WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer consortium mecc

  1. Managing Technology Change. "MECC: A Management History."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugo, John E.

    The Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) coordinates and provides computer services to students, teachers, and educational administrators throughout the state. MECC was organized in 1973 by the state's 4 public educational systems: the state university system (7 campuses), the community college system (18 campuses), the University of…

  2. Can we overcome the effect of conflicts in rendering palliative care? An introduction to the Middle Eastern Cancer Consortium (MECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbermann, Michael; Khleif, Amal; Tuncer, Murat; Pitsillides, Barbara; Shad, Aziza; Oberman, Amitai; Elshami, Mohammad; Gultekin, Murat; Daher, Michel; Tarawneh, Mohammed; Harford, Joe

    2011-08-01

    The Middle East has been experiencing an ongoing political conflict for the past several decades. This situation has been characterized by hostility often leading to violence of all sources. At times, such a conflict led to the outbreak of a military war, which was followed by an enmity between religious, ethnic, cultural, and national populations. In such environmental situations, palliative care professionals often confront major challenges including bias, mistrust, and mutual suspicion between patients and their treating clinicians. In order to overcome such obstacles, while rendering palliative care services, all professionals involved need careful planning and execution of their treatment plans. The latter is however possible, and sometimes successful even across lines of conflict, thereby promoting understanding, mutual respect, and tolerance between the involved communities and individuals.

  3. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  4. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site:Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    targeted therapy on the efficacy of cabazitaxel in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer R. Van Soest1, A. Nieuweboer2, E. De...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0159 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  5. The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium: interfacing genomics and cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is an international collaborative platform that amalgamates cancer biologists, cutting-edge genomics, and high-throughput expertise with medical oncologists and surgical oncologists; they address the most important translational questions that are central to cancer research and treatment. The annual GCGC symposium was held at the Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer, Mumbai, India, from November 9 to 11, 2011. The symposium showcased international next-generation sequencing efforts that explore cancer-specific transcriptomic changes, single-nucleotide polymorphism, and copy number variations in various types of cancers, as well as the structural genomics approach to develop new therapeutic targets and chemical probes. From the spectrum of studies presented at the symposium, it is evident that the translation of emerging cancer genomics knowledge into clinical applications can only be achieved through the integration of multidisciplinary expertise. In summary, the GCGC symposium provided practical knowledge on structural and cancer genomics approaches, as well as an exclusive platform for focused cancer genomics endeavors. ©2012 AACR.

  6. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype : An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poole, Elizabeth M; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; Setiawan, V Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Gram, Inger T; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J; Sjöholm, Louise K; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S

    PURPOSE: An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). PATIENTS

  7. University of Washington Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Sylvie Aubin, PhD Fad diets and dietary supplements for prostate cancer. What works and what doesn’t? Mark Moyad, MD Agenda is subject...Higano discussed the immunotherapy trials within the Consortium. In a “Meet the Expert” session, she spoke on the side effects of androgen...Hsp27. This Phase 2 study has been designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of OGX-427 plus low-dose prednisone versus low dose prednisone

  8. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  9. Global cancer consortiums: moving from consensus to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilbawi, André M; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2015-03-01

    The failure to translate cancer knowledge into action contributes to regional, national, and international health inequities. Disparities in cancer care are the most severe in low-resource settings, where delivery obstacles are compounded by health infrastructure deficits and inadequate basic services. Global cancer consortiums (GCCs) have developed to strengthen cancer care expertise, advance knowledge on best practices, and bridge the cancer gap worldwide. Within the complex matrix of public health priorities, consensus is emerging on cost-effective cancer care interventions in low- and medium-resource countries, which include the critical role of surgical services. Distinct from traditional health partnerships that collaborate to provide care at the local level, GCCs collaborate more broadly to establish consensus on best practice models for service delivery. To realize the benefit of programmatic interventions and achieve tangible improvements in patient outcomes, GCCs must construct and share evidence-based implementation strategies to be tested in real world settings. Implementation research should inform consensus formation, program delivery, and outcome monitoring to achieve the goals articulated by GCCs. Fundamental steps to successful implementation are: (1) to adopt an integrated, multisectoral plan with local involvement; (2) to define shared implementation priorities by establishing care pathways that avoid prescriptive but suboptimal health care delivery; (3) to build capacity through education, technology transfer, and surveillance of outcomes; and (4) to promote equity and balanced collaboration. GCCs can bridge the gap between what is known and what is done, translating normative sharing of clinical expertise into tangible improvements in patient care.

  10. MRSA carrying mecC in captive mara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Harrison, Ewan M; Moodley, Arshnee

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), virulence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus ST130 isolated from mara (Dolichotis patagonum), a large rodent species native to South America and kept in captivity at Copenhagen Zoo. METHODS......: The presence of mecC was confirmed by PCR in 15 S. aureus ST130 isolated from mara during a previous study. WGS was performed on two randomly selected isolates to characterize their genomes with respect to SCCmec, virulence and resistance gene content. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested using commercial...... broth microdilution tests. RESULTS: All the isolates belonged to spa type t528 ST130 and carried mecC. Based on WGS, mecC was 100% identical to the prototype sequence of S. aureus strain LGA251. The sequence of SCCmec type XI in the mara isolates had 23 SNPs compared with the one described in LGA251...

  11. Cancer Systems Biology Consortium | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer is a complex disease system involving multiple molecular, genetic, and cellular events. From its early initiation through progression and metastasis, cancer can adapt and evolve as a result of both internal and external signals. These properties make cancer difficult to predict, prevent, and treat. There has been significant progress in characterizing the genetics of cancer, as well as the downstream effects on the molecular and cellular pathways that are critical for the initiation and progression of cancer.

  12. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    . A marginally significant association was found for RB1 when all studies were included [ordinal odds ratio (OR) 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.00) p = 0.041 and dominant OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.76-0.98) p = 0.025]; when the studies that originally suggested an association were excluded, the result......The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...... (rs144848) in BRCA2, rs2854344 in intron 17 of RB1, rs2811712 5' flanking CDKN2A, rs523349 in the 3' UTR of SRD5A2, D302H (rs1045485) in CASP8 and L10P (rs1982073) in TGFB1. Fourteen studies genotyped 4,624 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 8,113 controls of white non-Hispanic origin...

  13. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B; Blows, Fiona; ver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Anulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B; Wachter, David L; Jud, Sebastian M. S; Loehberg, Christian R; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W. R; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Aneas; Karstens, Johann H; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Roiguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Sue M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2011-01-01

    ...) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium...

  14. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes: evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, C M; Nagle, C M; Whiteman, D.C.; Ness, R.; Pearce, C. L.; Pike, M C; Rossing, M A; Terry, Kathryn Lynne; Wu, A H; Risch, H.A.; Yu, H.; Doherty, J.A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S

    2013-01-01

    Whilst previous studies have reported that higher body-mass index (BMI) increases a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved in the last decade, we sought to examine the association in a pooled analysis of recent studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated the associ...

  15. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J

    2009-01-01

    the odds ratio was 2.81 among carriers of two copies of the minor allele (95% CI 1.20-6.56, P=0.017, p(het) across studies=0.42) with 1969 cases and 3491 controls. There was no association among heterozygous carriers. CYP3A4 encodes a key enzyme in oestrogen metabolism and our finding between rs2740574......The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P

  16. COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-03-30

    Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

  17. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Eng, Kevin H; Cannioto, Rikki A; Friel, Grace; Szender, J Brian; Segal, Brahm; Odunsi, Kunle; Mayor, Paul; Diergaarde, Brenda; Zsiros, Emese; Kelemen, Linda E; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; deFazio, Anna; Jordan, Susan J; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goodman, Marc T; Dörk, Thilo; Edwards, Robert; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Karlan, Beth Y; Goode, Ellen L; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Sutphen, Rebecca; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Jensen, Allan; Webb, Penelope M; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-09-01

    Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian carcinoma who participated in 23 studies included in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we explored associations between histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases and overall and progression-free survival. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, stage of disease, histology, and study site, we estimated pooled HRs and 95% confidence intervals to assess associations between each comorbidity and ovarian cancer outcomes.Results: None of the comorbidities were associated with ovarian cancer outcome in the overall sample nor in strata defined by histologic subtype, weight status, age at diagnosis, or stage of disease (local/regional vs. advanced).Conclusions: Histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, or neurologic diseases were not associated with ovarian cancer overall or progression-free survival.Impact: These previously diagnosed chronic diseases do not appear to affect ovarian cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1470-3. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  19. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Eng, Kevin H

    2017-01-01

    carcinoma who participated in 23 studies included in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we explored associations between histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases and overall and progression-free survival...... with ovarian cancer outcome in the overall sample nor in strata defined by histologic subtype, weight status, age at diagnosis, or stage of disease (local/regional vs. advanced).Conclusions: Histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, or neurologic....... Using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, stage of disease, histology, and study site, we estimated pooled HRs and 95% confidence intervals to assess associations between each comorbidity and ovarian cancer outcomes.Results: None of the comorbidities were associated...

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus containing mecC in Swedish dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnerstad Helle Ericsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hitherto, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has not been detected in Swedish cattle. However, due to the report of mecC, a novel homologue to the mecA gene, there was reason to re-evaluate susceptibility results from strain collections of Staphylococcus aureus and test suspected isolates for the presence of mecC. Findings Bovine isolates of S. aureus with elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams were retrospectively tested for presence of mecC. In four of the isolates mecC was detected. Conclusion In Sweden, this is the first finding of MRSA in cattle and the first detection of MRSA harbouring mecC of domestic animal origin. MRSA in animal populations has implications as a potential reservoir with risk for spread to humans. Occurrence of MRSA among Swedish cattle appears still very limited.

  1. Consortium for Molecular Characterization of Screen-Detected Lesions Created: Eight Grants Awarded | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI has awarded eight grants to create the Consortium for Molecular Characterization of Screen-Detected Lesions. The consortium has seven molecular characterization laboratories (MCLs) and a coordinating center, and is supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Biology. | 7 laboratories and a coordinating center focused on identifying screening-detected pre-cancers and early cancers, including within the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Carotenoid intake and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Leoncini, Emanuele; Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Cadoni, Gabriella; FERRARONI, MONICA; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F.; Zevallos, Jose P.; Winn, Deborah M.; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Food and nutrition play an important role in head and neck cancer (HNC) etiology; however, the role of carotenoids remains largely undefined. We explored the relation of HNC risk with the intake of carotenoids within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. We pooled individual-level data from 10 case–control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Japan. The analysis included 18,207 subjects (4414 with oral and pharyngeal cancer, 1545 with laryngeal cancer, and...

  3. Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Joanne W; Steplowski, Emily; Yu, Kai; Hartge, Patricia; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Brotzman, Michelle J; Chanock, Stephen J; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Arslan, Alan A; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J; LaCroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Amundadottir, Laufey; Bao, Ying; Boeing, Heiner; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E; Gaziano, J Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L; Duell, Eric J; Hallmans, Göran; Howard, Barbara V; Hunter, David J; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Michaud, Dominique S; Palli, Domenico; Phillips, Lawrence S; Overvad, Kim; Patel, Alpa V; Sansbury, Leah; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Simon, Michael S; Slimani, Nadia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Visvanathan, Kala; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wolpin, Brian M; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Fuchs, Charles S; Hoover, Robert N; Gross, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

  4. Consortium for Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdiagnosis and false positives present | 8 lead investigators combining imaging methods for the visualization of lesions with biomarkers to improve the accuracy of screening, early cancer detection, and the diagnosis of early stage cancers.

  5. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, M; Risch, H A; Bosetti, C; Anderson, K E; Petersen, G M; Bamlet, W R; Cotterchio, M; Cleary, S P; Ibiebele, T I; La Vecchia, C; Skinner, H G; Strayer, L; Bracci, P M; Maisonneuve, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Zaton Ski, W; Lu, L; Yu, H; Janik-Koncewicz, K; Polesel, J; Serraino, D; Neale, R E

    2015-08-01

    The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus vitamin A intake. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Previous Lung Diseases and Lung Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis From the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Darren R.; Boffetta, Paolo; Duell, Eric J.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; McCormack, Valerie; Muscat, Joshua E.; Yang, Ping; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Brueske-Hohlfeld, Irene; Schwartz, Ann G.; Cote, Michele L.; Tjønneland, Anne; Friis, Søren; Le Marchand, Loic; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Zaridze, David; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Schejbalova, Miriam; Brennan, Paul; Mates, Ioan N.; Lazarus, Philip; Field, John K.; Raji, Olaide; McLaughlin, John R.; Liu, Geoffrey; Wiencke, John; Neri, Monica; Ugolini, Donatella; Andrew, Angeline S.; Lan, Qing; Hu, Wei; Orlow, Irene; Park, Bernard J.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the role of previous lung diseases (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, pneumonia, and tuberculosis) in the development of lung cancer, the authors conducted a pooled analysis of studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Seventeen studies including 24,607 cases and 81,829 controls (noncases), mainly conducted in Europe and North America, were included (1984–2011). Using self-reported data on previous diagnoses of lung diseases, the authors derived study-specific effect estimates by means of logistic regression models or Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, and cumulative tobacco smoking. Estimates were pooled using random-effects models. Analyses stratified by smoking status and histology were also conducted. A history of emphysema conferred a 2.44-fold increased risk of lung cancer (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.64, 3.62 (16 studies)). A history of chronic bronchitis conferred a relative risk of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.29, 1.68 (13 studies)). Tuberculosis (relative risk = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.87 (16 studies)) and pneumonia (relative risk = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.22, 2.01 (12 studies)) were also associated with lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, elevated risks were observed for emphysema, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. These results suggest that previous lung diseases influence lung cancer risk independently of tobacco use and that these diseases are important for assessing individual risk. PMID:22986146

  7. Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan)

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Dominique S.; Vrieling, Alina; Jiao, Li; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Steplowski, Emily; Lynch, Shannon M.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) n...

  8. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  9. Five polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Milne, Roger L; Cox, Angela

    2009-01-01

    cancer cases and 30,000 controls, primarily of European descent, from 30 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) as a measure of association. We found that the minor alleles for these polymorphisms were not related......Previous studies have suggested that minor alleles for ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASP10 rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 may influence breast cancer risk, but the evidence is inconclusive due to their small sample size. These polymorphisms were genotyped in more than 30,000 breast...... to invasive breast cancer risk overall in women of European descent: ECCR4 per-allele OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.97-1.02), minor allele frequency = 27.5%; TNF 1.00 (0.95-1.06), 5.0%; CASP10 1.02 (0.98-1.07), 6.5%; PGR 1.02 (0.99-1.06), 15.3%; and BID 0.98 (0.86-1.12), 1.7%. However, we observed significant between...

  10. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes: evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Whiteman, David C; Ness, Roberta; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pike, Malcolm C; Rossing, Mary Anne; Terry, Kathryn L; Wu, Anna H; Risch, Harvey A; Yu, Herbert; Doherty, Jennifer A; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Matsuno, Rayna K; Lurie, Galina; Moysich, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Estrid; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen; Hoyo, Cathrine; Moorman, Patricia; Weber, Rachel P; Cramer, Daniel W; Vitonis, Allison F; Bandera, Elisa V; Olson, Sara H; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; King, Melony; Brinton, Louise A; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Webb, Penelope M

    2013-04-01

    Whilst previous studies have reported that higher BMI increases a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved in the last decade, we sought to examine the association in a pooled analysis of recent studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated the association between BMI (recent, maximum and in young adulthood) and ovarian cancer risk using original data from 15 case-control studies (13 548 cases and 17 913 controls). We combined study-specific adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random-effects model. We further examined the associations by histological subtype, menopausal status and post-menopausal hormone use. High BMI (all time-points) was associated with increased risk. This was most pronounced for borderline serous (recent BMI: pooled OR=1.24 per 5 kg/m(2); 95% CI 1.18-1.30), invasive endometrioid (1.17; 1.11-1.23) and invasive mucinous (1.19; 1.06-1.32) tumours. There was no association with serous invasive cancer overall (0.98; 0.94-1.02), but increased risks for low-grade serous invasive tumours (1.13, 1.03-1.25) and in pre-menopausal women (1.11; 1.04-1.18). Among post-menopausal women, the associations did not differ between hormone replacement therapy users and non-users. Whilst obesity appears to increase risk of the less common histological subtypes of ovarian cancer, it does not increase risk of high-grade invasive serous cancers, and reducing BMI is therefore unlikely to prevent the majority of ovarian cancer deaths. Other modifiable factors must be identified to control this disease.

  11. The NCI-Ireland consortium: a unique international partnership in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, P G; Daly, P A

    2001-01-01

    The Ireland-Northern Ireland-National Cancer Institute Cancer Consortium was launched in October of 1999, at a conference in Belfast, Northern Ireland, for the development of cancer programs in Ireland and Northern Ireland, where cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity. Cancer services there have undergone major restructuring as a result of several government reports. Specifically, the National Strategy Document for Cancer proposed that cancer treatment services should be centered around primary care services, regional services, and a national coordinating structure where supra-regional centers would deliver specialist surgery, medical and radiation oncology, rehabilitation, and specialist palliative care. Therefore, this was an opportune time to bring the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on board in a determined effort to redevelop and significantly improve services and outcomes for cancer patients throughout the island. During the NCI All Ireland Cancer Consortium, initial major goals were established as follows: A) To share best available technology and enhance clinical research; B) conduct joint clinical research studies involving people from all jurisdictions; C) sponsor formal training exchanges for Irish and American scholars in cancer programs in partner institutions; D) implement the use of teleconferencing, telesynergy, and other information technology capabilities to facilitate education, and E) consolidate the Cancer Registries of Ireland and Northern Ireland and learn more about cancer incidence and trends on the entire island. In the past year, significant advances have been made in all these areas. Plans are already under way for the second NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference which will be held in late 2002 and feature speakers from Ireland, Northern Ireland, the U.S., and other areas. It will be open to all oncologists, researchers, nurses, students, and other health care professionals interested in learning and enhancing cancer care

  12. New Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs): Reissuance of Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is soliciting applications for the reissuance of its Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) program.   CPTAC will support broad efforts focused on several cancer types to explore further the complexities of cancer proteomes and their connections to abnormalities in cancer genomes.

  13. A case-control analysis of oral contraceptive use and breast cancer subtypes in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bethea, Traci N; Rosenberg, Lynn; Hong, Chi-Chen; Troester, Melissa A; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Bandera, Elisa V; Schedin, Pepper; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    .... We investigated recency and duration of OC use in relation to molecular subtypes of breast cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium...

  14. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    a multi-institutional infrastructure incorporating 5 leading prostate cancer clinical sites, 2 sequencing and computational analysis sites, linked...unacceptable toxicity. Radiological assesment were defined according PCWG2 criteria and RECIST 1.1. Results: 64 pts were identified, 47 met all criteria

  15. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  16. Sequence variants and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chun eChuang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous molecular epidemiological studies on head and neck cancer have examined various single nucleotide polymorphisms, but there are very few documented associations. In the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE consortium, we evaluated associations between SNPs in the metabolism, cell cycle, and DNA repair pathways and the risk of head and neck cancer. We analyzed individual-level pooled data from 14 European, North American, Central American and Asia case-control studies (5,915 head and neck cancer cases and 10,644 controls participating in the INHANCE consortium. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for SNP effects, adjusting for age, sex, race, and country. We observed an association between head and neck cancer risk and MGMT Leu84Phe heterozygotes (OR=0.79, 95% CI=0.68-0.93, XRCC1 Arg194Trp rare homozygotes (OR=2.3, 95% CI=1.1-4.7, ADH1B Arg48His homozygotes Arg/Arg (OR=2.7, 95% CI=1.9-4.0, ADH1C Ile350Val homozygotes Ile/Ile (OR=1.2, 95% CI=1.1-1.4, and the GSTM1 null genotype (OR=1.1, 95% CI=1.0-1.2. Among these results, MGMT Leu84Phe, ADH1B Arg48His, ADH1C Ile350Arg, and the GSTM1 null genotype had fairly low false positive report probabilities (<20%. We observed associations between ADH1B Arg48His, ADH1C Ile350Arg, and GSTM1 null genotype and head and neck cancer risk. No functional study currently supports the observed association for MGMT Leu84Phe, and the association with XRCC1 Arg194Trp may be a chance finding.

  17. Lack of Association for Reported Endocrine Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci in the PANDoRA Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Obazee, Ofure; Pastore, Manuela; Panzuto, Francesco; Liço, Valbona; Greenhalf, William; Katzke, Verena; Tavano, Francesca; Costello, Eithne; Corbo, Vincenzo; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Strobel, Oliver; Zambon, Carlo Federico; Neoptolemos, John P; Zerboni, Giulia; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Lombardo, Carlo; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Gioffreda, Domenica; Hackert, Thilo; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Landi, Stefano; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Landoni, Luca; Lawlor, Rita T; Bambi, Franco; Pirozzi, Felice; Basso, Daniela; Pasquali, Claudio; Capurso, Gabriele; Canzian, Federico

    2017-08-01

    Background: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare neoplasms for which very little is known about either environmental or genetic risk factors. Only a handful of association studies have been performed so far, suggesting a small number of risk loci.Methods: To replicate the best findings, we have selected 16 SNPs suggested in previous studies to be relevant in PNET etiogenesis. We genotyped the selected SNPs (rs16944, rs1052536, rs1059293, rs1136410, rs1143634, rs2069762, rs2236302, rs2387632, rs3212961, rs3734299, rs3803258, rs4962081, rs7234941, rs7243091, rs12957119, and rs1800629) in 344 PNET sporadic cases and 2,721 controls in the context of the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium.Results: After correction for multiple testing, we did not observe any statistically significant association between the SNPs and PNET risk. We also used three online bioinformatic tools (HaploReg, RegulomeDB, and GTEx) to predict a possible functional role of the SNPs, but we did not observe any clear indication.Conclusions: None of the selected SNPs were convincingly associated with PNET risk in the PANDoRA consortium.Impact: We can exclude a major role of the selected polymorphisms in PNET etiology, and this highlights the need for replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations, especially in rare diseases such as PNETs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1349-51. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Warren (Helen); F. Dudbridge (Frank); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Orr (Nick); N. Johnson (Nichola); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Mahmoodi (Maryam); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); L.M. Braaf (Linde); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); A. Chaiwerawattana (Arkom); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Schulz-Wendtland (Rüdiger); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Langheinz (Anne); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Golatta (Michael); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); U. Eilber (Ursula); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); G. Zinnatullina (Guzel); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Smeets (Ann); R. Paridaens (Robert); C. Weltens (Caroline); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); K. Buck (Katharina); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); J.E. Olson (Janet); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Cariona); G. Severi (Gianluca); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I.W. Brock (Ian); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Marta); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which

  19. A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKay, James D

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁷). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10⁻⁸) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10⁻⁸) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10⁻⁸); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10⁻⁹; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.

  20. A genome-wide association study of upper aerodigestive tract cancers conducted within the INHANCE consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D McKay

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁷. Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1×10⁻⁸ located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p =2 × 10⁻⁸ located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 × 10⁻⁸; rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 × 10⁻⁹; and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02. These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility.

  1. ABO blood group alleles and prostate cancer risk: Results from the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium (BPC3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markt, Sarah C; Shui, Irene M; Unger, Robert H; Urun, Yuksel; Berg, Christine D; Black, Amanda; Brennan, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Gapstur, Susan M; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Key, Timothy J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Canzian, Federico; Larranga, Nerea; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Naccarati, Alessio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J; Stattin, Par; Stevens, Victoria L; Stram, Daniel O; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ziegler, Regina G; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Mucci, Lorelei A; Choueiri, Toni K; Wilson, Kathryn M

    2015-11-01

    ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney, and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.87-1.08; Type B: OR = 0.92, 95%CI =n0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between "dose" of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quality of palliative care for patients with advanced cancer in a community consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Nipp, Ryan D; Bull, Janet H; Stinson, Charles S; Lowery, Ashlei W; Nicolla, Jonathan M; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-02-01

    Measuring quality of care delivery is essential to palliative care program growth and sustainability. We formed the Carolinas Consortium for Palliative Care and collected a quality data registry to monitor our practice and inform quality improvement efforts. We analyzed all palliative care consultations in patients with cancer in our quality registry from March 2008 through October 2011 using 18 palliative care quality measures. Descriptive metric adherence was calculated after analyzing the relevant population for measurement. We used a paper-based, prospective method to monitor adherence for quality measures in a community-based palliative care consortium. We demonstrate that measures evaluating process assessment (range 63%-100%), as opposed to interventions (range 3%-17%), are better documented. Analyzing data on quality is feasible and valuable in community-based palliative care. Overall, processes to collect data on quality using nontechnology methods may underestimate true adherence to quality measures. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relation of allium vegetables intake with head and neck cancers: evidence from the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Carlotta; Turati, Federica; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Guercio, Valentina; Tavani, Alessandra; Serraino, Diego; Brennan, Paul; Fabianova, Eleonora; Lissowska, Jola; Mates, Dana; Rudnai, Peter; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Vaughan, Thomas L; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Levi, Fabio; Hayes, Richard B; Purdue, Mark P; Bosetti, Cristina; Brenner, Hermann; Pelucchi, Claudio; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    Only a few studies analyzed the role of allium vegetables with reference to head and neck cancers (HNC), with mixed results. We investigated the potential favorable role of garlic and onion within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium. We analyzed pooled individual-level data from eight case-control studies, including 4590 cases and 7082 controls. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between garlic and onion intakes and HNC risk. Compared with no or low garlic use, the ORs of HNC were 0.95 (95% CI 0.71-1.27) for intermediate and 0.74 (95% CI 0.55-0.99) for high garlic use (p for trend = 0.02). The ORs of HNC for increasing categories of onion intake were 0.91 (95% CI 0.68-1.21) for >1 to ≤3 portions per week, and 0.83 (95% CI 0.60-1.13) for >3 portions per week (p for trend = 0.02), as compared to laryngeal cancer risk (OR = 0.69; 95% CI 0.54-0.88), but no significant association for other subsites. The results of this pooled-analysis support a possible moderate inverse association between garlic and onion intake and HNC risk. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Genetic variants of the DNA repair genes from Exome Aggregation Consortium (EXAC) database: significance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raima; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    DNA repair pathway is a primary defense system that eliminates wide varieties of DNA damage. Any deficiencies in them are likely to cause the chromosomal instability that leads to cell malfunctioning and tumorigenesis. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have demonstrated a significant association with cancer risk. Our study attempts to give a glimpse of the overall scenario of the germline polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes by taking into account of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database as well as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) for evaluating the disease link, particularly in cancer. It has been found that ExAC DNA repair dataset (which consists of 228 DNA repair genes) comprises 30.4% missense, 12.5% dbSNP reported and 3.2% ClinVar significant variants. 27% of all the missense variants has the deleterious SIFT score of 0.00 and 6% variants carrying the most damaging Polyphen-2 score of 1.00, thus affecting the protein structure and function. However, as per HGMD, only a fraction (1.2%) of ExAC DNA repair variants was found to be cancer-related, indicating remaining variants reported in both the databases to be further analyzed. This, in turn, may provide an increased spectrum of the reported cancer linked variants in the DNA repair genes present in ExAC database. Moreover, further in silico functional assay of the identified vital cancer-associated variants, which is essential to get their actual biological significance, may shed some lights in the field of targeted drug development in near future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Predictors of pretreatment CA125 at ovarian cancer diagnosis: a pooled analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Ana; Cramer, Daniel W; Kelemen, Linda E; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; Webb, Penelope M; Johnatty, Sharon E; deFazio, Anna; Lambrechts, Diether; Goodman, Marc T; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Karlan, Beth Y; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Goode, Ellen L; Pejovic, Tanja; Moffitt, Melissa; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus; McNeish, Iain; Terry, Kathryn L

    2017-05-01

    Cancer antigen 125 (CA125) is a glycoprotein expressed by epithelial cells of several normal tissue types and overexpressed by several epithelial cancers. Serum CA125 levels are mostly used as an aid in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer patients, to monitor response to treatment and detect cancer recurrence. Besides tumor characteristics, CA125 levels are also influenced by several epidemiologic factors, such as age, parity, and oral contraceptive use. Identifying factors that influence CA125 levels in ovarian cancer patients could aid in the interpretation of CA125 values for individuals. We evaluated predictors of pretreatment CA125 in 13 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. This analysis included a total of 5,091 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer with pretreatment CA125 measurements. We used probit scores to account for variability in CA125 between studies and linear regression to estimate the association between epidemiologic factors and tumor characteristics and pretreatment CA125 levels. In age-adjusted models, older age, history of pregnancy, history of tubal ligation, family history of breast cancer, and family history of ovarian cancer were associated with higher CA125 levels while endometriosis was associated with lower CA125 levels. After adjusting for tumor-related characteristics (stage, histology, grade), body mass index (BMI) higher than 30 kg/m2 was associated with 10% (95% CI 2, 19%) higher CA125 levels, while race (non-white vs. white) was associated with 15% (95% CI 4, 27%) higher CA125 levels. Our results suggest that high BMI and race may influence CA125 levels independent of tumor characteristics. Validation is needed in studies that use a single assay for CA125 measurement and have a diverse study population.

  6. Age at Last Birth in Relation to Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Pooled Analysis in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pike, Malcolm C.; Karageorgi, Stalo; Deming, Sandra L.; Anderson, Kristin; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A.; Cai, Hui; Cerhan, James R.; Cozen, Wendy; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Lacey, James V.; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Lurie, Galina; Mack, Thomas; Matsuno, Rayna K.; McCann, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Olson, Sara H.; Rastogi, Radhai; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Risch, Harvey; Robien, Kim; Schairer, Catherine; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Strom, Brian L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Ursin, Giske; Webb, Penelope M.; Weiss, Noel S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2012-01-01

    Childbearing at an older age has been associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer, but whether the association is independent of the number of births or other factors remains unclear. Individual-level data from 4 cohort and 13 case-control studies in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium were pooled. A total of 8,671 cases of endometrial cancer and 16,562 controls were included in the analysis. After adjustment for known risk factors, endometrial cancer risk declined with increasing age at last birth (Ptrend < 0.0001). The pooled odds ratio per 5-year increase in age at last birth was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.90). Women who last gave birth at 40 years of age or older had a 44% decreased risk compared with women who had their last birth under the age of 25 years (95% confidence interval: 47, 66). The protective association was similar across the different age-at-diagnosis groups and for the 2 major tumor histologic subtypes (type I and type II). No effect modification was observed by body mass index, parity, or exogenous hormone use. In this large pooled analysis, late age at last birth was independently associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, and the reduced risk persisted for many years. PMID:22831825

  7. Multiple Novel Prostate Cancer Predisposition Loci Confirmed by an International Study: The PRACTICAL Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Ingles, Sue A.; Schaid, Daniel; Thibodeau, Stephen; Dörk, Thilo; Neal, David; Cox, Angela; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walter; Guy, Michelle; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Spurdle, Amanda; Steginga, Suzanne; John, Esther M.; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Foulkes, William D.; Hamel, Nancy; Salinas, Claudia A.; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Johanneson, Bo; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schürmann, Peter; Meyer, Andreas; Kuefer, Rainer; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Liu, Jo-fen; O'Mara, Tracy; Gardiner, R.A. (Frank); Aitken, Joanne; Joshi, Amit D.; Severi, Gianluca; English, Dallas R.; Southey, Melissa; Edwards, Stephen M.; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study found that genetic variants on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19 and X were associated with prostate cancer risk. We evaluated the most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these loci using a worldwide consortium of 13 groups (PRACTICAL). Blood DNA from 7,370 prostate cancer cases and 5,742 male controls was analyzed by genotyping assays. Odds ratios (OR) associated with each genotype were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Six of the seven SNPs showed clear evidence of association with prostate cancer (P = 0.0007-P = 10−17). For each of these six SNPs, the estimated per-allele OR was similar to those previously reported and ranged from 1.12 to 1.29. One SNP on 3p12 (rs2660753) showed a weaker association than previously reported [per-allele OR, 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.16; P = 0.06) versus 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.31)]. The combined risks associated with each pair of SNPs were consistent with a multiplicative risk model. Under this model, and in combination with previously reported SNPs on 8q and 17q, these loci explain 16% of the familial risk of the disease, and men in the top 10% of the risk distribution have a 2.1-fold increased risk relative to general population rates. This study provides strong confirmation of these susceptibility loci in multiple populations and shows that they make an important contribution to prostate cancer risk prediction. PMID:18708398

  8. HER2 mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: A report from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Rathi N; Behera, Madhusmita; Berry, Lynne D; Rossi, Mike R; Kris, Mark G; Johnson, Bruce E; Bunn, Paul A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2017-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) mutations have been reported in lung adenocarcinomas. Herein, the authors describe the prevalence, clinical features, and outcomes associated with HER2 mutations in 1007 patients in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC). Patients with advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas were enrolled to the LCMC. Tumor specimens were assessed for diagnosis and adequacy; multiplexed genotyping was performed in Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratories to examine 10 oncogenic drivers. The LCMC database was queried for patients with HER2 mutations to access demographic data, treatment history, and vital status. An exploratory analysis was performed to evaluate the survival of patients with HER2 mutations who were treated with HER2-directed therapies. A total of 920 patients were tested for HER2 mutations; 24 patients (3%) harbored exon 20 insertion mutations (95% confidence interval, 2%-4%). One patient had a concurrent mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) amplification. The median age of the patients was 62 years, with a slight predominance of females over males (14 females vs 10 males). The majority of the patients were never-smokers (71%) and presented with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The median survival for patients who received HER2-targeted therapies (12 patients) was 2.1 years compared with 1.4 years for those who did not (12 patients) (P = .48). Patients with HER2 mutations were found to have inferior survival compared with the rest of the LCMC cohort with other mutations: the median survival was 3.5 years in the LCMC population receiving targeted therapy and 2.4 years for patients not receiving targeted therapy. HER2 mutations were detected in 3% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma in the LCMC. HER2-directed therapies should be investigated in this subgroup of patients. Cancer 2017;123:4099-4105. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Strategic planning by the palliative care steering committee of the Middle East Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shannon Y; Pirrello, Rosene D; Christianson, Sonya K; Ferris, Frank D

    2011-04-01

    High quality comprehensive palliative care is a critical need for millions of patients and families, but remains only a dream in many parts of the world. The failure to do a strategic planning process is one obstacle to advancing education and pain prevention and relief. The Middle Eastern Cancer Consortium Steering Committee attendees completed an initial strategic planning process and identified "developmental steps" to advance palliative care. Underscoring the multi-disciplinary nature of comprehensive palliative care, discipline-specific planning was done (adult and pediatric cancer and medicine, pharmacy, nursing) in a separate process from country-specific planning. Delineating the layers of intersection and differences between disciplines and countries was very powerful. Finding the common strengths and weaknesses in the status quo creates the potential for a more powerful regional response to the palliative care needs. Implementing and refining these preliminary strategic plans will augment and align the efforts to advance palliative care education and pain management in the Middle East. The dream to prevent and relieve suffering for millions of patients with advanced disease will become reality with a powerful strategic planning process well implemented.

  10. Diet and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between diet and head and neck cancer (HNC) risk using data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. The INHANCE pooled data included 22 case-control studies with 14,520 cases and 22,737 controls. Center-specific quartiles among the controls were used for food groups, and frequencies per week were used for single food items. A dietary pattern score combining high fruit and vegetable intake and low red meat intake was created. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the dietary items on the risk of HNC were estimated with a two-stage random-effects logistic regression model. An inverse association was observed for higher-frequency intake of fruit (4th vs. 1st quartile OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.43-0.62, p (trend) < 0.01) and vegetables (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.90, p (trend) = 0.01). Intake of red meat (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.13-1.74, p (trend) = 0.13) and processed meat (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14-1.65, p (trend) < 0.01) was positively associated with HNC risk. Higher dietary pattern scores, reflecting high fruit\\/vegetable and low red meat intake, were associated with reduced HNC risk (per score increment OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.84-0.97).

  11. Carotenoid intake and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncini, Emanuele; Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Cadoni, Gabriella; Ferraroni, Monica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Decarli, Adriano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Food and nutrition play an important role in head and neck cancer (HNC) etiology; however, the role of carotenoids remains largely undefined. We explored the relation of HNC risk with the intake of carotenoids within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. We pooled individual-level data from 10 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Japan. The analysis included 18,207 subjects (4414 with oral and pharyngeal cancer, 1545 with laryngeal cancer, and 12,248 controls), categorized by quintiles of carotenoid intake from natural sources. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile, the risk reduction associated with total carotenoid intake was 39 % (95 % CI 29-47 %) for oral/pharyngeal cancer and 39 % (95 % CI 24-50 %) for laryngeal cancer. Intakes of β-carotene equivalents, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin were associated with at least 18 % reduction in the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer (95 % CI 6-29 %) and 17 % reduction in the rate of laryngeal cancer (95 % CI 0-32 %). The overall protective effect of carotenoids on HNC was stronger for subjects reporting greater alcohol consumption (p < 0.05). The odds ratio for the combined effect of low carotenoid intake and high alcohol or tobacco consumption versus high carotenoid intake and low alcohol or tobacco consumption ranged from 7 (95 % CI 5-9) to 33 (95 % CI 23-49). A diet rich in carotenoids may protect against HNC. Persons with both low carotenoid intake and high tobacco or alcohol are at substantially higher risk of HNC.

  12. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minlikeeva, A.N.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Eng, K.H.; Cannioto, R.A.; Friel, G.; Szender, J.B.; Segal, B.; Odunsi, K.; Mayor, P.; Diergaarde, B.; Zsiros, E.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kobel, M.; Steed, H.; Defazio, A.; Jordan, S.J.; Fasching, P.A.; Beckmann, M.W.; Risch, H.A.; Rossing, M.A.; Doherty, J.A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Goodman, M.T.; Dork, T.; Edwards, R.; Modugno, F.; Ness, R.B.; Matsuo, K.; Mizuno, M.; Karlan, B.Y.; Goode, E.L.; Kjaer, S.K.; Hogdall, E.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Bandera, E.V.; Paddock, L.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Sutphen, R.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Menon, U.; Gayther, S.A.; Ramus, S.J.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Pearce, C.L.; Wu, A.H.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Jensen, A.; Webb, P.M.; Moysich, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian

  13. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, CM; Dixon, SC; Jensen, A; Kjaer, SK; Modugno, F; DeFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J.; Johnatty, SE; Fasching, PA; Beckmann, MW; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E.; Lambrechts, S

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Cancer Research UK. All rights reserved. Background: Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-s...

  14. Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Dominique S; Vrieling, Alina; Jiao, Li; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Steplowski, Emily; Lynch, Shannon M; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J; Lacroix, Andrea; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Allen, Naomi; Ammundadottir, Laufey; Bergmann, Manuela M; Boffetta, Paolo; Buring, Julie E; Canzian, Federico; Chanock, Stephen J; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Clipp, Sandra; Freiberg, Matthew S; Michael Gaziano, J; Giovannucci, Edward L; Hankinson, Susan; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N; Allan Hubbell, F; Hunter, David J; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Manjer, Jonas; Navarro, Carmen; Peeters, Petra H M; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Stevens, Victoria; Thomas, Gilles; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallace, Robert; Wolpin, Brian M; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z

    2010-08-01

    The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.

  15. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. carrying the mecC gene, isolated from wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncaric, Igor; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Posautz, Annika; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Daniel; Rosengarten, Renate; Walzer, Chris

    2013-10-01

    A recently identified mecA homologue, mecC, in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been isolated from humans and different animal hosts. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance and provide molecular characterization of MRSA and methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci (MRnSA) isolated from wildlife that carried the gene mecC. Five S. aureus and one coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolate displaying phenotypic oxacillin resistance, but not recognized with conventional PCR for mecA, were further characterized by a polyphasic approach. The presence of mecC in all isolates was determined using specific PCR. PCR targeting Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes of MRSA was performed. MRSA isolates were genotyped by spa typing and multilocus sequence typing. All isolates were genotyped by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. 16S rDNA sequence analysis for MRnSA identification was performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for all isolates. All five MRSA isolates contained the mecC gene, were PVL negative, carried SCCmec type XI and belonged to ST130 (where ST stands for sequence type), with spa types t843, t10513 or t3256, or to ST2620, with spa type t4335. The MRnSA isolate, most closely related to Staphylococcus stepanovicii, carried mecA and blaZ genes related to SCCmec XI. MRSA isolates exhibited resistance to the β-lactams only. The MRSA isolates described in this study represent the first detection of mecC-positive MRSA in a European otter (Lutra lutra) and a European brown hare (Lepus europaeus). The MRnSA isolate represents the first isolation of MRnSA from a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

  16. Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants: Results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, J Esteban; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Jongen, Lynn; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Thoene, Kathrin; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Figueroa, Jonine; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon; Swerdlow, Anthony; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Dunning, Alison M; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Milne, Roger L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2017-11-01

    Investigating the most likely causal variants identified by fine-mapping analyses may improve the power to detect gene-environment interactions. We assessed the interplay between 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genetic fine-scale mapping of susceptibility loci and 11 epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER) positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) disease. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability (BFDP) was computed to assess the noteworthiness of the results. Four potential gene-environment interactions were identified as noteworthy (BFDP breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint  = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, pint  = 1.8 × 10-4 ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint  = 1.9 × 10-5 ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint  = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10-4 ) and between 8q23-rs13267382 and age at first full-term pregnancy (ORint  = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.95, pint  = 5.2 × 10-4 ). While these results do not suggest any strong gene-environment interactions, our results may still be useful to inform experimental studies. These may in turn, shed light on the potential interactions observed. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  17. Hormone use and risk for lung cancer: a pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesatori, A C; Carugno, M; Consonni, D; Hung, R J; Papadoupolos, A; Landi, M T; Brenner, H; Müller, H; Harris, C C; Duell, E J; Andrew, A S; McLaughlin, J R; Schwartz, A G; Wenzlaff, A S; Stucker, I

    2013-10-01

    The association between oral contraceptive (OC) use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and lung cancer risk in women is still debated. We performed a pooled analysis of six case-control studies (1961 cases and 2609 controls) contributing to the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Potential associations were investigated with multivariable unconditional logistic regression and meta-analytic models. Multinomial logistic regressions were performed to investigate lung cancer risk across histologic types. A reduced lung cancer risk was found for OC (odds ratio (OR)=0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.97) and HRT ever users (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.66-0.90). Both oestrogen only and oestrogen+progestin HRT were associated with decreased risk (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.61-0.94, and OR=0.66; 95% CI: 0.49-0.88, respectively). No dose-response relationship was observed with years of OC/HRT use. The greatest risk reduction was seen for squamous cell carcinoma (OR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.37-0.76) in OC users and in both adenocarcinoma (OR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-0.95) and small cell carcinoma (OR=0.37; 95% CI: 0.19-0.71) in HRT users. No interaction with smoking status or BMI was observed. Our findings suggest that exogenous hormones can play a protective role in lung cancer aetiology. However, given inconsistencies with epidemiological evidence from cohort studies, further and larger investigations are needed for a more comprehensive view of lung cancer development in women.

  18. The 4th Bi-annual international African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium conference: building capacity to address cancer health disparities in populations of African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Elizabeth; Campbell, Jasmine; Bowen, Carlene; Delmoor, Ernestine; Jean-Louis, Gilda; Noumbissi, Raphiatou; O'Garro, Yvonne; Richards-Waritay, Oni; Straughter, Stanley; Tolbert, Vera; Wilson, Barbara; Ragin, Camille

    2014-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the 4(th) International Meeting of the African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3), organized and sponsored by Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC), and held on July 21-22, 2012 at the Lincoln University Graduate Center, Lincoln Plaza, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. AC3 investigators gathered in Philadelphia, PA to present the results of our ongoing collaborative research efforts throughout the African Diaspora. The general theme addressed cancer health disparities and presentations represented all cancer types. However, there was particular emphasis on women's cancers, related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections.

  19. Gene–environment interactions involving functional variants: Results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Gago‐Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, J. Esteban; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Jongen, Lynn; Flesch‐Janys, Dieter; Thoene, Kathrin; Couch, Fergus J.; Giles, Graham G.; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Figueroa, Jonine; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon; Swerdlow, Anthony; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Schmidt, Marjanka; Garcia‐Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Milne, Roger L.

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the most likely causal variants identified by fine‐mapping analyses may improve the power to detect gene–environment interactions. We assessed the interplay between 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genetic fine‐scale mapping of susceptibility loci and 11 epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER) positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER–) disease. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability (BFDP) was computed to assess the noteworthiness of the results. Four potential gene–environment interactions were identified as noteworthy (BFDP < 0.80) when assuming a true prior interaction probability of 0.01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR‐rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67–0.88, p int = 1.8 × 10−4). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14‐rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.36, 95% CI: 1.16–1.59, p int = 1.9 × 10−5) in relation to ER– disease risk. The remaining two gene–environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER– breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21‐rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12–1.43, p int =1.8 × 10−4) and between 8q23‐rs13267382 and age at first full‐term pregnancy (ORint = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83–0.95, p int = 5.2 × 10−4). While these results do not suggest any strong gene–environment interactions, our results may still be useful to inform experimental studies. These may in turn, shed light on the potential interactions observed. PMID:28670784

  20. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: findings from the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mariana C.; Lin, Jie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kiltie, Anne E.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Tony; Benhamou, Simone; Taylor, Jack A.; Placidi, Donatella; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Steineck, Gunnar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Nuria; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Xifeng; Karagas, Margaret R.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Barrett, Jennifer H; Elliot, Faye; Corral, Román; Joshi, Amit D.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Vineis, Paolo; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Park, SungShim Lani; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important and well-established bladder cancer risk factor, and a rich source of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen species that can induce damage to DNA in urothelial cells. Therefore, common variation in DNA repair genes might modify bladder cancer risk. In this study we present results from meta- and pooled analyses conducted as part of the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer. We included data on 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms corresponding to 7 DNA repair genes from 13 studies. Pooled- and meta-analyses included 5,282 cases and 5,954 controls of non-Latino white origin. We found evidence for weak but consistent associations with ERCC2 D312N (rs1799793) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01–1.19; p = 0.021), NBN E185Q (rs1805794) (per allele OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.01–1.18; p = 0.028), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00–1.21, p = 0.044). The association with NBN E185Q was limited to ever smokers (interaction p = 0.002), and was strongest for the highest levels of smoking dose and smoking duration. Overall, our study provides the strongest evidence to date for a role of common variants in DNA repair genes in bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:19706757

  1. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  2. Association between air pollution and mammographic breast density in the Breast Cancer Surveilance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Arao, Robert; Brokamp, Cole; O'Meara, Ellen S; Sprague, Brian L; Ghita, Gabriela; Ryan, Patrick

    2017-04-06

    Mammographic breast density is a well-established strong risk factor for breast cancer. The environmental contributors to geographic variation in breast density in urban and rural areas are poorly understood. We examined the association between breast density and exposure to ambient air pollutants (particulate matter Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (2001-2009). We included women aged ≥40 years with known residential zip codes before the index mammogram (n = 279,967). Breast density was assessed using the American College of Radiology's Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) four-category breast density classification. PM2.5 and O3 estimates for grids across the USA (2001-2008) were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency Hierarchical Bayesian Model (HBM). For the majority of women (94%), these estimates were available for the year preceding the mammogram date. Association between exposure to air pollutants and density was estimated using polytomous logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Women with extremely dense breasts had higher mean PM2.5 and lower O3 exposures than women with fatty breasts (8.97 vs. 8.66 ug/m3 and 33.70 vs. 35.82 parts per billion (ppb), respectively). In regression analysis, women with heterogeneously dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were more likely to have higher exposure to PM2.5 (fourth vs. first quartile odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16 - 1.23). Women with extremely dense vs. scattered fibroglandular breasts were less likely to have higher levels of ozone exposure (fourth vs. first quartile OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.73-0.87). Exposure to PM2.5 and O3 may in part explain geographical variation in mammographic density. Further studies are warranted to determine the causal nature of these associations.

  3. The burden of cancer attributable to modifiable risk factors: the Australian cancer-PAF cohort consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga, Maria E; Vajdic, Claire M; Canfell, Karen; MacInnis, Robert; Hull, Peter; Magliano, Dianna J; Banks, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Cumming, Robert G; Byles, Julie E; Taylor, Anne W; Shaw, Jonathan E; Price, Kay; Hirani, Vasant; Mitchell, Paul; Adelstein, Barbara-Ann; Laaksonen, Maarit A

    2017-06-14

    To estimate the Australian cancer burden attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors and their combinations using a novel population attributable fraction (PAF) method that accounts for competing risk of death, risk factor interdependence and statistical uncertainty. 365 173 adults from seven Australian cohort studies. We linked pooled harmonised individual participant cohort data with population-based cancer and death registries to estimate exposure-cancer and exposure-death associations. Current Australian exposure prevalence was estimated from representative external sources. To illustrate the utility of the new PAF method, we calculated fractions of cancers causally related to body fatness or both tobacco and alcohol consumption avoidable in the next 10 years by risk factor modifications, comparing them with fractions produced by traditional PAF methods. Over 10 years of follow-up, we observed 27 483 incident cancers and 22 078 deaths. Of cancers related to body fatness (n=9258), 13% (95% CI 11% to 16%) could be avoided if those currently overweight or obese had body mass index of 18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 . Of cancers causally related to both tobacco and alcohol (n=4283), current or former smoking explains 13% (11% to 16%) and consuming more than two alcoholic drinks per day explains 6% (5% to 8%). The two factors combined explain 16% (13% to 19%): 26% (21% to 30%) in men and 8% (4% to 11%) in women. Corresponding estimates using the traditional PAF method were 20%, 31% and 10%. Our PAF estimates translate to 74 000 avoidable body fatness-related cancers and 40 000 avoidable tobacco- and alcohol-related cancers in Australia over the next 10 years (2017-2026). Traditional PAF methods not accounting for competing risk of death and interdependence of risk factors may overestimate PAFs and avoidable cancers. We will rank the most important causal factors and their combinations for a spectrum of cancers and inform cancer control activities. © Article

  4. Nutrient-based dietary patterns and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Edefonti, V; Hashibe, M; Ambrogi, F; Parpinel, M; Bravi, F; Talamini, R; Levi, F.; Yu, G.; Morgenstern, H.; Kelsey, K.; Mcclean, M; Schantz, S; Zhang, Z.; Chuang, S.; Boffetta, P

    2011-01-01

    Background The association between dietary patterns and head and neck cancer has rarely been addressed. Patients and methods We used individual-level pooled data from five case-control studies (2452 cases and 5013 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. A posteriori dietary patterns were identified through a principal component factor analysis carried out on 24 nutrients derived from study-specific food-frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (...

  5. Menstrual pain and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Ana; Harris, Holly R; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Jordan, Susan J; Webb, Penelope M; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Kjaer, Susanne K; Schildkraut, Joellen; Berchuck, Andrew; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2018-02-01

    Menstrual pain, a common gynecological condition, has been associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in some, but not all studies. Furthermore, potential variations in the association between menstrual pain and ovarian cancer by histologic subtype have not been adequately evaluated due to lack of power. We assessed menstrual pain using either direct questions about having experienced menstrual pain, or indirect questions about menstrual pain as indication for use of hormones or medications. We used multivariate logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for the association between severe menstrual pain and ovarian cancer, adjusting for potential confounders and multinomial logistic regression to calculate ORs for specific histologic subtypes. We observed no association between ovarian cancer and menstrual pain assessed by indirect questions. Among studies using direct question, severe pain was associated with a small but significant increase in overall risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01-1.13), after adjusting for endometriosis and other potential confounders. The association appeared to be more relevant for clear cell (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.10-1.99) and serous borderline (OR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05-1.63) subtypes. In this large international pooled analysis of case-control studies, we observed a small increase in risk of ovarian cancer for women reporting severe menstrual pain. While we observed an increased ovarian cancer risk with severe menstrual pain, the possibility of recall bias and undiagnosed endometriosis cannot be excluded. Future validation in prospective studies with detailed information on endometriosis is needed. © 2017 UICC.

  6. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A; Kjaer, S K; Modugno, F; deFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J; Johnatty, S E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E; Lambrechts, S; Risch, H A; Rossing, M A; Doherty, J A; Wicklund, K G; Chang-Claude, J; Goodman, M T; Ness, R B; Moysich, K; Heitz, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Schwaab, I; Matsuo, K; Hosono, S; Goode, E L; Vierkant, R A; Larson, M C; Fridley, B L; Høgdall, C; Schildkraut, J M; Weber, R P; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Bandera, E V; Paddock, L; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L; Wentzensen, N; Yang, H P; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Høgdall, E; Lundvall, L; Whittemore, A; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Rothstein, J; Sutphen, R; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Pearce, C L; Wu, A H; Webb, P M

    2015-09-01

    Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30-34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99-1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01-1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m(-2)) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m(-2)), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m(-2)) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer.

  7. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Capurso, Gabriele; Giese, Nathalia; Funel, Niccola; Greenhalf, William; Soucek, Pavel; Gazouli, Maria; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pasquali, Claudio; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Cantore, Maurizio; Andriulli, Angelo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Costello, Eithne; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Heller, Anette; Key, Tim J; Theodoropoulos, George; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Mambrini, Andrea; Bambi, Franco; Landi, Stefano; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Bassi, Claudio; Pacetti, Paola; Piepoli, Ada; Tavano, Francesca; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Vodickova, Ludmila; Basso, Daniela; Plebani, Mario; Fogar, Paola; Büchler, Markus W; Bugert, Peter; Vodicka, Pavel; Boggi, Ugo; Neoptolemos, John P; Werner, Jens; Canzian, Federico

    2013-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the European Union and in the USA, but little is known about its genetic susceptibility. The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium was established to unite the efforts of different research groups; its aim is to create a large bio-database to uncover new genetic factors for pancreatic cancer risk, response to treatment, and patient survival. So far 2220 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a smaller number of cases of endocrine pancreatic tumours (n=86), chronic pancreatitis (n=272) and 3847 healthy controls have been collected. As a collective effort of the consortium, SNPs associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk from a genome-wide association study performed in Caucasians were replicated. The possibility that the same genetic polymorphisms may influence patient survival as well was also addressed. This collective effort is particularly important for pancreatic cancer because it is a relatively rare disease for which little is known about aetiopathogenesis and risk factors. The recruitment of additional collaborators and partner institutions is continuously on-going. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  9. Pleiotropy of genetic variants on obesity and smoking phenotypes: Results from the Oncoarray Project of The International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Obesity and cigarette smoking are correlated through complex relationships. Common genetic causes may contribute to these correlations. In this study, we selected 241 loci potentially associated with body mass index (BMI based on the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT consortium data and calculated a BMI genetic risk score (BMI-GRS for 17,037 individuals of European descent from the Oncoarray Project of the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO. Smokers had a significantly higher BMI-GRS than never-smokers (p = 0.016 and 0.010 before and after adjustment for BMI, respectively. The BMI-GRS was also positively correlated with pack-years of smoking (p<0.001 in smokers. Based on causal network inference analyses, seven and five of 241 SNPs were classified to pleiotropic models for BMI/smoking status and BMI/pack-years, respectively. Among them, three and four SNPs associated with smoking status and pack-years (p<0.05, respectively, were followed up in the ever-smoking data of the Tobacco, Alcohol and Genetics (TAG consortium. Among these seven candidate SNPs, one SNP (rs11030104, BDNF achieved statistical significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, and three suggestive SNPs (rs13021737, TMEM18; rs11583200, ELAVL4; and rs6990042, SGCZ achieved a nominal statistical significance. Our results suggest that there is a common genetic component between BMI and smoking, and pleiotropy analysis can be useful to identify novel genetic loci of complex phenotypes.

  10. History of hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes and ovarian cancer patient survival: evidence from the ovarian cancer association consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Cannioto, Rikki A; Szender, J Brian; Eng, Kevin H; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; LaMonte, Michael J; Friel, Grace; Segal, Brahm H; Odunsi, Kunle; Mayor, Paul; Zsiros, Emese; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Dӧrk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Kelemen, Linda E; Kӧbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; de Fazio, Anna; Jordan, Susan J; Nagle, Christina M; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Goodman, Marc T; Edwards, Robert; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Berchuck, Andrew; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Diergaarde, Brenda; Webb, Penelope M; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-05-01

    Survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis is generally low; understanding factors related to prognosis could be important to optimize treatment. The role of previously diagnosed comorbidities and use of medications for those conditions in relation to prognosis for ovarian cancer patients has not been studied extensively, particularly according to histological subtype. Using pooled data from fifteen studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we examined the associations between history of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and medications taken for these conditions and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) among patients diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and stage to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) overall and within strata of histological subtypes. History of diabetes was associated with increased risk of mortality (n = 7,674; HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 1.01-1.25). No significant mortality associations were observed for hypertension (n = 6,482; HR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.88-1.02) or heart disease (n = 4,252; HR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.87-1.27). No association of these comorbidities was found with PFS in the overall study population. However, among patients with endometrioid tumors, hypertension was associated with lower risk of progression (n = 339, HR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.35-0.84). Comorbidity was not associated with OS or PFS for any of the other histological subtypes. Ever use of beta blockers, oral antidiabetic medications, and insulin was associated with increased mortality, HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.03-1.40, HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.05-1.55, and HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.20-2.20, respectively. Ever use of diuretics was inversely associated with mortality, HR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.53-0.94. Histories of hypertension, diabetes, and use of diuretics

  11. Genetic Variants in Immune-Related Pathways and Breast Cancer Risk in African American Women in the AMBER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Liu, Song; Hu, Qiang; Yao, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Haddad, Stephen A; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bandera, Elisa V; Rosenberg, Lynn A; Haiman, Christopher A; Lee, Kelvin; Evans, Sharon S; Abrams, Scott I; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2018-01-16

    Background: Constitutional immunity shaped by exposure to endemic infectious diseases and parasitic worms in Sub-Saharan Africa may play a role in the etiology of breast cancer among African American (AA) women. Methods: A total of 149,514 gene variants in 433 genes across 45 immune pathways were analyzed in the AMBER consortium among 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Gene-based pathway analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product statistic for overall breast cancer risk, and risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for single variants. Results: The top pathways were Interleukin binding ( P = 0.01), Biocarta TNFR2 ( P = 0.005), and positive regulation of cytokine production ( P = 0.024) for overall, ER + , and ER - cancers, respectively. The most significant gene was IL2RB ( P = 0.001) for overall cancer, with rs228952 being the top variant identified (OR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.92). Only BCL3 contained a significant variant for ER + breast cancer. Variants in IL2RB, TLR6, IL8, PRKDC , and MAP3K1 were associated with ER - disease. The only genes showing heterogeneity between ER - and ER + cancers were TRAF1, MAP3K1 , and MAPK3 ( P ≤ 0.02). We also noted genes associated with autoimmune and atopic disorders. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that genetic variants in immune pathways are relevant to breast cancer susceptibility among AA women, both for ER + and ER - breast cancers. Impact: Results from this study extend our understanding of how inherited genetic variation in immune pathways is relevant to breast cancer susceptibility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(3); 1-10. ©2018 AACR. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O’Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Dörk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Pérez, Jose Ignacio; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Zamora, Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Górski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collée, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Dynnes Ørsted, David; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P.E.A.; Tollenaar, RAEM.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case–case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case–control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In case–case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (≤12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR− than PR+ tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 × 10−6) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 × 10−9) were less frequent in ER− than in ER+ tumors. Obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m2) in younger women (≤50 years) was more frequent in ER−/PR− than in ER+/PR+ tumors (P = 1 × 10−7), whereas obesity in older women (>50 years) was less frequent in PR− than in PR+ tumors (P = 6 × 10−4). The triple-negative (ER−/PR−/HER2−) or core basal phenotype (CBP; triple-negative and cytokeratins [CK]5/6+ and/or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]+) accounted for much of the heterogeneity in parity-related variables and BMI in younger women. Case–control analyses showed that nulliparity, increasing age at first birth, and obesity in younger women showed the expected associations with the risk of ER+ or PR+ tumors but not triple-negative (nulliparity vs parity, odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.19, P = .61; 5-year increase in age at first full-term birth, OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.05, P = .34; obesity in younger women, OR = 1.36, 95

  13. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest K Amankwah

    Full Text Available Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN and lumican (LUM show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC. We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U.S.-based studies (discovery set, 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1 and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2. The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.48 decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend = 0.001 to 0.03. Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity≥0.13 and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity≤0.03, which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (P(interaction≤0.003, age at diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.04, and year of diagnosis (P(interaction = 0.05 in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls. We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required.

  14. Progesterone receptor variation and risk of ovarian cancer is limited to the invasive endometrioid subtype: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium pooled analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C.L.; Wu, A.H.; Gayther, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    analyses, we found a statistically significant association between risk of endometrioid ovarian cancer and the PROGINS allele (n=651, OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.01-1.36, P=0.036). We also observed borderline evidence of an association between risk of endometrioid ovarian cancer and the +331C/T variant (n=725 cases......There is evidence that progesterone plays a role in the aetiology of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, genes involved in pathways that regulate progesterone may be candidates for susceptibility to this disease. Previous studies have suggested that genetic variants in the progesterone...... receptor gene (PGR) may be associated with ovarian cancer risk, although results have been inconsistent. We have established an international consortium to pool resources and data from many ovarian cancer case-control studies in an effort to identify variants that influence risk. In this study, three PGR...

  15. Evaluation of a modular multiplex-PCR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection assay adapted for mecC detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert L; Paterson, Gavin K; Holmes, Mark A; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin; Peters, Georg; Kriegeskorte, André

    A mecC (mecA(LGA251))-adapted multiplex PCR-based methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection assay was evaluated using an international, spa-typed Staphylococcus aureus collection comprising 51 mecC-positive MRSA, 240 mecA-positive MRSA, and 50 mecA-and mecC-negative

  16. Genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen A.; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Hong, Chi-Chen; Zhu, Qianqian; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ambrosone, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk have been conducted mostly in populations of European ancestry, and only sparsely in African Americans (AA), who are known for a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed 24,445 germline variants in 63 genes from vitamin D-related pathways in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) consortium, including 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression models for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1,983 ER positive and 1,098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses of ER status. None of the three vitamin D-related pathways were associated with breast cancer risk overall or by ER status. Gene-level analyses identified associations with risk for several genes at a nominal p ≤ 0.05, particularly for ER− breast cancer, including rs4647707 in DDB2. In case-only analyses, vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways were associated with ER− cancer (pathway-level p = 0.02), driven by a single gene CASR (gene-level p = 0.001). The top SNP in CASR was rs112594756 (p = 7 × 10−5, gene-wide corrected p = 0.01), followed by a second signal from a nearby SNP rs6799828 (p = 1 × 10−4, corrected p = 0.03). In summary, several variants in vitamin D pathways were associated with breast cancer risk in AA women. In addition, CASR may be related to tumor ER status, supporting a role of vitamin D or calcium in modifying breast cancer phenotypes. PMID:26650177

  17. Breast cancer phenotype in women with TP53 germline mutations: a Li-Fraumeni syndrome consortium effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciari, Serena; Dillon, Deborah A; Rath, Michelle; Robson, Mark; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Balmana, Judith; Gruber, Stephen B; Ford, James M; Euhus, David; Lebensohn, Alexandra; Telli, Melinda; Pochebit, Stephen M; Lypas, Georgios; Garber, Judy E

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor in women with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), an inherited cancer syndrome associated with germline mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene. Their lifetime breast cancer risk is 49% by age 60. Breast cancers in TP53 mutation carriers recently have more often been reported to be hormone receptor and HER-2 positive by immunohistochemistry and FISH in small series. We seek to complement the existing small literature with this report of a histopathologic analysis of breast cancers from women with documented LFS. Unstained slides and paraffin-embedded tumor blocks from breast cancers from 39 germline TP53 mutation carriers were assembled from investigators in the LFS consortium. Central histology review was performed on 93% of the specimens by a single breast pathologist from a major university hospital. Histology, grade, and hormone receptor status were assessed by immunohistochemistry; HER-2 status was defined by immunohistochemistry and/or FISH. The 43 tumors from 39 women comprise 32 invasive ductal carcinomas and 11 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). No other histologies were observed. The median age at diagnosis was 32 years (range 22-46). Of the invasive cancers, 84% were positive for ER and/or PR; and 81% were high grade. Sixty three percent of invasive and 73% of in situ carcinomas were positive for Her2/neu (IHC 3+ or FISH amplified). Of the invasive tumors, 53% were positive for both ER and HER2+; other ER/PR/HER2 combinations were observed. The DCIS were positive for ER and HER2 in 27% of the cases. This report of the phenotype of breast cancers from women with LFS nearly doubles the literature on this topic. Most DCIS and invasive ductal carcinomas in LFS are hormone receptor positive and/or HER-2 positive. These findings suggest that modern treatments may result in improved outcomes for women with LFS-associated breast cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Justenhoven, Christina; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Harth, Volker; Rabstein, Sylvia; Bowtell, D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; deFazio, A.; Gertig, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Whiteman, D.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Webb, P. M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Verhoef, Senno; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Tollenaar, Rob A.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Mourits, Marian J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Boyes, Laura; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Side, Lucy; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durrell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Robinson, Anne; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Traficante, N.; Moore, S.; Hung, J.; Fereday, S.; Harrap, K.; Sadkowsky, T.; Pandeya, N.; Malt, M.; Mellon, A.; Robertson, R.; Vanden Bergh, T.; Jones, M.; Mackenzie, P.; Maidens, J.; Nattress, K.; Chiew, Y. E.; Stenlake, A.; Sullivan, H.; Alexander, B.; Ashover, P.; Brown, S.; Corrish, T.; Green, L.; Jackman, L.; Ferguson, K.; Martin, K.; Martyn, A.; Ranieri, B.; White, J.; Jayde, V.; Bowes, L.; Mamers, P.; Galletta, L.; Giles, D.; Hendley, J.; Alsop, K.; Schmidt, T.; Shirley, H.; Ball, C.; Young, C.; Viduka, S.; Tran, Hoa; Bilic, Sanela; Glavinas, Lydia; Brooks, Julia; Stuart-Harris, R.; Kirsten, F.; Rutovitz, J.; Clingan, P.; Glasgow, A.; Proietto, A.; Braye, S.; Otton, G.; Shannon, J.; Bonaventura, T.; Stewart, J.; Begbie, S.; Friedlander, M.; Bell, D.; Baron-Hay, S.; Ferrier, A.; Gard, G.; Nevell, D.; Pavlakis, N.; Valmadre, S.; Young, B.; Camaris, C.; Crouch, R.; Edwards, L.; Hacker, N.; Marsden, D.; Robertson, G.; Beale, P.; Beith, J.; Carter, J.; Dalrymple, C.; Houghton, R.; Russell, P.; Anderson, L.; Links, M.; Grygiel, J.; Hill, J.; Brand, A.; Byth, K.; Jaworski, R.; Harnett, P.; Sharma, R.; Wain, G.; Ward, B.; Papadimos, D.; Crandon, A.; Cummings, M.; Horwood, K.; Obermair, A.; Perrin, L.; Wyld, D.; Nicklin, J.; Davy, M.; Oehler, M. K.; Hall, C.; Dodd, T.; Healy, T.; Pittman, K.; Henderson, D.; Miller, J.; Pierdes, J.; Achan, A.; Blomfield, P.; Challis, D.; McIntosh, R.; Parker, A.; Brown, B.; Rome, R.; Allen, D.; Grant, P.; Hyde, S.; Laurie, R.; Robbie, M.; Healy, D.; Jobling, T.; Manolitsas, T.; McNealage, J.; Rogers, P.; Susil, B.; Sumithran, E.; Simpson, I.; Phillips, K.; Rischin, D.; Fox, S.; Johnson, D.; Waring, P.; Lade, S.; Loughrey, M.; O'Callaghan, N.; Murray, W.; Mileshkin, L.; Allan, P.; Billson, V.; Pyman, J.; Neesham, D.; Quinn, M.; Hamilton, A.; Underhill, C.; Bell, R.; Ng, L. F.; Blum, R.; Ganju, V.; Hammond, I.; Leung, Y.; McCartney, A.; Stewart, C.; Buck, M.; Haviv, I.; Purdie, D.; Zeps, N.; Gurry, P.; Hankinson, S.; Meltzer, P.; Murray, B.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication

  19. Dietary fiber intake and head and neck cancer risk: A pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Daisuke; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Turati, Federica; Parpinel, Maria; Decarli, Adriano; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Garavello, Werner; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Hashibe, Mia; Ferraroni, Monica; La Vecchia, Carlo; Edefonti, Valeria

    2017-11-01

    The possible role of dietary fiber in the etiology of head neck cancers (HNCs) is unclear. We used individual-level pooled data from ten case-control studies (5959 cases and 12,248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium, to examine the association between fiber intake and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx. Odds Ratios (ORs) and their 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression applied to quintile categories of non-alcohol energy-adjusted fiber intake and adjusted for tobacco and alcohol use and other known or putative confounders. Fiber intake was inversely associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer combined (OR for 5th vs. 1st quintile category = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.40-0.59; p for trend fiber may lower HNC risk. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Polymorphism in the GALNT1 gene and epithelial ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white women: the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelan, Catherine M; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Goode, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. The fixed effects estimate per rs17647532 allele was null (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.07). When a recessive model was fit, the results were unchanged. Test for heterogeneity of the odds ratios revealed consistency across the 14 replication......Aberrant glycosylation is a well-described hallmark of cancer. In a previous ovarian cancer case control study that examined polymorphisms in 26 glycosylation-associated genes, we found strong statistical evidence (P = 0.00017) that women who inherited two copies of a single-nucleotide polymorphism...... in the UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, GALNT1, had decreased ovarian cancer risk. The current study attempted to replicate this observation. The GALNT1 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17647532 was genotyped in 6,965 cases and 8,377 controls from 14 studies forming...

  1. Unifying Screening Processes Within the PROSPR Consortium: A Conceptual Model for Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane J.; Schapira, Marilyn M.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Zauber, Ann G.; Geiger, Ann M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Weaver, Donald L.; Tiro, Jasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    General frameworks of the cancer screening process are available, but none directly compare the process in detail across different organ sites. This limits the ability of medical and public health professionals to develop and evaluate coordinated screening programs that apply resources and population management strategies available for one cancer site to other sites. We present a trans-organ conceptual model that incorporates a single screening episode for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers into a unified framework based on clinical guidelines and protocols; the model concepts could be expanded to other organ sites. The model covers four types of care in the screening process: risk assessment, detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Interfaces between different provider teams (eg, primary care and specialty care), including communication and transfer of responsibility, may occur when transitioning between types of care. Our model highlights across each organ site similarities and differences in steps, interfaces, and transitions in the screening process and documents the conclusion of a screening episode. This model was developed within the National Cancer Institute–funded consortium Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR). PROSPR aims to optimize the screening process for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer and includes seven research centers and a statistical coordinating center. Given current health care reform initiatives in the United States, this conceptual model can facilitate the development of comprehensive quality metrics for cancer screening and promote trans-organ comparative cancer screening research. PROSPR findings will support the design of interventions that improve screening outcomes across multiple cancer sites. PMID:25957378

  2. Patients' experiences with care for lung cancer and colorectal cancer: findings from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Arora, Neeraj K; Kahn, Katherine L; Malin, Jennifer L; Ganz, Patricia A; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kiefe, Catarina I; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M; Weeks, Jane C; Harrington, David P

    2010-09-20

    To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health.

  3. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  4. Obesity, body fat distribution, and risk of breast cancer subtypes in African American women participating in the AMBER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Hong, Chi-Chen; Troester, Melissa A; Bethea, Traci N; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L; Haiman, Christopher A; Park, Song-Yi; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    African American (AA) women are more likely than white women to be obese and to be diagnosed with ER- and triple-negative (TN) breast cancer, but few studies have evaluated the impact of obesity and body fat distribution on breast cancer subtypes in AA women. We evaluated these associations in the AMBER Consortium by pooling data from four large studies. Cases were categorized according to hormone receptor status as ER+, ER-, and TN (ER-, PR-, and HER2-) based on pathology data. A total of 2104 ER+ cases, 1070 ER- cases (including 491 TN cases), and 12,060 controls were included. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were computed using logistic regression, taking into account breast cancer risk factors. In postmenopausal women, higher recent (most proximal value to diagnosis/index date) BMI was associated with increased risk of ER+ cancer (OR 1.31; 95 % CI 1.02-1.67 for BMI ≥ 35 vs. risk of TN tumors (OR 0.60; 95 % CI 0.39-0.93 for BMI ≥ 35 vs. cancer and all subtypes of postmenopausal cancer, and high recent waist-to-hip ratio with increased risk of premenopausal ER+ tumors (OR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.01-1.80) and all tumor subtypes combined in postmenopausal women (OR 1.26; 95 % CI 1.02-1.56). The impact of general and central obesity varies by menopausal status and hormone receptor subtype in AA women. Our findings imply different mechanisms for associations of adiposity with TN and ER+ breast cancers.

  5. Association of breast cancer risk and the mTOR pathway in women of African ancestry in 'The Root' Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Huo, Dezheng; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Zheng, Yonglan

    2017-08-01

    Functional studies have elucidated the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in breast carcinogenesis, but to date, there is a paucity of data on its contribution to breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. We examined 47628 SNPs in 61 mTOR pathway genes in the genome wide association study of breast cancer in the African Diaspora study (The Root consortium), which included 3686 participants (1657 cases). Pathway- and gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) test for 10994 SNPs that were not highly correlated (r2 < 0.8). Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated with logistic regression for each single-nucleotide polymorphism. The mTOR pathway was significantly associated with overall and estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer risk (P = 0.003 and 0.03, respectively). PRKAG3 (Padj = 0.0018) and RPS6KA3 (Padj = 0.061) were the leading genes for the associations with overall breast cancer risk and ER- breast cancer risk, respectively. rs190843378 in PRKAG3 was statistically significant after gene-level adjustment for multiple comparisons (OR = 0.50 for each T allele, 95% CI = 0.38-0.66, Padj = 3.6E-05), with a statistical power of 0.914. These results provide new insights on the biological relevance of the mTOR pathway in breast cancer progression and underscore the need for more genetic epidemiology studies of breast cancer in the African Diaspora. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Nutrient-based dietary patterns and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edefonti, V; Hashibe, M; Ambrogi, F; Parpinel, M; Bravi, F; Talamini, R; Levi, F; Yu, G; Morgenstern, H; Kelsey, K; McClean, M; Schantz, S; Zhang, Z; Chuang, S; Boffetta, P; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    2012-07-01

    The association between dietary patterns and head and neck cancer has rarely been addressed. We used individual-level pooled data from five case-control studies (2452 cases and 5013 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. A posteriori dietary patterns were identified through a principal component factor analysis carried out on 24 nutrients derived from study-specific food-frequency questionnaires. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models on quintiles of factor scores. We identified three major dietary patterns named 'animal products and cereals', 'antioxidant vitamins and fiber', and 'fats'. The 'antioxidant vitamins and fiber' pattern was inversely related to oral and pharyngeal cancer (OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.76 for the highest versus the lowest score quintile). The 'animal products and cereals' pattern was positively associated with laryngeal cancer (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.11), whereas the 'fats' pattern was inversely associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI 0.63-0.97) and positively associated with laryngeal cancer (OR=1.69, 95% CI 1.22-2.34). These findings suggest that diets rich in animal products, cereals, and fats are positively related to laryngeal cancer, and those rich in fruit and vegetables inversely related to oral and pharyngeal cancer.

  7. Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium (PanC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, C.; Lucenteforte, E.; Bracci, P. M.; Negri, E.; Neale, R. E.; Risch, H. A.; Olson, S. H.; Gallinger, S.; Miller, A. B.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Talamini, R.; Polesel, J.; Ghadirian, P.; Baghurst, P. A.; Zatonski, W.; Fontham, E.; Holly, E. A.; Gao, Y. T.; Yu, H.; Kurtz, R. C.; Cotterchio, M.; Maisonneuve, P.; Zeegers, M. P.; Duell, E. J.; Boffetta, P.; La Vecchia, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. Methods We pooled 10 case–control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case–control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. Results The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98–1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15–2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82–20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. Conclusions This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance. PMID:23970016

  8. Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, C; Lucenteforte, E; Bracci, P M; Negri, E; Neale, R E; Risch, H A; Olson, S H; Gallinger, S; Miller, A B; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Talamini, R; Polesel, J; Ghadirian, P; Baghurst, P A; Zatonski, W; Fontham, E; Holly, E A; Gao, Y T; Yu, H; Kurtz, R C; Cotterchio, M; Maisonneuve, P; Zeegers, M P; Duell, E J; Boffetta, P; La Vecchia, C

    2013-11-01

    Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

  9. Vitamin or mineral supplement intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Menezes, Ana; Matos, Elena; Koifman, Sergio; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Fernandez, Leticia; Daudt, Alexander W; Curado, Maria Paula; Winn, Deborah M; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Castellsague, Xavier; Morgenstern, Hal; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; McClean, Michael; Kelsey, Karl T; Hayes, Richard B; Purdue, Mark P; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chen, Chu; Benhamou, Simone; Olshan, Andrew F; Yu, Guopei; Schantz, Stimson; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the potential role of vitamin or mineral supplementation on the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC), we analyzed individual-level pooled data from 12 case-control studies (7,002 HNC cases and 8,383 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. There were a total of 2,028 oral cavity cancer, 2,465 pharyngeal cancer, 874 unspecified oral/pharynx cancer, 1,329 laryngeal cancer and 306 overlapping HNC cases. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self reported ever use of any vitamins, multivitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and calcium, beta-carotene, iron, selenium and zinc supplements were assessed. We further examined frequency, duration and cumulative exposure of each vitamin or mineral when possible and stratified by smoking and drinking status. All ORs were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, study center, education level, pack-years of smoking, frequency of alcohol drinking and fruit/vegetable intake. A decreased risk of HNC was observed with ever use of vitamin C (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.59-0.96) and with ever use of calcium supplement (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.97). The inverse association with HNC risk was also observed for 10 or more years of vitamin C use (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.54-0.97) and more than 365 tablets of cumulative calcium intake (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.16-0.83), but linear trends were not observed for the frequency or duration of any supplement intake. We did not observe any strong associations between vitamin or mineral supplement intake and the risk of HNC. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  10. Alcohol and lung cancer risk among never smokers: A pooled analysis from the international lung cancer consortium and the SYNERGY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Brenner, Darren R; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Lan, Qing; Vineis, Paolo; Johansson, Mattias; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Stucker, Isabelle; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Christiani, David C; Hong, Yun-Chul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Morgenstern, Hal; Schwartz, Ann G; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Rennert, Gad; McLaughlin, John R; Harris, Curtis C; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Orlow, Irene; Park, Bernard J; Zauderer, Marjorie; Barros Dios, Juan M; Ruano Raviña, Alberto; Siemiatycki, Jack; Koushik, Anita; Lazarus, Philip; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Tardon, Adonina; Le Marchand, Loic; Brenner, Hermann; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Duell, Eric J; Andrew, Angeline S; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Zaridze, David; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Consonni, Dario; Olsson, Ann; Straif, Kurt; Hung, Rayjean J

    2017-05-01

    It is not clear whether alcohol consumption is associated with lung cancer risk. The relationship is likely confounded by smoking, complicating the interpretation of previous studies. We examined the association of alcohol consumption and lung cancer risk in a large pooled international sample, minimizing potential confounding of tobacco consumption by restricting analyses to never smokers. Our study included 22 case-control and cohort studies with a total of 2548 never-smoking lung cancer patients and 9362 never-smoking controls from North America, Europe and Asia within the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) and SYNERGY Consortium. Alcohol consumption was categorized into amounts consumed (grams per day) and also modelled as a continuous variable using restricted cubic splines for potential non-linearity. Analyses by histologic sub-type were included. Associations by type of alcohol consumed (wine, beer and liquor) were also investigated. Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with lung cancer risk with evidence most strongly supporting lower risk for light and moderate drinkers relative to non-drinkers (>0-4.9 g per day: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.70-0.90; 5-9.9 g per day: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99; 10-19.9 g per day: OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.65-0.96). Inverse associations were found for consumption of wine and liquor, but not beer. The results indicate that alcohol consumption is inversely associated with lung cancer risk, particularly among subjects with low to moderate consumption levels, and among wine and liquor drinkers, but not beer drinkers. Although our results should have no relevant bias from the confounding effect of smoking we cannot preclude that confounding by other factors contributed to the observed associations. Confounding in relation to the non-drinker reference category may be of particular importance. © 2017 UICC.

  11. Vitamin E intake from natural sources and head and neck cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edefonti, V; Hashibe, M; Parpinel, M; Ferraroni, M; Turati, F; Serraino, D; Matsuo, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Moysich, K; Zhang, Z-F; Morgenstern, H; Levi, F; Kelsey, K; McClean, M; Bosetti, C; Schantz, S; Yu, G-P; Boffetta, P; Chuang, S-C; A Lee, Y-C; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the possible effect of vitamin E on head and neck cancers (HNCs) is limited. Methods: We used individual-level pooled data from 10 case–control studies (5959 cases and 12 248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium to assess the association between vitamin E intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models applied to quintile categories of nonalcohol energy-adjusted vitamin E intake. Results: Intake of vitamin E was inversely related to oral/pharyngeal cancer (OR for the fifth vs the first quintile category=0.59, 95% CI: 0.49–0.71; P for trend laryngeal cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.54–0.83, P for trend cancer. Inverse associations were generally observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer and within covariate strata for both sites. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that greater vitamin E intake from foods may lower HNC risk, although we were not able to explain the heterogeneity observed across studies or rule out certain sources of bias. PMID:25989276

  12. Challenges in initiating and conducting personalized cancer therapy trials: perspectives from WINTHER, a Worldwide Innovative Network (WIN) Consortium trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodon, J; Soria, J C; Berger, R; Batist, G; Tsimberidou, A; Bresson, C; Lee, J J; Rubin, E; Onn, A; Schilsky, R L; Miller, W H; Eggermont, A M; Mendelsohn, J; Lazar, V; Kurzrock, R

    2015-08-01

    Advances in 'omics' technology and targeted therapeutic molecules are together driving the incorporation of molecular-based diagnostics into the care of patients with cancer. There is an urgent need to assess the efficacy of therapy determined by molecular matching of patients with particular targeted therapies. WINTHER is a clinical trial that uses cutting edge genomic and transcriptomic assays to guide treatment decisions. Through the lens of this ambitious multinational trial (five countries, six sites) coordinated by the Worldwide Innovative Networking Consortium for personalized cancer therapy, we discovered key challenges in initiation and conduct of a prospective, omically driven study. To date, the time from study concept to activation has varied between 19 months at Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in France to 30 months at the Segal Cancer Center, McGill University (Canada). It took 3+ years to be able to activate US sites due to national regulatory hurdles. Access to medications proposed by the molecular analysis remains a major challenge, since their availability through active clinical trials is highly variable over time within sites and across the network. Rules regarding the off-label use of drugs, or drugs not yet approved at all in some countries, pose a further challenge, and many biopharmaceutical companies lack a simple internal mechanism to supply the drugs even if they wish to do so. These various obstacles should be addressed to test and then implement precision medicine in cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  14. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Tworoger Data analysis and interpretation : Nicolas Wentzensen, Elizabeth M. Poole; Britton Trabert, EmilyWhite, Alpa V. Patel, V.Wendy Setiawan, Kala...DC; Sabina Sieri, National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; Anna Tjonneland, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen , Denmark; Antonia Trichopoulou, Hellenic...School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA 10Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen , Denmark 11INSERM

  15. Analysis of Xq27-28 linkage in the international consortium for prostate cancer genetics (ICPCG families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey-Wilson Joan E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants are likely to contribute to a portion of prostate cancer risk. Full elucidation of the genetic etiology of prostate cancer is difficult because of incomplete penetrance and genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Current evidence suggests that genetic linkage to prostate cancer has been found on several chromosomes including the X; however, identification of causative genes has been elusive. Methods Parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using 26 microsatellite markers in each of 11 groups of multiple-case prostate cancer families from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG. Meta-analyses of the resultant family-specific linkage statistics across the entire 1,323 families and in several predefined subsets were then performed. Results Meta-analyses of linkage statistics resulted in a maximum parametric heterogeneity lod score (HLOD of 1.28, and an allele-sharing lod score (LOD of 2.0 in favor of linkage to Xq27-q28 at 138 cM. In subset analyses, families with average age at onset less than 65 years exhibited a maximum HLOD of 1.8 (at 138 cM versus a maximum regional HLOD of only 0.32 in families with average age at onset of 65 years or older. Surprisingly, the subset of families with only 2–3 affected men and some evidence of male-to-male transmission of prostate cancer gave the strongest evidence of linkage to the region (HLOD = 3.24, 134 cM. For this subset, the HLOD was slightly increased (HLOD = 3.47 at 134 cM when families used in the original published report of linkage to Xq27-28 were excluded. Conclusions Although there was not strong support for linkage to the Xq27-28 region in the complete set of families, the subset of families with earlier age at onset exhibited more evidence of linkage than families with later onset of disease. A subset of families with 2–3 affected individuals and with some evidence of male to male disease transmission

  16. The premenopausal breast cancer collaboration : A pooling project of studies participating in the national cancer institute cohort consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; Mcclain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Butler, Lesley M; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among

  17. Parity, lactation, and breast cancer subtypes in African American women: results from the AMBER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Julie R; Viscidi, Emma; Troester, Melissa A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Schedin, Pepper; Bethea, Traci N; Bandera, Elisa V; Borges, Virginia; McKinnon, Craig; Haiman, Christopher A; Lunetta, Kathryn; Kolonel, Laurence N; Rosenberg, Lynn; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2014-10-01

    African American (AA) women have a disproportionately high incidence of estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer, a subtype with a largely unexplained etiology. Because childbearing patterns also differ by race/ethnicity, with higher parity and a lower prevalence of lactation in AA women, we investigated the relation of parity and lactation to risk of specific breast cancer subtypes. Questionnaire data from two cohort and two case-control studies of breast cancer in AA women were combined and harmonized. Case patients were classified as ER+ (n = 2446), ER- (n = 1252), or triple negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-; n = 567) based on pathology data; there were 14180 control patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in polytomous logistic regression analysis with adjustment for study, age, reproductive and other risk factors. ORs for parity relative to nulliparity was 0.92 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.03) for ER+, 1.33 (95% CI = 1.11 to 1.59) for ER-, and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.06 to 1.70) for triple-negative breast cancer. Lactation was associated with a reduced risk of ER- (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.95) but not ER+ cancer. ER- cancer risk increased with each additional birth in women who had not breastfed, with an OR of 1.68 (95% CI = 1.15 to 2.44) for 4 or more births relative to one birth with lactation. The findings suggest that parous women who have not breastfed are at increased risk of ER- and triple-negative breast cancer. Promotion of lactation may be an effective tool for reducing occurrence of the subtypes that contribute disproportionately to breast cancer mortality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Additive interactions between susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies and breast cancer risk factors in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D; Lindström, Sara; Hüsing, Anika; Barrdahl, Myrto; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Gaudet, Mia M; Figueroa, Jonine D; Baglietto, Laura; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Diver, W Ryan; Dossus, Laure; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Henderson, Brian E; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N; Krogh, Vittorio; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, I-Min; Lund, Eiliv; McCarty, Catherine A; Overvad, Kim; Peeters, Petra H; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Stram, Daniel O; Sund, Malin; Thun, Michael J; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Willett, Walter C; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G; Kraft, Peter

    2014-11-15

    Additive interactions can have public health and etiological implications but are infrequently reported. We assessed departures from additivity on the absolute risk scale between 9 established breast cancer risk factors and 23 susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from genome-wide association studies among 10,146 non-Hispanic white breast cancer cases and 12,760 controls within the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We estimated the relative excess risk due to interaction and its 95% confidence interval for each pairwise combination of SNPs and nongenetic risk factors using age- and cohort-adjusted logistic regression models. After correction for multiple comparisons, we identified a statistically significant relative excess risk due to interaction (uncorrected P = 4.51 × 10(-5)) between a SNP in the DNA repair protein RAD51 homolog 2 gene (RAD51L1; rs10483813) and body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)). We also compared additive and multiplicative polygenic risk prediction models using per-allele odds ratio estimates from previous studies for breast-cancer susceptibility SNPs and observed that the multiplicative model had a substantially better goodness of fit than the additive model. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Dietary acrylamide and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, C; Rosato, V; Bracci, P M; Li, D; Neale, R E; Lucenteforte, E; Serraino, D; Anderson, K E; Fontham, E; Holly, E A; Hassan, M M; Polesel, J; Bosetti, C; Strayer, L; Su, J; Boffetta, P; Duell, E J; La Vecchia, C

    2017-02-01

    Occupational exposure to acrylamide was associated with excess mortality from pancreatic cancer, though in the absence of dose-risk relationship. Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between acrylamide from diet and pancreatic cancer risk. We considered this issue in a combined set of 1975 cases of pancreatic cancer and 4239 controls enrolled in six studies of the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) by estimating study-specific ORs through multivariate unconditional logistic regression models and pooling the obtained estimates using random-effects models. Compared with the lowest level of estimated dietary acrylamide intake, the pooled ORs were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.19) for the second, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.71-1.16) for the third, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.66-1.28) for the fourth (highest) quartile of intake. For an increase of 10 µg/day of acrylamide intake, the pooled OR was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.87-1.06), with heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 67%). Results were similar across various subgroups, and were confirmed when using a one-stage modelling approach. This PanC4 pooled-analysis found no association between dietary acrylamide and pancreatic cancer.

  20. Alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucenteforte, E; La Vecchia, C; Silverman, D; Petersen, G M; Bracci, P M; Ji, B T; Bosetti, C; Li, D; Gallinger, S; Miller, A B; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Talamini, R; Polesel, J; Ghadirian, P; Baghurst, P A; Zatonski, W; Fontham, E; Bamlet, W R; Holly, E A; Gao, Y T; Negri, E; Hassan, M; Cotterchio, M; Su, J; Maisonneuve, P; Boffetta, P; Duell, E J

    2012-02-01

    Heavy alcohol drinking has been related to pancreatic cancer, but the issue is still unsolved. To evaluate the role of alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer, we conducted a pooled analysis of 10 case-control studies (5585 cases and 11,827 controls) participating in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. We computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) by estimating study-specific ORs adjusted for selected covariates and pooling them using random effects models. Compared with abstainers and occasional drinkers (association for light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 4 drinks per day) and pancreatic cancer risk; however, associations were above unity for higher consumption levels (OR = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2 for subjects drinking ≥ 9 drinks per day). Results did not change substantially when we evaluated associations by tobacco smoking status, or when we excluded participants who reported a history of pancreatitis, or participants whose data were based upon proxy responses. Further, no notable differences in pooled risk estimates emerged across strata of sex, age, race, study type, and study area. This collaborative-pooled analysis provides additional evidence for a positive association between heavy alcohol consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  1. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  2. The etiology of uterine sarcomas: A pooled analysis of the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, A.S.; Cook, L.S.; Gaudet, M.M.; Rohan, T.E.; Schouten, L.J.; Setiawan, V.W.; Wise, L.A.; Anderson, K.E.; Bernstein, L.; Vivo, I. de; Friedenreich, C.M.; Gapstur, S.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Henderson, B.; Horn-Ross, P.L.; Kolonel, L.; Lacey, J.V.; Liang, X.; Lissowska, J.; Magliocco, A.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Olson, S.H.; Palmer, J.R.; Park, Y.; Patel, A.V.; Prescott, J.; Rastogi, R.; Robien, K.; Rosenberg, L.; Schairer, C.; Ou Shu, X.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Virkus, R.A.; Wentzensen, N.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Xu, W.-H.; Yang, H.P.; Brinton, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uterine sarcomas are characterised by early age at diagnosis, poor prognosis, and higher incidence among Black compared with White women, but their aetiology is poorly understood. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer

  3. South Carolina Cancer Health Equity Consortium: HBCU Student Summer Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    students are still enrolled at their home academic institutions  Several research mentors are writing manuscripts and will include their Student...36 APPENDIX I: ACADEMIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS TO DATE OF THE 2016 STUDENT FELLOWS...funding opportunities available to students, career opportunities in academic medicine, perspectives of prostate cancer among community members

  4. IGF-1, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 polymorphisms predict circulating IGF levels but not breast cancer risk: findings from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpa V Patel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available IGF-1 has been shown to promote proliferation of normal epithelial breast cells, and the IGF pathway has also been linked to mammary carcinogenesis in animal models. We comprehensively examined the association between common genetic variation in the IGF1, IGFBP1, and IGFBP3 genes in relation to circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels and breast cancer risk within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3. This analysis included 6,912 breast cancer cases and 8,891 matched controls (n = 6,410 for circulating IGF-I and 6,275 for circulating IGFBP-3 analyses comprised primarily of Caucasian women drawn from six large cohorts. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype patterns were characterized in the regions surrounding IGF1 and the genes coding for two of its binding proteins, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3. In total, thirty haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNP were selected to provide high coverage of common haplotypes; the haplotype structure was defined across four haplotype blocks for IGF1 and three for IGFBP1 and IGFBP3. Specific IGF1 SNPs individually accounted for up to 5% change in circulating IGF-I levels and individual IGFBP3 SNPs were associated up to 12% change in circulating IGFBP-3 levels, but no associations were observed between these polymorphisms and breast cancer risk. Logistic regression analyses found no associations between breast cancer and any htSNPs or haplotypes in IGF1, IGFBP1, or IGFBP3. No effect modification was observed in analyses stratified by menopausal status, family history of breast cancer, body mass index, or postmenopausal hormone therapy, or for analyses stratified by stage at diagnosis or hormone receptor status. In summary, the impact of genetic variation in IGF1 and IGFBP3 on circulating IGF levels does not appear to substantially influence breast cancer risk substantially among primarily Caucasian postmenopausal women.

  5. Risk Analysis of Prostate Cancer in PRACTICAL, a Multinational Consortium, Using 25 Known Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2015-01-01

    prostate cancer susceptibility loci in 40,414 individuals and derived a polygenic risk score (PRS). We estimated empirical odds ratios (OR) for prostate cancer associated with different risk strata defined by PRS and derived age-specific absolute risks of developing prostate cancer by PRS stratum......BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with prostate cancer risk which explain a substantial proportion of familial relative risk. These variants can be used to stratify individuals by their risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 25...... and family history. RESULTS: The prostate cancer risk for men in the top 1% of the PRS distribution was 30.6 (95% CI, 16.4-57.3) fold compared with men in the bottom 1%, and 4.2 (95% CI, 3.2-5.5) fold compared with the median risk. The absolute risk of prostate cancer by age of 85 years was 65.8% for a man...

  6. Efficacy of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) in advanced bladder cancer: results from the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daghmin, Ali; Kauffman, Eric C.; Shi, Yi; Badani, Ketan; Balbay, M. Derya; Canda, Erdem; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ghavamian, Reza; Grubb, Robert; Hemal, Ashok; Kaouk, Jihad; Kibel, Adam S.; Maatman, Thomas; Menon, Mani; Mottrie, Alex; Nepple, Kenneth; Pattaras, John G.; Peabody, James O.; Poulakis, Vassilis; Pruthi, Raj; Redorta, Juan Palou; Rha, Koon-Ho; Richstone, Lee; Schanne, Francis; Scherr, Douglas S.; Siemer, Stefan; Stöckle, Michael; Wallen, Eric M.; Weizer, Alon; Wiklund, Peter; Wilson, Timothy; Wilding, Gregory; Woods, Michael; Guru, Khurshid A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterise the surgical feasibility and outcomes of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) for pathological T4 bladder cancer. Patients and Methods Retrospective evaluation of a prospectively maintained International Radical Cystectomy Consortium database was conducted for 1118 patients who underwent RARC between 2003 and 2012. We dichotomised patients based on pathological stage (≤pT3 vs pT4) and evaluated demographic, operative and pathological variables in relation to morbidity and mortality. Results In all, 1000 ≤pT3 and 118 pT4 patients were evaluated. The pT4 patients were older than the ≤pT3 patients (P = 0.001). The median operating time and blood loss were 386 min and 350 mL vs 396 min and 350 mL for p T4 and ≤pT3, respectively. The complication rate was similar (54% vs 58%; P = 0.64) among ≤pT3 and pT4 patients, respectively. The overall 30-and 90-day mortality rate was 0.4% and 1.8% vs 4.2% and 8.5% for ≤pT3 vs pT4 patients (P 10 days, and 90-day readmission were significantly associated with complications in pT4 patients. Meanwhile, BMI, LOS >10 days, grade 3–5 complications, 90-day readmission, smoking, previous abdominal surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with mortality in pT4 patients. On multivariate analysis, BMI was an independent predictor of complications in pT4 patients, but not for mortality. Conclusions RARC for pT4 bladder cancer is surgically feasible but entails significant morbidity and mortality. BMI was independent predictor of complications in pT4 patients. PMID:24219170

  7. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    or jelly contraceptives ; 0=reported never using foam or jelly contraceptives ; 9=unknown/missing MALECON T Ever use of male contraceptives (i.e...condom) 1=reported ever using male contraceptives ; 0=reported never using male contraceptives ; 9=unknown/missing OTHERCO NT Ever use of other...for which we have received data. Preliminary analyses of primary ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., oral contraceptive use, parity) are on-going to

  8. Natural vitamin C intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: A pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Turati, Federica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Amy Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chuang, Shu-Chun; La Vecchia, Carlo; Decarli, Adriano

    2015-07-15

    Evidence of associations between single nutrients and head and neck cancer (HNC) is still more limited and less consistent than that for fruit and vegetables. However, clarification of the protective mechanisms of fruit and vegetables is important to our understanding of HNC etiology. We investigated the association between vitamin C intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx using individual-level pooled data from ten case-control studies (5,959 cases and 12,248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. After harmonization of study-specific exposure information via the residual method, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models on quintile categories of 'non-alcohol energy-adjusted' vitamin C intake. In the presence of heterogeneity of the estimated ORs among studies, we derived those estimates from generalized linear mixed models. Higher intakes of vitamin C were inversely related to oral and pharyngeal (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.45-0.65, for the fifth quintile category versus the first one, p for trendcancers (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.40-0.68, p for trend = 0.006), although in the presence of heterogeneity among studies for both sites. Inverse associations were consistently observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer, and across strata of age, sex, education, body mass index, tobacco, and alcohol, for both cancer sites. The inverse association of vitamin C intake from foods with HNC may reflect a protective effect on these cancers; however, we cannot rule out other explanations. © 2014 UICC.

  9. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broeks, A; Schmidt, M.K; Sherman, M.E; Couch, F.J; Hopper, J.L; Dite, G.S; Apicella, C; Smith, L.D; Hammet, F; Southey, M.C; Veer, L.J. van 't; Groot, R. de; Smit, V.T; Fasching, P.A; Beckmann, M.W; Jud, S; Ekici, A.B; Hartmann, A; Hein, A; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Burwinkel, B; Marme, F; Schneeweiss, A; Sinn, H.P; Sohn, C; Tchatchou, S; Bojesen, S.E; Nordestgaard, B.G; Flyger, H; Orsted, D.D; Kaur-Knudsen, D; Milne, R.L; Perez, J.I; Zamora, P; Roiguez, P.M; Benitez, J; Brauch, H; Justenhoven, C; Ko, Y.D; Hamann, U; Fischer, H.P; Bruning, T; Pesch, B; Chang-Claude, J; Wang-Gohrke, S; Bremer, M; Karstens, J.H; Hillemanns, P; Dork, T; Nevanlinna, H.A; Heikkinen, T; Heikkila, P; Blomqvist, C; Aittomaki, K; Aaltonen, K; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kosma, V.M; Kauppinen, J.M; Kataja, V; Auvinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Soini, Y; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A.B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Holland, H; Lambrechts, D; Claes, B; Vandorpe, T; Neven, P; Wildiers, H; Flesch-Janys, D; Hein, R; Loning, T; Kosel, M; Fredericksen, Z.S; Wang, X; Giles, G.G; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; McLean, C; Haiman, C.A; Henderson, B.E; Marchand, L. le; Kolonel, L.N; Alnaes, G.G; Kristensen, V; Borresen-Dale, A.L; Hunter, D.J; Hankinson, S.E; Anulis, I.L; Mulligan, A.M; O'Malley, F.P; Devilee, P; Huijts, P.E; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M; Asperen, C.J. van

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes...

  10. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations...

  11. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    cell carcinomas (RR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.14-1.65). Ever use of menopausal hormone therapy was associated with increased risk of serous (RR: 1.39; 95% CI...convert to year by diving by 12 of the above assigned values FAMILY HISTORY OF BREAST AND/OR OVARIAN CANCER HXBRCA 1st degree family...to categories 1-6 respectively, then convert to year by diving by 12 of the above assigned values EONLY Ever use of oral estrogen only 0=No; 1=Yes

  12. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    women were confirmed to be of European ancestry by genetic analysis. Controls had to have at least one intact ovary and cases were limited to invasive...to be over 6,100 invasive ovarian cancer cases among more than 1.4 million women . The goals of the OC3 are to bring together cohorts with ovarian...The submitted manuscript is in Appendix 1 and the details of the analytic approach are outlined there. Briefly, among over 1.3 million women from

  13. Animal models of human prostate cancer: The Consensus Report of the New York Meeting of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium Prostate Pathology Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael; Huang, Jiaoti; Radaelli, Enrico; Martin, Philip; Signoretti, Sabina; Sullivan, Ruth; Simons, Brian W.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Robinson, Brian D.; Chu, Gerald C.; Loda, Massimo; Thomas, George; Borowsky, Alexander; Cardiff, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models, particularly mouse models, play a central role in the study of the etiology, prevention and treatment of human prostate cancer (PCa). While tissue culture models are extremely useful in understanding the biology of PCa, they cannot recapitulate the complex cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment that play a key role in cancer initiation and progression. The NCI Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium convened a group of human and veterinary pathologists to review the current animal models of PCa and make recommendations regarding the pathological analysis of these models. Over 40 different models with 439 samples were reviewed including genetically engineered mouse models, xenograft, rat and canine models. Numerous relevant models have been developed over the last 15 years and each approach has strengths and weaknesses. Analysis of multiple genetically engineered models has shown that reactive stroma formation is present in all the models developing invasive carcinomas. In addition, numerous models with multiple genetic alterations display aggressive phenotypes characterized by sarcomatoid carcinomas and metastases, which is presumably a histological manifestation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The significant progress in development of improved models of PCa has already accelerated our understanding the complex biology of PCa and promises to enhance development of new approaches to prevention, detection and treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:23610450

  14. Replication of lung cancer susceptibility loci at chromosomes 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21: a pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Therese; Hung, Rayjean J; Amos, Christopher I; Wu, Xifeng; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Sauter, Wiebke; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Risch, Angela; Dienemann, Hendrik; Kaaks, Rudolph; Yang, Ping; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Hansen, Helen; Kelsey, Karl T; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tajima, Kazuo; Schwartz, Ann G; Wenzlaff, Angie; Seow, Adeline; Ying, Chen; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Nürnberg, Peter; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua E; Gallagher, Carla J; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Haugen, Aage; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Isla, Dolores; Mayordomo, Jose Ignacio; Rafnar, Thorunn; Stefansson, Kari; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Chang, Shen-Chih; Kim, Jin Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul; Duell, Eric J; Andrew, Angeline S; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Gad; Müller, Heiko; Brenner, Hermann; Le Marchand, Loïc; Benhamou, Simone; Bouchardy, Christine; Teare, M Dawn; Xue, Xiaoyan; McLaughlin, John; Liu, Geoffrey; McKay, James D; Brennan, Paul; Spitz, Margaret R

    2010-07-07

    Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies. Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case-control studies for 11 645 lung cancer case patients and 14 954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, P(trend) = 2 x 10(-26)), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, P(trend) = 1 x 10(-10)) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, P(trend) = 5 x 10(-8)) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, P(trend) = 2 x 10(-5); rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, P(trend) = .007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups

  15. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients

  16. History of hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes and ovarian cancer patient survival: evidence from the ovarian cancer association consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minlikeeva, A.N.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Cannioto, R.A.; Szender, J.B.; Eng, K.H.; Modugno, F.; Ness, R.B.; LaMonte, M.J.; Friel, G.; Segal, B.H.; Odunsi, K.; Mayor, P.; Zsiros, E.; Schmalfeldt, B.; Klapdor, R.; Drk, T.; Hillemanns, P.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kbel, M.; Steed, H.; Fazio, A. de; Jordan, S.J.; Nagle, C.M.; Risch, H.A.; Rossing, M.A.; Doherty, J.A.; Goodman, M.T.; Edwards, R.; Matsuo, K.; Mizuno, M.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kjaer, S.K.; Hogdall, E.; Jensen, A.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Bandera, E.V.; Paddock, L.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Berchuck, A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Diergaarde, B.; Webb, P.M.; Moysich, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis is generally low; understanding factors related to prognosis could be important to optimize treatment. The role of previously diagnosed comorbidities and use of medications for those conditions in relation to prognosis for ovarian cancer patients

  17. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  18. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oligomenorrhea, and Risk of Ovarian Cancer Histotypes: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Babic, Ana; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Jordan, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine M; McLaughlin, John R; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Terry, Kathryn L

    2018-02-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and one of its distinguishing characteristics, oligomenorrhea, have both been associated with ovarian cancer risk in some but not all studies. However, these associations have been rarely examined by ovarian cancer histotypes, which may explain the lack of clear associations reported in previous studies. Methods: We analyzed data from 14 case-control studies including 16,594 women with invasive ovarian cancer ( n = 13,719) or borderline ovarian disease ( n = 2,875) and 17,718 controls. Adjusted study-specific ORs were calculated using logistic regression and combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Pooled histotype-specific ORs were calculated using polytomous logistic regression. Results: Women reporting menstrual cycle length >35 days had decreased risk of invasive ovarian cancer compared with women reporting cycle length ≤35 days [OR = 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.84]. Decreased risk of invasive ovarian cancer was also observed among women who reported irregular menstrual cycles compared with women with regular cycles (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.76-0.89). No significant association was observed between self-reported PCOS and invasive ovarian cancer risk (OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.65-1.15). There was a decreased risk of all individual invasive histotypes for women with menstrual cycle length >35 days, but no association with serous borderline tumors ( P heterogeneity = 0.006). Similarly, we observed decreased risks of most invasive histotypes among women with irregular cycles, but an increased risk of borderline serous and mucinous tumors ( P heterogeneity < 0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that menstrual cycle characteristics influence ovarian cancer risk differentially based on histotype. Impact: These results highlight the importance of examining ovarian cancer risk factors associations by histologic subtype. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(2); 174-82. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American

  19. Meta-Analysis of Mismatch Repair Polymorphisms within the Cogent Consortium for Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Juan, Diego Morillas; Raquel, Muñoz; Marisa, Manzano; Francisco, Colina; Jose, Díaz; Carolina, Ibarrola; Guadalupe, López; Alberto, Ibáñez; Antoni, Castells; Virgínia, Piñol; Sergi, Castellví-Bel; Francesc, Balaguer; Victoria, Gonzalo; Teresa, Ocaña; María Dolores, Giráldez; Maria, Pellisé; Anna, Serradesanferm; Leticia, Moreira; Miriam, Cuatrecasas; Josep, M. Piqué; Ángel, Lanas; Javier, Alcedo; Javier, Ortego; Joaquin, Cubiella; Ma, Soledad Díez; Mercedes, Salgado; Eloy, Sánchez; Mariano, Vega; Montserrat, Andreu; Anna, Abuli; Xavier, Bessa; Mar, Iglesias; Agustín, Seoane; Felipe, Bory; Gemma, Navarro; Beatriz, Bellosillo; Josep, Ma Dedeu; Cristina, Álvarez; Marc, Puigvehí; Luis, Bujanda; Ángel, Cosme; Inés, Gil; Mikel, Larzabal; Carlos, Placer; María, del Mar Ramírez; Elisabeth, Hijona; Jose, M. Enríquez-Navascués; Jose, L. Elosegui; Artemio, Payá; Rodrigo, Jover; Cristina, Alenda; Laura, Sempere; Nuria, Acame; Estefanía, Rojas; Lucía, Pérez-Carbonell; Joaquim, Rigau; Ángel, Serrano; Anna, Giménez; Joan, Saló; Eduard, Batiste-Alentorn; Josefina, Autonell; Ramon, Barniol; Ana, María García; Fernando, Carballo; Antonio, Bienvenido; Eduardo, Sanz; Fernando, González; Jaime, Sánchez; Akiko, Ono; Mercedes, Latorre; Enrique, Medina; Jaime, Cuquerella; Pilar, Canelles; Miguel, Martorell; José, Ángel García; Francisco, Quiles; Elisa, Orti; Juan, Clofent; Jaime, Seoane; Antoni, Tardío; Eugenia, Sanchez; Ma, Luisa de Castro; Antoni, Tardío; Juan, Clofent; Vicent, Hernández; Xavier, Llor; Rosa, M. Xicola; Marta, Piñol; Mercè, Rosinach; Anna, Roca; Elisenda, Pons; José, M. Hernández; Miquel, A. Gassull; Fernando, Fernández-Bañares; Josep, M. Viver; Antonio, Salas; Jorge, Espinós; Montserrat, Forné; Maria, Esteve; Josep, M. Reñé; Carmen, Piñol; Juan, Buenestado; Joan, Viñas; Enrique, Quintero; David, Nicolás; Adolfo, Parra; Antonio, Martín; Lidia, Argüello; Vicente, Pons; Virginia, Pertejo; Teresa, Sala; Dolors, Gonzalez; Eva, Roman; Teresa, Ramon; Maria, Poca; Ma, Mar Concepción; Marta, Martin; Lourdes, Pétriz; Daniel, Martinez; Ángel, Carracedo; Clara, Ruiz-Ponte; Ceres, Fernández-Rozadilla; Ma, Magdalena Castro; Sabino, Riestra; Luis, Rodrigo; Javier, Fernández; Jose, Luis Cabriada; Luis, Carreño; Susana, Oquiñena; Federico, Bolado; Elena, Peña; José, Manuel Blas; Gloria, Ceña; Juan, José Sebastián; Antonio, Naranjo; Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Vodickova, Ludmila; Müller, Heiko; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A.; Stibbard, Geoffrey; Peterlongo, Paolo; Nici, Carmela; Veneroni, Silvia; Li, Li; Casey, Graham; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Moreno, Victor; van Wezel, Tom; Wijnen, Juul; Dunlop, Malcolm; Radice, Paolo; Scott, Rodney J.; Vodicka, Pavel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Brenner, Hermann; Buch, Stephan; Völzke, Henry; Hampe, Jochen; Schafmayer, Clemens; Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    In the last four years, Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified sixteen low-penetrance polymorphisms on fourteen different loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Due to the low risks conferred by known common variants, most of the 35% broad-sense heritability estimated by twin studies remains unexplained. Recently our group performed a case-control study for eight Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 CRC genes. The present investigation is a follow-up of that study. We have genotyped six SNPs that showed a positive association and carried out a meta-analysis based on eight additional studies comprising in total more than 8000 cases and 6000 controls. The estimated recessive odds ratio for one of the SNPs, rs3219489 (MUTYH Q338H), decreased from 1.52 in the original Swedish study, to 1.18 in the Swedish replication, and to 1.08 in the initial meta-analysis. Since the corresponding summary probability value was 0.06, we decided to retrieve additional information for this polymorphism. The incorporation of six further studies resulted in around 13000 cases and 13000 controls. The newly updated OR was 1.03. The results from the present large, multicenter study illustrate the possibility of decreasing effect sizes with increasing samples sizes. Phenotypic heterogeneity, differential environmental exposures, and population specific linkage disequilibrium patterns may explain the observed difference of genetic effects between Sweden and the other investigated cohorts. PMID:24039736

  20. Cigarette, Cigar, and Pipe Smoking and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancers: Pooled Analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Annah; Hashibe, Mia; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Yu, Guo-Pei; Winn, Deborah M.; Wei, Qingyi; Talamini, Renato; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Sturgis, Erich M.; Smith, Elaine; Shangina, Oxana; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Schantz, Stimson; Rudnai, Peter; Purdue, Mark P.; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Muscat, Joshua; Morgenstern, Hal; Michaluart, Pedro; Menezes, Ana; Matos, Elena; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levi, Fabio; Lazarus, Philip; La Vecchia, Carlo; Koifman, Sergio; Herrero, Rolando; Hayes, Richard B.; Franceschi, Silvia; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Fernandez, Leticia; Fabianova, Eleonora; Daudt, Alexander W.; Dal Maso, Luigino; Curado, Maria Paula; Chen, Chu; Castellsague, Xavier; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; Cadoni, Gabriella; Boccia, Stefania; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Cigar and pipe smoking are considered risk factors for head and neck cancers, but the magnitude of effect estimates for these products has been imprecisely estimated. By using pooled data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium (comprising 13,935 cases and 18,691 controls in 19 studies from 1981 to 2007), we applied hierarchical logistic regression to more precisely estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cigarette, cigar, and pipe smoking separately, compared with reference groups of those who had never smoked each single product. Odds ratios for cigar and pipe smoking were stratified by ever cigarette smoking. We also considered effect estimates of smoking a single product exclusively versus never having smoked any product (reference group). Among never cigarette smokers, the odds ratio for ever cigar smoking was 2.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93, 3.34), and the odds ratio for ever pipe smoking was 2.08 (95% CI: 1.55, 2.81). These odds ratios increased with increasing frequency and duration of smoking (Ptrend ≤ 0.0001). Odds ratios for cigar and pipe smoking were not elevated among ever cigarette smokers. Head and neck cancer risk was elevated for those who reported exclusive cigar smoking (odds ratio = 3.49, 95% CI: 2.58, 4.73) or exclusive pipe smoking (odds ratio = 3.71, 95% CI: 2.59, 5.33). These results suggest that cigar and pipe smoking are independently associated with increased risk of head and neck cancers. PMID:23817919

  1. Clinicopathologic features and outcomes of patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring BRAF mutations in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Socinski, Mark A; Abberbock, Shira; Berry, Lynne D; Johnson, Bruce E; Kwiatkowski, David J; Iafrate, A John; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Franklin, Wilbur A; Camidge, D Ross; Sequist, Lecia V; Haura, Eric B; Ladanyi, Mark; Kurland, Brenda F; Kugler, Kelly; Minna, John D; Bunn, Paul A; Kris, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    The advent of effective targeted therapy for BRAF(V600E) -mutant lung adenocarcinomas necessitates further exploration of the unique clinical features and behavior of advanced-stage BRAF-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. Data were reviewed for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas enrolled in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium whose tumors underwent testing for mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), AKT1, BRAF, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog (NRAS), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA); for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations; and for MET amplification. Twenty-one BRAF mutations were identified in 951 patients with adenocarcinomas (2.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4%-3.4%): 17 (81%; 95% CI, 60%-92%) were BRAF(V600E) mutations, and 4 were non-BRAF(V600E) mutations. Among the 733 cases tested for all 10 genes, BRAF mutations were more likely to occur than most other genotypic abnormalities in current or former smokers (BRAF vs sensitizing EGFR, 82% vs 36%, mid-P mutations, 49%, mid-P = .02; BRAF vs patients with more than 1 oncogenic driver [doubleton], 46%, mid-P = .04.) The double-mutation rate was 16% among patients with BRAF mutations but 5% among patients with other genomic abnormalities (mid-P = .045). Differences were not found in survival between patients with BRAF mutations and those with other genomic abnormalities (P > .20). BRAF mutations occurred in 2.2% of advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas, were most commonly V600E, and were associated with distinct clinicopathologic features in comparison with other genomic subtypes and with a high mutation rate in more than 1 gene. These findings underscore the importance of comprehensive genomic profiling in assessing patients with

  2. Infertility and incident endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis from the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H P; Cook, L S; Weiderpass, E; Adami, H-O; Anderson, K E; Cai, H; Cerhan, J R; Clendenen, T V; Felix, A S; Friedenreich, C M; Garcia-Closas, M; Goodman, M T; Liang, X; Lissowska, J; Lu, L; Magliocco, A M; McCann, S E; Moysich, K B; Olson, S H; Petruzella, S; Pike, M C; Polidoro, S; Ricceri, F; Risch, H A; Sacerdote, C; Setiawan, V W; Shu, X O; Spurdle, A B; Trabert, B; Webb, P M; Wentzensen, N; Xiang, Y-B; Xu, Y; Yu, H; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Brinton, L A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nulliparity is an endometrial cancer risk factor, but whether or not this association is due to infertility is unclear. Although there are many underlying infertility causes, few studies have assessed risk relations by specific causes. Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 8153 cases and 11 713 controls from 2 cohort and 12 case-control studies. All studies provided self-reported infertility and its causes, except for one study that relied on data from national registries. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Nulliparous women had an elevated endometrial cancer risk compared with parous women, even after adjusting for infertility (OR=1.76; 95% CI: 1.59–1.94). Women who reported infertility had an increased risk compared with those without infertility concerns, even after adjusting for nulliparity (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.13–1.33). Among women who reported infertility, none of the individual infertility causes were substantially related to endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Based on mainly self-reported infertility data that used study-specific definitions of infertility, nulliparity and infertility appeared to independently contribute to endometrial cancer risk. Understanding residual endometrial cancer risk related to infertility, its causes and its treatments may benefit from large studies involving detailed data on various infertility parameters. PMID:25688738

  3. Infertility and incident endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis from the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium (E2C2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H P; Cook, L S; Weiderpass, E; Adami, H-O; Anderson, K E; Cai, H; Cerhan, J R; Clendenen, T V; Felix, A S; Friedenreich, C M; Garcia-Closas, M; Goodman, M T; Liang, X; Lissowska, J; Lu, L; Magliocco, A M; McCann, S E; Moysich, K B; Olson, S H; Petruzella, S; Pike, M C; Polidoro, S; Ricceri, F; Risch, H A; Sacerdote, C; Setiawan, V W; Shu, X O; Spurdle, A B; Trabert, B; Webb, P M; Wentzensen, N; Xiang, Y-B; Xu, Y; Yu, H; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Brinton, L A

    2015-03-03

    Nulliparity is an endometrial cancer risk factor, but whether or not this association is due to infertility is unclear. Although there are many underlying infertility causes, few studies have assessed risk relations by specific causes. We conducted a pooled analysis of 8153 cases and 11 713 controls from 2 cohort and 12 case-control studies. All studies provided self-reported infertility and its causes, except for one study that relied on data from national registries. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Nulliparous women had an elevated endometrial cancer risk compared with parous women, even after adjusting for infertility (OR=1.76; 95% CI: 1.59-1.94). Women who reported infertility had an increased risk compared with those without infertility concerns, even after adjusting for nulliparity (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.13-1.33). Among women who reported infertility, none of the individual infertility causes were substantially related to endometrial cancer. Based on mainly self-reported infertility data that used study-specific definitions of infertility, nulliparity and infertility appeared to independently contribute to endometrial cancer risk. Understanding residual endometrial cancer risk related to infertility, its causes and its treatments may benefit from large studies involving detailed data on various infertility parameters.

  4. Genome-wide Analysis Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Ovarian Cancer Outcomes: Findings from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnatty, S.E.; Tyrer, J.P.; Kar, S.; Beesley, J.; Lu, Y.; Gao, B.; Fasching, P.A.; Hein, A.; Ekici, A.B.; Beckmann, M.W.; Lambrechts, D.; Nieuwenhuysen, E. Van; Vergote, I.; Lambrechts, S.; Rossing, M.A.; Doherty, J.A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Modugno, F.; Ness, R.B.; Moysich, K.B.; Levine, D.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Cybulski, C.; Brinton, L.; Lissowska, J.; Wentzensen, N.; Song, H.; Rhenius, V.; Campbell, I.; Eccles, D.; Sieh, W.; Whittemore, A.S.; McGuire, V.; Rothstein, J.H.; Sutphen, R.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Gayther, S.A.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Menon, U.; Ramus, S.J.; Pearce, C.L.; Pike, M.C.; Stram, D.O.; Wu, A.H.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Rzepecka, I.K.; Spiewankiewicz, B.; Goodman, M.T.; Wilkens, L.R.; Carney, M.E.; Thompson, P.J.; Heitz, F.; Bois, A. du; Schwaab, I.; Harter, P.; Pisterer, J.; Hillemanns, P.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Winham, S.J.; Earp, M.; Larson, M.C.; Fogarty, Z.C.; Hogdall, E.; Jensen, A.; Kjaer, S.K.; Fridley, B.L.; Cunningham, J.M.; Vierkant, R.A.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Iversen, E.S.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Bandera, E.V.; Orlow, I.; Pejovic, T.; Bean, Y.; Hogdall, C.; Lundvall, L.; McNeish, I.; Paul, J.; Carty, K.; Siddiqui, N.; Glasspool, R.; Sellers, T.; Kennedy, C.; Chiew, Y.E.; Berchuck, A.; MacGregor, S.; Pharoah, P.D.; Goode, E.L.; Defazio, A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. We hypothesize that germline polymorphisms might be associated with clinical outcome. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed approximately 2.8 million genotyped and imputed SNPs from the iCOGS experiment for

  5. ESR1/SYNE1 polymorphism and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk: an Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2010-01-01

    We genotyped 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) region in three population-based case-control studies of epithelial ovarian cancer conducted in the United States, comprising a total of 1,128 and 1,866 non-Hispanic white invasive cases and controls...

  6. Understanding predictors of continued long-term pediatric cancer care across the region: A report from the Consortium for New England Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Jennifer J G; Kenney, Lisa B; Hirway, Priya; Usmani, G Naheed; Kadan-Lottick, Nina; Grewal, Satkiran S; Huang, Mary; Bradeen, Heather; Ader, Jeremy; Diller, Lisa; Schwartz, Cindy L

    2017-10-01

    Many survivors of childhood cancer do not receive recommended longitudinal oncology care. Factors present at the time of childhood cancer diagnosis may identify patients who are vulnerable to poor adherence to follow-up. This cohort of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed from 1996 to 1999 at seven Consortium for New England Childhood Cancer Survivors institutions was evaluated for attendance at oncology clinics at 5 and 10 years from diagnosis. Demographic, socioeconomic, disease, and treatment characteristics were analyzed as risk factors for nonadherence to follow-up. Of 317 patients, 90% were alive 5 years from diagnosis and 88% of those remained in active follow-up. At 10 years from diagnosis, 88% were alive, 73% of whom continued in active follow-up. Insurance status at diagnosis was significantly associated with adherence at both 5 and 10 years. At 10 years, initial enrollment on therapeutic study was associated with increased attendance and central nervous system (CNS) leukemia with decreased attendance. In multivariable modeling of follow-up at 5 years, patients who were adults were less likely to participate and those with private insurance at diagnosis more likely to participate. At 10 years, insurance status at diagnosis remained a predictor of adherence to follow-up. In this regional cohort, many patients who are survivors of ALL continue to participate in oncology care at 5 and 10 years from diagnosis. Factors known at diagnosis including insurance status, CNS leukemia, older age, and enrollment on therapeutic study were associated with differential attendance to follow-up visits. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a Susceptibility Locus for Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Helen; Dudbridge, Frank; Fletcher, Olivia; Orr, Nick; Johnson, Nichola; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linda M.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Wiangnon, Surapon; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Arias-Pérez, José-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Langheinz, Anne; Meindl, Alfons; Golatta, Michael; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuriy; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Zinnatullina, Guzel; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Ann; Paridaens, Robert; Weltens, Caroline; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet; Giles, Graham; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Cariona A.; Severi, Gianluca; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M.A.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Pharoah, Paul; Blows, Fiona M.; Dunning, Alison M.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet; Wang, Qin; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods To further investigate the rs865686–breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which comprises 37 case–control studies (48,394 cases, 50,836 controls). Results This replication study provides additional strong evidence of an inverse association between rs865686 and breast cancer risk [study-adjusted per G-allele OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88; 0.91, P = 2.01 × 10–29] among women of European ancestry. There were ethnic differences in the estimated minor (G)-allele frequency among controls [0.09, 0.30, and 0.38 among, respectively, Asians, Eastern Europeans, and other Europeans; P for heterogeneity (Phet) = 1.3 × 10–143], but no evidence of ethnic differences in per allele OR (Phet = 0.43). rs865686 was associated with estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) disease (per G-allele OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86–0.91; P = 3.13 × 10–22) but less strongly, if at all, with ER-negative (ER–) disease (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.94–1.02; P = 0.26; Phet = 1.16 × 10–6), with no evidence of independent heterogeneity by progesterone receptor or HER2 status. The strength of the breast cancer association decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, with case-only analysis showing a trend in the number of copies of the G allele with increasing age at diagnosis (P for linear trend = 0.0095), but only among women with ER+ tumors. Conclusions This study is the first to show that rs865686 is a susceptibility marker for ER+ breast cancer. Impact The findings further support the view that genetic susceptibility varies according to tumor subtype. PMID:22859399

  8. ESR1/SYNE1 polymorphism and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk: an Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2010-01-01

    , respectively. A SNP 19 kb downstream of ESR1 (rs2295190, G-to-T change) was associated with invasive ovarian cancer risk, with a per-T-allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.44, P = 0.006]. rs2295190 is a nonsynonymous coding SNP in a neighboring gene called spectrin repeat......We genotyped 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) region in three population-based case-control studies of epithelial ovarian cancer conducted in the United States, comprising a total of 1,128 and 1,866 non-Hispanic white invasive cases and controls...... containing, nuclear envelope 1 (SYNE1), which is involved in nuclear organization and structural integrity, function of the Golgi apparatus, and cytokinesis. An isoform encoded by SYNE1 has been reported to be downregulated in ovarian and other cancers. rs2295190 was genotyped in an additional 12 studies...

  9. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C.; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G.; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis; McGuffog, Lesley; Offit, Ken; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; LaBoissière, Sylvie; Robidoux, Frederic; Nielsen, Sune F.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Windebank, Sharon A.; Hilker, Christopher A.; Meyer, Jeffrey; Angelakos, Maggie; Maskiell, Judi; van der Schoot, Ellen; Rutgers, Emiel; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans; Boonyawongviroj, Prat; Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep; Schrauder, Michael; Rübner, Matthias; Oeser, Sonja; Landrith, Silke; Williams, Eileen; Ryder-Mills, Elaine; Sargus, Kara; McInerney, Niall; Colleran, Gabrielle; Rowan, Andrew; Jones, Angela; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiß, Andeas; Bugert, Peter; Álvarez, Núria; Lacey, James; Wang, Sophia; Ma, Huiyan; Lu, Yani; Deapen, Dennis; Pinder, Rich; Lee, Eunjung; Schumacher, Fred; Horn-Ross, Pam; Reynolds, Peggy; Nelson, David; Ziegler, Hartwig; Wolf, Sonja; Hermann, Volker; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D; Chenevix-Trench, G; deFazio, A; Gertig, D; Green, A; Webb, P; Green, A.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Webb, P.; Whiteman, D.; Fung, Annie; Yashiki, June; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; Brussel, Thomas Van; Corthouts, Kathleen; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Celik, Muhabbet; Olchers, Til; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Maniscalco, Angela; Rossi, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Sze Yee, Phuah; Kang, Peter; Nee, Kang In; Mariapun, Shivaani; Sook-Yee, Yoon; Lee, Daphne; Ching, Teh Yew; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; staff, OFBCR; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Brock, Ian; Luccarini, Craig; Conroy, Don; Baynes, Caroline; Chua, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10−6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10−6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10−17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10−8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10−10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act

  10. Comparison of 6q25 breast cancer hits from Asian and European Genome Wide Association Studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hein

    Full Text Available The 6q25.1 locus was first identified via a genome-wide association study (GWAS in Chinese women and marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs2046210, approximately 180 Kb upstream of ESR1. There have been conflicting reports about the association of this locus with breast cancer in Europeans, and a GWAS in Europeans identified a different SNP, tagged here by rs12662670. We examined the associations of both SNPs in up to 61,689 cases and 58,822 controls from forty-four studies collaborating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, of which four studies were of Asian and 39 of European descent. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Case-only analyses were used to compare SNP effects in Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+ versus negative (ER- tumours. Models including both SNPs were fitted to investigate whether the SNP effects were independent. Both SNPs are significantly associated with breast cancer risk in both ethnic groups. Per-allele ORs are higher in Asian than in European studies [rs2046210: OR (A/G = 1.36 (95% CI 1.26-1.48, p = 7.6 × 10(-14 in Asians and 1.09 (95% CI 1.07-1.11, p = 6.8 × 10(-18 in Europeans. rs12662670: OR (G/T = 1.29 (95% CI 1.19-1.41, p = 1.2 × 10(-9 in Asians and 1.12 (95% CI 1.08-1.17, p = 3.8 × 10(-9 in Europeans]. SNP rs2046210 is associated with a significantly greater risk of ER- than ER+ tumours in Europeans [OR (ER- = 1.20 (95% CI 1.15-1.25, p = 1.8 × 10(-17 versus OR (ER+ = 1.07 (95% CI 1.04-1.1, p = 1.3 × 10(-7, p(heterogeneity = 5.1 × 10(-6]. In these Asian studies, by contrast, there is no clear evidence of a differential association by tumour receptor status. Each SNP is associated with risk after adjustment for the other SNP. These results suggest the presence of two variants at 6q25.1 each independently associated with breast cancer risk in Asians and in Europeans. Of these two, the one tagged by rs2046210 is associated with a greater

  11. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among...... and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)=0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR¿=¿0.6 to 0.9; P(trend)¿=¿0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically...... homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)=0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs¿=¿1.2; P(trend)=0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity)=0.03), which precluded combining. In post...

  12. Polymorphisms in stromal genes and susceptibility to serous epithelial ovarian cancer: a report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among...... and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P(trend) = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically...... homogeneous (P(heterogeneity)≥0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P(trend)≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P(heterogeneity)≤0.03), which precluded combining. In post...

  13. Allergies and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H.; Hsu, Meier; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Silverman, Debra T.; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Anderson, Kristin E.; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dai, Qi; Duell, Eric J.; Fontham, Elizabeth H.; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kurtz, Robert C.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lowenfels, Albert B.; Luckett, Brian; Ludwig, Emmy; Petersen, Gloria M.; Polesel, Jerry; Seminara, Daniela; Strayer, Lori; Talamini, Renato

    2013-01-01

    In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age. PMID:23820785

  14. Meeting report: The 13th Annual Meeting of the Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3); Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment, Columbus, Ohio; March 1-2, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Carson, William E; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Wei, Wei-zen; Kalinski, Pawel; Lotze, Michael T; June, Carl H; Petros, William; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Olencki, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3) is a cancer immunotherapy network, established to promote biologic therapeutics in the Midwestern and Northeastern regions of The United States. The 13th Annual Meeting of the TrC3 was hosted by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and took place at The Blackwell Hotel and Conference Center in Columbus, OH on March 1-2, 2010 (http://www.osuccc.osu.edu/TrC3/index.htm). This year's theme was "Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment." The meeting consisted of 21 oral presentations, a roundtable discussion focused on enhancing collaborative relationships within the consortium, and a poster session with 54 abstracts from predoctoral or postdoctoral researchers. This annual meeting brought together more than 170 investigators from 9 regional cancer centers including: Abramson Cancer Center at The University of Pennsylvania, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute at Wayne State University, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn State Cancer Institute, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. The proceedings of this year's meeting are summarized in this report.

  15. Trends in breast biopsy pathology diagnoses among women undergoing mammography in the United States: a report from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kimberly H; Abraham, Linn A; Weaver, Donald L; Tosteson, Anna N A; Nelson, Heidi D; Onega, Tracy; Geller, Berta M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Carney, Patricia A; Ichikawa, Laura E; Buist, Diana S M; Elmore, Joann G

    2015-05-01

    Current data on the pathologic diagnoses of breast biopsy after mammography can inform patients, clinicians, and researchers about important population trends. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data on 4,020,140 mammograms between 1996 and 2008 were linked to 76,567 pathology specimens. Trends in diagnoses in biopsies by time and risk factors (patient age, breast density, and family history of breast cancer) were examined for screening and diagnostic mammography (performed for a breast symptom or short-interval follow-up). Of the total mammograms, 88.5% were screening and 11.5% diagnostic; 1.2% of screening and 6.8% of diagnostic mammograms were followed by biopsies. The frequency of biopsies over time was stable after screening mammograms, but increased after diagnostic mammograms. For biopsies obtained after screening, frequencies of invasive carcinoma increased over time for women ages 40-49 and 60-69, Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) increased for those ages 40-69, whereas benign diagnoses decreased for all ages. No trends in pathology diagnoses were found following diagnostic mammograms. Dense breast tissue was associated with high-risk lesions and DCIS relative to nondense breast tissue. Family history of breast cancer was associated with DCIS and invasive cancer. Although the frequency of breast biopsy after screening mammography has not changed over time, the percentages of biopsies with DCIS and invasive cancer diagnoses have increased. Among biopsies following mammography, women with dense breasts or family history of breast cancer were more likely to have high-risk lesions or invasive cancer. These findings are relevant to breast cancer screening and diagnostic practices. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  16. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium's randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences.

  17. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. ABO blood groups and pancreatic cancer risk and survival: results from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Campa, Daniele; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Soucek, Pavel; Greenhalf, William; Capurso, Gabriele; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Heller, Anette; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Tim J; Bambi, Franco; Landi, Stefano; Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Vodickova, Ludmila; Büchler, Markus W; Bugert, Peter; Vodicka, Pavel; Neoptolemos, John P; Werner, Jens; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Bauer, Andrea S; Giese, Nathalia; Canzian, Federico

    2013-04-01

    There is strong epidemiologic evidence indicating that common genetic variability could be implicated in pancreatic cancer risk and, to date, various loci have been proposed. In particular, there is increasing evidence of the involvement of ABO gene variability and pancreatic cancer risk. In a large multicentric study of 1,028 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 2,257 controls in the context of the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium, we investigated the suggested association with increased risk for carriers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determining the A or B allele in comparison with the O allele, which encodes for a non-functional enzyme. Since glycosyltransferase activity, encoded by ABO, is higher for the A1 variant compared with the A2 variant, we investigated the hypothesis that A1 carriers were at an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. In our analysis, carriers of the A1 were indeed at greater risk of developing the disease. In addition, we investigated the possible influence that genetic variability at the ABO locus may have in pancreatic cancer survival, but we observed no effect in our population.

  19. Pre-diagnostic vitamin D concentrations and cancer risks in older individuals: an analysis of cohorts participating in the CHANCES consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel; Schöttker, Ben; Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Olsen, Anja; Halkjær, Jytte; Kampman, Ellen; de Groot, Lisette; Jansen, Eugene; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Siganos, Galatios; Wilsgaard, Tom; Perna, Laura; Holleczek, Bernd; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Boffetta, Paolo; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    The associations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations with total and site-specific cancer incidence have been examined in several epidemiological studies with overall inconclusive findings. Very little is known about the association of vitamin D with cancer incidence in older populations. We assessed the association of pre-diagnostic serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of all cancers combined and incidence of lung, colorectal, breast, prostate and lymphoid malignancies among older adults. Pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D concentrations and cancer incidence were available in total for 15,486 older adults (mean age 63, range 50-84 years) participating in two cohort studies: ESTHER (Germany) and TROMSØ (Norway); and a subset of previously published nested-case control data from a another cohort study: EPIC-Elderly (Greece, Denmark, Netherlands, Spain and Sweden) from the CHANCES consortium on health and aging. Cox proportional hazards or logistic regression were used to derive multivariable adjusted hazard and odds ratios, respectively, and their 95% confidence intervals across 25(OH)D categories. Meta-analyses with random effects models were used to pool study-specific risk estimates. Overall, lower 25(OH)D concentrations were not significantly associated with increased incidence of most of the cancers assessed. However, there was some evidence of increased breast cancer and decreased lymphoma risk with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. Our meta-analyses with individual participant data from three large European population-based cohort studies provide at best limited support for the hypothesis that vitamin D may have a major role in cancer development and prevention among European older adults.

  20. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus isolates: the "mec alphabet" with specific consideration of mecC, a mec homolog associated with zoonotic S. aureus lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karsten; Ballhausen, Britta; Köck, Robin; Kriegeskorte, André

    2014-10-01

    Livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have globally emerged during the past decade. In Europe, this was particularly due to the occurrence of LA-MRSA strains associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, more recently animal-adapted clonal lineages of S. aureus showing phenotypic methicillin resistance have been identified such as CC130, CC599, CC59, CC1943 and CC425. These newly emerging LA-MRSA CCs/STs caused infections in animals and zoonoses in humans. In contrast to other S. aureus clonal lineages, the methicillin resistance of the latter CCs/STs is based on a mecA gene homolog, designated mecC, which is part of a distinct SCCmec type (SCCmec XI). Including mecB found in Macrococcus caseolyticus, henceforth, the "mec alphabet" comprises three major gene types with several allotypes. As known for mecA, the gene homolog mecC is also not restricted to S. aureus, but found in several staphylococcal species including S. sciuri, S. stepanovicii and S. xylosus (mecC1 allotype). First investigations showed a wide geographical distribution of mecC-MRSA in Europe and a broad diversity of host species including livestock, companion and wildlife animals. In particular, wild rodents and insectivores might serve as reservoir for staphylococci harboring mecC. Economic burden may be caused by mastitis of dairy cattle. Livestock animals may likely serve as source for human infections with mecC-MRSA; reported cases comprise skin and soft tissue infections, osteomyelitis and bacteremia. Due to the divergent molecular nature of mecC-MRSA, its diagnostics is hampered by difficulties to verify the methicillin resistance using phenotypic as well as DNA-based procedures, which could have negative consequences for therapy of mecC-MRSA-caused infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Multilayer-omics analyses of human cancers: Exploration of biomarkers and drug targets based on the activities of the International Human Epigenome Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yae eKanai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations consisting mainly of DNA methylation alterations and histone modification alterations are frequently observed in cancers associated with chronic inflammation and/or persistent infection with viruses or other pathogenic microorganisms, or with cigarette smoking. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations of DNA methylation are involved even in the early and precancerous stages. On the other hand, in patients with cancers, aberrant DNA methylation is frequently associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. Recently, epigenome alterations have been attracting a great deal of attention from researchers who are focusing on not only cancers but also neuronal, immune and metabolic disorders. In order to accurately identify disease-specific epigenome profiles that could be potentially applicable for disease prevention, diagnosis and therapy, strict comparison with standard epigenome profiles of normal tissues is indispensable. However, epigenome mechanisms show heterogeneity among tissues and cell lineages. Therefore, it is not easy to obtain a comprehensive picture of standard epigenome profiles of normal tissues. In 2010, the International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC was established to coordinate the production of reference maps of human epigenomes for key cellular states. In order to gain substantial coverage of the human epigenome, the IHEC has set an ambitious goal to decipher at least 1000 epigenomes within the next 7-10 years. We consider that pathway analysis using genes showing multilayer-omics abnormalities, including genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome abnormalities, may be useful for elucidating the molecular background of pathogenesis and for exploring possible therapeutic targets for each disease.

  2. Patient survival and tumor characteristics associated with CHEK2:p.I157T - findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru A; Blomqvist, Carl; Dörk, Thilo; Jakubowska, Anna; Heikkilä, Päivi; Fagerholm, Rainer; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Bojesen, Stig E; Shah, Mitul; Dunning, Alison M; Rhenius, Valerie; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Couch, Fergus J; Hart, Steven N; Figueroa, Jonine; García-Closas, Montserrat; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Andrulis, Irene L; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Lubinski, Jan; Dubrowinskaja, Natalia; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-10-03

    P.I157T is a CHEK2 missense mutation associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk. Previously, another CHEK2 mutation, the protein truncating c.1100delC has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. Here, we have investigated patient survival and characteristics of breast tumors of germ line p.I157T carriers. We included in the analyses 26,801 European female breast cancer patients from 15 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We analyzed the association between p.I157T and the clinico-pathological breast cancer characteristics by comparing the p.I157T carrier tumors to non-carrier and c.1100delC carrier tumors. Similarly, we investigated the p.I157T associated risk of early death, breast cancer-associated death, distant metastasis, locoregional relapse and second breast cancer using Cox proportional hazards models. Additionally, we explored the p.I157T-associated genomic gene expression profile using data from breast tumors of 183 Finnish female breast cancer patients (ten p.I157T carriers) (GEO: GSE24450). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using a moderated t test. Functional enrichment was investigated using the DAVID functional annotation tool and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). The tumors were classified into molecular subtypes according to the St Gallen 2013 criteria and the PAM50 gene expression signature. P.I157T was not associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-associated death or distant metastasis relapse, and there was a significant difference in prognosis associated with the two CHEK2 mutations, p.I157T and c.1100delC. Furthermore, p.I157T was associated with lobular histological type and clinico-pathological markers of good prognosis, such as ER and PR expression, low TP53 expression and low grade. Gene expression analysis suggested luminal A to be the most common subtype for p.I157T carriers and CDH1 (cadherin 1) target genes to be significantly

  3. Dietary patterns derived with multiple methods from food diaries and breast cancer risk in the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, G.K.; Stephen, AM; Dahm, C.C.; Key, T.J.; Cairns, B.J.; Burley, V.J.; Cade, J.E.; Greenwood, D.C.; Keogh, R.H.; Bhaniani, A.; McTaggert, A.; Lentjes, M.A.H.; Mishra, G.; Brunner, E.J.; Khaw, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives:In spite of several studies relating dietary patterns to breast cancer risk, evidence so far remains inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate associations of dietary patterns derived with three different methods with breast cancer risk.Subjects/Methods:The Mediterranean

  4. Prostate cancer risk related to foods, food groups, macronutrients and micronutrients derived from the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium food diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J A; Oliver, S E; Appleby, P N; Lentjes, M A H; Emmett, P; Kuh, D; Stephen, A; Brunner, E J; Shipley, M J; Hamdy, F C; Neal, D E; Donovan, J L; Khaw, K-T; Key, T J

    2017-02-01

    The influence of dietary factors remains controversial for screen-detected prostate cancer and inconclusive for clinically detected disease. We aimed to examine these associations using prospectively collected food diaries. A total of 1,717 prostate cancer cases in middle-aged and older UK men were pooled from four prospective cohorts with clinically detected disease (n=663), with routine data follow-up (means 6.6-13.3 years) and a case-control study with screen-detected disease (n=1054), nested in a randomised trial of prostate cancer treatments (ISCTRN 20141297). Multiple-day food diaries (records) completed by men prior to diagnosis were used to estimate intakes of 37 selected nutrients, food groups and items, including carbohydrate, fat, protein, dairy products, fish, meat, fruit and vegetables, energy, fibre, alcohol, lycopene and selenium. Cases were matched on age and diary date to at least one control within study (n=3528). Prostate cancer risk was calculated, using conditional logistic regression (adjusted for baseline covariates) and expressed as odds ratios in each quintile of intake (±95% confidence intervals). Prostate cancer risk was also investigated by localised or advanced stage and by cancer detection method. There were no strong associations between prostate cancer risk and 37 dietary factors. Prostate cancer risk, including by disease stage, was not strongly associated with dietary factors measured by food diaries in middle-aged and older UK men.

  5. The Impact of Smoking and TP53 mutations in lung adenocarcinoma patients with targetable mutations - the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisner, Dara L; Sholl, Lynette M; Berry, Lynne; Rossi, Michael; Chen, Heidi; Fujimoto, Junya; Moreira, Andre L; Ramalingam, Suresh; Villaruz, Liza C; Otterson, Gregory A; Haura, Eric B; Politi, Katerina; Glisson, Bonnie S; Cetnar, Jeremy; Garon, Edward; Schiller, Joan; Waqar, Saiama; Sequist, Lecia V; Brahmer, Julie R; Shyr, Yu; Kugler, Kelly; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan; Johnson, Bruce E; Minna, John D; Kris, Mark G; Bunn, Paul A; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2017-12-07

    PURPOSE Multiplex genomic profiling is standard of care for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC) is a multi-institutional effort to identify and treat oncogenic driver events in patients with lung adenocarcinomas. PATIENTS AND METHODS Sixteen U.S. institutions enrolled 1367 lung cancer patients in LCMC2; 904 were deemed eligible and had at least one of 14 cancer-related genes profiled using validated methods including genotyping, massively parallel sequencing, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The use of targeted therapies in patients with EGFR, ERBB2, or BRAF p.V600E mutations, ALK, ROS1 or RET rearrangements, or MET amplification was associated with a survival increment of 1.5 years compared to those with such mutations not receiving targeted therapy; and 1.0 year compared to those lacking a targetable driver. Importantly, 60 patients with a history of smoking derived similar survival benefit from targeted therapy for alterations in EGFR ALK/ROS1, when compared to 75 never smokers with the same alterations. In addition, co-existing TP53 mutations were associated with shorter survival among patients with EGFR, ALK, or ROS1 alterations. CONCLUSION Patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung and an oncogenic driver mutation treated with effective targeted therapy have a longer survival, regardless of prior smoking history. Molecular testing should be performed on all individuals with lung adenocarcinomas irrespective of clinical characteristics. Routine use of massively parallel sequencing enables detection of both targetable driver alterations and tumor suppressor gene and other alterations that have potential significance for therapy selection and as predictive markers for the efficacy of treatment. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2017-05-01

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  7. ABCB1 (MDR1) polymorphisms and ovarian cancer progression and survival: A comprehensive analysis from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnatty, Sharon E.; Beesley, Jonathan; Gao, Bo; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lu, Yi; Law, Matthew H.; Henderson, Michelle J.; Russell, Amanda J.; Hedditch, Ellen L.; Emmanuel, Catherine; Fereday, Sian; Webb, Penelope M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fridley, Brooke L

    2013-01-01

    Objective\\ud ABCB1 encodes the multi-drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and has been implicated in multi-drug resistance. We comprehensively evaluated this gene and flanking regions for an association with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC).\\ud Methods\\ud The best candidates from fine-mapping analysis of 21 ABCB1 SNPs tagging C1236T (rs1128503), G2677T/A (rs2032582), and C3435T (rs1045642) were analysed in 4616 European invasive EOC patients from thirteen Ovarian Cancer A...

  8. NCI's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium 1st Annual Scientific Symposium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  9. Intercenter validation of a knowledge based model for automated planning of volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer. The experience of the German RapidPlan Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Schubert

    Full Text Available To evaluate the performance of a model-based optimisation process for volumetric modulated arc therapy applied to prostate cancer in a multicentric cooperative group. The RapidPlan (RP knowledge-based engine was tested for the planning of Volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc on prostate cancer patients. The study was conducted in the frame of the German RapidPlan Consortium (GRC.43 patients from one institute of the GRC were used to build and train a RP model. This was further shared with all members of the GRC plus an external site from a different country to increase the heterogeneity of the patient's sampling. An in silico multicentric validation of the model was performed at planning level by comparing RP against reference plans optimized according to institutional procedures. A total of 60 patients from 7 institutes were used.On average, the automated RP based plans resulted fully consistent with the manually optimised set with a modest tendency to improvement in the medium-to-high dose region. A per-site stratification allowed to identify different patterns of performance of the model with some organs at risk resulting better spared with the manual or with the automated approach but in all cases the RP data fulfilled the clinical acceptability requirements. Discrepancies in the performance were due to different contouring protocols or to different emphasis put in the optimization of the manual cases.The multicentric validation demonstrated that it was possible to satisfactorily optimize with the knowledge based model patients from all participating centres. In the presence of possibly significant differences in the contouring protocols, the automated plans, though acceptable and fulfilling the benchmark goals, might benefit from further fine tuning of the constraints. The study demonstrates that, at least for the case of prostate cancer patients, it is possibile to share models among different clinical institutes in a cooperative

  10. Recent alcohol consumption and risk of incident ovarian carcinoma: a pooled analysis of 5,342 cases and 10,358 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelemen Linda E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies evaluating the association between alcohol intake and ovarian carcinoma (OC are inconsistent. Because OC and ovarian borderline tumor histologic types differ genetically, molecularly and clinically, large numbers are needed to estimate risk associations. Methods We pooled data from 12 case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium comprising 5,342 OC cases, 1,455 borderline tumors and 10,358 controls with quantitative information on recent alcohol intake to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI according to frequencies of average daily intakes of beer, wine, liquor and total alcohol. Results Total alcohol intake was not associated with all OC: consumption of >3 drinks per day compared to none, OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.76-1.10, P trend=0.27. Among beverage types, a statistically non-significant decreased risk was observed among women who consumed >8 oz/d of wine compared to none (OR=0.83, 95% CI=0.68-1.01, P trend=0.08. This association was more apparent among women with clear cell OC (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.22-0.83; P trend=0.02, although based on only 10 cases and not statistically different from the other histologic types (P value for statistical heterogeneity between histologic types = 0.09. Statistical heterogeneity of the alcohol- and wine-OC associations was seen among three European studies, but not among eight North American studies. No statistically significant associations were observed in separate analyses evaluating risk with borderline tumors of serous or mucinous histology. Smoking status did not significantly modify any of the associations. Conclusions We found no evidence that recent moderate alcohol drinking is associated with increased risk for overall OC, or that variation in risk is associated strongly with specific histologic types. Understanding modifiable causes of these elusive and deadly cancers remains a priority for the research community.

  11. Harmonization guidelines for HLA-peptide multimer assays derived from results of a large scale international proficiency panel of the Cancer Vaccine Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Cedrik Michael; Janetzki, Sylvia; Ben-Porat, Leah; Clay, Timothy M; Kalos, Michael; Maecker, Holden; Odunsi, Kunle; Pride, Michael; Old, Lloyd; Hoos, Axel; Romero, Pedro

    2009-10-01

    The Cancer Vaccine Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute (CVC-CRI) conducted a multicenter HLA-peptide multimer proficiency panel (MPP) with a group of 27 laboratories to assess the performance of the assay. Participants used commercially available HLA-peptide multimers and a well characterized common source of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for two HLA-A2-restricted model antigens was measured by flow cytometry. The panel design allowed for participants to use their preferred staining reagents and locally established protocols for both cell labeling, data acquisition and analysis. We observed significant differences in both the performance characteristics of the assay and the reported frequencies of specific T cells across laboratories. These results emphasize the need to identify the critical variables important for the observed variability to allow for harmonization of the technique across institutions. Three key recommendations emerged that would likely reduce assay variability and thus move toward harmonizing of this assay. (1) Use of more than two colors for the staining (2) collect at least 100,000 CD8 T cells, and (3) use of a background control sample to appropriately set the analytical gates. We also provide more insight into the limitations of the assay and identified additional protocol steps that potentially impact the quality of data generated and therefore should serve as primary targets for systematic analysis in future panels. Finally, we propose initial guidelines for harmonizing assay performance which include the introduction of standard operating protocols to allow for adequate training of technical staff and auditing of test analysis procedures.

  12. The present and future opportunities of the Rare Cancer Network: an international consortium for advancement of oncologic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Rare Cancer Network

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, the Rare Cancer Network (RCN has initiated more than 90 studies and 54 peer-reviewed publications were produced as a result. The Second International Symposium of the Rare Cancer Network recently took place in Istanbul, Turkey on April 17-18, 2015, and update was given on multiple currently ongoing projects, while also giving room for new proposals which will shape the direction of future studies for the group. This companion issue of the RCN Proceedings summarized the findings of this meeting, while also serving as a call for fresh projects and papers which will continue to energize the group and advance the oncologic science. A brief introduction to the principles, history, and vision of the RCN was also included. To review, the academic year of 2014-15 marked an enormous success for the international members of the RCN, with the generation of 8 fully published papers and more than 12 newly proposed topics. By the collective efforts of all RCN members, in the future, we look forward to the upcoming opportunities in continuing to advance the standard of chemo- and radiotherapeutic oncologic care for selected rare tumor topics. The studies of these rare cancers often do not allow the design and execution of prospectively enrolled trials; however, these uncommon malignancies do impact the humankind and add to its suffering globally in significant ways.

  13. Cardiotoxicity and Cardiac Monitoring During Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Daily Dutch Practice: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; de Boer, Maaike; Derksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Joore, Manuela; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the incidence and timing of first cardiac events, impact on trastuzumab prescription, and role of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) monitoring in daily practice of trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early breast cancer. We included all patients with stage I-III breast cancer diagnosed in the early years (2005-2007) after the introduction of adjuvant trastuzumab in five hospitals in Southeast Netherlands. We studied the incidence and timing of cardiotoxicity in patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab, using similar cardiac endpoints as in the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial. Of 2,684 included patients, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 269 (56.9%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and of these, 230 (85.5%) also received trastuzumab. Cardiotoxicity was observed in 29 of 230 patients (12.6%). Twenty of the 230 patients (8.7%) had symptomatic cardiotoxicity, defined as a drop in LVEF of at least 10 percentage points and to below 50%, accompanied by symptoms of congestive heart failure. Trastuzumab was definitely discontinued because of supposed cardiotoxicity in 36 patients (15.6%), of whom only 15 (6.5%) had a significant LVEF drop. Of the 36 patients who prematurely discontinued trastuzumab (including the 29 in whom cardiotoxicity was observed), 84.8% stopped in the first 6 months. No cardiac deaths were seen. In the first years after implementation of trastuzumab for treatment of early breast cancer, physicians frequently based their decision to discontinue treatment on patient symptoms apart from LVEF outcome. We suggest that focusing LVEF monitoring on the first 6 months might be more cost-effective without compromising patient safety. Nonetheless, further research is needed. Knowledge of when cardiotoxicity occurs in daily practice will help shape the best follow-up method for cardiac monitoring in trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2

  14. Curricular factors associated with medical students' practice of the skin cancer examination: an educational enhancement initiative by the integrated skin exam consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Wang, Joyce; Reddy, Shalini B; Powers, Jennifer; Jacob, Reza; Powers, Michael; Biello, Katie; Cayce, Rachael; Savory, Stephanie; Belazarian, Leah; Domingues, Erik; Korzenko, Adam; Wilson, Lindsay; Grant-Kels, Jane M; George, Paul; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Trotter, Shannon C; Geller, Alan C

    2014-08-01

    As medical school curricula become progressively integrated, a need exists to optimize education related to the skin cancer examination (SCE) for melanoma, a relevant competency gap that influences secondary prevention efforts. To identify curricular factors associated with medical students' confidence, intent, and performance regarding the SCE. Survey-based cross-sectional study from the Integrated Skin Exam Consortium at accredited US medical schools among a volunteer sample of second-year students representing 8 geographically varied public and private institutions. Students were administered a questionnaire to assess characteristics, curricular exposures, and educational and practical experiences related to skin cancer, as well as knowledge of melanoma risk and a detection method. Primary outcomes were confidence in performing the SCE, intent to perform an integrated skin examination, and actual performance of the SCE. Physical diagnosis session and clinical encounter were most predictive of confidence in performance of the SCE (odds ratios [ORs], 15.35 and 11.48, respectively). Other curricular factors associated with confidence included instruction time of at least 60 minutes on skin cancer (OR, 6.35), lecture on the SCE (OR, 7.54), knowledge of melanoma risk (OR, 3.71), and at least 1 opportunity to observe the SCE (OR, 2.70). Physical diagnosis session and at least 4 opportunities to observe the SCE were most predictive of intent to perform an integrated skin examination (ORs, 4.84 and 4.72, respectively). Other curricular factors associated with intent included knowledge of melanoma risk (OR, 1.83), clinical encounter (OR, 2.39), and at least 1 opportunity to observe the SCE (OR, 1.95). Clinical encounter, physical diagnosis session, and at least 1 opportunity to observe the SCE were most predictive of performance of the SCE (ORs, 21.67, 15.48, and 9.92, respectively). Other curricular factors associated with performance included instruction time of at

  15. Risk factors for head and neck cancer in young adults: a pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Znaor, Ariana; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Yu, Guo-Pei; Winn, Deborah M; Wei, Qingyi; Vilensky, Marta; Vaughan, Thomas; Thomson, Peter; Talamini, Renato; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Sturgis, Erich M; Smith, Elaine; Shangina, Oxana; Schwartz, Stephen M; Schantz, Stimson; Rudnai, Peter; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Ramroth, Heribert; Purdue, Mark P; Olshan, Andrew F; Eluf-Neto, José; Muscat, Joshua; Moyses, Raquel Ajub; Morgenstern, Hal; Menezes, Ana; McClean, Michael; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mates, Dana; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levi, Fabio; Lazarus, Philip; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lagiou, Pagona; Koifman, Sergio; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kelsey, Karl; Holcatova, Ivana; Herrero, Rolando; Healy, Claire; Hayes, Richard B; Franceschi, Silvia; Fernandez, Leticia; Fabianova, Eleonora; Daudt, Alexander W; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; Maso, Luigino Dal; Curado, Maria Paula; Conway, David I; Chen, Chu; Castellsague, Xavier; Canova, Cristina; Cadoni, Gabriella; Brennan, Paul; Boccia, Stefania; Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Agudo, Antonio; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Filho, Victor Wünsch

    2015-02-01

    Increasing incidence of head and neck cancer (HNC) in young adults has been reported. We aimed to compare the role of major risk factors and family history of cancer in HNC in young adults and older patients. We pooled data from 25 case-control studies and conducted separate analyses for adults ≤ 45 years old ('young adults', 2010 cases and 4042 controls) and >45 years old ('older adults', 17700 cases and 22 704 controls). Using logistic regression with studies treated as random effects, we estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The young group of cases had a higher proportion of oral tongue cancer (16.0% in women; 11.0% in men) and unspecified oral cavity / oropharynx cancer (16.2%; 11.1%) and a lower proportion of larynx cancer (12.1%; 16.6%) than older adult cases. The proportions of never smokers or never drinkers among female cases were higher than among male cases in both age groups. Positive associations with HNC and duration or pack-years of smoking and drinking were similar across age groups. However, the attributable fractions (AFs) for smoking and drinking were lower in young when compared with older adults (AFs for smoking in young women, older women, young men and older men, respectively, = 19.9% (95% CI=9.8%, 27.9%), 48.9% (46.6%, 50.8%), 46.2% (38.5%, 52.5%), 64.3% (62.2%, 66.4%); AFs for drinking=5.3% (-11.2%, 18.0%), 20.0% (14.5%, 25.0%), 21.5% (5.0%, 34.9%) and 50.4% (46.1%, 54.3%). A family history of early-onset cancer was associated with HNC risk in the young [OR=2.27 (95% CI=1.26, 4.10)], but not in the older adults [OR=1.10 (0.91, 1.31)]. The attributable fraction for family history of early-onset cancer was 23.2% (8.60% to 31.4%) in young compared with 2.20% (-2.41%, 5.80%) in older adults. Differences in HNC aetiology according to age group may exist. The lower AF of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking in young adults may be due to the reduced length of exposure due to the lower age. Other

  16. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    areas to include overview presentations, followed by questions and answers, and a poster session. Small group discussion breakout sessions for each...BADER CTDB user portal was updated with two short informational videos (BADER-NICHD CTDB Partnership and CTDB Overview ). Two CTDB monthly “huddle-up...Diego (NMCSD) Neptune , Rick BADER Consortium Affiliate University of Texas at Austin Nordin, Margareta BADER Consortium Affiliate New York

  17. Old Drugs To Treat Resistant Bugs: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates with mecC Are Susceptible to a Combination of Penicillin and Clavulanic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Xiaoliang; Harrison, Ewan M; Lovering, Andrew L; Gleadall, Nicholas; Zadoks, Ruth; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Holden, Matthew T G; Paterson, Gavin K; Holmes, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    β-Lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is mediated by the expression of an alternative penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) (encoded by mecA) with a low affinity for β-lactam antibiotics. Recently, a novel variant of mecA, known as mecC, was identified in MRSA isolates from both humans and animals. In this study, we demonstrate that mecC-encoded PBP2c does not mediate resistance to penicillin. Rather, broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance in MRSA strains carrying mecC (mecC-MRSA strains) is mediated by a combination of both PBP2c and the distinct β-lactamase encoded by the blaZ gene of strain LGA251 (blaZLGA251), which is part of mecC-encoding staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI. We further demonstrate that mecC-MRSA strains are susceptible to the combination of penicillin and the β-lactam inhibitor clavulanic acid in vitro and that the same combination is effective in vivo for the treatment of experimental mecC-MRSA infection in wax moth larvae. Thus, we demonstrate how the distinct biological differences between mecA- and mecC-encoded PBP2a and PBP2c have the potential to be exploited as a novel approach for the treatment of mecC-MRSA infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Results and harmonization guidelines from two large-scale international Elispot proficiency panels conducted by the Cancer Vaccine Consortium (CVC/SVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzki, Sylvia; Panageas, Katherine S; Ben-Porat, Leah; Boyer, Jean; Britten, Cedrik M; Clay, Timothy M; Kalos, Michael; Maecker, Holden T; Romero, Pedro; Yuan, Jianda; Kast, W Martin; Hoos, Axel

    2008-03-01

    The Cancer Vaccine Consortium of the Sabin Vaccine Institute (CVC/SVI) is conducting an ongoing large-scale immune monitoring harmonization program through its members and affiliated associations. This effort was brought to life as an external validation program by conducting an international Elispot proficiency panel with 36 laboratories in 2005, and was followed by a second panel with 29 participating laboratories in 2006 allowing for application of learnings from the first panel. Critical protocol choices, as well as standardization and validation practices among laboratories were assessed through detailed surveys. Although panel participants had to follow general guidelines in order to allow comparison of results, each laboratory was able to use its own protocols, materials and reagents. The second panel recorded an overall significantly improved performance, as measured by the ability to detect all predefined responses correctly. Protocol choices and laboratory practices, which can have a dramatic effect on the overall assay outcome, were identified and lead to the following recommendations: (A) Establish a laboratory SOP for Elispot testing procedures including (A1) a counting method for apoptotic cells for determining adequate cell dilution for plating, and (A2) overnight rest of cells prior to plating and incubation, (B) Use only pre-tested serum optimized for low background: high signal ratio, (C) Establish a laboratory SOP for plate reading including (C1) human auditing during the reading process and (C2) adequate adjustments for technical artifacts, and (D) Only allow trained personnel, which is certified per laboratory SOPs to conduct assays. Recommendations described under (A) were found to make a statistically significant difference in assay performance, while the remaining recommendations are based on practical experiences confirmed by the panel results, which could not be statistically tested. These results provide initial harmonization guidelines

  19. Polymorphism in the GALNT1 gene and epithelial ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white women: the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelan, Catherine M; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Goode, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a well-described hallmark of cancer. In a previous ovarian cancer case control study that examined polymorphisms in 26 glycosylation-associated genes, we found strong statistical evidence (P = 0.00017) that women who inherited two copies of a single-nucleotide polymorphism...

  20. Evaluation of linkage of breast cancer to the putative BRCA3 locus on chromosome 13q21 in 128 multiple case families from the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Deborah; Szabo, Csilla I.; Mangion, Jon; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Odefrey, Fabrice; Seal, Sheila; Barfoot, Rita; Kroeze-Jansema, Karin; Teare, Dawn; Rahman, Nazneen; Renard, Hélène; Mann, Graham; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Senie, Ruby; Daly, Mary B.; West, Dee; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Offit, Ken; Peretz, Tamar; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Olàh, Edith; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Ruiz, Pablo; Badzioch, Michael D.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Futreal, Andrew P.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven A.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Eeles, Ros A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Couch, Fergus J.; Eccles, Diana M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lenoir, Gilbert; Weber, Barbara L.; Devilee, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Goldgar, David E.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The known susceptibility genes for breast cancer, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, only account for a minority of the familial aggregation of the disease. A recent study of 77 multiple case breast cancer families from Scandinavia found evidence of linkage between the disease and polymorphic markers on

  1. Pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of E7389 (eribulin, halichondrin B analog) during a phase I trial in patients with advanced solid tumors: a California Cancer Consortium trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert J; Synold, Timothy W; Longmate, Jeffrey A; Quinn, David I; Gandara, David; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Ruel, Christopher; Xi, Bixin; Lewis, Michael D; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Doroshow, James; Newman, Edward M

    2015-11-01

    The California Cancer Consortium completed a phase I trial of E7389 (eribulin mesylate), an analog of the marine natural product halichondrin B. This trial was to determine the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and MTD of E7389 administered by bolus injection weekly for 3 weeks out of four. This trial included a rapid titration design. Real-time pharmacokinetics were utilized to guide dose escalation. Initially, single-patient cohorts were enrolled with intra- and inter-patient dose doubling. The second phase was a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation schedule. At the MTD, a cohort of patients was enrolled for target validation studies (separate manuscript). The starting dose was 0.125 mg/m(2), and doses were doubled within and between patients in the first phase. Blood and urine sampling for E7389 pharmacokinetics was performed on doses 1 and 3 of cycle 1. Levels were determined using a LC/MS/MS assay. Forty patients were entered. Thirty-eight were evaluable for toxicity and 35 for response. The rapid escalation ended with a grade 3 elevation of alkaline phosphatase at 0.5 mg/m(2)/week. The second phase ended at 2.0 mg/m(2)/week with dose-limiting toxicities of grades 3 and 4 febrile neutropenia. Other toxicities included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, and fatigue. The MTD was 1.4 mg/m(2)/week. Responses included four partial responses (lung cancer [2], urothelial [1], and melanoma [1]). E7389 was well tolerated in this trial with the major toxicity being myelosuppression. PD shows that E7389 induces significant morphologic changes (bundle formation) in the microtubules of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumor cells in vivo. The data suggest that lower intra-tumoral levels of β-tubulin III or higher intra-tumoral levels of MAP4 may correlate with response to E7389, while lower intra-tumoral levels of stathmin may be associated with progression. PK data reveal that E7389 exhibits a tri-exponential elimination from the plasma of patients receiving a rapid i

  2. Characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa: a multicountry observational study from the Africa Liver Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Dong; Mohamed, Essa A; Aziz, Ashraf O Abdel; Shousha, Hend I; Hashem, Mohamed B; Nabeel, Mohamed M; Abdelmaksoud, Ahmed H; Elbaz, Tamer M; Afihene, Mary Y; Duduyemi, Babatunde M; Ayawin, Joshua P; Gyedu, Adam; Lohouès-Kouacou, Marie-Jeanne; Ndam, Antonin W Ndjitoyap; Moustafa, Ehab F; Hassany, Sahar M; Moussa, Abdelmajeed M; Ugiagbe, Rose A; Omuemu, Casimir E; Anthony, Richard; Palmer, Dennis; Nyanga, Albert F; Malu, Abraham O; Obekpa, Solomon; Abdo, Abdelmounem E; Siddig, Awatif I; Mudawi, Hatim M Y; Okonkwo, Uchenna; Kooffreh-Ada, Mbang; Awuku, Yaw A; Nartey, Yvonne A; Abbew, Elizabeth T; Awuku, Nana A; Otegbayo, Jesse A; Akande, Kolawole O; Desalegn, Hailemichael M; Omonisi, Abidemi E; Ajayi, Akande O; Okeke, Edith N; Duguru, Mary J; Davwar, Pantong M; Okorie, Michael C; Mustapha, Shettima; Debes, Jose D; Ocama, Ponsiano; Lesi, Olufunmilayo A; Odeghe, Emuobor; Bello, Ruth; Onyekwere, Charles; Ekere, Francis; Igetei, Rufina; Mah'moud, Mitchell A; Addissie, Benyam; Ali, Hawa M; Gores, Gregory J; Topazian, Mark D; Roberts, Lewis R

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related death in Africa, but there is still no comprehensive description of the current status of its epidemiology in Africa. We therefore initiated an African hepatocellular carcinoma consortium aiming to describe the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in Africa. We did a multicentre, multicountry, retrospective observational cohort study, inviting investigators from the African Network for Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases to participate in the consortium to develop hepatocellular carcinoma research databases and biospecimen repositories. Participating institutions were from Cameroon, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. Clinical information-demographic characteristics, cause of disease, liver-related blood tests, tumour characteristics, treatments, last follow-up date, and survival status-for patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma between Aug 1, 2006, and April 1, 2016, were extracted from medical records by participating investigators. Because patients from Egypt showed differences in characteristics compared with patients from the other countries, we divided patients into two groups for analysis; Egypt versus other African countries. We undertook a multifactorial analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model to identify factors affecting survival (assessed from the time of diagnosis to last known follow-up or death). We obtained information for 2566 patients at 21 tertiary referral centres (two in Egypt, nine in Nigeria, four in Ghana, and one each in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, Sudan, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda). 1251 patients were from Egypt and 1315 were from the other African countries (491 from Ghana, 363 from Nigeria, 277 from Ivory Coast, 59 from Cameroon, 51 from Sudan, 33 from Ethiopia, 21 from Tanzania, and 20 from Uganda). The median age at which hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed

  3. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    underestimation of the population attributable risk (PAR) of job strain for CHD, and policy implications arising from the findings of the IPD-Work consortium; and (iii) outline general principles for designing evidence-based policy and prevention from good-quality evidence, including future directions...

  4. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality...

  5. Increased risk of lung cancer in individuals with a family history of the disease: A pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cote, M.L.; Liu, M.; Bonassi, S.; Neri, M.; Schwartz, A.G.; Christiani, D.C.; Spitz, M.R.; Muscat, J.E.; Rennert, G.; Aben, K.K.H.; Andrew, A.S.; Bencko, V.; Bickeboller, H.; Boffetta, P.; Brennan, P.; Brenner, H.; Duell, E.J.; Fabianova, E.; Field, J.K.; Foretova, L.; Friis, S.; Harris, C.C.; Holcatova, I.; Hong, Y.C.; Isla, D.; Janout, V.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kiyohara, C.; Lan, Q.; Lazarus, P.; Lissowska, J.; Marchand, L. le; Mates, D.; Matsuo, K.; Mayordomo, J.I.; McLaughlin, J.R.; Morgenstern, H.; Mueller, H.; Orlow, I.; Park, B.J.; Pinchev, M.; Raji, O.Y.; Rennert, H.S.; Rudnai, P.; Seow, A.; Stucker, I.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Teare, M.D.; Tjonnelan, A.; Ugolini, D.; Heijden, E. van der; Wichmann, E.; Wiencke, J.K.; Woll, P.J.; Yang, P.; Zaridze, D.; Zhang, Z.F.; Etzel, C.J.; Hung, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Familial aggregation of lung cancer exists after accounting for cigarette smoking. However, the extent to which family history affects risk by smoking status, histology, relative type and ethnicity is not well described. This pooled analysis included 24 case-control studies

  6. COGENT (COlorectal cancer GENeTics) : an international consortium to study the role of polymorphic variation on the risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomlinson, I. P. M.; Dunlop, M.; Campbell, H.; Zanke, B.; Gallinger, S.; Hudson, T.; Koessler, T.; Pharoah, P. D.; Niittymaki, I.; Tuupanen, S.; Aaltonen, L. A.; Hemminki, K.; Lindblom, A.; Forsti, A.; Sieber, O.; Lipton, L.; van Wezel, T.; Morreau, H.; Wijnen, J. T.; Devilee, P.; Matsuda, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Castellvi-Bel, S.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Castells, A.; Carracedo, A.; Ho, J. W. C.; Sham, P.; Hofstra, R. M. W.; Vodicka, P.; Brenner, H.; Hampe, J.; Schafmayer, C.; Tepel, J.; Schreiber, S.; Volzke, H.; Lerch, M. M.; Schmidt, C. A.; Buch, S.; Moreno, V.; Villanueva, C. M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Echeverry, M. M.; Velez, A.; Carvajal-Carmona, L.; Scott, R.; Penegar, S.; Broderick, P.; Tenesa, A.; Houlston, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    It is now recognised that a part of the inherited risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be explained by the co-inheritance of low-penetrance genetic variants. The accumulated experience to date in identifying these variants has served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and

  7. Replication of lung cancer susceptibility loci at chromosomes 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21: a pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, T.; Hung, R.J.; Amos, C.I.; Wu, X.; Bickeboller, H.; Rosenberger, A.; Sauter, W.; Illig, T.; Wichmann, H.E.; Risch, A.; Dienemann, H.; Kaaks, R.; Yang, P.; Jiang, R.; Wiencke, J.K.; Wrensch, M.; Hansen, H.; Kelsey, K.T.; Matsuo, K.; Tajima, K.; Schwartz, A.G.; Wenzlaff, A.; Seow, A.; Ying, C.; Staratschek-Jox, A.; Nurnberg, P.; Stoelben, E.; Wolf, J.; Lazarus, P.; Muscat, J.E.; Gallagher, C.J.; Zienolddiny, S.; Haugen, A.; Heijden, H.F. van der; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Isla, D.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Rafnar, T.; Stefansson, K.; Zhang, Z.F.; Chang, S.C.; Kim, J.H.; Hong, Y.C.; Duell, E.J.; Andrew, A.S.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Rennert, G.; Muller, H.; Brenner, H.; Marchand, L. le; Benhamou, S.; Bouchardy, C.; Teare, M.D.; Xue, X.; McLaughlin, J.; Liu, G.; McKay, J.D.; Brennan, P.; Spitz, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we

  8. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  9. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C.; Lobbezoo, Dorien J.A.; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M. Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J.W.; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A.; Peer, Petronella G.M.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. Methods. We included all patients with stage I–III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005–2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Results. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37–1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. PMID:26099745

  10. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2015-08-01

    The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. We included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005-2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Associated Links Among Smoking, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruyi; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J; Liu, Geoffrey; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Zong, Xuchen; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Brüske, Irene; Heinrich, Joachim; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Jin Hee; Cote, Michele; Wenzlaff, Angela; Schwartz, Ann G; Stucker, Isabelle; Mclaughlin, John; Marcus, Michael W; Davies, Michael P A; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Field, John K; Matsuo, Keitaro; Barnett, Matt; Thornquist, Mark; Goodman, Gary; Wang, Yi; Chen, Size; Yang, Ping; Duell, Eric J; Andrew, Angeline S; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; Woll, Penella; Horsman, Janet; Teare, M Dawn; Flugelman, Anath; Rennert, Gad; Zhang, Yan; Brenner, Hermann; Stegmaier, Christa; van der Heijden, Erik H F M; Aben, Katja; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Barros-Dios, Juan; Pérez-Ríos, Monica; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Caporaso, Neil E; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Landi, Maria Teresa; Dai, Juncheng; Hongbing Shen, Hongbing; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Suarez, Marta; Tardon, Adonina; Christiani, David C

    2015-11-01

    The high relapse and mortality rate of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) fuels the need for epidemiologic study to aid in its prevention. We included 24 studies from the ILCCO collaboration. Random-effects panel logistic regression and cubic spline regression were used to estimate the effects of smoking behaviors on SCLC risk and explore their non-linearity. Further, we explored whether the risk of smoking on SCLC was mediated through COPD. Significant dose-response relationships of SCLC risk were observed for all quantitative smoking variables. Smoking pack-years were associated with a sharper increase of SCLC risk for pack-years ranged 0 to approximately 50. The former smokers with longer cessation showed a 43%quit_for_5-9 years to 89%quit_for_≥ 20 years declined SCLC risk vs. subjects who had quit smoking < 5 years. Compared with non-COPD subjects, smoking behaviors showed a significantly higher effect on SCLC risk among COPD subjects, and further, COPD patients showed a 1.86-fold higher risk of SCLC. Furthermore, smoking behaviors on SCLC risk were significantly mediated through COPD which accounted for 0.70% to 7.55% of total effects. This is the largest pooling study that provides improved understanding of smoking on SCLC, and further demonstrates a causal pathway through COPD that warrants further experimental study.

  12. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    PhD. “Prosthetic Leg Prescription (ProLegRx): What is the optimal stiffness and height of a running-specific prosthesis ?” Recommended for funding...Alison Linberg, DPT. “Sustainable Benefits of a Powered Ankle Prosthesis for Transtibial K2 and K3 Ambulators.” Recommended for funding with...BiOM: The Director of the BADER Consortium was invited to participate in a local (Newark, DE) demonstration of the BiOM Bionic Lower Leg System. BiOM

  13. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...

  14. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maunsell John HR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium.

  15. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  16. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  17. The effects of height and BMI on prostate cancer incidence and mortality: a Mendelian randomization study in 20,848 cases and 20,214 controls from the PRACTICAL consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Neil M; Gaunt, Tom R; Lewis, Sarah J; Holly, Jeff; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Kemp, John P; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pandha, Hardev; Lathrop, Mark; Smith, George Davey; Martin, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a potential role for obesity and determinants of adult stature in prostate cancer risk and mortality, but the relationships described in the literature are complex. To address uncertainty over the causal nature of previous observational findings, we investigated associations of height- and adiposity-related genetic variants with prostate cancer risk and mortality. We conducted a case-control study based on 20,848 prostate cancers and 20,214 controls of European ancestry from 22 studies in the PRACTICAL consortium. We constructed genetic risk scores that summed each man's number of height and BMI increasing alleles across multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms robustly associated with each phenotype from published genome-wide association studies. The genetic risk scores explained 6.31 and 1.46% of the variability in height and BMI, respectively. There was only weak evidence that genetic variants previously associated with increased BMI were associated with a lower prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation increase in BMI genetic score 0.98; 95% CI 0.96, 1.00; p = 0.07). Genetic variants associated with increased height were not associated with prostate cancer incidence (OR 0.99; 95% CI 0.97, 1.01; p = 0.23), but were associated with an increase (OR 1.13; 95 % CI 1.08, 1.20) in prostate cancer mortality among low-grade disease (p heterogeneity, low vs. high grade increased BMI were associated with an increase (OR 1.08; 95 % CI 1.03, 1.14) in all-cause mortality among men with low-grade disease (p heterogeneity = 0.03). We found little evidence of a substantial effect of genetically elevated height or BMI on prostate cancer risk, suggesting that previously reported observational associations may reflect common environmental determinants of height or BMI and prostate cancer risk. Genetically elevated height and BMI were associated with increased mortality (prostate cancer-specific and all-cause, respectively) in men with

  18. Balancing the benefits and harms of thyroid cancer surveillance in survivors of Childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer: Recommendations from the international Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, S. C.; Kremer, L. C. M.; Verburg, F. A.; Simmons, J. H.; Goldfarb, M.; Peeters, R. P.; Alexander, E. K.; Bardi, E.; Brignardello, E.; Constine, L. S.; Dinauer, C. A.; Drozd, V. M.; Felicetti, F.; Frey, E.; Heinzel, A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; Huang, S. A.; Links, T. P.; Lorenz, K.; Mulder, R. L.; Neggers, S. J.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J. M.; Oeffinger, K. C.; van Rijn, R. R.; Rivkees, S. A.; Ronckers, C. M.; Schneider, A. B.; Skinner, R.; Wasserman, J. D.; Wynn, T.; Hudson, M. M.; Nathan, P. C.; van Santen, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the thyroid gland during treatment of childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer (CAYAC) may cause differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Surveillance recommendations for DTC vary considerably, causing uncertainty about optimum screening practices. The International Late

  19. Quantification of the smoking-associated cancer risk with rate advancement periods: meta-analysis of individual participant data from cohorts of the CHANCES consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel; Schöttker, Ben; Mons, Ute; Jenab, Mazda; Freisling, Heinz; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; O'Doherty, Mark G; Scott, Angela; Kee, Frank; Stricker, Bruno H; Hofman, Albert; de Keyser, Catherine E; Ruiter, Rikje; Söderberg, Stefan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Freedman, Neal D; Wilsgaard, Tom; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; Kampman, Ellen; Håkansson, Niclas; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Tjønneland, Anne; Pająk, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Kubínová, Růžena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Bobak, Martin; Katsoulis, Michail; Orfanos, Philippos; Boffetta, Paolo; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-04-05

    Smoking is the most important individual risk factor for many cancer sites but its association with breast and prostate cancer is not entirely clear. Rate advancement periods (RAPs) may enhance communication of smoking related risk to the general population. Thus, we estimated RAPs for the association of smoking exposure (smoking status, time since smoking cessation, smoking intensity, and duration) with total and site-specific (lung, breast, colorectal, prostate, gastric, head and neck, and pancreatic) cancer incidence and mortality. This is a meta-analysis of 19 population-based prospective cohort studies with individual participant data for 897,021 European and American adults. For each cohort we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for the association of smoking exposure with cancer outcomes using Cox regression adjusted for a common set of the most important potential confounding variables. RAPs (in years) were calculated as the ratio of the logarithms of the HRs for a given smoking exposure variable and age. Meta-analyses were employed to summarize cohort-specific HRs and RAPs. Overall, 140,205 subjects had a first incident cancer, and 53,164 died from cancer, during an average follow-up of 12 years. Current smoking advanced the overall risk of developing and dying from cancer by eight and ten years, respectively, compared with never smokers. The greatest advancements in cancer risk and mortality were seen for lung cancer and the least for breast cancer. Smoking cessation was statistically significantly associated with delays in the risk of cancer development and mortality compared with continued smoking. This investigation shows that smoking, even among older adults, considerably advances, and cessation delays, the risk of developing and dying from cancer. These findings may be helpful in more effectively communicating the harmful effects of smoking and the beneficial effect of smoking cessation.

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  1. Patient survival and tumor characteristics associated with CHEK2:p.I157T - findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Blomqvist, Carl; Dörk, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    characteristics by comparing the p.I157T carrier tumors to non-carrier and c.1100delC carrier tumors. Similarly, we investigated the p.I157T associated risk of early death, breast cancer-associated death, distant metastasis, locoregional relapse and second breast cancer using Cox proportional hazards models...

  2. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  3. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  4. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  5. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  6. Estimating and explaining the effect of education and income on head and neck cancer risk: INHANCE consortium pooled analysis of 31 case-control studies from 27 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, David I; Brenner, Darren R; McMahon, Alex D; Macpherson, Lorna M D; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Bosetti, Cristina; Brenner, Hermann; Castellsague, Xavier; Chen, Chu; Curado, Maria Paula; Curioni, Otávio A; Dal Maso, Luigino; Daudt, Alexander W; de Gois Filho, José F; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Edefonti, Valeria; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Franceschi, Silvia; Gillison, Maura; Hayes, Richard B; Healy, Claire M; Herrero, Rolando; Holcatova, Ivana; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Kelsey, Karl; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Koifman, Sergio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lagiou, Pagona; Lazarus, Philip; Levi, Fabio; Lissowska, Jolanta; Luce, Daniele; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mates, Dana; Matos, Elena; McClean, Michael; Menezes, Ana M; Menvielle, Gwenn; Merletti, Franco; Morgenstern, Hal; Moysich, Kirsten; Müller, Heiko; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew F; Purdue, Mark P; Ramroth, Heribert; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rudnai, Peter; Schantz, Stimson; Schwartz, Stephen M; Shangina, Oxana; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Elaine; Stucker, Isabelle; Sturgis, Erich M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Talamini, Renato; Thomson, Peter; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Yu, Guo-Pei; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Zheng, Tongzhang; Znaor, Ariana; Boffetta, Paolo; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Ghodrat, Marianoosh; Amy Lee, Yuan-Chin; Hashibe, Mia; Brennan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Low socioeconomic status has been reported to be associated with head and neck cancer risk. However, previous studies have been too small to examine the associations by cancer subsite, age, sex, global region and calendar time and to explain the association in terms of behavioral risk factors. Individual participant data of 23,964 cases with head and neck cancer and 31,954 controls from 31 studies in 27 countries pooled with random effects models. Overall, low education was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 2.02 - 3.09). Overall one-third of the increased risk was not explained by differences in the distribution of cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors; and it remained elevated among never users of tobacco and nondrinkers (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13 - 2.31). More of the estimated education effect was not explained by cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors: in women than in men, in older than younger groups, in the oropharynx than in other sites, in South/Central America than in Europe/North America and was strongest in countries with greater income inequality. Similar findings were observed for the estimated effect of low versus high household income. The lowest levels of income and educational attainment were associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of head and neck cancer, which is not entirely explained by differences in the distributions of behavioral risk factors for these cancers and which varies across cancer sites, sexes, countries and country income inequality levels. © 2014 UICC.

  7. Estimating and explaining the effect of education and income on head and neck cancer risk: INHANCE consortium pooled analysis of 31 case-control studies from 27 countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, David I.; Brenner, Darren R.; McMahon, Alex D.; Macpherson, Lorna M.D.; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Bosetti, Cristina; Brenner, Hermann; Castellsague, Xavier; Chen, Chu; Curado, Maria Paula; Curioni, Otávio A.; Maso, Luigino Dal; Daudt, Alexander W.; de Gois Filho, José F.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Edefonti, Valeria; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Franceschi, Silvia; Gillison, Maura; Hayes, Richard B.; Healy, Claire M.; Herrero, Rolando; Holcatova, Ivana; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Kelsey, Karl; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Koifman, Sergio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lagiou, Pagona; Lazarus, Philip; Levi, Fabio; Lissowska, Jolanta; Luce, Daniele; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Mates, Dana; Matos, Elena; McClean, Michael; Menezes, Ana M; Menvielle, Gwenn; Merletti, Franco; Morgenstern, Hal; Moysich, Kirsten; Müller, Heiko; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew F.; Purdue, Mark P.; Ramroth, Heribert; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rudnai, Peter; Schantz, Stimson; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Shangina, Oxana; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Elaine; Stucker, Isabelle; Sturgis, Erich M.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Talamini, Renato; Thomson, Peter; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M.; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Yu, Guo-Pei; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Zheng, Tongzhang; Znaor, Ariana; Boffetta, Paolo; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Ghodrat, Marianoosh; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; Brennan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Low socioeconomic status has been reported to be associated with head and neck cancer risk. However, previous studies have been too small to examine the associations by cancer subsite, age, sex, global region and calendar time and to explain the association in terms of behavioral risk factors. Individual participant data of 23,964 cases with head and neck cancer and 31,954 controls from 31 studies in 27 countries pooled with random effects models. Overall, low education was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 2.02 – 3.09). Overall one-third of the increased risk was not explained by differences in the distribution of cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors; and it remained elevated among never users of tobacco and nondrinkers (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13 – 2.31). More of the estimated education effect was not explained by cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors: in women than in men, in older than younger groups, in the oropharynx than in other sites, in South/Central America than in Europe/North America and was strongest in countries with greater income inequality. Similar findings were observed for the estimated effect of low versus high household income. The lowest levels of income and educational attainment were associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of head and neck cancer, which is not entirely explained by differences in the distributions of behavioral risk factors for these cancers and which varies across cancer sites, sexes, countries and country income inequality levels. PMID:24996155

  8. Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Pastore, Manuela; Capurso, Gabriele; Hackert, Thilo; Di Leo, Milena; Izbicki, Jakob R; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gioffreda, Domenica; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Pasquali, Claudio; Macinga, Peter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Stigliano, Serena; Peeters, Petra H; Key, Timothy J; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Vodicka, Pavel; Valente, Roberto; Vashist, Yogesh K; Salvia, Roberto; Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Valsuani, Chiara; Zambon, Carlo Federico; Gazouli, Maria; Valantiene, Irena; Niesen, Willem; Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Hara, Kazuo; Soucek, Pavel; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H Bas; Johnson, Theron; Brenner, Herman; Tavano, Francesca; Fogar, Paola; Ito, Hidemi; Sperti, Cosimo; Butterbach, Katja; Latiano, Anna; Andriulli, Angelo; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Busch, Olivier R C; Dijk, Frederike; Greenhalf, William; Matsuo, Keitaro; Lombardo, Carlo; Strobel, Oliver; König, Anna-Katharina; Cuk, Katarina; Strothmann, Hendrik; Katzke, Verena; Cantore, Maurizio; Mambrini, Andrea; Oliverius, Martin; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Landi, Stefano; Canzian, Federico

    2017-09-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (ORhomozygous  = 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, p = 0.023). Additionally all the SNPs confirmed statistically significant associations with risk of developing CP, the strongest being PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 (ORheterozygous  = 0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.67, p = 1.10 × 10(-6) ) and MORC4-rs 12837024 (ORhomozygous  = 2.07 (1.55-2.77, ptrend  = 0.7 × 10(-11) ). Taken together, the results from our study do not support variants rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220 as strong predictors of PDAC risk, but further support the role of these SNPs in CP susceptibility. Our study suggests that CP and PDAC probably do not share genetic susceptibility, at least in terms of high frequency variants. © 2017 UICC.

  9. Genetic variation in the vitamin D related pathway and breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry in the root consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Huo, Dezheng; Kupfer, Sonia; Alleyne, Dereck; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Zheng, Yonglan

    2018-01-01

    The vitamin D related pathway has been evaluated in carcinogenesis but its genetic contribution remains poorly understood. We examined single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vitamin D related pathway genes using data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in the African Diaspora that included 3,686 participants (1,657 cases). Pathway- and gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product test. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated at SNP-level. After stringent Bonferroni corrections, we observed no significant association between variants in the vitamin D pathway and breast cancer risk at the pathway-, gene-, or SNP-level. In addition, no association was found for either the reported signals from GWASs of vitamin D related traits, or the SNPs within vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding regions. Furthermore, a decrease in genetically predicted 25(OH)D levels by Mendelian randomization was not associated with breast cancer (p = 0.23). However, an association for breast cancer with the pigment synthesis/metabolism pathway almost approached significance (pathway-level p = 0.08), driven primarily by a nonsense SNP rs41302073 in TYRP1, with an OR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.24-1.91, p adj  = 0.007). In conclusion, we found no evidence to support an association between vitamin D status and breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry, suggesting that vitamin D is unlikely to have significant effect on breast carcinogenesis. Interestingly, TYRP1 might be related to breast cancer through a non-vitamin D relevant mechanism but further studies are needed. © 2017 UICC.

  10. Effects of KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective consortium analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Roock, Wendy; Claes, Bart; Bernasconi, David

    2010-01-01

    Following the discovery that mutant KRAS is associated with resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies, the tumours of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are now profiled for seven KRAS mutations before receiving cetuximab or panitumumab. However, most patients...... with KRAS wild-type tumours still do not respond. We studied the effect of other downstream mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab in, to our knowledge, the largest cohort to date of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy in the pre...

  11. HPV16 DNA status is a strong prognosticator of loco-regional control after postoperative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma: results from a multicentre explorative study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohaus, Fabian; Linge, Annett; Tinhofer, Inge; Budach, Volker; Gkika, Eleni; Stuschke, Martin; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Rödel, Claus; Avlar, Melanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Abdollahi, Amir; Debus, Jürgen; Bayer, Christine; Belka, Claus; Pigorsch, Steffi; Combs, Stephanie E; Mönnich, David; Zips, Daniel; von Neubeck, Cläre; Baretton, Gustavo B; Löck, Steffen; Thames, Howard D; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the impact of HPV status in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), who received surgery and cisplatin-based postoperative radiochemotherapy. For 221 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx, oropharynx or oral cavity treated at the 8 partner sites of the German Cancer Consortium, the impact of HPV DNA, p16 overexpression and p53 expression on outcome were retrospectively analysed. The primary endpoint was loco-regional tumour control; secondary endpoints were distant metastases and overall survival. In the total patient population, univariate analyses revealed a significant impact of HPV16 DNA positivity, p16 overexpression, p53 positivity and tumour site on loco-regional tumour control. Multivariate analysis stratified for tumour site showed that positive HPV 16 DNA status correlated with loco-regional tumour control in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (p=0.02) but not in the oral cavity carcinoma group. Multivariate evaluation of the secondary endpoints in the total population revealed a significant association of HPV16 DNA positivity with overall survival (ploco-regional tumour control after postoperative cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma and is now being explored in a prospective validation trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... us? Who we are The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) is a community of patients, caregivers, survivors, ...

  13. A phase I/pharmacokinetic study of sunitinib in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-positive patients with cancer: AIDS Malignancy Consortium Trial AMC 061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, Michelle A; Moore, Page C.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Aboulafia, David; Gerecitano, John; Sullivan, Ryan; Cianfrocca, Mary E.; Henry, David H.; Ratner, Lee; Haigentz, Missak; Dowlati, Afshin; Little, Richard F.; Ivy, S. Percy; Deeken, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of non-AIDS defining cancers (NADCs) may be complicated by drug interactions between highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and chemotherapy. This trial is the first by the AIDS Malignancy Consortium assessing targeted therapies and HAART in HIV+ cancer patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00890747). Methods Patients were stratified into two arms based on whether they were taking ritonavir, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, in a modified phase I study of sunitinib. Patients in arm 1 (non-ritonavir HAART) received standard sunitinib dosing (50mg/day). Arm 2 (ritonavir-based HAART) used a phase I, 3+3 dose escalation design (from 25 to 50mg/day). Cycles were with four weeks on treatment followed by a two week break (6 weeks total). Pharmacokinetics of sunitinib and its active metabolite (N-desethyl sunitinib) were assessed. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled and evaluable. Patients on Arm 1 tolerated treatment with one observed dose limiting toxicity (DLT). In Arm 2, a DLT was experienced at 37.5mg, and an additional 3 of 5 patients experienced grade 3 neutropenia, an uncommon toxicity of sunitinib. No patient had a response, but 10 had stable disease, including 8 with prolonged disease stability. Efavirenz, a potent inducer of CYP3A4, resulted in increased exposure of N-desethyl sunitinib, whereas ritonavir caused decreased exposure of the metabolite. Hand-foot syndrome was associated with higher steady-state trough concentrations of sunitinib. Conclusions Patients on non-ritonavir based HAART regimens tolerated standard dosing of sunitinib. Patients on ritonavir-based therapy treated with 37.5mg/day experienced higher toxicities. Dose reduction of sunitinib to 37.5mg may be warranted in patients on ritonavir. PMID:24474568

  14. Vitamin D receptor rs2228570 polymorphism and invasive ovarian carcinoma risk: pooled analysis in five studies within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    The association of invasive ovarian carcinoma risk with the functional polymorphism rs2228570 (aka rs10735810; FokI polymorphism) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene was examined in 1820 white non-Hispanic cases and 3479 controls in a pooled analysis of five population-based case-control studies...... analysis provides further evidence that the VDR rs2228570 polymorphism might influence ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  16. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...... vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits....

  17. HIF1α is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in advanced primary epithelial ovarian cancer – a study of the OVCAD Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braicu EI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Elena Ioana Braicu,1 Hrvoje Luketina,1 Rolf Richter,1 Dan Cacsire Castillo-Tong,2 Sandrina Lambrechts,4 Sven Mahner,5 Nicole Concin,6 Monika Mentze,1 Robert Zeillinger,2,3 Ignace Vergote,4 Jalid Sehouli1 1Department of Gynecology, European Competence Center for Ovarian Cancer, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, 3Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster Translational Oncology, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 5Department of Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, AustriaPurpose: Hypoxia is a common phenomenon encountered in solid cancers, leading to chemotherapy resistance and therefore to aggressiveness of the disease. The homeostatic response to hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HIF1α in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer.Methods: In this multicentric study, 275 patients with advanced primary epithelial ovarian cancer were included. All patients underwent cytoreductive surgery with maximal surgical effort and adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. HIF1α expression was analyzed in tissue lysates, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: HIF1α was detected in 79.3% of the tissue samples. Patients with increased HIF1α expression (cutoff: 80 pg/mg protein in tumoral tissue lysates were more likely to have less favorable survival. HIF1α (P=0.009, hazard ratio [HR] 2.505, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.252–5.013 together with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (III versus IV (P=0.013, HR 0.540, 95% CI 0.332–0.878, histology (P=0.007, HR

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Consortium of Prospective Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Collins, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fuller, Donald [Genesis Healthcare Partners, San Diego, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Katz, Alan [Flushing Radiation Oncology, Flushing, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early and late health-related quality of life (QOL) outcomes among prostate cancer patients following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patient self-reported QOL was prospectively measured among 864 patients from phase 2 clinical trials of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Data from the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals up to 6 years. SBRT delivered a median dose of 36.25 Gy in 4 or 5 fractions. A short course of androgen deprivation therapy was given to 14% of patients. Results: Median follow-up was 3 years and 194 patients remained evaluable at 5 years. A transient decline in the urinary and bowel domains was observed within the first 3 months after SBRT which returned to baseline status or better within 6 months and remained so beyond 5 years. The same pattern was observed among patients with good versus poor baseline function and was independent of the degree of early toxicities. Sexual QOL decline was predominantly observed within the first 9 months, a pattern not altered by the use of androgen deprivation therapy or patient age. Conclusion: Long-term outcome demonstrates that prostate SBRT is well tolerated and has little lasting impact on health-related QOL. A transient and modest decline in urinary and bowel QOL during the first few months after SBRT quickly recovers to baseline levels. With a large number of patients evaluable up to 5 years following SBRT, it is unlikely that unexpected late adverse effects will manifest themselves.

  19. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  20. Cost and cost-effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in the real world setting: A study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Ramaekers, Bram L T; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Joore, Manuela A

    2017-10-03

    We assessed the real world costs and cost-effectiveness of the addition of trastuzumab in HER2 positive early breast cancer compared to chemotherapy alone in the Dutch daily practice as opposed to the results based on trial data and based on a subset of patients that were treated according to the guidelines. In a cohort study, we included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer treated with curative intent in 5 Dutch hospitals between 2005 and 2007 (n=2684).We assessed three scenarios: a real-world scenario, a trial scenario and a guideline scenario, with costs and effectiveness based on either the cohort study, the published trials or the guidelines. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) were constructed. Costs were €243,216 and €239,657 for trastuzumab and no trastuzumab for the real world scenario, €224,443 and €218,948 for the guideline scenario and €253,666 and €265,116 for the trial scenario. The QALYs were 0.827, 0.861, 0.993 for the real world, guideline and trial scenario. The corresponding ICERs were €4,304, €6,382 and dominance, respectively. CEACs showed that the probability that trastuzumab is cost-effective is ≥99% in each scenario. Adjuvant trastuzumab in the real world can be considered cost-effective.

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asada, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    ... of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research accomplishments within the last six months since we launched the second phase of the consortium...

  2. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Maria E.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Douwes, Jeroen; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kromhout, Hans; Lebailly, Pierre; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Schenker, Marc; Schüz, Joachim; Waring, Stephen C.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baldi, Isabelle; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel; Ferro, Giles; Fervers, Béatrice; Langseth, Hilde; London, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; McLaughlin, John; Merchant, James A.; Pahwa, Punam; Sigsgaard, Torben; Stayner, Leslie; Wesseling, Catharina; Yoo, Keun-Young; Zahm, Shelia H.; Straif, Kurt; Blair, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides. PMID:21655123

  3. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  4. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: pathology data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Neuhausen, Susan L; Fox, Stephen; Karlan, Beth Y; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul; Thull, Darcy L; Zorn, Kristin K; Carter, Natalie J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ramus, Susan J; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rantala, Johanna; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Caligo, Maria A; Spugnesi, Laura; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Kramer, Gero; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Navratilova, Marie; Vasickova, Petra; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Sharma, Priyanka; Kim, Sung-Won; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Izquierdo, Angel; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Balmaña, Judith; Diez, Orland; Ivady, Gabriella; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Kwong, Ava; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Perez Segura, Pedro; Caldes, Trinidad; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen B M; Isaacs, Claudine; Elan, Camille; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wand, Dorothea; Godwin, Andrew K; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Hamann, Ute; Garber, Judy; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Pasini, Barbara; Giannini, Giuseppe; Rizzolo, Piera; Russo, Antonio; Cortesi, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Palli, Domenico; Zanna, Ines; Savarese, Antonella; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pensotti, Valeria; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Tung, Nadine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Bane, Anita; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2016-02-09

    BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1/2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P for trend = 2 × 10(-5)) and higher grade (P for trend = 0.005) and were more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive [odds ratio (OR) 10.59; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 5.15-21.80] and progesterone receptor-positive (OR 5.04; 95 % CI 3.17-8.04). With the exception of grade, similar patterns of associations emerged when we compared BRCA1 MBCs and FBCs. BRCA2 MBCs also presented with higher grade than MBCs from the SEER database (P for trend = 4 × 10(-12)). On the basis of the largest series analysed to date, our results show that BRCA1/2 MBCs display distinct pathologic characteristics compared with BRCA1/2 FBCs, and we identified a specific BRCA2-associated MBC phenotype characterised by a variable suggesting greater biological aggressiveness (i.e., high histologic grade). These findings could lead to the development of gender-specific risk prediction models and guide clinical strategies appropriate for MBC management.

  5. Pathology of Breast and Ovarian Cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. METHODS: We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze...... the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancers. RESULTS: There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (P-trend = 1.2 × 10(-5)), but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2, carriers (P......-trend = 6.8 × 10(-6)). The proportion of triple-negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histologic grade than ER-positive tumors (grade 3 vs. grade 1; P = 1...

  6. Risk Factors for Early-Onset and Very-Early-Onset Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bamlet, William R; Petersen, Gloria M; Li, Donghui; Risch, Harvey A; Yu, Herbert; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Luckett, Brian; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bracci, Paige; Gallinger, Steven; Neale, Rachel E; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2016-02-01

    While pancreatic cancer (PC) most often affects older adults, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of risk factors among PC patients younger than 60 years. We defined early-onset PC (EOPC) and very-early-onset PC (VEOPC) as diagnosis of PC in patients younger than 60 and 45 years, respectively. We pooled data from 8 case-control studies, including 1954 patients with EOPC and 3278 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations with EOPC and VEOPC. Family history of PC, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and pancreatitis were associated with EOPC. Alcohol use equal to or greater than 26 g daily also was associated with increased risk of EOPC (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.84), and there appeared to be a dose- and age-dependent effect of alcohol on risk. The point estimate for risk of VEOPC was an odds ratio of 2.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-4.09). The established risk factors for PC, including smoking, diabetes, family history of PC, and obesity, also apply to EOPC. Alcohol intake appeared to have an age-dependent effect; the strongest association was with VEOPC.

  7. Risk Factors for Early-Onset and Very-Early-Onset Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bamlet, William R; Petersen, Gloria M; Li, Donghui; Risch, Harvey; Yu, Herbert; Fontham, Elizabeth TH; Luckett, Brian; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bracci, Paige; Gallinger, Steven; Neale, Rachel E; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While pancreatic cancer (PC) most often affects older adults, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of risk factors among PC patients under age 60. Methods We defined early onset PC (EOPC) and very early onset PC (VEOPC) as diagnosis of PC under ages 60 and 45, respectively. We pooled data from eight case-control studies, including 1,954 patients with EOPC and 3,278 age- and sex-matched controls. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations with EOPC and VEOPC. Results Family history of PC, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and pancreatitis were associated with EOPC. Alcohol use ≥26 g daily also was associated with increased risk for EOPC (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.21-1.84), and there appeared to be a dose-and age-dependent effect of alcohol on risk. The point estimate for risk for VEOPC was OR 2.18, (95% CI 1.17-4.09). Conclusion The established risk factors for PC, including smoking, diabetes, family history of PC, and obesity also apply to EOPC. Alcohol intake appeared to have an age-dependent effect; the strongest association was with VEOPC. PMID:26646264

  8. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  9. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  10. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  11. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias-Perez, José Ignacio; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Clarke, Christina A.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Collée, J. Margriet; Jager, Agnes; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Soucy, Penny; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Fasching, Peter A.; Häberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Mariani, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federik; Burwinkel, Barbara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Hall, Per; Benítez, Javier; Malats, Núria; Easton, Douglas F.; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija; Kemiläinen, Helena; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Bowtell, D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; deFazio, A.; Gertig, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Whiteman, D.; Peuteman, Gilian; Smeets, Dominiek; van Brussel, Thomas; Corthouts, Kathleen; Slanger, Tracy; Mutschelknauss, Elke; Salazar, Ramona; Behrens, S.; Birr, R.; Busch, W.; Eilber, U.; Kaspereit, B.; Knese, N.; Smit, K.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Feroce, Irene; Bonanni, Bernardo; Goldberg, Mark; Tranchant, Martine; Valois, Marie-France; Turgeon, Annie; Heguy, Lea; Otsukka, Meeri; Mononen, Kari; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Krol-Warmerdam, E.; Molenaar, J.; Blom, J.; Brinton, Louise; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Peplonska, Beata; Zatonski, Witold; Chao, Pei; Stagner, Michael; Bos, Petra; Blom, Jannet; Crepin, Ellen; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Heemskerk, Annette; Higham, Sue; Cross, Simon; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Pilarski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

  12. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  13. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating...

  14. A large-scale assessment of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility using 46,450 cases and 42,461 controls from the breast cancer association consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Herranz, Jesús; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibil...

  15. In real life, one-quarter of patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer receive chemotherapy as initial palliative therapy: a study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, D.J.; Kampen, R.J. van; Voogd, A.C.; Dercksen, M.W.; Berkmortel, F. van den; Smilde, T.J.; Wouw, A.J. van de; Peters, F.P.; Riel, J.M. van; Peters, N.A.; Boer, M. de; Peer, P.G.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to present initial systemic treatment choices and the outcome of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) metastatic breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All the 815 consecutive patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2007-2009 in eight participating

  16. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  17. Recommendations for gonadotoxicity surveillance in male childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skinner, Roderick; Mulder, Renee L.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Constine, Louis S.; Bardi, Edit; Boekhout, Annelies; Borgmann-Staudt, Anja; Brown, Morven C.; Cohn, Richard; Dirksen, Uta; Giwercman, Alexsander; Ishiguro, Hiroyuki; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Kenney, Lisa B.; Loonen, Jacqueline J.; Meacham, Lilian; Neggers, Sebastian; Nussey, Stephen; Petersen, Cecilia; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; Wallace, William H. B.; Green, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery that involves reproductive organs can cause impaired spermatogenesis, testosterone deficiency, and physical sexual dysfunction in male pubertal, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors. Guidelines for surveillance and management of potential

  18. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium that... articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This... consortium's (1) Management structure; (2) Method of making payments to consortium members; (3) Means of...

  19. Completed | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the current Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), previously funded initiatives associated with clinical proteomics research included: Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC 2.0) Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative (CPTC) Mouse Proteomic Technologies Initiative

  20. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia : a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by

  1. Pre-diagnosis insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by histological subtypes : A collaborative re-analysis from the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Poole, Elizabeth M; Lehtinen, Matti; Visvanathan, Kala; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Mattiello, Amalia; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Rinaldi, Sabina; Merritt, Melissa A; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Tworoger, Shelley S; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    PURPOSE: Biologic evidence suggests that the Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-family may be involved in the etiology of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC). However, prospective studies investigating the role of IGF-I in ovarian carcinogenesis have yielded conflicting results. METHODS: We

  2. Recommendations for Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Surveillance for Female Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer: A Report From the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in Collaboration With the PanCareSurFup Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, Wendy; Mulder, Renée L; Kremer, Leontien C M; Hudson, Melissa M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; van den Berg, Marleen H; Levine, Jennifer M; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; di Iorgi, Natascia; Albanese, Assunta; Armenian, Saro H; Bhatia, Smita; Constine, Louis S; Corrias, Andreas; Deans, Rebecca; Dirksen, Uta; Gracia, Clarisa R; Hjorth, Lars; Kroon, Leah; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Leiper, Alison; Meacham, Lillian; Mussa, Alesandro; Neggers, Sebastian J; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Revelli, Alberto; van Santen, Hanneke M; Skinner, Roderick; Toogood, Andrew; Wallace, William H; Haupt, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult (CAYA) cancer who were treated with alkylating agents and/or radiation, with potential exposure of the ovaries, have an increased risk of premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Clinical practice guidelines can facilitate these survivors' access to optimal treatment of late effects that may improve health and quality of survival; however, surveillance recommendations vary among the existing long-term follow-up guidelines, which impedes the implementation of screening. The present guideline was developed by using an evidence-based approach and summarizes harmonized POI surveillance recommendations for female survivors of CAYA cancer who were diagnosed at age < 25 years. The recommendations were formulated by an international multidisciplinary panel and graded according to the strength of the evidence and the potential benefit gained from early detection and intervention. The harmonized POI surveillance recommendations were developed by using a transparent process and are intended to facilitate care for survivors of CAYA cancer. The harmonized set of POI surveillance recommendations is intended to be scientifically rigorous, to positively influence health outcomes, and to facilitate the care for female survivors of CAYA cancer. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. In real life, one-quarter of patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer receive chemotherapy as initial palliative therapy: a study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, D J A; van Kampen, R J W; Voogd, A C; Dercksen, M W; van den Berkmortel, F; Smilde, T J; van de Wouw, A J; Peters, F P J; van Riel, J M G H; Peters, N A J B; de Boer, M; Peer, P G M; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to present initial systemic treatment choices and the outcome of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) metastatic breast cancer. All the 815 consecutive patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2007-2009 in eight participating hospitals were identified. From the 611 patients with HR+ disease, a total of 520 patients with HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer were included. Initial palliative systemic treatment was registered. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) per initial palliative systemic therapy were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. From the total of 520 patients with HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer, 482 patients (93%) received any palliative systemic therapy. Patients that received initial chemotherapy (n = 116) were significantly younger, had less comorbidity, had received more prior adjuvant systemic therapy and were less likely to have bone metastasis only compared with patients that received initial endocrine therapy (n = 366). Median PFS of initial palliative chemotherapy was 5.3 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.2-6.2] and of initial endocrine therapy 13.3 months (95% CI 11.3-15.5), with a median OS of 16.1 and 36.9 months, respectively. Initial chemotherapy was also associated with worse outcome in terms of PFS and OS after adjustment for prognostic factors. A high percentage of patients with HR+ disease received initial palliative chemotherapy, which was associated with worse outcome, even after adjustment of relevant prognostic factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The current status of follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, are we meeting goals and expectations: a report from the Consortium for New England Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Lisa B; Bradeen, Heather; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S; Diller, Lisa; Homans, Alan; Schwartz, Cindy L

    2011-12-01

    National guidelines for follow-up care of childhood cancer survivors have been established. It has not been determined if pediatric oncology programs have successfully incorporated these standards for long term survivor care into clinical practice. To describe survivor services available in a geographically and socio-economically diverse region of the US we surveyed all 12 academic institutions with pediatric oncology programs in the New England (NE) region. Participating sites diagnose a median of 34 (range 10-250) new pediatric cancers annually. The 12 institutions have 11 survivor clinics. Clinics are staffed by: pediatric oncologists (11/11); nurse practitioners (7/11); social workers/psychologists (9/11); RNs (5/11); primary care physicians (3/11); and sub-specialists (3/11). Most clinics recommend annual follow-up for all survivors (7/11); however, point of entry into survivor programs is variable. Treatment summaries and care plans are part of survivor care at each program. Almost all (10/11) refer to sub-specialists to manage late effects. Only 4 programs identified a policy for transitioning survivors to adult care (2 to adult survivor programs, 2 to adult primary-care) and 4 reported this as a problem. Two clinics had no designated funding for survivor services; 8/11 receive institutional support; 5/11 philanthropic. Five institutions conduct research in survivorship (1 government-funded, 2 philanthropy-funded, and 2 both). Pediatric oncology services in the NE region are making progress toward meeting follow-up care goals for childhood cancer survivors. Funding for resource intense programs, transitioning care to adult clinical services, volume of sub-specialty referral, and participation in research are common challenges. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    and pleiotropic effects of loci that have been identified for disease-specific risk, and jointly model genetic, environmental, and lifestyle-related exposures. IMPACT: Ongoing analyses will shed light on etiology and risk assessment for many types of cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 126-35. ©2016...

  6. Outcome and clinical management of 275 patients with advanced ovarian cancer International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology II to IV inside the European Ovarian Cancer Translational Research Consortium-OVCAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekerov, Radoslav; Braicu, Ioana; Castillo-Tong, Dan Cacsire; Richter, Rolf; Cadron, Isabelle; Mahner, Sven; Woelber, Linn; Marth, Christian; Van Gorp, Toon; Speiser, Paul; Zeillinger, Robert; Vergote, Ignace; Sehouli, Jalid

    2013-02-01

    The Sixth Framework Program European Union project OVCAD, "Ovarian Cancer-Diagnosis of a Silent Killer," aimed to investigate new predictors for early detection of minimal residual disease in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Here we present the main pathologic, surgical, and chemotherapy characteristics of the OVCAD patient cohort. Between February 2005 and December 2008, 5 European gynecologic cancer centers (WP2 group) enrolled prospective 275 consecutive patients with EOC into this translational study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: advanced International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology II to IV stage, cytoreductive surgery, platinum-based chemotherapy, and collected tumor samples. WP2 coordinated the implementation, screening, and recruiting of the patients and tumor samples into a Web-based data bank according established standard operating procedures. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 58 years. Most patients presented advanced high-grade EOC: International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology III/IV (94.5%), grade 2/3 (96%), serous histology (86.2%), ascites (76%), peritoneal carcinomatosis (67.6%), and lymph node involvement (52%). The most common surgical procedures were omentectomy (92.4%), bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (90.9%), hysterectomy (77.3%), pelvic (69.5%) and paraaortic (66.9%) lymphadenectomy, and large (37.7%) or small bowel resection (13.4%). Patients were treated commonly with platinum-based therapy (98.2%). The macroscopic cytoreduction rate was 68.4%. After a median follow-up of 37 months, 70 patients (25.5%) developed a platinum-resistant recurrence. Biological materials such as tumor and paraffin tissue, ascites, and blood samples were collected consecutively. The implementation of the OVCAD cohort demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of an open, prospective, and multicenter recruitment inside a translational research study. Essential was the predefinition of all inclusion criteria, standard operating

  7. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell...... expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). RESULTS: Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein...... signatures are potential prognostic biomarkers for patients with locally advanced HNSCC, who were treated by primary RCTx. The study also supports that the individual tumour volumes should generally be included in biomarker studies and that panels of biomarkers are superior to individual parameters....

  8. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  9. Real-world and trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis of bevacizumab in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients: a study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, R J W; Ramaekers, B L T; Lobbezoo, D J A; de Boer, M; Dercksen, M W; van den Berkmortel, F; Smilde, T J; van de Wouw, A J; Peters, F P J; van Riel, J M G; Peters, N A J B; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Joore, M A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our analysis was to assess the real-world cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment versus taxane monotherapy for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer compared with the cost-effectiveness based on the efficacy results from a trial. A state transition model was built to estimate costs, life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for both treatments. Two scenarios were examined: a real-world scenario and a trial-based scenario in which transition probabilities were primarily based on a real-world cohort study and the E2100 trial, respectively. In both scenarios, costs and utility parameter estimates were extracted from the real-world cohort study. Moreover, the Dutch health care perspective was adopted. In both the real-world and trial scenarios, bevacizumab-taxane is more expensive (incremental costs of €56,213 and €52,750, respectively) and more effective (incremental QALYs of 0.362 and 0.189, respectively) than taxane monotherapy. In the real-world scenario, bevacizumab-taxane compared to taxane monotherapy led to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €155,261 per QALY gained. In the trial scenario, the ICER amounted to €278,711 per QALY gained. According to the Dutch informal threshold, bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment was not considered cost-effective for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer both in a real-world and in a trial scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Therapy Versus No Radiation Therapy to the Neo-breast Following Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Autologous Free Flap Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: Patient-Reported and Surgical Outcomes at 1 Year-A Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Diaz-Abele, Julian; Hayakawa, Tom; Buchel, Ed; Dalke, Kimberly; Lambert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is associated with adverse patient-reported outcomes and surgical complications 1 year after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer. We compared 24 domains of patient-reported outcome measures 1 year after autologous reconstruction between patients who received adjuvant RT and those who did not. A total of 125 patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2015 at our institution were included from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study database. Adjusted multivariate models were created incorporating RT technical data, age, cancer stage, estrogen receptor, chemotherapy, breast size, body mass index, and income to determine whether RT was associated with outcomes. At 1 year after surgery, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire breast symptoms were significantly greater in 64 patients who received RT (8-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, PBREAST-Q (Post-operative Reconstruction Module), Patient-Report Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile 29, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF) score, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-were not statistically different between groups. Surgical complications were uncommon and did not differ by treatment. RT to the neo-breast compared with no RT following immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer is well tolerated at 1 year following surgery despite patients undergoing RT also having a higher cancer stage and more intensive surgical and systemic treatment. Neo-breast symptoms are more common in patients receiving RT by the EORTC Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire but not by the BREAST-Q. Patient-reported results at 1 year after surgery suggest RT following immediate autologous free flap breast reconstruction is well tolerated

  11. A multicenter phase I study of cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone, and prednisone for chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A department of defense prostate cancer clinical trials consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Bryce, Alan; Ryan, Charles J; Harzstark, Andrea; Derleth, Christina; Kim, Won; Friedlander, Terence; Lin, Amy M; Rodvelt-Bagchi, Tammy; Dhawan, Mallika; Zhang, Li; Lee, Mina; Siebeneck, Eric; Hough, Jeffrey; Small, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Cabazitaxel plus prednisone has significant activity in patients with chemotherapy-naïve and pretreated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Mitoxantrone has antitumor activity in mCRPC and nonoverlapping mechanism of action and toxicity profile. To establish the maximally tolerated dose of the combination of cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone, and prednisone. Patients with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC were prospectively enrolled in a multicenter phase 1 trial. Cabazitaxel 20 and 25mg/m2 were each evaluated in combination with escalating doses of mitoxantrone (starting dose 4mg/m2), given with prednisone 5mg twice daily. A total of 25 patients were enrolled, with median age of 67 (range: 51-78) and prostate-specific antigen of 66.8ng/ml (range: 3-791.2). There were 4 dose-limiting toxicities (febrile neutropenia, n = 3; sepsis, n = 1). The maximally tolerated dose was cabazitaxel 20mg/m2 plus mitoxantrone 12mg/m2. The most common treatment-related grade≥3 related adverse events included neutropenia (n = 8; 32%), febrile neutropenia (n = 5; 20%), and thrombocytopenia (n = 4; 16%). The median number of treatment cycles was 8 (range: 2 to 19+). Decline in prostate-specific antigen to≥50% from baseline was observed in 15 patients (60%). Objective responses were observed in 10/14 (71%) evaluable patients. The median radiographic progression-free survival was 14.5 months (95% CI: 8.0-not reached (NR)), and median overall survival was 23.3 months (95% CI: 14.3-NR). The approved single-agent doses of mitoxantrone and cabazitaxel were safely combined. The combination led to durable tumor responses in most patients. Further study of the combination is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  14. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wi...

  15. Viability of Azotobacter consortium in auxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulaika, Enny; Solikhah, Farihatus; Alami, Nur Hidayatul; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita; Shovitri, Maya

    2017-06-01

    Azotobacter is a kind of rhizobacteria which is abundant in soil and having beneficial for plants due to its ability to produce auxin. Each isolated Azotobacter from Eco Urban Farming ITS were able to produce auxin individually. However, the isolated Azotobacter consortium was prefer to produce more auxin than the individual one. Synergism test were carried out in order to verify non-antagonism among Azotobacter isolates. Auxin production test was conducted by inoculating 100 ml of Azotobacter consortium starter in 400 ml nutrient broth by addition of 1.000 ppm of L-tryptophan while shaking 100 rpm in rotary shaker at room temperature for 8 weeks. Auxin concentration was measured spectrophotometrically according to the Salkowski method. The Azotobacter consortium showed living synergistically and able to produce 1,82 ppm auxin in 2 hours incubation time although the concentration was tend to decrease periodically.

  16. Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium - Testing and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin; Skare, Paul; Pratt, Rob; Kim, Tom; Ellis, Abraham

    2017-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the unique testing capabilities and projects being performed at several national laboratories as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium. As part of this effort, the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium Testing Network isbeing developed to accelerate grid modernization by enablingaccess to a comprehensive testing infrastructure and creating a repository of validated models and simulation tools that will be publicly available. This work is key to accelerating thedevelopment, validation, standardization, adoption, and deployment of new grid technologies to help meet U. S. energy goals.

  17. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have g...

  18. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  19. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  20. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency

  1. National STEM Consortium Evaluation. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Acting as the lead agency for the "National STEM Consortium" (NSC), Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) engaged Hezel Associates to provide an independent program and impact evaluation of the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)-funded STEM certificate initiative. This report is comprehensive and covers the findings from all 4 years of the…

  2. Global Consortium on Security Transformation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... the displaced, the oppressed. It is hoped that by linking Southern researchers, policymakers and civil society organizations, the Consortium will empower them to challenge Northern-dominated security discourse and practice, and foster creative alternatives to dysfunctional security architecture using human security as a ...

  3. High prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the mecC gene in a semi-extensive red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) farm in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; González-Barrio, David; Zarazaga, Myriam; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Torres, Carmen

    2015-06-12

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in red deer of a semi-extensive farm and in humans in contact with the estate animals, and to characterize obtained isolates. Nasal swabs of 65 deer and 15 humans were seeded on mannitol-salt-agar and oxacillin-resistance-screening-agar-base. Isolates were identified by microbiological and molecular methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined for 16 antibiotics by disk-diffusion and the presence of eight antibiotic resistance genes, seven virulence genes and genes of immune-evasion-cluster (IEC) was analyzed by PCR. S. aureus was typed by PFGE-SmaI, spa, agr, SCCmec and MLST. Isolates were detected in 16 deer (24.6%). Eleven S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and five were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). All MRSA harbored mecC gene and were agr-III/SCCmecXI/ST1945 (four spa-t843 and seven spa-t1535). All mecC-MRSA carried blaZ-SCCmecXI and etd2, were IEC-type-E, and belonged to the same PFGE pattern. The five MSSA were typed as spa-t2420/agr-I/ST133. Regarding humans, S. aureus was recovered from six samples (40%). The isolates were MSSA and were typed as spa-t002/agr-II, spa-t012/agr-III or spa-t822/agr-III and showed different IEC types (A, B, D and F). blaZ and erm(A) genes were detected, as well as cna and tst genes. As conclusion, red deer analyzed in this study are frequent carriers of mecC-MRSA CC130 (16.9%), they are characterized by few resistance and virulence determinants, and by the presence of IEC type-E. Deer could be a source of mecC-MRSA which could potentially be transmitted to other animals, or even to humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has advanced dramatically over the last 30 years. Unfortunately, this has had little impact in terms of new treatments. Over the same time frame, only one new class of medication for COPD......, and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources...

  5. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  6. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  7. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of Hormone and Genetic Variation in 36 Genes Related to Steroid Hormone Metabolism in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, L.; Husing, A.; Setiawan, V. W.

    2011-01-01

    a pooled sample of 3852 pre- and postmenopausal Caucasian women from EPIC and NHS and 454 postmenopausal women from MEC.Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were SHBG, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS), androstenedione, estrone (E1), and estradiol (E2) as well as breast cancer risk...

  9. Preprocessed Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Durnez, Joke; Poldrack, Russell A

    2017-01-01

    Here we present preprocessed MRI data of 265 participants from the Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics (CNP) dataset. The preprocessed dataset includes minimally preprocessed data in the native, MNI and surface spaces accompanied with potential confound regressors, tissue probability masks, brain masks and transformations. In addition the preprocessed dataset includes unthresholded group level and single subject statistical maps from all tasks included in the original dataset. We hope that availability of this dataset will greatly accelerate research.

  10. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    Mizrahi , MD – PI D. Frost, MD D. Friedman, MD R. Hrachovy, M.D J. Slater, MD Project Summary Introduction: This report outlines the participation...of Eli M. Mizrahi , M.D. and his colleagues in the Mission Connect Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) Translational Research Consortium during the...time period of August 1, 2009 through July 31, 2010. Dr. Mizrahi is the principal investigator (P.I.) for the Neurophysiology Core which supports the

  11. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  12. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  13. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  14. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  15. CPTAC | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is a national effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of large-scale proteome and genome analysis, or proteogenomics.

  16. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  17. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  19. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  20. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  1. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  2. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  3. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prostate cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer In US women, other than skin cancer the three most common cancers are: Breast cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer Some cancers are more common in certain parts of the world. For example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But ...

  4. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  5. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Consortium pour la Recherche E ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This funding will help strengthen the Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale's (CRES) role as a credible public policy institution in Senegal by enhancing its ability to provide high-quality, influential, and policy-relevant research. About the Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale. CRES was ...

  6. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  7. Predicting Outcomes of Hormone and Chemotherapy in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) Study by Biochemically-inspired Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucaki, Eliseos J; Baranova, Katherina; Pham, Huy Q; Rezaeian, Iman; Angelov, Dimo; Ngom, Alioune; Rueda, Luis; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Genomic aberrations and gene expression-defined subtypes in the large METABRIC patient cohort have been used to stratify and predict survival. The present study used normalized gene expression signatures of paclitaxel drug response to predict outcome for different survival times in METABRIC patients receiving hormone (HT) and, in some cases, chemotherapy (CT) agents. This machine learning method, which distinguishes sensitivity vs. resistance in breast cancer cell lines and validates predictions in patients; was also used to derive gene signatures of other HT  (tamoxifen) and CT agents (methotrexate, epirubicin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil) used in METABRIC. Paclitaxel gene signatures exhibited the best performance, however the other agents also predicted survival with acceptable accuracies. A support vector machine (SVM) model of paclitaxel response containing genes  ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2, SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B  was 78.6% accurate in predicting survival of 84 patients treated with both HT and CT (median survival ≥ 4.4 yr). Accuracy was lower (73.4%) in 304 untreated patients. The performance of other machine learning approaches was also evaluated at different survival thresholds. Minimum redundancy maximum relevance feature selection of a paclitaxel-based SVM classifier based on expression of genes  BCL2L1, BBC3, FGF2, FN1,  and  TWIST1   was 81.1% accurate in 53 CT patients. In addition, a random forest (RF) classifier using a gene signature ( ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2,SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A,  and TUBB4B ) predicted >3-year survival with 85.5% accuracy in 420 HT patients. A similar RF gene signature showed 82.7% accuracy in 504 patients treated with CT and/or HT. These results suggest that tumor gene expression signatures refined by machine learning techniques can be useful for

  8. Predicting Outcomes of Hormone and Chemotherapy in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC Study by Biochemically-inspired Machine Learning [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseos J. Mucaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic aberrations and gene expression-defined subtypes in the large METABRIC patient cohort have been used to stratify and predict survival. The present study used normalized gene expression signatures of paclitaxel drug response to predict outcome for different survival times in METABRIC patients receiving hormone (HT and, in some cases, chemotherapy (CT agents. This machine learning method, which distinguishes sensitivity vs. resistance in breast cancer cell lines and validates predictions in patients; was also used to derive gene signatures of other HT  (tamoxifen and CT agents (methotrexate, epirubicin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil used in METABRIC. Paclitaxel gene signatures exhibited the best performance, however the other agents also predicted survival with acceptable accuracies. A support vector machine (SVM model of paclitaxel response containing genes ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2, SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B was 78.6% accurate in predicting survival of 84 patients treated with both HT and CT (median survival ≥ 4.4 yr. Accuracy was lower (73.4% in 304 untreated patients. The performance of other machine learning approaches was also evaluated at different survival thresholds. Minimum redundancy maximum relevance feature selection of a paclitaxel-based SVM classifier based on expression of genes BCL2L1, BBC3, FGF2, FN1, and TWIST1 was 81.1% accurate in 53 CT patients. In addition, a random forest (RF classifier using a gene signature (ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC10, BAD, BBC3, BCL2, BCL2L1, BMF, CYP2C8, CYP3A4, MAP2, MAP4, MAPT, NR1I2,SLCO1B3, TUBB1, TUBB4A, and TUBB4B predicted >3-year survival with 85.5% accuracy in 420 HT patients. A similar RF gene signature showed 82.7% accuracy in 504 patients treated with CT and/or HT. These results suggest that tumor gene expression signatures refined by machine learning techniques can be useful for

  9. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  10. Perspectives of International Human Epigenome Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Bum Bae

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC launched officially at the 2010 Washington meeting, a giant step toward the conquest of unexplored regions of the human genome has begun. IHEC aims at the production of 1,000 reference epigenomes to the international scientific community for next 7-10 years. Seven member institutions, including South Korea, Korea National Institute of Health (KNIH, will produce 25-200 reference epigenomes individually, and the produced data will be publically available by using a data center. Epigenome data will cover from whole genome bisulfite sequencing, histone modification, and chromatin access information to miRNA-seq. The final goal of IHEC is the production of reference maps of human epigenomes for key cellular status relevant to health and disease.

  11. Li-Fraumeni syndrome: report of a clinical research workshop and creation of a research consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L; Malkin, David; Garber, Judy E; Schiffman, Joshua D; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Strong, Louise C; Wyss, Oliver; Locke, Luana; Means, Von; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Hainaut, Pierre; Frebourg, Thierry; Evans, D Gareth; Bleiker, Eveline; Patenaude, Andrea; Schneider, Katherine; Wilfond, Benjamin; Peters, June A; Hwang, Paul M; Ford, James; Tabori, Uri; Ognjanovic, Simona; Dennis, Phillip A; Wentzensen, Ingrid M; Greene, Mark H; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Savage, Sharon A

    2012-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome that was first described in 1969. In most families, it is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is characterized by early onset of multiple specific cancers and very high lifetime cumulative cancer risk. Despite significant progress in understanding the molecular biology of TP53, the optimal clinical management of this syndrome is poorly defined. We convened a workshop on November 2, 2010, at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, bringing together clinicians and scientists, as well as individuals from families with LFS, to review the state of the science, address clinical management issues, stimulate collaborative research, and engage the LFS family community. This workshop also led to the creation of the Li-Fraumeni Exploration (LiFE) Research Consortium. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  13. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  14. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  15. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  16. Exploring the clonal evolution of CD133/aldehyde-dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1)-positive cancer stem-like cells from primary to recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). A study of the Ovarian Cancer Therapy-Innovative Models Prolong Survival (OCTIPS) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Ilary; Cacsire Castillo-Tong, Dan; Vergote, Ignace; Ignat, Iulia; Stanske, Mandy; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Ganapathi, Ram N; Glajzer, Jacek; Kulbe, Hagen; Trillsch, Fabian; Mustea, Alexander; Kreuzinger, Caroline; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Gourley, Charlie; Gabra, Hani; Kessler, Mirjana; Sehouli, Jalid; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Braicu, Elena Ioana

    2017-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) causes 80% of all ovarian cancer (OC) deaths. In this setting, the role of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) is still unclear. In particular, the evolution of CSC biomarkers from primary (pOC) to recurrent (rOC) HGSOCs is unknown. Aim of this study was to investigate changes in CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1) CSC biomarker expression in pOC and rOC HGSOCs. Two-hundred and twenty-four pOC and rOC intrapatient paired tissue samples derived from 112 HGSOC patients were evaluated for CD133 and ALDH1 expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC); pOCs and rOCs were compared for CD133 and/or ALDH1 levels. Expression profiles were also correlated with patients' clinicopathological and survival data. Some 49.1% of the patient population (55/112) and 37.5% (42/112) pOCs were CD133+ and ALDH1+ respectively. CD133+ and ALDH1+ samples were detected in 33.9% (38/112) and 36.6% (41/112) rOCs. CD133/ALDH1 coexpression was observed in 23.2% (26/112) and 15.2% (17/112) of pOCs and rOCs respectively. Pairwise analysis showed a significant shift of CD133 staining from higher (pOCs) to lower expression levels (rOCs) (p HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.03-2.60; p = 0.036) and OS (HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.01-2.88; p = 0.045). Analysis on 52 pts patients with known somatic BRCA status revealed that BRCA mutations did not influence CSC biomarker expression. The study showed that CD133/ALDH1 expression impacts HGSOC patients' survival and first suggests that CSCs might undergo phenotypic change during the disease course similarly to non stem-like cancer cells, providing also a first evidence that there is no correlation between CSCs and BRCA status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CEPH consortium map of chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attwood, J.; Povey, S. (University College, London (United Kingdom)); Chiano, M.; Goudie, D.; Yates, J. (Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)); Collins, A.; Shields, D. (Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)); Donis-Keller, H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Dracopoli, N. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Fountain, J. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)) (and others)

    1994-01-15

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 9. A total of 124 markers were typed in the CEPH family DNAs by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 42 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The uniquely placed markers include 31 that can be typed by PCR. A further 28 markers that can be typed by PCR are approximately positioned on the map. Multilocus linkage analysis with CRI-MAP has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 176, 237, and 209 cM, respectively, while sex-averaged maps produced with MAPMAKER and the multiple two-point program MAP extended for 170 and 129 cM, respectively. The male map contains only two intervals greater than 10 cM, and the mean genetic distance between the 42 uniquely placed loci is 4.3 cM. However, no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. The results confirm the high level of interference suggested by chiasma maps of chromosome 9. Detailed meiotic breakpoints for three of the families are shown. These can be used to provide rapid placement of any new marker without the need for statistical analysis. 36 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. CEPH consortium Map of chromosome 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, J; Chiano, M; Collins, A; Donis-Keller, H; Dracopoli, N; Fountain, J; Falk, C; Goudie, D; Gusella, J; Haines, J

    1994-01-15

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 9. A total of 124 markers were typed in the CEPH family DNAs by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 42 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The uniquely placed markers include 31 that can be typed by PCR. A further 28 markers that can be typed by PCR are approximately positioned on the map. Multilocus linkage analysis with CRI-MAP has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 176, 237, and 209 cM, respectively, while sex-averaged maps produced with MAPMAKER and the multiple two-point program MAP extended for 170 and 129 cM, respectively. The male map contains only two intervals greater than 10 cM, and the mean genetic distance between the 42 uniquely placed loci is 4.3 cM. However, no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. The results confirm the high level of interference suggested by chiasma maps of chromosome 9. Detailed meiotic breakpoints for three of the families are shown. These can be used to provide rapid placement of any new marker without the need for statistical analysis.

  19. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  20. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  1. International network of cancer genome projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, Thomas J.; Anderson, Warwick; Aretz, Axel; Barker, Anna D.; Bell, Cindy; Bernabé, Rosa R.; Bhan, M. K.; Calvo, Fabien; Eerola, Iiro; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guttmacher, Alan; Guyer, Mark; Hemsley, Fiona M.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Kerr, David; Klatt, Peter; Kolar, Patrik; Kusuda, Jun; Lane, David P.; Laplace, Frank; Lu, Youyong; Nettekoven, Gerd; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Rao, T. S.; Remacle, Jacques; Schafer, Alan J.; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Vockley, Joseph G.; Watanabe, Koichi; Yang, Huanming; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Bobrow, Martin; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dressler, Lynn G.; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Joly, Yann; Kato, Kazuto; Kennedy, Karen L.; Nicolás, Pilar; Parker, Michael J.; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Wallace, Susan; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Zeps, Nikolajs; Lichter, Peter; Biankin, Andrew V.; Chabannon, Christian; Chin, Lynda; Clément, Bruno; de Alava, Enrique; Degos, Françoise; Ferguson, Martin L.; Geary, Peter; Hayes, D. Neil; Johns, Amber L.; Kasprzyk, Arek; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Penny, Robert; Piris, Miguel A.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; van de Vijver, Marc; Futreal, P. Andrew; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Bayés, Mónica; Bowtell, David D. L.; Campbell, Peter J.; Estivill, Xavier; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gut, Ivo; Hirst, Martin; López-Otín, Carlos; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D.; Ning, Zemin; Puente, Xose S.; Ruan, Yijun; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Swerdlow, Harold; Velculescu, Victor E.; Wilson, Richard K.; Xue, Hong H.; Yang, Liu; Spellman, Paul T.; Bader, Gary D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Flicek, Paul; Getz, Gad; Guigó, Roderic; Guo, Guangwu; Haussler, David; Heath, Simon; Hubbard, Tim J.; Jiang, Tao; Jones, Steven M.; Li, Qibin; López-Bigas, Nuria; Luo, Ruibang; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Ouellette, B. F. Francis; Pearson, John V.; Quesada, Victor; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Sander, Chris; Speed, Terence P.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Valencia, Alfonso; Wheeler, David A.; Wu, Honglong; Zhao, Shancen; Zhou, Guangyu; Lathrop, Mark; Thomas, Gilles; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Axton, Myles; Gunter, Chris; Miller, Linda J.; Zhang, Junjun; Haider, Syed A.; Wang, Jianxin; Yung, Christina K.; Cross, Anthony; Liang, Yong; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Guberman, Jonathan; Hsu, Jack; Chalmers, Don R. C.; Hasel, Karl W.; Kaan, Terry S. H.; Lowrance, William W.; Masui, Tohru; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vergely, Catherine; Cloonan, Nicole; Defazio, Anna; Eshleman, James R.; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Gardiner, Brooke A.; Kench, James G.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Waddell, Nicola J.; Wilson, Peter J.; Gallinger, Steve; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; DePinho, Ronald A.; Thayer, Sarah; Shazand, Kamran; Beck, Timothy; Sam, Michelle; Timms, Lee; Ballin, Vanessa; Ji, Jiafu; Zhang, Xiuqing; Chen, Feng; Hu, Xueda; Yang, Qi; Tian, Geng; Zhang, Lianhai; Xing, Xiaofang; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan; Yu, Jun; Tost, Jörg; Brennan, Paul; Holcatova, Ivana; Zaridze, David; Brazma, Alvis; Egevad, Lars; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Banks, Rosamonde Elizabeth; Uhlén, Mathias; Viksna, Juris; Ponten, Fredrik; Skryabin, Konstantin; Birney, Ewan; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Martin, Sancha; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Sotiriou, Christos; van't Veer, Laura; Birnbaum, Daniel; Blanche, Hélène; Boucher, Pascal; Boyault, Sandrine; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Pauporté, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tabone, Eric; Theillet, Charles; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Decaens, Thomas; Franco, Dominique; Gut, Marta; Samuel, Didier; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Korbel, Jan O.; Korshunov, Andrey; Landgraf, Pablo; Lehrach, Hans; Pfister, Stefan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Reifenberger, Guido; Taylor, Michael D.; von Kalle, Christof; Majumder, Partha P.; Pederzoli, Paolo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Delledonne, Massimo; Bardelli, Alberto; Gress, Thomas; Klimstra, David; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nakamura, Yusuke; Miyano, Satoru; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Campo, Elias; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Montserrat, Emili; González-Díaz, Marcos; Jares, Pedro; Himmelbaue, Heinz; Bea, Silvia; Aparicio, Samuel; Easton, Douglas F.; Collins, Francis S.; Compton, Carolyn C.; Lander, Eric S.; Burke, Wylie; Green, Anthony R.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Ley, Timothy J.; Liu, Edison T.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the

  2. HCMI Organization | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consortium The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) was created and funded by the US National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, the foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Together, these organizations develop policy and make programmatic decisions to contribute to the function of the HCMI. National Cancer Institute

  3. DoD Alcohol and Substance Abuse Consortium Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    DoD Alcohol and Substance Abuse Consortium Award Annual Report 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Award Number: W81XWH-15-2-0077 TITLE: DoD Alcohol and Substance Abuse Consortium Award PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rick Williams CONTRACTING...views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author (s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army

  4. International Consortium on Mammographic Density: Methodology and Population Diversity captured across 22 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Valerie A.; Burton, Anya; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hipwell, John H.; Dickens, Caroline; Salem, Dorria; Kamal, Rasha; Hartman, Mikael; Ling Lee, Charmaine Pei; Chia, Kee-Seng; Ozmen, Vahit; Aribal, Mustafa Erkin; Flugelman, Anath Arzee; Lajous, Martín; Lopez-Riduara, Ruy; Rice, Megan; Romieu, Isabelle; Ursin, Giske; Qureshi, Samera; Ma, Huiyan; Lee, Eunjung; van Gils, Carla H.; Wanders, Johanna O.P.; Vinayak, Sudhir; Ndumia, Rose; Allen, Steve; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Moss, Sue; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Jisun; Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Sirous, Reza; Sirous, Mehri; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Bertrand, Kimberly; Nagata, Chisato; Kwong, Ava; Vachon, Celine; Scott, Christopher; Perez-Gomez, Beatriz; Pollan, Marina; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Stone, Jennifer; Rajaram, Nadia; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yaffe, Martin J.; Schüz, Joachim; Chiarelli, Anna; Linton, Linda; Boyd, Norman F.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a quantitative trait, measurable in all women, and is among the strongest markers of breast cancer risk. The population-based epidemiology of MD has revealed genetic, lifestyle and societal/environmental determinants, but studies have largely been conducted in women with similar westernized lifestyles living in countries with high breast cancer incidence rates. To benefit from the heterogeneity in risk factors and their combinations worldwide, we created an International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD) to pool individual-level epidemiological and MD data from general population studies worldwide. ICMD aims to characterize determinants of MD more precisely, and to evaluate whether they are consistent across populations worldwide. We included 11755 women, from 27 studies in 22 countries, on whom individual-level risk factor data were pooled and original mammographic images were re-read for ICMD by a core team to obtain standardized comparable MD data. In the present article, we present (i) the rationale for this consortium; (ii) characteristics of the studies and women included; and (iii) study methodology to obtain comparable MD data from original re-read films. We also highlight the risk factor heterogeneity captured by such an effort and, thus, the unique insight the pooled study promises to offer through wider exposure ranges, different confounding structures and enhanced power for sub-group analyses. PMID:26724463

  5. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  6. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  7. AIDS and Cancer Virus Program (ACVP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers from the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program (ACVP) work to improve the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of HIV infection, AIDS, and AIDS-related tumors,...

  8. The CEPH consortium primary linkage map of human chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R L; Lalouel, J M; Nakamura, Y; Donis-Keller, H; Green, P; Bowden, D W; Mathew, C G; Easton, D F; Robson, E B; Morton, N E

    1990-03-01

    The first CEPH consortium map, that of chromosome 10, is presented. This primary linkage map contains 28 continuously linked loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 37 probe and enzyme combinations. Cytogenetic localization of some of the genetic markers indicates that the consortium map extends, at least, from 10p13 to 10q26. The order of loci on the consortium map agrees with the physical localization data. The female map spans 309 cM (206 cM if an approximation of interference is included in the mapping function used to construct the map), and the mean genetic distance of intervals is 11 cM (7 cM). Also presented are maps of chromosome 10 from each of five CEPH collaborating laboratories, based on genotypes for all relevant markers in the CEPH database. The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 10 should be useful for localization of any gene of interest falling within the span covered. The genotypes in the chromosome 10 consortium map database are now available to the scientific community.

  9. Medical education in Korea: the e-learning consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Han, Joungho; Park, Ie Byung; Kee, Changwon

    2009-09-01

    This article reports the latest development in e-learning in Korean medical education. The Korean Consortium for e-Learning in Medical Education was formed for collaboration in providing quality online learning resources for medical schools around the nation. This e-learning strategy is aimed at improving the quality of medical education at the national level by providing students with equal access to quality learning resources and fostering students' self-directed learning and, in doing so, enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of developing online learning resources by sharing necessary resources among the medical schools. The consortium also plans to share e-learning content with medical schools in other countries by engaging more medical schools in the consortium and also by sharing e-learning content developed by other institutions or consortiums. The consortium is also dedicated to the research and development of effective online learning strategies for medical education, including interactive virtual patient cases and other innovative pedagogies using Web 2.0 technologies.

  10. Advances in industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium for biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Li; Zhou, Jin-Jie; Quan, Chun-Shan; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-01-01

    One of the important targets of industrial biotechnology is using cheap biomass resources. The traditional strategy is microbial fermentations with single strain. However, cheap biomass normally contains so complex compositions and impurities that it is very difficult for single microorganism to utilize availably. In order to completely utilize the substrates and produce multiple products in one process, industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium draws more and more attention. In this review, we first briefly described some examples of existing industrial bioprocesses involving microbial consortia. Comparison of 1,3-propanediol production by mixed and pure cultures were then introduced, and interaction relationships between cells in microbial consortium were summarized. Finally, the outlook on how to design and apply microbial consortium in the future was also proposed.

  11. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: a decade of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E; Johnston, Jodie M; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M; Payne, Richard J; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; James, Michael N G; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Eisenberg, David S; Sacchettini, James C; Goulding, Celia W

    2011-03-01

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately lead to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  13. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  14. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  15. An Appraisal of the Consortium of Tanzania University and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wemafr

    Abstract. This study investigated factors constraining effective growth of the Consortium of Tanzania. University and Research Libraries (COTUL). A mixed research design was employed to gain a deeper insight into the subject matter. Data was collected using interviews, questionnaires and observations. Fifty-eight (58) ...

  16. Cohort Profile : The Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H.; Astor, Brad C.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gansevoort, Ronald; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Levey, Andrew S.; Levin, Adeera; Wen, Chi-Pang; Woodward, Mark; Coresh, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium (CKD-PC) was established in 2009 to provide comprehensive evidence about the prognostic impact of two key kidney measures that are used to define and stage CKD, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, on mortality and kidney

  17. International Arid Lands Consortium's contributions to Madrean Archipelago stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffery O. Dawson; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; E. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhannad Shatanawi; Donald F. Caccamise; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2005-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands worldwide. Building on a decade of experience, the IALC continues to increase the knowledge base for managers by funding research, development, and demonstration...

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement. Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    deliver to our sponsors the First Progress Report of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research...experiments in diverse fields of home automation and healthcare research, ranging from human physiological modeling, patient monitoring, and

  19. The Research Consortium, 1977-2010: Contributions, Milestones, and Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Claman, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Research and innovation are a cornerstone of any progressive organization. The Research Consortium (RC) has served as the principal organization fulfilling this function on behalf of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) throughout much of its history. The RC is an organization of approximately 5,000…

  20. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    degrading microorganisms in oil-polluted site. (Atlas, 1981). Crude oil biodegradation can occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions (Zengler et al., 1999). This research was aimed at investigating the effects of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and. Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ...

  1. Lessons on consortium-based research in climate change and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-04-03

    Apr 3, 2014 ... Collaborative research efforts are emerging as a way to address complex development challenges such as adapting to climate change. Lessons on consortium-based research in climate change and development is the first in a series of working papers based on work funded by the Collaborative ...

  2. Characteristics of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of 2 bacteria belonging to the genera Cobetia and Bacillus was investigated. The extracellular bioflocculant was composed of 66% uronic acid and 31% protein and showed an optimum flocculation (90% flocculating activity) of kaolin suspension at a dosage of ...

  3. Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System (Vps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marz, Bryan E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the launch and post-launch activities of Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System, V(ps). It is a comprehensive overview covering launch activities, post-launch activities, experimental results, and future flight recommendations.

  4. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries (ICOR).'' The ] purpose of the public workshop is to facilitate discussion among FDA and worldwide...

  5. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  6. Characteristics of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reducing chemical oxygen demand (COD) in brewery wastewater, dairy wastewater and river water. ... affirmation of their bioflocculant production potential. .... (66.2%), protein (31.5%) and neutral sugar (0.5%) (Table 1). TABLE 1. Composition of purified bioflocculant produced by the bacterial consortium. Component.

  7. An Appraisal of the Consortium of Tanzania University and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated factors constraining effective growth of the Consortium of Tanzania University and Research Libraries (COTUL). A mixed research design was employed to gain a deeper insight into the subject matter. Data was collected using interviews, questionnaires and observations. Fifty-eight (58) purposively ...

  8. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  9. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas , Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  10. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  11. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    Abstract. The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic ...

  12. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What elements must a consortium... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.124 What elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating PHAs...

  13. Electricity purchase. Industrialists allowed to build a consortium; Achat d'electricite. Les industriels autorises a constituer un consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V

    2005-08-01

    On July 20, 2005, the French government has announced the implementation of a system allowing the big power-consuming companies (over 20 TWh per year) to group together into a consortium in order to negotiate contracts with power supplier for a 15 to 20 years warranty of prices. Short paper. (J.S.)

  14. Germline mutations of BRCA1 gene exon 11 are not associated with platinum response neither with survival advantage in patients with primary ovarian cancer: understanding the clinical importance of one of the biggest human exons. A study of the Tumor Bank Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Desislava; Ruscito, Ilary; Olek, Sven; Richter, Rolf; Hellwag, Alexander; Türbachova, Ivana; Woopen, Hannah; Baron, Udo; Braicu, Elena Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2016-09-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 gene have been reported in up to 20 % of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Distinct clinical characteristics have been attributed to this special EOC population. We hypothesized that mutations in different BRCA1 gene exons may differently affect the clinical course of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a large cohort of primary EOCs, the clinical impact of mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11, the largest exon of the gene sequence encoding the 60 % of BRCA1 protein. Two hundred sixty-three primary EOC patients, treated between 2000 and 2008 at Charité University Hospital of Berlin, were included. Patients' blood samples were obtained from the Tumor Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Network ( www.toc-network.de ). Direct sequencing of BRCA1 gene exon 11 was performed for each patient to detect mutations. Based on their BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status, patients were compared regarding clinico-pathological variables and survival. Mutations in BRCA1 exon 11 were found in 18 out of 263 patients (6.8 %). Further 10/263 (3.8 %) cases showed variants of uncertain significance (VUS). All exon 11 BRCA1-positive tumors (100 %) were Type 2 ovarian carcinomas (p = 0.05). Age at diagnosis was significantly younger in Type 2 exon 11 mutated patients (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status was not found to be an independent predictive factor for optimal cytoreduction, platinum response, or survival. Mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11 seem to predispose women to exclusively develop a Type 2 ovarian cancer at younger age. Exon 11 BRCA1-mutated EOC patients showed distinct clinico-pathological features but similar clinical outcome with respect to sporadic EOC patients.

  15. Tumor Genomic Profiling in Breast Cancer Patients Using Targeted Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Genomics” Invited Talk The 3rd Global Cancer Genomics Consortium Symposium: From Oncogenomics to Cancer Care Lisbon, Portugal 2013 “Clinical Cancer...City, Mexico 2013 “Clinical Cancer Genomics and Precision Cancer Medicine” Invited Talk Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Mexico

  16. Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics, which forms the third cycle CCNE Program at Stanford University, is a consortium that has three highly synchronized Projects and three Cores.

  17. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Rennert, Hedy S; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer, current evidence remains inconclusive. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer [OR (drinkers vs. non-drinkers), 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.86; P coffee consumption alone (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; P = 0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.94; P = 0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer. Compared with 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39-0.54; P Coffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer in a dose-response manner. Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 634-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    OpenAIRE

    Armato, Samuel G.; Mclennan, Geoffrey; Bidaut, Luc; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Meyer, Charles R.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Zhao, Binsheng; Aberle, Denise R; Henschke, Claudia I.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; MacMahon, Heber; van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Yankelevitz, David; Biancardi, Alberto M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further adv...

  19. Utilizing the Experience of Consumers in Consultation to Develop the Australasian Oncofertility Consortium Charter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazodo, Antoinette C; Gerstl, Brigitte; Stern, Catharyn J; McLachlan, Robert I; Agresta, Franca; Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Cohn, Richard J; Wakefield, Claire E; Chapman, Michael; Ledger, William; Sullivan, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, there has not been a national systematic development of oncofertility services for cancer patients of reproductive age although many cancer and fertility centers have independently developed services. A number of barriers exist to the development of these services, including a lack of clear referral pathways, a lack of communication between clinicians and patients about fertility preservation, differences in the knowledge base of clinicians about the risk of cancer treatment causing infertility and fertility preservation options, a lack of national health insurance funding covering all aspects of fertility preservation, and storage costs and cultural, religious, and ethical barriers. The development of strategies to overcome these barriers is a high priority for oncofertility care to ensure that equitable access to the best standard of care is available for all patients. The FUTuRE Fertility Research Group led a collaborative consultation process with the Australasian Oncofertility Consumer group and oncofertility specialists to explore consumers' experiences of oncofertility care. Consumers participated in qualitative focus group meetings to define and develop a model of consumer driven or informed "gold standard oncofertility care" with the aim of putting together a Charter that specifically described this. The finalized Australasian Oncofertility Consortium Charter documents eight key elements of gold standard oncofertility care that will be used to monitor the implementation of oncofertility services nationally, to ensure that these key elements are incorporated into standard practice over time.

  20. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer and other research.

  1. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group - The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consortium; The Cancer Institute of New Jersey/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; Robert Wood Johnson Medical School...University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer...cilengitide in children with refractory brain tumors: pediatric brain tumor consortium study PBTC-012. J Clin Oncol 26:919–924 29. Moreno J, DeBono

  3. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  4. p-Cresol mineralization by a nitrifying consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Luna, C. D.; Gomez, J.; Houbron, E.; Cuervo Lopez, F. M.; Texier, A. C.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrification and denitrification processes are considered economically feasible technologies for nitrogen removal from wastewater. Knowledge of the toxic or inhibitory effects of cresols on the nitrifying respiratory process is still insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic behavior and oxidizing ability of a nitrifying consortium exposed to p-cresol in batch cultures. Biotransformation of p-cresol was investigated by identifying the different intermediates formed. (Author)

  5. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Azumoun, Bob [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blatnik, Marie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pak, Robert [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, Martin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Di Ruzza, Benedetto [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Woody, Craig [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bhopatkar, Vallary [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Twigger, Jessie [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Zhang, Aiwu [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Dehmelt, Klaus [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Feege, Nils [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Hemmick, Thomas [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Bai, Xinzhang [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gnanvo, Kondo [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Liyanage, Nilanga [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Majka, Richard [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Smirnov, Nikolai [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  6. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry—The 2012 Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current...

  7. Soutien institutionnel au Consortium pour la recherche économique ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale (CRES) est une équipe de chercheurs pluridisciplinaire établie à Dakar, au Sénégal. Il compte cinq départements : Croissance et équité; Développement local, intégration régionale et mondialisation; Économie des ressources humaines; Secteur rural; Économie de ...

  8. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial consortium isolated from agriculture soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, Chitrambalam; Jiwal, Sonia; Rout, Pallabi; Ramya, Mohandass

    2012-03-01

    Organophosphorous pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control major insect pests. Chlorpyrifos is one of the major organophosphorous pesticides which is used to control insects including termites, beetles. The widespread use of these pesticides is hazardous to the environment and also toxic to mammals, thus it is essential to remove the same from the environment. From the chlorpyrifos contaminated soil nine morphologically different bacterial strains, one actinomycete and two fungal strains were isolated. Among those isolates four bacterial strains which were more efficient were developed as consortium. The four bacterial isolates namely Pseudomonas putida (NII 1117), Klebsiella sp., (NII 1118), Pseudomonas stutzeri (NII 1119), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NII 1120) present in the consortia were identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The intracellular fractions of the consortium exhibited more organophosphorus hydrolase activity (0.171 ± 0.003 U/mL/min). The degradation studies were carried out at neutral pH and temperature 37°C with chlorpyrifos concentration 500 mg L(-1). LC-mass spectral analysis showed the presence of metabolites chlopyrifos-oxon and Diethylphosphorothioate. These results highlight an important potential use of this consortium for the cleanup of chlorpyrifos contaminated pesticide waste in the environment.

  9. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Rennert, Hedy S.; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), current evidence remains inconclusive. Methods We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of CRC in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Results Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing CRC [Odds Ratio (drinkers versus non-drinkers)=0.74; 95% CI: 0.64–0.86; Pcoffee consumption alone (OR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.68–0.99; P=0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.94; P=0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing CRC. Compared to 2.5 servings/day (OR=0.46; 95% CI: 0.39–0.54; PCoffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of CRC in a dose-response manner. Impact Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of CRC. PMID:27196095

  10. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA. ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000...

  11. CPTAC Launches Proteomics Data Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) announces the launch of the CPTAC Data Portal. The Data Portal hosts all the data that is currently being produced by the consortium with additional historic data from CPTAC 1. The total amount of hosted data exceeds over 500 GB of RAW data in over 800 files.

  12. International network of cancer genome projects.

    OpenAIRE

    Aretz, Axel; Bernabé, Rosa R.; Calvo, Fabien; Eerola, Iiro; Hemsley, Fiona M.; Jennings, Jennifer L; Kerr, David; Klatt, Peter; Kolar, Patrik; Lane, David P; Laplace, Frank; Nettekoven, Gerd; Remacle, Jacques; Watanabe, Koichi; Matthew M. F. Yuen

    2010-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic levels will reveal the repertoire of oncogenic mutations, uncover traces of the mutagenic influences, define clinically relevant subtypes for prognosis and therapeut...

  13. Pathway and network analysis of cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Reimand, Jueri; Haider, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Genomic information on tumors from 50 cancer types cataloged by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) shows that only a few well-studied driver genes are frequently mutated, in contrast to many infrequently mutated genes that may also contribute to tumor biology. Hence there has been ...

  14. Colorectal Cancer Subtypes: Developmental Origin and Microenvironmental Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fessler, Evelyn; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease and many cancer types do not represent a single entity, but are composed of biologically and clinically diverse subtypes. The subtype affiliation can influence prognosis and response to therapy. Recently, a multicenter colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium

  15. Height, selected genetic markers and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence on height and prostate cancer risk is mixed, however, recent studies with large data sets support a possible role for its association with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. METHODS: We analysed data from the PRACTICAL consortium consisting of 6207 prostate cancer cases ...

  16. Cultivation of algae consortium in a dairy farm wastewater for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy farm wastewaters are potential resources for production of microalgae biofuels. A study was conducted to evaluate the capability of production of biodiesel from consortium of native microalgae culture in dairy farm treated wastewater. Native algal strains were isolated from dairy farm wastewaters collection tank (untreated wastewater as well as from holding tank (treated wastewater. The consortium members were selected on the basis of fluorescence response after treating with Nile red reagent. Preliminary studies of two commercial and consortium of ten native strains of algae showed good growth in wastewaters. A consortium of native strains was found capable to remove more than 98% nutrients from treated wastewater. The biomass production and lipid content of consortium cultivated in treated wastewater were 153.54 t ha−1 year−1 and 16.89%, respectively. 72.70% of algal lipid obtained from consortium could be converted into biodiesel.

  17. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  18. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a halophilic microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Khajeh, Khosro; Shavandi, Mahmoud; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    In this study we investigated the phenanthrene degradation by a halophilic consortium obtained from a saline soil sample. This consortium, named Qphe, could efficiently utilize phenanthrene in a wide range of NaCl concentrations, from 1% to 17% (w/v). Since none of the purified isolates could degrade phenanthrene, serial dilutions were performed and resulted in a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture named Qphe-SubIV which was shown to contain one culturable Halomonas strain and one unculturable strain belonging to the genus Marinobacter. Qphe-SubIV was shown to grow on phenanthrene at salinities as high as 15% NaCl (w/v) and similarly to Qphe, at the optimal NaCl concentration of 5% (w/v), could degrade more than 90% of the amended phenanthrene in 6 days. The comparison of the substrate range of the two consortiums showed that the simplified culture had lost the ability to degrade chrysene but still could grow on other polyaromatic substrates utilized by Qphe. Metabolite analysis by HPLC and GC-MS showed that 2-hydroxy 1-naphthoic acid and 2-naphthol were among the major metabolites accumulated in the Qphe-SubIV culture media, indicating that an initial dioxygenation step might proceed at C1 and C2 positions. By investigating the growth ability on various substrates along with the detection of catechol dioxygenase gene, it was postulated that the uncultured Marinobacter strain had the central role in phenanthrene degradation and the Halomonas strain played an auxiliary role in the culture by utilizing phenanthrene metabolites whose accumulation in the media could be toxic.

  19. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  20. Research Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... le développement de l'agriculture en Haïti. Même avant le tremblement de terre qui a dévasté le pays en janvier 2010, les enfants d'Haïti présentaient certains des pires taux de dénutrition en Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes. Voir davantageConsortium de recherche pour le développement de l'agriculture en Haïti ...

  1. Fecal occult blood versus DNA testing: indirect comparison in a colorectal cancer screening population

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner H; Chen H

    2017-01-01

    Hermann Brenner,1–3 Hongda Chen1,4 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 2Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 3German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; 4Program Office for Cancer Screening in Urban China, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Med...

  2. CPTAC Releases Cancer Proteome Confirmatory Colon Study Data | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) announces the release of the cancer proteome confirmatory colon study data. The goal of the study is to analyze the proteomes of approximately 100 confirmatory colon tumor patients, which includes tumor and adjacent normal samples, with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling.

  3. Meeting report: the fourth Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Garrity, George M; Gray, Tanya; Sterk, Peter; Cochrane, Guy; Vaughan, Robert; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Angiuoli, Sam; Dawyndt, Peter; Guralnick, Robert; Goldstein, Philip; Hall, Neil; Hirschman, Lynette; Kravitz, Saul; Lister, Allyson L; Markowitz, Victor; Thomson, Nick; Whetzel, Trish

    2008-06-01

    This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the "eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection IV" workshop held June 6-8, 2007, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS), Cambridge, United Kingdom. This fourth workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) was a mix of short presentations, strategy discussions, and technical sessions. Speakers provided progress reports on the development of the "Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence" (MIGS) specification and the closely integrated "Minimum Information about a Metagenome Sequence" (MIMS) specification. The key outcome of the workshop was consensus on the next version of the MIGS/MIMS specification (v1.2). This drove further definition and restructuring of the MIGS/MIMS XML schema (syntax). With respect to semantics, a term vetting group was established to ensure that terms are properly defined and submitted to the appropriate ontology projects. Perhaps the single most important outcome of the workshop was a proposal to move beyond the concept of "minimum" to create a far richer XML schema that would define a "Genomic Contextual Data Markup Language" (GCDML) suitable for wider semantic integration across databases. GCDML will contain not only curated information (e.g., compliant with MIGS/MIMS), but also be extended to include a variety of data processing and calculations. Further information about the Genomic Standards Consortium and its range of activities can be found at http://gensc.org.

  4. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  5. A programmable Escherichia coli consortium via tunable symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Kerner

    Full Text Available Synthetic microbial consortia that can mimic natural systems have the potential to become a powerful biotechnology for various applications. One highly desirable feature of these consortia is that they can be precisely regulated. In this work we designed a programmable, symbiotic circuit that enables continuous tuning of the growth rate and composition of a synthetic consortium. We implemented our general design through the cross-feeding of tryptophan and tyrosine by two E. coli auxotrophs. By regulating the expression of genes related to the export or production of these amino acids, we were able to tune the metabolite exchanges and achieve a wide range of growth rates and strain ratios. In addition, by inverting the relationship of growth/ratio vs. inducer concentrations, we were able to "program" the co-culture for pre-specified attributes with the proper addition of inducing chemicals. This programmable proof-of-concept circuit or its variants can be applied to more complex systems where precise tuning of the consortium would facilitate the optimization of specific objectives, such as increasing the overall efficiency of microbial production of biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

  6. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  7. Birth Cohort Consortium of Asia: Current and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Reiko; Zhang, Jun Jim; Ha, Eun-Hee; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tian, Ying; Xia, Yankai; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kim, Sungkyoon; Hong, Soo-Jong; Hong, Yun-Chul; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Parajuli, Rajendra Prasad; Adair, Linda S; Chong, Yap Seng; Guo, Yue Leon; Wang, Shu-Li; Nishijo, Muneko; Kido, Teruhiko; Tai, Pham The; Nandasena, Sumal

    2017-10-01

    The environmental health of children is one of the great global health concerns. Exposures in utero and throughout development can have major consequences on later health. However, environmental risks or disease burdens vary from region to region. Birth cohort studies are ideal for investigating different environmental risks. The principal investigators of three birth cohorts in Asia including the Taiwan Birth Panel Study (TBPS), the Mothers and Children's Environmental Health Study (MOCEH), and the Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children' Health (Hokkaido Study) coestablished the Birth Cohort Consortium of Asia (BiCCA) in 2011. Through a series of five PI meetings, the enrolment criteria, aim of the consortium, and a first-phase inventory were confirmed. To date, 23 birth cohorts have been established in 10 Asian countries, consisting of approximately 70,000 study subjects in the BiCCA. This article provides the study framework, environmental exposure and health outcome assessments, as well as maternal and infant characteristics of the participating cohorts. The BiCCA provides a unique and reliable source of birth cohort information in Asian countries. Further scientific cooperation is ongoing to identify specific regional environmental threats and improve the health of children in Asia.

  8. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  9. Height and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ben; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Delahanty, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. METHODS: We performed a meta......-analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using...... a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. RESULTS: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence...

  10. Medicinal Plants and Natural Active Compounds for Cancer Chemoprevention/Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilal Zaid; Michael Silbermann; Alaa Amash; Dan Gincel; Essam Abdel-Sattar; Nazli B. Sarikahya

    2017-01-01

    .... Box 240, Jenin, State of Palestine 3, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Middle East Cancer Consortium, Haifa, Israel 4, The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal...

  11. 77 FR 12041 - Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program AGENCY: Office...: Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program; Notice inviting applications for new..., to the Department at the following address: U.S. Department of ] Education, Application Control...

  12. Biodegradability of fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol using different microbial consortiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Yolanda Flores; Nacheva, Petia Mijaylova

    2017-03-01

    The biodegradation of fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol using ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing consortium, nitrite-oxidizing consortium, and heterotrophic biomass was evaluated in batch tests applying different retention times. The ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing consortium presented the highest biodegradation percentages for mefenamic acid and metoprolol, of 85 and 64% respectively. This consortium was also capable to biodegrade 79% of fluoxetine. The heterotrophic consortium showed the highest ability to biodegrade fluoxetine reaching 85%, and it also had a high potential for biodegrading mefenamic acid and metoprolol, of 66 and 58% respectively. The nitrite-oxidizing consortium presented the lowest biodegradation of the three pharmaceuticals, of less than 48%. The determination of the selected pharmaceuticals in the dissolved phase and in the biomass indicated that biodegradation was the major removal mechanism of the three compounds. Based on the obtained results, the biodegradation kinetics was adjusted to pseudo-first-order for the three pharmaceuticals. The values of k biol for fluoxetine, mefenamic acid, and metoprolol determined with the three consortiums indicated that ammonium-nitrite-oxidizing and heterotrophic biomass allow a partial biodegradation of the compounds, while no substantial biodegradation can be expected using nitrite-oxidizing consortium. Metoprolol was the less biodegradable compound. The sorption of fluoxetine and mefenamic acid onto biomass had a significant contribution for their removal (6-14%). The lowest sorption coefficients were obtained for metoprolol indicating that the sorption onto biomass is poor (3-4%), and the contribution of this process to the global removal can be neglected.

  13. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... Workshop AGENCY: National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and... clinic. On April 13, 2012, NIST convened the workshop ``Genome in a Bottle'' to initiate a consortium to...

  14. 24 CFR 943.128 - How does a consortium carry out planning and reporting functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a consortium carry out planning and reporting functions? 943.128 Section 943.128 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Consortia § 943.128 How does a consortium carry out planning and reporting functions? (a) During the term of...

  15. The creation of the SAVE consortium – Saving Asia's Vultures from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes the background to this problem, caused mainly by the veterinary drug diclofenac, and the establishment and structure of the SAVE consortium created to help coordinate the necessary conservation response. The lessons learnt in Asia and the working model of such a consortium are presented, which ...

  16. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  17. Consortium de recherche pour le développement de l'agriculture en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti. Even before it was hit by a devastating earthquake in January 2010, Haiti's children suffered some of the worst rates of undernutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean. View moreResearch Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti ...

  18. The fungal consortium of Andromeda polifolia in bog habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Filippova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available (1 Andromeda polifolia (bog rosemary is a common plant species in northern circumboreal peatlands. While not a major peat-forming species in most peatlands, it is characterised by a substantial woody below-ground biomass component that contributes directly to the accumulation of organic matter below the moss surface, as well as sclerophyllous leaf litter that contributes to the accumulation of organic matter above the moss surface. Rather little is known about the fungal communities associated with this plant species. Hence, we investigated the fungal consortium of A. polifolia in three distinct vegetation communities of ombrotrophic bogs near Khanty-Mansiysk, West Siberia, Russia, in 2012 and 2013. These vegetation communities were forested bog (Tr = treed, Sphagnum-dominated lawn (Ln, and Eriophorum-Sphagnum-dominated hummock (Er. (2 In total, 37 fungal taxa, belonging to five classes and 16 families, were identified and described morphologically. Seven fungal species were previously known from Andromeda as host. Others are reported for the first time, thus considerably expanding the fungal consortium of this dwarf shrub. Most taxa were saprobic on fallen leaves of A. polifolia found amongst Sphagnum in the bog. Two taxa were parasitic on living plant tissues and one taxon was saprobic on dead twigs. Three taxa, recorded only on A. polifolia leaves and on no other plant species or materials, may be host-specific to this dwarf shrub. (3 A quantitative analysis of the frequency of occurrence of all taxa showed that one taxon (Coccomyces duplicarioides was very abundant, 64 % of the taxa occurred frequently, and 32 % of the taxa occurred infrequently. The mean Shannon diversity index of the community was 2.4. (4 There were no statistical differences in the fungal community composition of A. polifolia in the three vegetation communities investigated in this study. Redundancy analysis suggested that some fungal taxa were positively, and others

  19. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachinskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  20. Removal of two organophosphate pesticides by a bacterial consortium immobilized in alginate or tezontle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo; Sanchez-Salinas, Enrique; Jimenez-Tobon, Gloria Alicia; Penninckx, Michel; Ortiz-Hernández, María Laura

    2009-09-15

    In order to remove methyl-parathion (MP) and tetrachlorvinphos (TCF), a bacterial consortium was immobilized with two supports consisting of alginate beads or stones of tezontle colonized by biofilm. Removal kinetics were recorded for suspended and immobilized consortium using a mineral salt medium supplemented with MP and TCF at 25mg/L and with 0.1% (w/v) glucose as a co-substrate. The viability of the consortium cultivated in suspension was maintained for 6 days, whereas the viability of the consortium immobilized in alginate and tezontle supports was maintained for up to 11 and 13 days, respectively. Growth was enhanced when using glucose as a co-substrate. The percentage of MP removed was significantly higher (alpha=0.05) when consortium was immobilized in alginate beads and biofilm on tezontle as compared to suspension culture.

  1. Crystals against cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This is a remarkable example of direct technology transfer from particle physics to medicine. Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new medical imaging system for the diagnosis of breast cancer, which uses positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  2. Assessment of microalgae and nitrifiers activity in a consortium in a continuous operation and the effect of oxygen depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The consortium it can be obtained in a single continuous operation, and has a high capacity for nitrogen removal with low oxygen content. The consortium could prove to be a more economical method compared to traditional.

  3. 77 FR 25406 - Consortium on “Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)”: Membership Fee Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME... NIST/Industry Consortium on Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The notice stated that...

  4. Overview of the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Stevens, Victor J; Zhu, Shu-Hong; Morgan, Glen; Grossman, Debra

    2012-08-01

    The Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART) is a network of six projects and a research coordinating unit funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research. The CHART projects will assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions initiated during hospitalization and continued post-discharge. Along with a seventh project funded previously under the NIH Challenge grants, the CHART projects will assess smoking cessation strategies delivered to approximately 10,000 hospitalized smokers across a geographically diverse group of nearly 20 private, public, academic, and community hospitals. The CHART research coordinating unit at Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research provides organizational and data coordination support, facilitating the development of common measures for combining data from multiple CHART projects. The targeted enrollment in CHART, if achieved, will represent the largest, most diverse pooled dataset of hospitalized smokers receiving smoking cessation assistance, and is designed to contribute to the dissemination and implementation of smoking cessation interventions provided by hospital systems.

  5. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  6. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  7. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowcock, A M; Gerken, S C; Barnes, R I; Shiang, R; Jabs, E W; Warren, A C; Antonarakis, S; Retief, A E; Vergnaud, G; Leppert, M

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178 cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alpha RI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM.

  9. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurr, N.K.; Cox, S.; Bryant, S.P. (Human Genetic Resources Unit, Herts (United Kingdom)); Attwood, J. (Univ. College London (United Kingdom)); Shields, D.C. (Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)); Steinbrueck, T.; Donis-Keller, H. (Washington Univ. School of medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Jenkins, T. (Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)); Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); Kidd, K.K. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 2. The map contains 36 loci defined by genotyping generated from the CEPH family DNAs. A total of 73 different markers were typed by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 36 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. Markers are placed along the length of the chromosome but no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. Multilocus linkage analysis has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 261, 430, and 328 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains five intervals greater than 15 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 36 uniquely placed loci is 9.1 cM. 25 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, N K; Cox, S; Bryant, S P; Attwood, J; Robson, E B; Shields, D C; Steinbrueck, T; Jenkins, T; Murray, J C; Kidd, K K

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 2. The map contains 36 loci defined by genotyping generated from the CEPH family DNAs. A total of 73 different markers were typed by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 36 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. Markers are placed along the length of the chromosome but no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. Multilocus linkage analysis has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 261, 430, and 328 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains five intervals greater than 15 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 36 uniquely placed loci is 9.1 cM.

  11. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowcock, A M; Barnes, R I; White, R L; Kruse, T A; Tsipouras, P; Sarfarazi, M; Jenkins, T; Viljoen, C; Litt, M; Kramer, P L

    1992-12-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 15q is presented. The map contains 41 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 45 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 10 laboratories. A total of 29 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from 15q13 to 15q25-qter. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 127, 190, and 158 cM, respectively. The largest interval is 21 cM and is between D15S37 and D15S74. The on-average locus spacing is 5.6 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 21 uniquely placed loci is 8 cM.

  12. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 15q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); White, R.L. (Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Kruse, T.A. (Aarhus Universitet (Denmark)); Tsipouras, P.; Sarfarazi, M. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT (United States)); Litt, M.; Kramer, P.L. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)); Jenkins, T.; Viljoen, C. (and others)

    1992-12-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 15q is presented. The map contains 41 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 45 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 10 laboratories. A total of 29 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from 15q13 to 15q25-qter. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 127, 190, and 158 cM, respectively. The largest interval is 21 cM and is between D15S37 and D15S74. The on-average locus spacing is 5.6 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 21 uniquely placed loci is 8 cM. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. The international consortium on the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Lara; Byers, Peter; Francomano, Clair; Tinkle, Brad; Malfait, Fransiska

    2017-03-01

    Since 1998, two developments have led to concerns that the EDS nosology needs to be substantially revised. The first development was the clinical and molecular characterization of several new EDS variants, which substantially broadened the molecular basis underlying EDS. The second was the growing concern, in the absence of genetic diagnosis, that the hypermobile type of EDS had an expanded phenotype, may be genetically heterogeneous, and that the diagnostic criteria currently in use were inadequate. Furthermore, there is a dire need for the development of guidelines for management for each type of EDS to allow both the specialist and the generalist to care for affected individuals and their families. We have been meeting together as an international consortium over the past 2 years to establish these new criteria and management and care guidelines © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Collaborative community research consortium: a model for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanstad, K H; Stall, R; Goldstein, E; Everett, W; Brousseau, R

    1999-04-01

    In 1991, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) at the University of California, San Francisco, set out to develop a model of community collaborative research that would bring the skills of science to the service of HIV prevention and the knowledge of service providers into the domain of research. Essential elements of the model were training for community-based organizations (CBOs) in research protocol writing, partnership between CBOs and CAPS researchers, program research funding, support to implement studies and analyze results, and a program manager to oversee the effort and foster the relationships between CBOs and researchers. In this article, the authors describe the CAPS model of consortium-based community collaborative research. They also introduce a set of papers, written by researchers and service providers, that describes collaborative research projects conducted by research institutions and CBOs and illustrates how collaboration can change both HIV prevention research and service.

  15. Physiological characterization of a broad spectrum reductively dechlorinating consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium (WBC-2) was developed by the US Geological Survey and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for potential use in bioaugmentation applications. On the basis of bench-scale tests, the consortium could completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and vinyl chloride in culture medium. Batch microcosms were carried out under anaerobic conditions in culture medium with neutral pH and with pH adjusted from acidic (pH 4, 5, and 6) to alkaline (pH 8 and 9). To evaluate oxygen sensitivity of WBC-2, an aliquot was removed from an anaerobic culture vessel and poured into smaller containers on the bench top where a series of oxygen exposures were applied to the culture by bubbling ambient air through the culture at a rate of ??? 100 mL/min. Chlorinated methanes tended to inhibit activity of a wide range of microorganisms. Although toxicity effects from CT addition were observed with WBC-2 in liquid culture at 3 mg/L concentration, WBC-2 in the columns could maintain degradation of CT and chloroform (CF) and of the chlorinated ethanes and ethylenes at CT and CF concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/L, respectively. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  16. On the Need to Establish an International Soil Modeling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.; Schnepf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate-change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society. To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key

  17. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tobacco uselifestyle choices (such as diet and exercise)family historyfactors in your workplace and environment.How do I know if I am at ... you…Diet Choices to Prevent CancerRead Article >>Healthy Food ChoicesDiet Choices to ... is powered by © 2018 American Academy of Family Physicians

  18. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? 287.30 Section 287.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up...

  19. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachinskaya V.V.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  20. The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, E Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Zhou, Renke; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Wrensch, Margaret R; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Scheurer, Michael E; Aldape, Kenneth; Alafuzoff, Irina; Brännström, Thomas; Broholm, Helle; Collins, Peter; Giannini, Caterina; Rosenblum, Marc; Tihan, Tarik; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-01-15

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium: Defining the Path to Elegance in Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Farrington, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium was formed at the end of 2010 to study the approaches to producing elegant systems on a consistent basis. This has been a transformative study looking at the engineering and organizational basis of systems engineering. The consortium has engaged in a variety of research topics to determine the path to elegant systems. In the second year of the consortium, a systems engineering framework emerged which structured the approach to systems engineering and guided our research. This led in the third year to set of systems engineering postulates that the consortium is continuing to refine. The consortium has conducted several research projects that have contributed significantly to the understanding of systems engineering. The consortium has surveyed the application of the NASA 17 systems engineering processes, explored the physics and statistics of systems integration, and considered organizational aspects of systems engineering discipline integration. The systems integration methods have included system exergy analysis, Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), State Variable Analysis, Multidisciplinary Coupling Analysis (MCA), Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), System Cost Modelling, System Robustness, and Value Modelling. Organizational studies have included the variability of processes in change evaluations, margin management within the organization, information theory of board structures, social categorization of unintended consequences, and initial looks at applying cognitive science to systems engineering. Consortium members have also studied the bidirectional influence of policy and law with systems engineering.

  2. NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium: Defining the Path to Elegance in Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Farrington, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium was formed at the end of 2010 to study the approaches to producing elegant systems on a consistent basis. This has been a transformative study looking at the engineering and organizational basis of systems engineering. The consortium has engaged in a variety of research topics to determine the path to elegant systems. In the second year of the consortium, a systems engineering framework emerged which structured the approach to systems engineering and guided our research. This led in the third year to set of systems engineering postulates that the consortium is continuing to refine. The consortium has conducted several research projects that have contributed significantly to the understanding of systems engineering. The consortium has surveyed the application of the NASA 17 systems engineering processes, explored the physics and statistics of systems integration, and considered organizational aspects of systems engineering discipline integration. The systems integration methods have included system energy analysis, Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), State Variable Analysis, Multidisciplinary Coupling Analysis (MCA), Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), System Cost Modeling, System Robustness, and Value Modeling. Organizational studies have included the variability of processes in change evaluations, margin management within the organization, information theory of board structures, social categorization of unintended consequences, and initial looks at applying cognitive science to systems engineering. Consortium members have also studied the bidirectional influence of policy and law with systems engineering.

  3. 7q21-rs6964587 and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Lorenzo-Bermejo, Justo; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, the authors previously reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism 7q21-rs6964587 (AKAP9-M463I) is associated with breast cancer risk. The authors have now assessed this association more comprehensively using 16 independent case-control studies....

  4. A multi-centre evaluation of oral cancer in Southern and Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Oral cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths among African populations. Lack of standard cancer registries and under-reporting has inaccurately depicted its magnitude in Nigeria. Development of multi-centre collaborative oral pathology networks such as the African Oral Pathology Research Consortium ...

  5. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To... Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is initiating a public private... biotechnology companies. This consortium will evaluate promising nanotechnology platforms and facilitate their...

  6. CPTAC Team Releases Targeted Proteomic Assays for Ovarian Cancer | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigators in the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), announces the public release of 98 targeted mass spectrometry-based assays for ovarian cancer research studies.  Chosen based on proteogenomic observations from the recently published multi-institutional collaborative project between PNNL and Johns Hopkins University that comprehensively examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of ovarian cancer patients (highlighted in a paper in

  7. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset from Previously Genome Characterized Tumors | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and  phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  8. A novel lignin degradation bacterial consortium for efficient pulping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxia; Liu, Quan; Yan, Lei; Gao, Yamei; Wang, Yanjie; Wang, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    A lignin degradation bacterial consortium named LDC was screened from the sludge of a reeds pond by a restricted subculture. It could break down 60.9% lignin in reeds at 30°C under conditions of static culture within 15 days. In order to analyze the diversity of LDC, plate isolation, 16S rDNA clone library and ARDRA (Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis) were performed. Six bacterial strains were isolated from LDC and eighteen DNA phylotypes were identified from 230 bacterial analyzed clones. They were classified into Clostridiales(9.1%), Geovibrio thiophilus (5.1%), Desulfomicrobium (10.9%), Pseudomonas sp. (25.2%), Azoarcus sp. (5.1%), Thauera (5.1%), Paenibacillus sp. (5.1%), Cohnella sp. (2.2%), Acinetobacter sp. (3.1%), Microbacterium (7.8%), and uncultured bacterium (21.3%). In addition, physical characteristics of paper hand-sheets between biological pretreatment and chemical pretreatment were compared. The results showed that LDC had the capability of lignin degradation and was efficient for pulping, which would provide a new choice for biopulping. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, K. R.; Reis, J.; Hall, I. R.

    2011-12-01

    In response to the complexity and multidisciplinary nature of climate change research, the Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W) was formed in 2009 by the Welsh universities of Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cardiff and Swansea. Initially funded by Welsh Government, through the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, the Countryside Council for Wales and the universities, C3W aims to bring together climate change researchers from a wide range of disciplines to explore scientific and sociological drivers, impacts and implications at local, national and international scale. The specific aims are to i) improve our fundamental understanding of the causes, nature, timing and consequences of climate change on Planet Earth's environment and on humanity, and ii) to reconfigure climate research in Wales as a recognisable centre of excellence on the world stage. In addition to improving the infrastructure for climate change research, we aim to improve communication, networking, collaborative research, and multidisciplinary data assimilation within and between the Welsh universities, and other UK and international institutions. Furthermore, C3W aims to apply its research by actively contributing towards national policy development, business development and formal and informal education activities within and beyond Wales.

  10. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Keith, T.P. [Collaborative Research Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map. 39 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, M.; Kramer, P. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Kort, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The CEPH consortium framework map of chromosome 11 is presented. The map was generated from CEPH family DNAs with 181 probe/enzyme combinations contributed by 20 laboratories. Seventy-seven of the loci are defined by microsatellite polymorphisms that can be typed by the PCR. A total of 42 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The female, male, and sex-average maps extend for 179.6, 110.8, and 145.3 cM, respectively. The largest interval on the sex-average map is less than 11 cM, and the average distance between uniquely placed loci is 4 cM. The genotypic data obtained for map construction have been used to identify the positions of crossovers on the chromosomes of CEPH family children, allowing the localization of new markers without computationally intensive likelihood models and providing a basis for efficient extension of the linkage map to higher resolution. 36 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozman, H M; Keith, T P; Donis-Keller, H; White, R L; Weissenbach, J; Dean, M; Vergnaud, G; Kidd, K; Gusella, J; Royle, N J

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  13. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Sutherland, G.R. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-average map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM and the female map length is 197 cM. The map virtually covers the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 Kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  14. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracopoli, N C; O'Connell, P; Elsner, T I; Lalouel, J M; White, R L; Buetow, K H; Nishimura, D Y; Murray, J C; Helms, C; Mishra, S K

    1991-04-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of human chromosome 1. The map contains 101 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 146 different contributions from 11 laboratories. A total of 58 loci are uniquely placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the terminal bands of both chromosome arms (locus D1Z2 in 1p36.3 and D1S68 in 1q44) and is anchored at the centromere by the D1Z5 alpha-satellite polymorphism. With the exception of a single locus, the remaining loci are arrayed on the fixed map in short intervals and their possible locations are indicated. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 308, 478, and 390 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains only four intervals greater than 15 cM, and the mean genetic distance between the 58 uniquely placed loci is 6.7 cM.

  15. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, M; Kramer, P; Kort, E; Fain, P; Cox, S; Root, D; White, R; Weissenbach, J; Donis-Keller, H; Gatti, R

    1995-05-01

    The CEPH consortium framework map of chromosome 11 is presented. The map was generated from CEPH family DNAs with 181 probe/enzyme combinations contributed by 20 laboratories. Seventy-seven of the loci are defined by microsatellite polymorphisms that can be typed by the PCR. A total of 42 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The female, male, and sex-average maps extend for 179.6, 110.8, and 145.3 cM, respectively. The largest interval on the sex-average map is less than 11 cM, and the average distance between uniquely placed loci is 4 cM. The genotypic data obtained for map construction have been used to identify the positions of crossovers on the chromosomes of CEPH family children, allowing the localization of new markers without computationally intensive likelihood models and providing a basis for efficient extension of the linkage map to higher resolution.

  16. Bacterial consortium proteomics under 4-chlorosalicylate carbon-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla Fazzini, Roberto A; Bielecka, Agata; Quintas, Ana K Poucas; Golyshin, Peter N; Preto, Maria J; Timmis, Kenneth N; dos Santos, Vitor A P Martins

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the stable consortium composed by Pseudomonas reinekei strain MT1 and Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain MT3 (cell numbers in proportion 9:1) was under investigation to reveal bacterial interactions that take place under severe nutrient-limiting conditions. The analysis of steady states in continuous cultures was carried out at the proteome, metabolic profile, and population dynamic levels. Carbon-limiting studies showed a higher metabolic versatility in the community through upregulation of parallel catabolic enzymes (salicylate 5-hydroxylase and 17-fold on 2-keto-4-pentenoate hydratase) indicating a possible alternative carbon routing in the upper degradation pathway highlighting the effect of minor proportions of strain MT3 over the major consortia component strain MT1 with a significant change in the expression levels of the enzymes of the mainly induced biodegradation pathway such as salicylate 1-hydroxylase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase together with important changes in the outer membrane composition of P. reinekei MT1 under different culture conditions. The study has demonstrated the importance of the outer membrane as a sensing/response protective barrier caused by interspecies interactions highlighting the role of the major outer membrane proteins OprF and porin D in P. reinekei sp. MT1 under the culture conditions tested.

  17. The National Astronomy Consortium - An Adaptable Model for OAD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers.The NAC model has already shown success and is a very promising and innovative model for increasing participation of young people in STEM and STEM-related careers. I will discuss how this model could be adapted in various countries at all levels of education.

  18. Geodata fusion study by the Open Geospatial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivall, George

    2013-05-01

    Making new connections in existing data is a powerful method to gain understanding of the world. Data fusion is not a new topic, but new approaches provide opportunities to enhance this ubiquitous process. Interoperability based on open standards is radically changing the classical domains of data fusion while inventing entirely new ways to discern relationships in data with little structure. Associations based on locations and times are of the most primary type. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) conducted a Fusion Standards study with recommendations implemented in testbeds. In the context of this study, Data Fusion was defined as: "the act or process of combining or associating data or information regarding one or more entities considered in an explicit or implicit knowledge framework to improve one's capability (or provide a new capability) for detection, identification, or characterization of that entity". Three categories were used to organize this study: Observation Fusion, Feature fusion, and Decision fusion. The study considered classical fusion as exemplified by the JDL and OODA models as well as how fusion is achieved by new technology such as web-based mash-ups and mobile Internet. The study considers both OGC standards as well open standards from other standards organizations. These technologies and standards aid in bringing structure to unstructured data as well as enabling a major new thrust in Decision Fusion.

  19. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  20. Phosphorus mobilizing consortium Mammoth P™ enhances plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin; Mancini, Lauren M.; Lee, Melanie N.; Conant, Richard T.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical nutrient used to maximize plant growth and yield. Current agriculture management practices commonly experience low plant P use efficiency due to natural chemical sorption and transformations when P fertilizer is applied to soils. A perplexing challenge facing agriculture production is finding sustainable solutions to deliver P more efficiently to plants. Using prescribed applications of specific soil microbial assemblages to mobilize soil bound—P to improve crop nutrient uptake and productivity has rarely been employed. We investigated whether inoculation of soils with a bacterial consortium developed to mobilize soil P, named Mammoth PTM, could increase plant productivity. In turf, herbs, and fruits, the combination of conventional inorganic fertilizer combined with Mammoth PTM increased productivity up to twofold compared to the fertilizer treatments without the Mammoth PTM inoculant. Jalapeño plants were found to bloom more rapidly when treated with either Mammoth P. In wheat trials, we found that Mammoth PTM by itself was able to deliver yields equivalent to those achieved with conventional inorganic fertilizer applications and improved productivity more than another biostimulant product. Results from this study indicate the substantial potential of Mammoth PTM to enhance plant growth and crop productivity. PMID:27326379

  1. Phosphorus mobilizing consortium Mammoth P(™) enhances plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Peter; Bell, Colin; Mancini, Lauren M; Lee, Melanie N; Conant, Richard T; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical nutrient used to maximize plant growth and yield. Current agriculture management practices commonly experience low plant P use efficiency due to natural chemical sorption and transformations when P fertilizer is applied to soils. A perplexing challenge facing agriculture production is finding sustainable solutions to deliver P more efficiently to plants. Using prescribed applications of specific soil microbial assemblages to mobilize soil bound-P to improve crop nutrient uptake and productivity has rarely been employed. We investigated whether inoculation of soils with a bacterial consortium developed to mobilize soil P, named Mammoth P(TM), could increase plant productivity. In turf, herbs, and fruits, the combination of conventional inorganic fertilizer combined with Mammoth P(TM) increased productivity up to twofold compared to the fertilizer treatments without the Mammoth P(TM) inoculant. Jalapeño plants were found to bloom more rapidly when treated with either Mammoth P. In wheat trials, we found that Mammoth P(TM) by itself was able to deliver yields equivalent to those achieved with conventional inorganic fertilizer applications and improved productivity more than another biostimulant product. Results from this study indicate the substantial potential of Mammoth P(TM) to enhance plant growth and crop productivity.

  2. Phosphorus mobilizing consortium Mammoth P™ enhances plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Baas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a critical nutrient used to maximize plant growth and yield. Current agriculture management practices commonly experience low plant P use efficiency due to natural chemical sorption and transformations when P fertilizer is applied to soils. A perplexing challenge facing agriculture production is finding sustainable solutions to deliver P more efficiently to plants. Using prescribed applications of specific soil microbial assemblages to mobilize soil bound—P to improve crop nutrient uptake and productivity has rarely been employed. We investigated whether inoculation of soils with a bacterial consortium developed to mobilize soil P, named Mammoth PTM, could increase plant productivity. In turf, herbs, and fruits, the combination of conventional inorganic fertilizer combined with Mammoth PTM increased productivity up to twofold compared to the fertilizer treatments without the Mammoth PTM inoculant. Jalapeño plants were found to bloom more rapidly when treated with either Mammoth P. In wheat trials, we found that Mammoth PTM by itself was able to deliver yields equivalent to those achieved with conventional inorganic fertilizer applications and improved productivity more than another biostimulant product. Results from this study indicate the substantial potential of Mammoth PTM to enhance plant growth and crop productivity.

  3. Transmission of a bacterial consortium in Eisenia fetida egg capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Seana K; Powell, Ryan J; Stahl, David A

    2010-08-01

    The earthworm Eisenia fetida harbours Verminephrobacter eiseniae within their excretory nephridia. This symbiont is transferred from the parent into the egg capsules where the cells are acquired by the developing earthworm in a series of recruitment steps. Previous studies defined V. eiseniae as the most abundant cell type in the egg capsules, leaving approximately 30% of the bacteria unidentified and of unknown origin. The study presented here used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis together with cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to define the composition of the bacterial consortium in E. fetida egg capsules from early to late development. Newly formed capsules of E. fetida contained three bacterial types, a novel Microbacteriaceae member, a Flexibacteriaceae member and the previously described V. eiseniae. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using specific and general rRNA probes demonstrated that the bacteria are abundant during early development, colonize the embryo and appear in the adult nephridia. As the capsules mature, Herbaspirillum spp. become abundant although they were not detected within the adult worm. These divergent taxa could serve distinct functions in both the adult earthworm and in the egg capsule to influence the competitive ability of earthworms within the soil community. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Tulalip Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC)to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  5. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  6. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Saddle Mountain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  7. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  8. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  9. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  10. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Willapa Valley (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In January, 2014 WSI, a Quantum Spatial (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  11. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  12. Formulation of bacterial consortium as whole cell biocatalyst for degradation of oil compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetti, Elvi; A'la, Amalia; Luthfiyah, Nailul; Wijaya, Hans; Thontowi, Ahmad; Yopi

    2017-11-01

    In this research, weaim to investigateformulation of bacterial consortium as whole cell biocatalyst for degradation of oil compounds. We constructed microbial consortium from 4 (four) selected marine oil bacteria to become 15 (twelve) combination culture. Those bacteria were from collection of Laboratory of Biocatalyst and Fermentation, Research Center for Biotechnology, Indonesian Institutes of Sciences and designated as Labrenzia sp. MBTDCMFRIMab26, Labrenzia aggregata strasin HQB397, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans strain PQ-3 16S, and Novosphingobium pentaromativorans strain US6-1. The mixture or bacteria consortia, denoted as F1, F2, …F15 consisted of 1, 2, 3 and 4 bacterial strains, respectively. The strains were selected based on the criteria that they were able to display good growth in crude oil containing media. Five bacterialformulationsshowed good potentialas candidates for microbial consortium. We will optimize these consortium with carrier matrix choosed from biomass materials and also carry out oil content analysis.

  13. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of Western Lewis County for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data set covers...

  14. Novel fungal consortium pretreatment of waste oat straw to enhance economic and efficient biohydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bio-pretreatment using a fungal consortium to enhance the efficiency of lignocellulosic biohydrogen production was explored.  A fungal consortium comprised of T. viride and P. chrysosporium as microbial inoculum was compared with untreated and single-species-inoculated samples. Fungal bio-pretreatment was carried out at atmospheric conditions with limited external energy input.  The effectiveness of the pretreatment is evaluated according to its lignin removal and digestibility. Enhancement of biohydrogen production is observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. Fungal consortium pretreatment effectively degraded oat straw lignin (by >47% in 7 days leading to decomposition of cell-wall structure as revealed in SEM images, increasing biohydrogen yield. The hydrogen produced from the fungal consortium pretreated straw increased by 165% 6 days later, and was more than produced from either a single fungi species of T. viride or P. chrysosponium pretreated straw (94% and 106%, respectively. No inhibitory effect on hydrogen production was observed.

  15. Monitoring Consortiums: A Cost-Effective Means to Enhancing Watershed Data Collection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring is essential for tracking overall watershed health, but monitoring costs are a limiting factor. As demonstrated in the four case studies, consortiums can reduce costs and improve cooperation among partners.

  16. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  17. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  18. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 100 square miles and covers part of...

  19. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viskochil, David H; Stevenson, David; Carey, John

    2007-01-01

    The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program (CGRP) provided the infrastructure for our site to perform clinical trials within the scope of a consortium to treat multiple medical complications of neurofibromatosis type 1...

  20. Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Meeting on Disease Progression Modeling for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Larkindale, Jane; Abresch, Richard; Aviles, Enrique; Bronson, Abby; Chin, Janice; Furlong, Pat; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Habeeb-Louks, Elizabeth; Henricson, Erik; Kroger, Hans; Lynn, Charles; Lynn, Stephen; Martin, Dana; Nuckolls, Glen; Rooney, William

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium (D-RSC) was established to develop tools to accelerate drug development for DMD.? The resulting tools are anticipated to meet validity requirements outlined by qualification/endorsement pathways at both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Administration (EMA), and will be made available to the drug development community. The initial goals of the consortium include the development of a disease progression m...

  1. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report. Volume 2. 1988 Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans (NLP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Encontro Portugues de Inteligencia Artificial (EPIA), Oporto, Portugal, September 1985. [15] N. J. Nilsson. Principles Of Artificial Intelligence. Tioga...FI1 F COPY () RADC-TR-89-259, Vol II (of twelve) Interim Report October 1969 AD-A218 154 NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL...7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial Of p0ilcabe) Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) Rome_____ Air___ Development____Center

  2. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    OpenAIRE

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Scott E Fraser; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression pat...

  3. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  4. The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline of Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishijima, K

    2002-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline was constructed by the Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis which was established in April 2001. The consortium is composed of 22 pharmaceutical companies affiliating with the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. The beamline is the first exclusive on that is owned by pharmaceutical enterprises at SPring-8. The specification and equipments of the Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline is almost same as that of RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamline I and II. (author)

  5. Highly migratory shark fisheries research by the National Shark Research Consortium (NSRC), 2002-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Hueter, Robert E.; Cailliet, Gregor M.; Ebert, David A.; Musick, John A.; Burgess, George H.

    2007-01-01

    The National Shark Research Consortium (NSRC) includes the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory, the Pacific Shark Research Center at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, the Shark Research Program at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, and the Florida Program for Shark Research at the University of Florida. The consortium objectives include shark-related research in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the U.S., education and scientific cooperation.

  6. [Report of the National Oncology Research and Developement Consortium, 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tímár, József

    2004-01-01

    Consorcial projects focused on 5 cancer types, breast-, colorectal-, head and neck- and pediatric cancers, and malignant melanoma. Breast cancer studies revealed unique splicing mechanisms concerning BRCA1. In sporadic breast cancers the involvement of DNA-repair genes was proved to be dependent on the histological type. Bone-metastatic tumors have been characterized by decreased NM23 and increased c-met and p53 expressions. C-erbB2 genotype of the primary tumor was not maintained frequently in bone metastases. Application of DNA-microarray and quantitative PCR technologies improved the prediction of therapeutic sensitivity of breast cancers. Colorectal cancer studies revealed regional inhomogenities (clusters) in various geographical regions of Hungary, which were distinct in the case of colonic and rectal cancers. To increase the sensitivity of fecal blood test of colorectal cancer screening, a new double-antibody test was developed and tested in a large cohort of patients. Genetic analysis revealed that hypermethylation is a significant factor in microsatellite instability which, and plays a role in silencing of APC and E-cadherin genes as well. The Hungarian pattern of TS polymorphism was also determined and was correlated not only with the efficacy of 5-FU treatment but with the progression of the disease as well. Population-based studies have been carried out in head and neck cancer patients (HNC) and smokers as well to reveal the genetic background of increasing tumor incidence. These studies revealed polymorphism in XRCC1/3 methylation enzyme gene which has preventive role. Other studies found frequent local immunosuppression in HNC patients. Studies indicated that the success of irradiation in this cancer type is dependent on the anti-vascular effects. Pediatric cancer studies determined the parameters of neuroblastoma screening based on VMA measurements. New splice variants of the WT1 gene involved in the monitoring of MRD of ALL patients was also

  7. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  8. Development of Leptospirillum ferriphilum dominated consortium for ferric iron regeneration and metal bioleaching under extreme stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhargav C; Tipre, Devayani R; Dave, Shailesh R

    2012-08-01

    Activated iron oxidizing consortium SR-BH-L enriched from Rajpardi lignite mine soil sample gave iron oxidation rate 1954 mg/L/h. Developed novel polystress resistant consortium oxidized ferrous iron under 11cP viscosity, 7.47 M ionic strength, 2.3 pH and g/L of 0.50 cadmium, 3.75 copper, 0.20 lead, 92.00 zinc, 6.4 sodium, 5.5 chloride, 154 sulphate and 393.8 TDS. The developed consortium showed 78.0% and 70.0% copper and zinc extraction from polymetallic bulk concentrate in monophasic bioleaching process. The bioregenerated ferric by the consortium in leachate showed 80.81% and 54.0% copper and zinc leaching in only 30 and 90 min. The DGGE analysis indicated the presence of 11 OTUs in the consortium. 16S rRNA gene sequence (JN797729) of the dominant band on DGGE shared >99% similarity with Leptospirillum ferriphilum. RE digestion analysis of the total 16S rRNA gene also illustrated the dominance of L. ferriphilum in the consortium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prebiotics Mediate Microbial Interactions in a Consortium of the Infant Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Medina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Composition of the gut microbiome is influenced by diet. Milk or formula oligosaccharides act as prebiotics, bioactives that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes. The influence of prebiotics on microbial interactions is not well understood. Here we investigated the transformation of prebiotics by a consortium of four representative species of the infant gut microbiome, and how their interactions changed with dietary substrates. First, we optimized a culture medium resembling certain infant gut parameters. A consortium containing Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus was grown on fructooligosaccharides (FOS or 2′-fucosyllactose (2FL in mono- or co-culture. While Bi. infantis and Ba. vulgatus dominated growth on 2FL, their combined growth was reduced. Besides, interaction coefficients indicated strong competition, especially on FOS. While FOS was rapidly consumed by the consortium, B. infantis was the only microbe displaying significant consumption of 2FL. Acid production by the consortium resembled the metabolism of microorganisms dominating growth in each substrate. Finally, the consortium was tested in a bioreactor, observing similar predominance but more pronounced acid production and substrate consumption. This study indicates that the chemical nature of prebiotics modulate microbial interactions in a consortium of infant gut species.

  10. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  11. Evaluation of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium undergraduate faculty training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R; Virani, Rose; Grant, Marcia; Rhome, Anne; Malloy, Pam; Bednash, Geraldine; Grimm, Megan

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that nursing education has not prepared nurses to provide optimum end-of-life (EOL) care; and yet, care of patients at the EOL is contingent on adequate preparation of nurses. To date, there has not been a unified or organized effort to broadly address the preparation of nurses in EOL care. The purpose of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC), a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded project (2000-2004), was to develop and implement a comprehensive national effort to improve EOL care by nurses through a joint collaboration between the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the City of Hope Cancer Center. Based on the AACN Peaceful Death document, the ELNEC curriculum focuses on nine EOL core areas. This project is a synthesis of research and knowledge in EOL care and is intended to assist clinical nurses with implementing scientifically based care in practice. Eight national training courses followed the development of the core training curriculum to enhance EOL expertise in faculty in undergraduate nursing programs (five courses) as well as in continuing education programs (three courses). Development of the ELNEC program included detailed teaching materials to integrate EOL content into existing nursing curricula and clinical teaching and extensive follow up evaluation. The data revealed significant outcomes in the report of implementation in the nursing curriculum including an increase in the amount of content, perceived effectiveness of new graduates, and of faculty expertise in EOL care, and a broad dissemination of all modules geographically. This national organized effort is a major step toward preparing nurses in EOL care to improve care of the dying.

  12. DNA Methylation in Newborns and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Genome-wide Consortium Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Bonnie R; Felix, Janine F; Yousefi, Paul; Bakulski, Kelly M; Just, Allan C; Breton, Carrie; Reese, Sarah E; Markunas, Christina A; Richmond, Rebecca C; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Küpers, Leanne K; Oh, Sam S; Hoyo, Cathrine; Gruzieva, Olena; Söderhäll, Cilla; Salas, Lucas A; Baïz, Nour; Zhang, Hongmei; Lepeule, Johanna; Ruiz, Carlos; Ligthart, Symen; Wang, Tianyuan; Taylor, Jack A; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sharp, Gemma C; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Nilsen, Roy M; Vaez, Ahmad; Fallin, M Daniele; Hu, Donglei; Litonjua, Augusto A; Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Huen, Karen; Kere, Juha; Kull, Inger; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Gehring, Ulrike; Bustamante, Mariona; Saurel-Coubizolles, Marie José; Quraishi, Bilal M; Ren, Jie; Tost, Jörg; Gonzalez, Juan R; Peters, Marjolein J; Håberg, Siri E; Xu, Zongli; van Meurs, Joyce B; Gaunt, Tom R; Kerkhof, Marjan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Feinberg, Andrew P; Eng, Celeste; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Bradman, Asa; Merid, Simon Kebede; Bergström, Anna; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Brunekreef, Bert; Pinart, Mariona; Heude, Barbara; Ewart, Susan; Yao, Jin; Lemonnier, Nathanaël; Franco, Oscar H; Wu, Michael C; Hofman, Albert; McArdle, Wendy; Van der Vlies, Pieter; Falahi, Fahimeh; Gillman, Matthew W; Barcellos, Lisa F; Kumar, Ashish; Wickman, Magnus; Guerra, Stefano; Charles, Marie-Aline; Holloway, John; Auffray, Charles; Tiemeier, Henning W; Smith, George Davey; Postma, Dirkje; Hivert, Marie-France; Eskenazi, Brenda; Vrijheid, Martine; Arshad, Hasan; Antó, Josep M; Dehghan, Abbas; Karmaus, Wilfried; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Sunyer, Jordi; Ghantous, Akram; Pershagen, Göran; Holland, Nina; Murphy, Susan K; DeMeo, Dawn L; Burchard, Esteban G; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Snieder, Harold; Nystad, Wenche; Koppelman, Gerard H; Relton, Caroline L; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Wilcox, Allen; Melén, Erik; London, Stephanie J

    2016-04-07

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, represent a potential mechanism for environmental impacts on human disease. Maternal smoking in pregnancy remains an important public health problem that impacts child health in a myriad of ways and has potential lifelong consequences. The mechanisms are largely unknown, but epigenetics most likely plays a role. We formed the Pregnancy And Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) consortium and meta-analyzed, across 13 cohorts (n = 6,685), the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and newborn blood DNA methylation at over 450,000 CpG sites (CpGs) by using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Over 6,000 CpGs were differentially methylated in relation to maternal smoking at genome-wide statistical significance (false discovery rate, 5%), including 2,965 CpGs corresponding to 2,017 genes not previously related to smoking and methylation in either newborns or adults. Several genes are relevant to diseases that can be caused by maternal smoking (e.g., orofacial clefts and asthma) or adult smoking (e.g., certain cancers). A number of differentially methylated CpGs were associated with gene expression. We observed enrichment in pathways and processes critical to development. In older children (5 cohorts, n = 3,187), 100% of CpGs gave at least nominal levels of significance, far more than expected by chance (p value smoking in pregnancy with persistence into later childhood and provide insights into mechanisms underlying effects of this important exposure. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Brain Tumor Epidemiology - A Hub within Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology. Report on the 15th Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) Annual Meeting, Vienna, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Lau, Ching C; Prayer, Daniela; Bauchet, Luc; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Capper, David; Fisher, Paul G; Kool, Marcel; Müller, Martin; Kros, Johan M; Kruchko, Carol; Wiemels, Joseph; Wrensch, Margaret; Danysh, Heather E; Zouaoui, Sonia; Heck, Julia E; Johnson, Kimberly J; Qi, Xiaoyang; O'Neill, Brian P; Afzal, Samina; Scheurer, Michael E; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Nousome, Darryl; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) is an open scientific forum, which fosters the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations. BTEC aims to develop a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors (http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/btec/). The 15th annual Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Meeting, hosted by the Austrian Societies of Neuropathology and Neuro-oncology, was held on September 9 - 11, 2014 in Vienna, Austria. The meeting focused on the central role of brain tumor epidemiology within multidisciplinary neuro-oncology. Knowledge of disease incidence, outcomes, as well as risk factors is fundamental to all fields involved in research and treatment of patients with brain tumors; thus, epidemiology constitutes an important link between disciplines, indeed the very hub. This was reflected by the scientific program, which included various sessions linking brain tumor epidemiology with clinical neuro-oncology, tissue-based research, and cancer registration. Renowned experts from Europe and the United States contributed their personal perspectives stimulating further group discussions. Several concrete action plans evolved for the group to move forward until next year's meeting, which will be held at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, MN, USA.

  14. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  15. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2014 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Campleman, Sharan L; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry was queried for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. In 2014, 9172 cases were entered in the Registry across 47 active member sites. Females accounted for 51.1 % of cases. The majority (65.1 %) of cases were adults between the ages of 19 and 65. Caucasians made up the largest identified ethnic group (48.9 %). Most Registry cases originated from the inpatient setting (93.5 %), with a large majority of these consultations coming from the emergency department or inpatient admission services. Intentional and unintentional pharmaceutical exposures continued to be the most frequent reasons for consultation, accounting for 61.7 % of cases. Among cases of intentional pharmaceutical exposure, 62.4 % were associated with a self-harm attempt. Non-pharmaceutical exposures accounted for 14.1 % of Registry cases. Similar to the past years, non-opioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Clinical signs or symptoms were noted in 81.9 % of cases. There were 89 recorded fatalities (0.97 %). Medical treatment (e.g., antidotes, antivenom, chelators, supportive care) was rendered in 62.3 % of cases. Patient demographics and exposure characteristics in 2014 Registry cases remain similar to prior years. The majority of consultations arose in the acute care setting (emergency department or inpatient) and involved exposures to pharmaceutical products. Among exposures, non-opioid analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, and opioids were the most frequently

  16. Thirty Years of Innovation in Seismology with the IRIS Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Ahern, T. K.; Anderson, K. R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Evers, B.; Frassetto, A.; Hafner, K.; Simpson, D. W.; Sweet, J. R.; Taber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States academic seismology community, through the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium, has promoted and encouraged a rich environment of innovation and experimentation in areas such as seismic instrumentation, data processing and analysis, teaching and curriculum development, and academic science. As the science continually evolves, IRIS helps drive the market for new research tools that enable science by establishing a variety of standards and goals. This has often involved working directly with manufacturers to better define the technology required, co-funding key development work or early production prototypes, and purchasing initial production runs. IRIS activities have helped establish de-facto international standards and impacted the commercial sector in areas such as seismic instrumentation, open-access data management, and professional development. Key institutional practices, conducted and refined over IRIS' thirty-year history of operations, have focused on open-access data availability, full retention of maximum-bandwidth, continuous data, and direct community access to state-of-the-art seismological instrumentation and software. These practices have helped to cultivate and support a thriving commercial ecosystem, and have been a key element in the professional development of multiple generations of seismologists who now work in both industry and academia. Looking toward the future, IRIS is increasing its engagement with industry to better enable bi-directional exchange of techniques and technology, and enhancing the development of tomorrow's workforce. In this presentation, we will illustrate how IRIS has promoted innovations grown out of the academic community and spurred technological advances in both academia and industry.

  17. Microbial hydrogen production from sewage sludge bioaugmented with a constructed microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotay, Shireen Meher; Das, Debabrata [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-10-15

    A constructed microbial consortium was formulated from three facultative H{sub 2}-producing anaerobic bacteria, Enterobacter cloacae IIT-BT 08, Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139 and Bacillus coagulans IIT-BT S1. This consortium was tested as the seed culture for H{sub 2} production. In the initial studies with defined medium (MYG), E. cloacae produced more H{sub 2} than the other two strains and it also was found to be the dominant member when consortium was used. On the other hand, B. coagulans as a pure culture gave better H{sub 2} yield (37.16 ml H{sub 2}/g COD{sub consumed}) than the other two strains using sewage sludge as substrate. The pretreatment of sludge included sterilization (15% v/v), dilution and supplementation with 0.5% w/v glucose, which was found to be essential to screen out the H{sub 2} consuming bacteria and ameliorate the H{sub 2} production. Considering (1:1:1) defined consortium as inoculum, COD reduction was higher and yield of H{sub 2} was recorded to be 41.23 ml H{sub 2}/g COD{sub reduced}. Microbial profiling of the spent sludge showed that B. coagulans was the dominant member in the constructed consortium contributing towards H{sub 2} production. Increase in H{sub 2} yield indicated that in consortium, the substrate utilization was significantly higher. The H{sub 2} yield from pretreated sludge (35.54 ml H{sub 2}/g sludge) was comparatively higher than that reported in literature (8.1-16.9 ml H{sub 2}/g sludge). Employing formulated microbial consortium for biohydrogen production is a successful attempt to augment the H{sub 2} yield from sewage sludge. (author)

  18. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  19. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members

  20. EMSO ERIC - Ocean Consortium Facility for Europe and the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Mairi

    2017-04-01

    EMSO is forging ahead through the next challenge in Earth-Ocean Science: How to co-ordinate ocean data acquisition, analysis and response across provincial, national, regional, and global scales. EMSO provides power, communications, sensors, and data infrastructure for continuous, high resolution, real-time, interactive ocean observations across a truly multi- and interdisciplinary range of research areas including biology, geology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computer science; from polar to tropical environments, through the water column down to the abyss. 11 deep sea and 4 shallow nodes span from Arctic through the Atlantic and Mediterranean, to the Black Sea. The EMSO Preparatory Phase (FP7) project led to the Interim phase (involving 13 countries) of forming the legal entity: the EMSO European Research Infrastructure Consortium (EMSO-ERIC)-officially created by the EC in 2016. The open user community, originally developed through ESONET (European Seafloor Observatory NETwork), follows on scientific community planning contributions of the ESONET-NoE (FP6) project. Further progress made through the FixO3 project (FP7) also contributes to this shared infrastructure. Coordination among nodes is being strengthened through the EMSOdev project (H2020) which is producing the EMSO Generic Instrument Module (EGIM) - standardised observations of temperature, pressure, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll fluorescence, currents, passive acoustics, pH, pCO2, and nutrients. Early installations are now being upgraded; in October 2015 EMSO-France deployed a second cable and junction box serving the Ligurian Sea Node in order to monitor slope stability offshore Nice; in 2016 the EMSO Azores Node receives a major upgrade that will double its observing capacity; for EMSO-Italia the Capo Passero site is being installed and the Catania site is being upgraded. EMSOLINK will continue the expansion work. EMSO is a key player in international coordination

  1. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition

  2. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  3. Open Geospatial Consortium standards supporting Lake Maggiore Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Massimiliano; Antonovic, Milan; Molinari, Monia; Pozzoni, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    management to OGC services with internally implemented software (GeoShield [7]). The presentation illustrates the case study focusing on selected technical solution and strength, weakness and opportunities that the authors identified in the conduction of this experimentation. References: [1] http://www.ti.ch [2] http://www.pcilocarno.ch [3] http://www.supsi.ch/ist [4] Klopfer, M., Simonis, I. (Eds.), SANY - An Open Service Architecture for Sensor Networks, SANY Consortium, 2009. [5] http://www.tridec-online.eu [6] http://istgeo.ist.supsi.ch/software/istsos [7] http://sites.google.com/site/geoshieldproject

  4. Zinc bioaccumulation by microbial consortium isolated from nickel smelter sludge disposal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvasnová Simona

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is one of the most important environmental issues of today. Bioremediation by microorganisms is one of technologies extensively used for pollution treatment. In this study, we investigated the heavy metal resistance and zinc bioaccumulation by microbial consortium isolated from nickel sludge disposal site near Sereď (Slovakia. The composition of consortium was analyzed based on MALDI-TOF MS of cultivable bacteria and we have shown that the consortium was dominated by bacteria of genus Arthrobacter. While consortium showed very good growth in the zinc presence, it was able to remove only 15 % of zinc from liquid media. Selected members of consortia have shown lower growth rates in the zinc presence but selected isolates have shown much higher bioaccumulation abilities compared to whole consortium (up to 90 % of zinc removal for NH1 strain. Bioremediation is frequently accelerated through injection of native microbiota into a contaminated area. Based on data obtained in this study, we can conclude that careful selection of native microbiota could lead to the identification of bacteria with increased bioaccumulation abilities.

  5. Development of a consortium for water security and safety: Planning for an early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.M.; Adam, N.R.; Atluri, V.; Halem, M.; Vowinkel, E.F.; ,

    2004-01-01

    The events of September 11, 2001 have raised concerns over the safety and security of the Nation's critical infrastructure including water and waste water systems. In June 2002, the U.S. EPA's Region II Office (New York City), in response to concerns over water security, in collaboration with Rutgers University agreed to establish a Regional Drinking Water Security and Safety Consortium (RDWSSC). Members of the consortium include: Rutgers University's Center for Information Management, Integration and Connectivity (CIMIC), American Water (AW), the Passaic Valley Water Commission (PVWC), the North Jersey District Water Supply Commission (NJDWSC), the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencies, Region II Office. In December of 2002 the consortium members signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to pursue activities to enhance regional water security. Development of an early warning system for source and distributed water was identified as being of primary importance by the consortium. In this context, an early warning system (EWS) is an integrated system of monitoring stations located at strategic points in a water utilities source waters or in its distribution system, designed to warn against contaminants that might threaten the health and welfare of drinking water consumers. This paper will discuss the consortium's progress in achieving these important objectives.

  6. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2010-01-01

    involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675) and controls (n=1,162) were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three...

  7. Cancer Genomics: Integrative and Scalable Solutions in R / Bioconductor | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This proposal develops scalable R / Bioconductor software infrastructure and data resources to integrate complex, heterogeneous, and large cancer genomic experiments. The falling cost of genomic assays facilitates collection of multiple data types (e.g., gene and transcript expression, structural variation, copy number, methylation, and microRNA data) from a set of clinical specimens. Furthermore, substantial resources are now available from large consortium activities like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  8. Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Meeting on Disease Progression Modeling for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkindale, Jane; Abresch, Richard; Aviles, Enrique; Bronson, Abby; Chin, Janice; Furlong, Pat; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Habeeb-Louks, Elizabeth; Henricson, Erik; Kroger, Hans; Lynn, Charles; Lynn, Stephen; Martin, Dana; Nuckolls, Glen; Rooney, William; Romero, Klaus; Sweeney, Lee; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn; Wolff, Jodi; Wong, Brenda; McDonald, Craig M; Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Imaging-Dmd Consortium And The Cinrg Investigators, Members Of The

    2017-01-12

    The Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium (D-RSC) was established to develop tools to accelerate drug development for DMD.  The resulting tools are anticipated to meet validity requirements outlined by qualification/endorsement pathways at both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Administration (EMA), and will be made available to the drug development community. The initial goals of the consortium include the development of a disease progression model, with the goal of creating a model that would be used to forecast changes in clinically meaningful endpoints, which would inform clinical trial protocol development and data analysis.  Methods: In April of 2016 the consortium and other experts met to formulate plans for the development of the model.  Conclusions: Here we report the results of the meeting, and discussion as to the form of the model that we plan to move forward to develop, after input from the regulatory authorities.

  9. Transplantation of a bacterial consortium ameliorates trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis and intestinal dysbiosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Zhenzhen; Wen, Shu; Liu, Yinhui; Wang, Ying; Tang, Li

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of a defined bacterial consortium on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis and intestinal dysbiosis in rats. Rats with TNBS-induced colitis were treated with ceftriaxone and/or a mixture of ten bacterial strains isolated from mouse feces for continuous 24 days. Macroscopic and histopathological parameters in colonic tissue were compared, as were myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and cytokine levels. Patterns of intestinal microbiota were assessed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, the abundance of selected microbial groups was evaluated by qPCR. Transplantation of the bacterial consortium showed anti-inflammatory activity in the intestines of rats with TNBS-induced colitis and contributed to the rapid re-establishment of intestinal microbial equilibrium. A defined bacterial consortium may be a viable therapeutic option for the treatment inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Romo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control.

  11. CONSORTIUM OF PUBLIC MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE OF PARANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Alves dos Anjos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Public Consortium can be a viable alternative to meet the current demands of sanitation scenario. The objective of this research was to analyze the process of formation of new public consortia of municipal solid waste, using as a case study the state of Paraná. The methodology was based on a literature review and field research. The group of municipalities of the Intermunicipal Consortium for Management of Municipal Solid Waste (CONRESOL and a group of not associated municipalities were selected as sample. Questionnaires were applied to the two groups. Among the results one can point the initiative of the municipality as fundamental in the process of formation of new consortia; the legal process for the formation of consortium representing more a legal certainty than a hindrance; and the feasibility of appropriate disposition the greatest advantage in the forming of this arrangement.

  12. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  13. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2011 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J; Wax, Paul M; Schwartz, Tayler; Finkelstein, Yaron; Gorodetsky, Rachel; Brent, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). ToxIC is a prospective registry, which exclusively compiles suspected and confirmed toxic exposure cases cared for at the bedside by medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The Registry aims to fulfill two important gaps in the field: a real-time toxicosurveillance system to identify current poisoning trends and a powerful research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows extraction of information from medical records making it the most robust multicenter database on chemical toxicities in existence. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered in a database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2011 was tabulated. 2010 data was also included so that cumulative total numbers could be described as well. The current report is a summary of the data collected in 2011 in comparison to 2010 entries and also includes cumulative data through December 31st, 2011. During 2011, 28 sites with 49 specific institutions contributed a total of 6,456 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the registry at the end of 2011 was 10,392. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultations in 2011, accounting for 53 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdoses, which occurred in 48 % of patients, including intentional (37 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,492 entries in 23 % of cases), non-opioid analgesics (1,368 cases in 21 % of cases), opioids (17 %), antidepressants (16 %), stimulants/sympathomimetics (12 %), and ethanol (8 %). N-acetylcysteine was the most commonly administered antidote during 2011, similar to 2010, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab fragments (CroFab) were

  14. STROKOG (stroke and cognition consortium): An international consortium to examine the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocognitive disorders in relation to cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S; Lo, Jessica W; Crawford, John D; Mellon, Lisa; Hickey, Anne; Williams, David; Bordet, Régis; Mendyk, Anne-Marie; Gelé, Patrick; Deplanque, Dominique; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lim, Jae-Sung; Brodtmann, Amy; Werden, Emilio; Cumming, Toby; Köhler, Sebastian; Verhey, Frans R J; Dong, Yan-Hong; Tan, Hui Hui; Chen, Christopher; Xin, Xu; Kalaria, Raj N; Allan, Louise M; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Dichgans, Martin; Wollenweber, Frank A; Zietemann, Vera; Hoffmann, Michael; Desmond, David W; Linden, Thomas; Blomstrand, Christian; Fagerberg, Björn; Skoog, Ingmar; Godefroy, Olivier; Barbay, Mélanie; Roussel, Martine; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Wardlaw, Joanna; Makin, Stephen J; Doubal, Fergus N; Chappell, Francesca M; Srikanth, Velandai K; Thrift, Amanda G; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Chander, Russell J; Lin, Xuling; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Moulin, Solene; Rossi, Costanza; Sabayan, Behnam; Stott, David J; Jukema, J Wouter; Melkas, Susanna; Jokinen, Hanna; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, Adrian; Lam, Bonnie Y K; Leys, Didier; Hénon, Hilde; Bombois, Stéphanie; Lipnicki, Darren M; Kochan, Nicole A

    2017-01-01

    The Stroke and Cognition consortium (STROKOG) aims to facilitate a better understanding of the determinants of vascular contributions to cognitive disorders and help improve the diagnosis and treatment of vascular cognitive disorders (VCD). Longitudinal studies with ≥75 participants who had suffered or were at risk of stroke or TIA and which evaluated cognitive function were invited to join STROKOG. The consortium will facilitate projects investigating rates and patterns of cognitive decline, risk factors for VCD, and biomarkers of vascular dementia. Currently, STROKOG includes 25 (21 published) studies, with 12,092 participants from five continents. The duration of follow-up ranges from 3 months to 21 years. Although data harmonization will be a key challenge, STROKOG is in a unique position to reuse and combine international cohort data and fully explore patient level characteristics and outcomes. STROKOG could potentially transform our understanding of VCD and have a worldwide impact on promoting better vascular cognitive outcomes.

  15. Oak woodlands and forests fire consortium: A regional view of fire science sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Keith W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Marschall, Joseph M.; Abadir, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Fire Science Program established 14 regional fire science knowledge exchange consortia to improve the delivery of fire science information and communication among fire managers and researchers. Consortia were developed regionally to ensure that fire science information is tailored to meet regional needs. In this paper, emphasis was placed on the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium to provide an inside view of how one regional consortium is organized and its experiences in sharing fire science through various social media, conference, and workshop-based fire science events.

  16. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    , in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models...

  17. 19p13.1 is a triple-negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M

    2012-01-01

    -negative breast cancer risk when triple-negative cases were excluded (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.89-1.07; P = 0.62). In addition, a combined analysis of triple-negative cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC; N = 3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170...

  18. Recreational physical inactivity and mortality in women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki A.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Kelemen, Linda E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about modifiable behaviours that may be associated with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) survival. We conducted a pooled analysis of 12 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic physical inactivity and m...

  19. NCI's Proteome Characterization Centers Announced | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). CPTAC is a comprehensive, coordinated team effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows.

  20. Polymorphism in the IL18 gene and epithelial ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmieri, R.T.; Wilson, M.A.; Iversen, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    a significantly associated IL18 haplotype and there was an increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer per rs1834481 allele (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.45). In a replication stage, 12 independent studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) genotyped rs1834481...

  1. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei-Yu Lin, Lin; Camp, Nicola J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Th Rutgers, Emiel J.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Cheng, Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Frederik Marmé, Marmé; Surowy, Harald M.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon Dschun; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Horio, Akiyo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Neven, Patrick; Wauters, Els; Wildiers, Hans; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Mclean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Marchand, Loic Le; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Hassan, Norhashimah; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Van DenOuweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu Tang; Cai, Hui; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D P; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Blows, Fiona M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun Young; Noh, Dong Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Hamann, Ute; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen Yang; Hsiung, Chia Ni; Wu, Pei Ei; Ding, Shian Ling; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Bui, Quang M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Irwanto, Astrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare A.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Adank, Muriel A.; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/153170824; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas F.; Cox, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide

  2. Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, K.; Spiegelman, D.; Hou, T.; Albanes, D.; Allen, N.E.; Berndt, S.I.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Giles, G.G.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Goodman, G.G.; Goodman, P.J.; Håkansson, N.; Inoue, M.; Key, T.J.; Kolonel, L.N.; Männistö, S.; McCullough, M.L.; Neuhouser, M.L.; Park, Y.; Platz, E.A.; Schenk, J.M.; Sinha, R.; Stampfer, M.J.; Stevens, V.L.; Tsugane, S.; Visvanathan, K.; Wilkens, L.R.; Wolk, A.; Ziegler, R.G.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Reports relating meat intake to prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Associations between these dietary factors and prostate cancer were examined in a consortium of 15 cohort studies. During follow-up, 52,683 incident prostate cancer cases, including 4,924 advanced cases, were identified among

  3. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Camp, Nicola J; Ghoussaini, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide po...

  4. The NextGen Genetic Association Studies Consortium: A Foray into In Vitro Population Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Curtis R; Jaquish, Cashell E; Cowan, Chad A

    2017-04-06

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Next Generation Genetic Association Studies Consortium has used induced pluripotent stem cell technology to study the effects of common genetic variants in vitro. This issue of Cell Stem Cell and affiliated journals include several manuscripts describing the results of the consortium's efforts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco; Hansen, Thomas V O; Pedersen, Inge S; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Menéndez, Mireia; Fachal, Laura; Santamariña, Marta; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars; Agata, Simona; Whiley, Phillip; Tognazzo, Silvia; Tornero, Eva; Jensen, Uffe B; Balmaña, Judith; Kruse, Torben A; Goldgar, David E; Lázaro, Conxi; Diez, Orland; Spurdle, Amanda B; Vega, Ana

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. A common problem in clinical genetic testing is interpretation of variants with unknown clinical significance. The Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortium was initiated to evaluate and implement strategies to characterize the clinical significance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants. As an initial project of the ENIGMA Splicing Working Group, we report splicing and multifactorial likelihood analysis of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants from seven different laboratories. Splicing analysis was performed by reverse transcriptase PCR or mini gene assay, and sequencing to identify aberrant transcripts. The findings were compared to bioinformatic predictions using four programs. The posterior probability of pathogenicity was estimated using multifactorial likelihood analysis, including co-occurrence with a deleterious mutation, segregation and/or report of family history. Abnormal splicing patterns expected to lead to a non-functional protein were observed for 7 variants (BRCA1 c.441+2T>A, c.4184_4185+2del, c.4357+1G>A, c.4987-2A>G, c.5074G>C, BRCA2 c.316+5G>A, and c.8754+3G>C). Combined interpretation of splicing and multifactorial analysis classified an initiation codon variant (BRCA2 c.3G>A) as likely pathogenic, uncertain clinical significance for 7 variants, and indicated low clinical significance or unlikely pathogenicity for another 10 variants. Bioinformatic tools predicted disruption of consensus donor or acceptor sites with high sensitivity, but cryptic site usage was predicted with low specificity, supporting the value of RNA-based assays. The findings also provide further evidence that clinical RNA-based assays should be extended from analysis of invariant dinucleotides to routinely include all variants located within the donor and acceptor consensus splicing sites. Importantly, this study demonstrates the added value of

  6. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report draft, 1995--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research-oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCUs/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise educational programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development and transfer to address the nation`s critical environmental problems. While the Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan is the cornerstone of its overall program efforts, the initial programmatic activities of the Consortium focused on environmental education at all levels with the objective of addressing the underrepresentation of minorities in the environmental professions. This 1996 Annual Report provides an update on the activities of the Consortium with a focus on environmental curriculum development for the Technical Qualifications Program (TQP) and Education for Sustainability.

  7. A candidate gene approach to searching for low-penetrance breast and prostate cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, D J; Riboli, E; Haiman, C A; Albanes, D; Altshuler, D; Chanock, S J; Haynes, R B; Henderson, B E; Kaaks, R; Stram, D O; Thomas, G; Thun, M J; Blanché, H; Buring, J E; Burtt, N P; Calle, E E; Cann, H; Canzian, F; Chen, Y C; Colditz, G A; Cox, D G; Dunning, A M; Feigelson, H S; Freedman, M L; Gaziano, J M; Giovannucci, E; Hankinson, S E; Hirschhorn, J N; Hoover, R N; Key, T; Kolonel, L N; Kraft, P; Le Marchand, L; Liu, S; Ma, J; Melnick, S; Pharaoh, P; Pike, M C; Rodriguez, C; Setiawan, V W; Stampfer, M J; Trapido, E; Travis, R; Virtamo, J; Wacholder, S; Willett, W C

    2005-12-01

    Most cases of breast and prostate cancer are not associated with mutations in known high-penetrance genes, indicating the involvement of multiple low-penetrance risk alleles. Studies that have attempted to identify these genes have met with limited success. The National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium--a pooled analysis of multiple large cohort studies with a total of more than 5,000 cases of breast cancer and 8,000 cases of prostate cancer--was therefore initiated. The goal of this consortium is to characterize variations in approximately 50 genes that mediate two pathways that are associated with these cancers--the steroid-hormone metabolism pathway and the insulin-like growth factor signalling pathway--and to associate these variations with cancer risk.

  8. Advanced nutrient removal from surface water by a consortium of attached microalgae and bacteria: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzhuo; Wu, Yonghong; Wu, Chenxi; Muylaert, Koenraad; Vyverman, Wim; Yu, Han-Qing; Muñoz, Raúl; Rittmann, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Innovative and cost-effective technologies for advanced nutrient removal from surface water are urgently needed for improving water quality. Conventional biotechnologies, such as ecological floating beds, or constructed wetlands, are not effective in removing nutrients present at low-concentration. However, microalgae-bacteria consortium is promising for advanced nutrient removal from wastewater. Suspended algal-bacterial systems can easily wash out unless the hydraulic retention time is long, attached microalgae-bacteria consortium is more realistic. This critical review summarizes the fundamentals and status of attached microalgae-bacteria consortium for advanced nutrient removal from surface water. Key advantages are the various nutrient removal pathways, reduction of nutrients to very low concentration, and diversified photobioreactor configurations. Challenges include poor identification of functional species, poor control of the community composition, and long start-up times. Future research should focus on the selection and engineering of robust microbial species, mathematical modelling of the composition and functionality of the consortium, and novel photobioreactor configurations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overview of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) (SIGs IA, USE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of a planned session to describe the work of the World Wide Web Consortium, including technical specifications for HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), XML (Extensible Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), and over 20 other Web standards that address graphics, multimedia, privacy, metadata, and other technologies. (LRW)

  10. Communal microaerophilic-aerobic biodegradation of Amaranth by novel NAR-2 bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Giek Far; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul; Chua, Lee Suan; Ab llah, Norzarini; Nasiri, Rozita; Ikubar, Mohamed Roslan Mohamad

    2012-02-01

    A novel bacterial consortium, NAR-2 which consists of Citrobacter freundii A1, Enterococcus casseliflavus C1 and Enterobacter cloacae L17 was investigated for biodegradation of Amaranth azo dye under sequential microaerophilic-aerobic condition. The NAR-2 bacterial consortium with E. casseliflavus C1 as the dominant strain enhanced the decolorization process resulting in reduction of Amaranth in 30 min. Further aerobic biodegradation, which was dominated by C. freundii A1 and E. cloacae L17, allowed biotransformation of azo reduction intermediates and mineralization via metabolic pathways including benzoyl-CoA, protocatechuate, salicylate, gentisate, catechol and cinnamic acid. The presence of autoxidation products which could be metabolized to 2-oxopentenoate was elucidated. The biodegradation mechanism of Amaranth by NAR-2 bacterial consortium was predicted to follow the steps of azo reduction, deamination, desulfonation and aromatic ring cleavage. This is for the first time the comprehensive microaerophilic-aerobic biotransformation pathways of Amaranth dye intermediates by bacterial consortium are being proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. International Arid Lands Consortium: Better land stewardship in water and watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; James T. Fisher; Menachem Sachs; Darrell W. DeBoer; Jeffrey O. Dawson; Timothy E. Fulbright; John Tracy

    2000-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training for the development, management, and restoration of arid and semi-arid lands throughout the world. One activity of IALC members and cooperators is to support research and development and demonstration projects that enhance management of these fragile...

  12. Parenting Interventions in Early Head Start: The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Boyd, Misty L.; Constantino, John N.; Hallam, Rena A.; Han, Myae; Hustedt, Jason; Harden, Brenda Jones; Raver, C. Cybele; Sarche, Michelle; Vu, Jennifer A.; Watamura, Sarah Enos; Meyer, Aleta; Fortunato, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium was created by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families to test preventive interventions for Early Head Start families facing toxic stress, as conceptualized by Shonkoff, Boyce, and McEwen in their influential 2009 article. Because relationships…

  13. Evaluating robustness of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydow, Mateusz; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Szczepaniak, Zuzanna

    2016-01-01

    kinetics on individual hydrocarbons. However, despite this low resistance, structural and functional resilience were high, as verified by re-exposing the hydrocarbon-perturbed consortium to diesel fuel. The high resilience is either due to the short exposure time, insufficient for permanent changes...

  14. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  15. The International Cannabis Consortium: What did we learn about the genetics of cannabis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, C.J.H.; Minica, C.C.; Stringer, S.; Most, P.J. van der; Mbarek, H.; Nivard, M.G.; Abdellaoui, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Martin, N.G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gillespie, N.A.; Derks, E.M.; Vink, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cannabis is the most frequently used and abused illicit drug worldwide and cannabis (ab)use is associated with social, physical, and psychological problems. Twin and family studies have shown that cannabis use and abuse are heritable traits. The International Cannabis Consortium was

  16. Biological Removal of Phosphate Using Phosphate Solubilizing Bacterial Consortium from Synthetic Wastewater: A Laboratory Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological phosphate removal is an important process having gained worldwide attention and widely used for removing phosphorus from wastewater. The present investigation was aimed to screen the efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial isolates and used to remove phosphate from synthetic wastewater under shaking flasks conditions. Pseudomonas sp. JPSB12, Enterobacter sp. TPSB20, Flavobacterium sp. TPSB23 and mixed bacterial consortium (Pseudomonas sp. JPSB12+Enterobacter sp. TPSB20+Flavobacterium sp. TPSB23 were used for the removal of phosphate. Among the individual strains, Enterobacter sp. TPSB20 was removed maximum phosphate (61.75% from synthetic wastewater in presence of glucose as a carbon source. The consortium was effectively removed phosphate (74.15-82.50% in the synthetic wastewater when compared to individual strains. The pH changes in culture medium with time and extracellular phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline were also investigated. The efficient removal of phosphate by the consortium may be due to the synergistic activity among the individual strains and phosphatase enzyme activity. The use of bacterial consortium in the remediation of phosphate contaminated aquatic environments has been discussed.

  17. Fidelity monitoring across the seven studies in the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART)

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Sonia A.; Sharon E. Cummins; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Harrington, Kathleen F.; Kirby, Carrie; Rogers, Erin; Scheuermann, Taneisha S.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Waltje, Andrea H

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper describes fidelity monitoring (treatment differentiation, training, delivery, receipt and enactment) across the seven National Institutes of Health-supported Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART) studies. The objectives of the study were to describe approaches to monitoring fidelity including treatment differentiation (lack of crossover), provider training, provider delivery of treatment, patient receipt of treatment, and patient enactment (behavi...

  18. Rationale and design of the multiethnic Pharmacogenomics in Childhood Asthma consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farzan, Niloufar; Vijverberg, Susanne J.; Andiappan, Anand K.; Arianto, Lambang; Berce, Vojko; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Bisgaard, Hans; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Burchard, Esteban G.; Campo, Paloma; Canino, Glorisa; Carleton, Bruce; Celedon, Juan C.; Chew, Fook Tim; Chiang, Wen Chin; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Daley, Denis; Den Dekker, Herman T.; Dijk, Nicole F.; Duijts, Liesbeth; Flores, Carlos; Forno, Erick; Hawcutt, Daniel B.; Hernandez-Pacheco, Natalia; de Jongste, Johan C.; Kabesch, Michael; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Melen, Erik; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Nilsson, Sara; Palmer, Colin N.; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Pirmohamed, Munir; Potocnki, Uros; Raaijmakers, Jan A.; Repnik, Katja; Schieck, Maximilian; Sio, Yang Yie; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Szalai, Csaba; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Turner, Steve; van der Schee, Marc P.; Verhamme, Katia M.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: International collaboration is needed to enable large-scale pharmacogenomics studies in childhood asthma. Here, we describe the design of the Pharmacogenomics in Childhood Asthma (PiCA) consortium.  Materials & methods: Investigators of each study participating in PiCA provided data on the

  19. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of Institutions Compliance... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Using a consortium or other person for research... group of institutions, professional organizations, or mixed groups which will conduct research...

  20. BTS fact sheet: Ryan Homes and the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-07

    Through Building America's unique collaboration process, Ryan Homes, the US Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings worked together to identify ways to incorporate money-saving energy features throughout the Carborne house.