receptor-positive breast cancers (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.60-2.17) but was not associated with estrogen receptor-negative cancers. Obesity grade 2 plus 3 was also associated with advanced disease, including larger tumor size (HR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.67-2.69; P = .02), positive lymph nodes (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.46-2.45; P = .06), regional and/or distant stage (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.52-2.47; P = .05), and deaths after breast cancer (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57-2.84; P cancer

  14. Branched chain amino acid suppressed insulin-initiated proliferation of human cancer cells through induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubetu, Gizachew Yismaw; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Ishikawa, Daichi; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Yamada, Shinichiro; Morine, Yuji; Iwahashi, Shuichi; Saito, Yu; Arakawa, Yusuke; Imura, Satoru; Arimochi, Hideki; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2014-09-01

    Branched chain amino acid (BCAA) dietary supplementation inhibits activation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) axis in diabetic animal models. However, the in vitro effect of BCAA on human cancer cell lines under hyper-insulinemic conditions remains unclear. Colon (HCT-116) and hepatic (HepG2) tumor cells were treated with varying concentrations of BCAA with or without fluorouracil (5-FU). The effect of BCAA on insulin-initiated proliferation was determined. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting, respectively. BCAA supplementation had no significant effect on cell proliferation and did not show significant synergistic or antagonistic effects with 5-FU. However, BCAA significantly decreased insulin-initiated proliferation of human colon and hepatic cancer cell lines in vitro. BCAA supplementation caused a marked decrease in activated IGF-IR expression and significantly enhanced both mRNA and protein expression of LC3-II and BECN1 (BECLIN-1). BCAA could be a useful chemopreventive modality for cancer in hyperinsulinemic conditions. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. DNA Amplification by Breakage/Fusion/Bridge Cycles Initiated by Spontaneous Telomere Loss in a Human Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W.l. Lo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of genomic instability is an important step in generatingthe multiple genetic changes required for cancer. One consequence of genomic instability is the overexpression of oncogenes due to gene amplification. One mechanism for gene amplification is the breakagelfusionlbridge (B/F/Bcyclethatinvolvesthe repeated fusion and breakage of chromosomes following the loss of a telomere. B/F/B cycles have been associated with low-copy gene amplification in human cancer cells, and have been proposed to be an initiating event in high-copy gene amplification. We have found that spontaneous telomere loss on a marker chromosome 16 in a human tumor cell line results in sister chromatid fusion and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. The high rate of anaphase bridges involving chromosome 16 demonstrates that this instability results from B/F/B cycles. The amplification of subtelomeric DNA on the marker chromosome provides conclusive evidence that B/F/B cycles initiated by spontaneous telomere loss are a mechanism for gene amplification in human cancer cells.

  16. Initial study on in vivo conductivity mapping of breast cancer using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaewook; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Joonsung; Nam, Yoonho; Kim, Min-Oh; Choi, Narae; Kim, Sooyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    To develop and apply a method to measure in vivo electrical conductivity values using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in subjects with breast cancer. A recently developed technique named MREPT (MR electrical properties tomography) together with a novel coil combination process was used to quantify the conductivity values. The overall technique was validated using a phantom study. In addition, 90 subjects were imaged (50 subjects with previously biopsy-confirmed breast tumor and 40 normal subjects), which was approved by our institutional review board (IRB). A routine clinical protocol, specifically a T2 -weighted FSE (fast spin echo) imaging data, was used for reconstruction of conductivity. By employing the coil combination, the relative error in the conductivity map was reduced from ~70% to 10%. The average conductivity values in breast cancers regions (0.89 ± 0.33S/m) was higher compared to parenchymal tissue (0.43 S/m, P conductivity compared to benign cases (0.56 S/m, n = 5) (P conductivity compared to in situ cancers (0.57 S/m) (P conductivity mapping of breast cancers is feasible using a noninvasive in vivo MREPT technique combined with a coil combination process. The method may provide a tool in the MR diagnosis of breast cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Simultaneous cancer control and diagnosis with magnetic nanohybrid materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saadat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coated magnetite nanoparticles were linked to 68Ga complexes used in the positron emission tomography (PET for a new technical approach to detect cancer tissue with radiopharmaceuticals. By substitution of the Ga isotope with an alpha emitter the same compound could be used for cancer treatment. Furthermore the nanoparticles were connected to pH-sensitive complexes, enabling a pH-controlled assembly/disassembly and therefore the spreading of the particles in the tissue. With this novel method of combining detection and treatment simultaneously, the amount of medical exposure could be minimized for the patient. The results demonstrate that magnetite nanoparticles can effectively be functionalized with PET isotopes and pH sensitive complexes in order to use them as a new type of radiopharmaceuticals.

  18. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  19. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early...

  20. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home: a randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    2014-09-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is non-inferior to an in hospital based setting. Seventy-seven patients were included, of which 38 patients started HMV at home. All patients were diagnosed with chronic respiratory failure due to a neuromuscular or thoracic cage disease. Primary outcome was the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) while quality of life and costs were secondary outcomes. Telemonitoring was used in the home group to provide therapeutic information, for example; transcutaneous carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation and ventilator information, to the caregivers. Follow-up was six months. PaCO2, improved by 0.72 (SE ± 0.16) kPa in the hospital group and by 0.91 (±0.20) in the home group, both improvements being significant and the latter clearly not inferior. There were also significant improvements in quality of life in both groups, again not being inferior with home treatment. This study is the first to show that initiation of HMV at home in a selective group of patients with chronic respiratory failure is as effective for gas exchange and quality of life as hospital initiation. In addition we found that it is safe, technically feasible and that more than € 3000 per patient can be saved compared to our standard care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.