WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer consensus conference

  1. Prostate cancer: ESMO Consensus Conference Guidelines 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horwich, A.; Hugosson, J.; de Reijke, T.; Wiegel, T.; Fizazi, K.; Kataja, V.; Parker, Chris; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Berthold, Dominik; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Carlsson, Sigrid; Daugaard, Gedske; de Meerleer, Gert; Dearnaley, David; Fizazi, Karim; Fonteyne, Valérie; Gillessen, Silke; Heinrich, Daniel; Horwich, Alan; Hugosson, Jonas; Kataja, Vesa; Kwiatkowski, Maciej; Nilsson, Sten; Padhani, Anwar; Papandreou, Christos; Roobol, Monique; Sella, Avishay; Valdagni, Riccardo; van der Kwast, Theo; Verhagen, Paul; Wiegel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The first ESMO Consensus Conference on prostate cancer was held in Zurich, Switzerland, on 17-19 November 2011, with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals including experts in methodological aspects. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically

  2. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, D; Ng, T; Ahmad, C; Alfakeeh, A; Alruzug, I; Biagi, J; Brierley, J; Chaudhury, P; Cleary, S; Colwell, B; Cripps, C; Dawson, L A; Dorreen, M; Ferland, E; Galiatsatos, P; Girard, S; Gray, S; Halwani, F; Kopek, N; Mahmud, A; Martel, G; Robillard, L; Samson, B; Seal, M; Siddiqui, J; Sideris, L; Snow, S; Thirwell, M; Vickers, M; Goodwin, R; Goel, R; Hsu, T; Tsvetkova, E; Ward, B; Asmis, T

    2016-12-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016 was held in Montreal, Quebec, 5-7 February. Experts in radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, and infectious diseases involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses multiple topics: ■ Follow-up and survivorship of patients with resected colorectal cancer■ Indications for liver metastasectomy■ Treatment of oligometastases by stereotactic body radiation therapy■ Treatment of borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer■ Transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma■ Infectious complications of antineoplastic agents.

  3. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, M K; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Aoki, D

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC), reached at the fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), which was held in Tokyo, Japan, in November 2015. Three important questions were identified: (i) What are the subgroups for clinical trials i...... including pre-defined patient reported outcomes (PROs), time to second subsequent therapy (TSST), or time until definitive deterioration of quality of life (TUDD)....

  4. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). Methods: Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. The document was available to all Committee members as a web-based document customized for the consensus process. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by a topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each member commented and voted, sentence by sentence thrice. Sentences upon which an agreement was not reached after voting round no. 2 were openly debated during a Consensus Conference in Perugia (Italy) from 11 December to 13 December 2008. A hand-held televoting system collected the opinions of both the Committee members and the audience after each debate. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', and 'minimum consensus'. Results: The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only 3 (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Conclusions: This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines

  5. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG): clinical trial design for rare ovarian tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leary, A. F.; Quinn, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Coleman, R. L.; Kohn, E.; Sugiyama, T.; Glasspool, R.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Colombo, N.; Bacon, M.; Zeimet, A.; Westermann, A.; Gomez-Garcia, E.; Provencher, D.; Welch, S.; Small, W.; Millan, D.; Okamoto, A.; Stuart, G.; Ochiai, K.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements on designing clinical trials in rare ovarian tumours reached at the fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC) held in Tokyo, November 2015. Three important questions were identified concerning rare ovarian tumours (rare epithelial ovarian

  6. Role of genetic testing for inherited prostate cancer risk: Philadelphia prostate cancer consensus conference 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Giri (Veda); Knudsen, K.E. (Karen E.); Kelly, W.K. (William K.); Abida, W. (Wassim); G.L. Andriole (Gerald); C.H. Bangma (Chris); Bekelman, J.E. (Justin E.); Benson, M.C. (Mitchell C.); A. Blanco (Amie); Burnett, A. (Arthur); Catalona, W.J. (William J.); Cooney, K.A. (Kathleen A.); M.R. Cooperberg (Matthew); D. Crawford (David); Den, R.B. (Robert B.); Dicker, A.P. (Adam P.); S. Eggener (Scott); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); Freedman, M.L. (Matthew L.); F. Hamdy (Freddie); Hoffman-Censits, J. (Jean); Hurwitz, M.D. (Mark D.); Hyatt, C. (Colette); Isaacs, W.B. (William B.); Kane, C.J. (Christopher J.); Kantoff, P. (Philip); R.J. Karnes (Jeffrey); Karsh, L.I. (Lawrence I.); Klein, E.A. (Eric A.); Lin, D.W. (Daniel W.); Loughlin, K.R. (Kevin R.); Lu-Yao, G. (Grace); Malkowicz, S.B. (S. Bruce); Mann, M.J. (Mark J.); Mark, J.R. (James R.); McCue, P.A. (Peter A.); Miner, M.M. (Martin M.); Morgan, T. (Todd); Moul, J.W. (Judd W.); Myers, R.E. (Ronald E.); Nielsen, S.M. (Sarah M.); Obeid, E. (Elias); Pavlovich, C.P. (Christian P.); Peiper, S.C. (Stephen C.); D.F. Penson (David F.); D.P. Petrylak (Daniel P); Pettaway, C.A. (Curtis A.); R. Pilarski (Robert); P. Pinto (Peter); Poage, W. (Wendy); Raj, G.V. (Ganesh V.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M. Robson (Mark); Rosenberg, M.T. (Matt T.); Sandler, H. (Howard); A.O. Sartor (Oliver); Schaeffer, E. (Edward); Schwartz, G.F. (Gordon F.); Shahin, M.S. (Mark S.); N.D. Shore (Neal); Shuch, B. (Brian); Soule, H.R. (Howard R.); S.A. Tomlins (Scott A); Trabulsi, E.J. (Edouard J.); Uzzo, R. (Robert); Griend, D.J.V. (Donald J. Vander); P.C. Walsh (Patrick); Weil, C.J. (Carol J.); Wender, R. (Richard); Gomella, L.G. (Leonard G.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling,

  7. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  8. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference......, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  9. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P.S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M.R.; Soule, H.R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T.M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A.M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I.D.; Santis, M. de; Drake, C.G.; Eeles, R.A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M.E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N.D.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Logothetis, C.J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W.K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A.R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Scher, H.I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N.D.; Small, E.J.; Sternberg, C.N.; Suzuki, H; Sweeney, C.J.; Tannock, I.F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant

  10. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-04

    To provide clinicians, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the representatives of the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Presentations and discussions were divided into 3 phases over 2 1/2 days: (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that were part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. The conference was organized and supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine and the Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The literature, produced from January 1970 to October 1997, was searched through MEDLINE, Allied and Alternative Medicine, EMBASE, and MANTIS, as well as through a hand search of 9 journals that were not indexed by the National Library of Medicine. An extensive bibliography of 2302 references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Expert speakers prepared abstracts of their own conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in the open forum and scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience

  11. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  12. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...... at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement on three of these areas: NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, the treatment of first-line...

  13. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the confer...

  14. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  15. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  16. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the

  17. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012 : Science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the

  18. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; de Giorgi, U.; de Santis, M.; de Wit, M.; de Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-de Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  19. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  20. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J; Albers, P; Altena, R; Aparicio, J; Bokemeyer, C; Busch, J; Cathomas, R; Cavallin-Stahl, E; Clarke, N W; Claßen, J; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Dahl, A A; Daugaard, G; De Giorgi, U; De Santis, M; De Wit, M; De Wit, R; Dieckmann, K P; Fenner, M; Fizazi, K; Flechon, A; Fossa, S D; Germá Lluch, J R; Gietema, J A; Gillessen, S; Giwercman, A; Hartmann, J T; Heidenreich, A; Hentrich, M; Honecker, F; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Kliesch, S; Kollmannsberger, C; Krege, S; Laguna, M P; Looijenga, L H J; Lorch, A; Lotz, J P; Mayer, F; Necchi, A; Nicolai, N; Nuver, J; Oechsle, K; Oldenburg, J; Oosterhuis, J W; Powles, T; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Rick, O; Rosti, G; Salvioni, R; Schrader, M; Schweyer, S; Sedlmayer, F; Sohaib, A; Souchon, R; Tandstad, T; Winter, C; Wittekind, C

    2013-04-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements.

  1. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis: consensus conference guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretto, N; Carrara, A; Corradi, A; De Vivo, G; Lazzaro, L; Ricciardelli, L; Agresta, F; Amodio, C; Bergamini, C; Borzellino, G; Catani, M; Cavaliere, D; Cirocchi, R; Gemini, S; Mirabella, A; Palasciano, N; Piazza, D; Piccoli, M; Rigamonti, M; Scatizzi, M; Tamborrino, E; Zago, M

    2012-05-01

    Laparoscopic adhesiolysis has been demonstrated to be technically feasible in small bowel obstruction and carries advantages in terms of post-surgical course. The increasing dissemination of laparoscopic surgery in the emergency setting and the lack of concrete evidence in the literature have called for a consensus conference to draw recommendations for clinical practice. A literature search was used to outline the evidence, and a consensus conference was held between experts in the field. A survey of international experts added expertise to the debate. A public jury of surgeons discussed and validated the statements, and the entire process was reviewed by three external experts. Recommendations concern the diagnostic evaluation, the timing of the operation, the selection of patients, the induction of the pneumoperitoneum, the removal of the cause of obstructions, the criteria for conversion, the use of adhesion-preventing agents, the need for high-technology dissection instruments and behaviour in the case of misdiagnosed hernia or the need for bowel resection. Evidence of this kind of surgery is scanty because of the absence of randomized controlled trials. Nevertheless laparoscopic skills in emergency are widespread. The recommendations given with the consensus process might be a useful tool in the hands of surgeons. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Rödel, Claus; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Boelens, Petra G.; Aristei, Cynthia; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  3. testing a consensus conference method by discussing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... Objectives: To test the recommended consensus conference methods in Tanzania by discussing the management ... “wrong”, based on recommendations advocated in western ..... future scenarios sponsored the conference.

  4. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...... on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process...

  6. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Boelens, Petra G; Borras, Josep M; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H; van Krieken, J Han; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason J; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. For the Delphi process, multidisciplinary experts were invited to comment and vote three web-based online voting rounds and to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. This manuscript covers all sentences of the consensus document with the result of the voting. The consensus document represents sections on diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical oncology, radiotherapy, and follow-up where

  7. ESMO consensus conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladetto, M; Buske, C; Hutchings, M

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) consensus conference on mature B-cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was held on 20 June 2015 in Lugano, Switzerland, and included a multidisciplinary panel of 25 leading experts. The aim of the conference was to develop recommen......The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) consensus conference on mature B-cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was held on 20 June 2015 in Lugano, Switzerland, and included a multidisciplinary panel of 25 leading experts. The aim of the conference was to develop...... to their potentially high prognostic value, at least in some lymphoma entities, implementation of interim PET, COO and MRD was highly recommended in the context of clinical trials. All expert panel members approved this final article....

  8. ESMO Consensus Conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buske, C; Hutchings, M; Ladetto, M

    2018-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) consensus conference on mature B cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was held on 20 June 2015 in Lugano, Switzerland, and included a multidisciplinary panel of 25 leading experts. The aim of the conference was to develop recommen......The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) consensus conference on mature B cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was held on 20 June 2015 in Lugano, Switzerland, and included a multidisciplinary panel of 25 leading experts. The aim of the conference was to develop...... of the three key areas identified. This manuscript presents the consensus recommendations regarding the clinical management of elderly patients diagnosed with malignant lymphoma. Four clinically-relevant topics identified by the panel were: 1) how to define patient fitness, 2) assessing quality of life, 3......) diagnostic work-up and 4) clinical management of elderly patients with lymphoma. Each of these key topics is addressed in the context of five different lymphoma entities, namely: CLL, follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Results, including...

  9. UK national consensus conference on radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven-Howe, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    UK CEED organised a consensus conference to debate radwaste disposal. It lasted from 21-24 May 1999. Among the witnesses called to give evidence were UKAEA, BNFL, Nuclear Industries' Inspectorate, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace. The end result was a report produced by the panel of members of the public, recording their views and recommendations. Conclusions are presented. (author)

  10. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: Tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1......%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm 2) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order...

  11. Consensus conference on irradiation of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Danish government is obliged to define its attitude to a proposal made by the European Communities regarding common regulations for the irradiation of food (May 1989). Denmark, in comparison to some other European countries, tends to show reserve on this issue. At the consensus conference a panel discussed related questions. The participants reached the conclusion that as yet disagreement and uncertainty about the subjects of safety, public health and food quality is so significant that they were not able to recommend that sanctions for irradiation of food should be given in Denmark. It was also agreed that problems related to control and determination of radiation content were too serious to allow this method of food preservation. The panel felt that there were many areas of research, such as long-term biological effects, that had not been investigated satisfactorily. Experiments carried out in India and China did not encourage confidence, as the people tested had recommenced eating food preserved by other methods, so that long term effects could not be measured. The specialists claim that Danish standards in relation to the food industry are very high so that alternative methods of preservation to those already used do not appear to be necessary. The only applications to the National Food Agency for authorization to irradiate food had come from producers of spices and in relation to educative acitivites. (AB)

  12. Defining biochemical failure following radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy in men with clinically localized prostate cancer: Recommendations of the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Hanks, Gerald; Thames, Howard; Schellhammer, Paul; Shipley, William U.; Sokol, Gerald H.; Sandler, Howard

    2006-01-01

    In 1996 the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) sponsored a Consensus Conference to establish a definition of biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The ASTRO definition defined prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure as occurring after three consecutive PSA rises after a nadir with the date of failure as the point halfway between the nadir date and the first rise or any rise great enough to provoke initiation of therapy. This definition was not linked to clinical progression or survival; it performed poorly in patients undergoing hormonal therapy (HT), and backdating biased the Kaplan-Meier estimates of event-free survival. A second Consensus Conference was sponsored by ASTRO and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in Phoenix, Arizona, on January 21, 2005, to revise the ASTRO definition. The panel recommended: (1) a rise by 2 ng/mL or more above the nadir PSA be considered the standard definition for biochemical failure after EBRT with or without HT; (2) the date of failure be determined 'at call' (not backdated). They recommended that investigators be allowed to use the ASTRO Consensus Definition after EBRT alone (no hormonal therapy) with strict adherence to guidelines as to 'adequate follow-up.' To avoid the artifacts resulting from short follow-up, the reported date of control should be listed as 2 years short of the median follow-up. For example, if the median follow-up is 5 years, control rates at 3 years should be cited. Retaining a strict version of the ASTRO definition would allow comparisons with a large existing body of literature

  13. The Oslo consensus conference on protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.; Strand, P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of international organisations are focussing on a revision of radiation protection policy from the existing system which addresses only effects on man, to one which also addresses effects on the wider environment. These developments are expected to effect a wide range of stakeholders, including industry, regulators, scientists, users and the public. With this in mind a 'Consensus Conference on Protection of the Environment' was arranged as part of an International Seminar on 'Radiation Protection in the 21st Century: Ethical, Philosophical and Environmental Issues' held at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The conference attracted 46 international experts representing various disciplines and affiliations including Environmental Science, Health Physics, Radioecology, Ethics and Philosophy and a wide spectrum of perspectives bearing on the question of radiation protection of the environment. The conference was novel in that the participants were professionals rather than laypersons, and the purpose of the consensus procedure was to identify areas of agreement as an input to the ongoing regulatory developments. The success and innovation of the model is reflected in the significant areas of agreement identified in the final consensus statement, and the subsequent interest at an international level. Participants also noted the need for furthering the debate through ongoing work. Notable issues were the harmonisation of standards for radiation with other environmental stressors, guidance for balancing different interests and values within practical management, and the need for assessment criteria

  14. 78 FR 11210 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS... ``Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.'' The conference will be open to... http://prevention.nih.gov/cdp/ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a...

  15. Consensus Report of the 2015 Weinman International Conference on Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 9 and 10, 2015, the International Conference on Mesothelioma in Populations Exposed to Naturally Occurring Asbestiform Fibers was held at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The meeting was cosponsored by the International Association for the S...

  16. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas. PMID:25360320

  17. MIS in the management of colon and rectal cancer: consensus meeting of the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachta, Christopher M; Ashamalla, Shady; Smith, Andy

    2013-11-01

    A consensus conference on the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in the management of colon and rectal cancer was convened by the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada in Toronto on April 18, 2012. This is a report of the consensus of an invited group of Canadian experts in MIS and surgery of the colon and rectum that addresses the role this technology should play in treatment and also considers advocacy and resources.

  18. Diabetic kidney disease: a report from an ADA Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Bakris, George L; Bilous, Rudolf W; Chiang, Jane L; de Boer, Ian H; Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Narva, Andrew S; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Patel, Uptal D; Ratner, Robert E; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Molitch, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus have grown significantly throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 diabetes. This overall increase in the number of people with diabetes has had a major impact on development of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), one of the most frequent complications of both types of diabetes. DKD is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), accounting for approximately 50% of cases in the developed world. Although incidence rates for ESRD attributable to DKD have recently stabilized, these rates continue to rise in high-risk groups such as middle-aged African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics. The costs of care for people with DKD are extraordinarily high. In the Medicare population alone, DKD-related expenditures among this mostly older group were nearly $25 billion in 2011. Due to the high human and societal costs, the Consensus Conference on Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes was convened by the American Diabetes Association in collaboration with the American Society of Nephrology and the National Kidney Foundation to appraise issues regarding patient management, highlighting current practices and new directions. Major topic areas in DKD included (1) identification and monitoring, (2) cardiovascular disease and management of dyslipidemia, (3) hypertension and use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, (4) glycemia measurement, hypoglycemia, and drug therapies, (5) nutrition and general care in advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, (6) children and adolescents, and (7) multidisciplinary approaches and medical home models for health care delivery. This current state summary and research recommendations are designed to guide advances in care and the generation of new knowledge that will meaningfully improve life for people with DKD. Copyright © 2014 American Diabetes Association and the National Kidney Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  19. Report of the international consensus development conference on female sexual dysfunction: definitions and classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basson, R.; Berman, J.; Burnett, A.; Derogatis, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fourcroy, J.; Goldstein, I.; Graziottin, A.; Heiman, J.; Laan, E.; Leiblum, S.; Padma-Nathan, H.; Rosen, R.; Segraves, K.; Segraves, R. T.; Shabsigh, R.; Sipski, M.; Wagner, G.; Whipple, B.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Female sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent but not well defined or understood. We evaluated and revised existing definitions and classifications of female sexual dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An interdisciplinary consensus conference panel consisting of 19 experts in female sexual

  20. Quantifying federal funding and scholarly output related to the academic emergency medicine consensus conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Dinh, Tu; May, Larissa; Yadav, Kabir; Gaddis, Gary M; Cone, David C

    2014-01-01

    Every year since 2000, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) has presented a one-day consensus conference to generate a research agenda for advancement of a scientific topic. One of the 12 annual issues of AEM is reserved for the proceedings of these conferences. The purpose of this study was to measure academic productivity of these conferences by evaluating subsequent federal research funding received by authors of conference manuscripts and calculating citation counts of conference papers. This was a cross-sectional study. In 2012, the NIH RePORTER system was searched to identify subsequent federal funding obtained by authors of the consensus conference issues from 2000 to 2010. Funded projects were coded as related or unrelated to conference topic. Citation counts for all conference manuscripts were quantified using Scopus and Google Scholar. Simple descriptive statistics were reported. Eight hundred fifty-two individual authors contributed to 280 papers published in the 11 consensus conference issues. One hundred thirty-seven authors (16%) obtained funding for 318 projects. A median of 22 topic-related projects per conference (range 10-97) accounted for a median of $20,488,331 per conference (range $7,779,512 to $122,918,205). The average (± SD) number of citations per paper was 15.7 ± 20.5 in Scopus and 23.7 ± 32.6 in Google Scholar. The authors of consensus conference manuscripts obtained significant federal grant support for follow-up research related to conference themes. In addition, the manuscripts generated by these conferences were frequently cited. Conferences devoted to research agenda development appear to be an academically worthwhile endeavor.

  1. International consensus conference on open abdomen in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Osvaldo; Cimbanassi, Stefania; Biffl, Walter; Leppaniemi, Ari; Henry, Sharon; Scalea, Thomas M; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Chieregato, Arturo; de Blasio, Elvio; Gambale, Giorgio; Gordini, Giovanni; Nardi, Guiseppe; Paldalino, Pietro; Gossetti, Francesco; Dionigi, Paolo; Noschese, Giuseppe; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Sgardello, Sebastian; Magnone, Stefano; Rausei, Stefano; Mariani, Anna; Mengoli, Francesca; di Saverio, Salomone; Castriconi, Maurizio; Coccolini, Federico; Negreanu, Joseph; Razzi, Salvatore; Coniglio, Carlo; Morelli, Francesco; Buonanno, Maurizio; Lippi, Monica; Trotta, Liliana; Volpi, Annalisa; Fattori, Luca; Zago, Mauro; de Rai, Paolo; Sammartano, Fabrizio; Manfredi, Roberto; Cingolani, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A part of damage-control laparotomy is to leave the fascial edges and the skin open to avoid abdominal compartment syndrome and allow further explorations. This condition, known as open abdomen (OA), although effective, is associated with severe complications. Our aim was to develop evidence-based recommendations to define indications for OA, techniques for temporary abdominal closure, management of enteric fistulas, and methods of definitive wall closure. The literature from 1990 to 2014 was systematically screened according to PRISMA [Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses] protocol. Seventy-six articles were reviewed by a panel of experts to assign grade of recommendations (GoR) and level of evidence (LoE) using the GRADE [Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation] system, and an international consensus conference was held. OA in trauma is indicated at the end of damage-control laparotomy, in the presence of visceral swelling, for a second look in vascular injuries or gross contamination, in the case of abdominal wall loss, and if medical treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome has failed (GoR B, LoE II). Negative-pressure wound therapy is the recommended temporary abdominal closure technique to drain peritoneal fluid, improve nursing, and prevent fascial retraction (GoR B, LoE I). Lack of OA closure within 8 days (GoR C, LoE II), bowel injuries, high-volume replacement, and use of polypropylene mesh over the bowel (GoR C, LoE I) are risk factors for frozen abdomen and fistula formation. Negative-pressure wound therapy allows to isolate the fistula and protect the surrounding tissues from spillage until granulation (GoR C, LoE II). Correction of fistula is performed after 6 months to 12 months. Definitive closure of OA has to be obtained early (GoR C, LoE I) with direct suture, traction devices, component separation with or without mesh. Biologic meshes are an option for wall reinforcement if bacterial

  2. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health'' to be held... the public. Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, a sugar...

  3. Defining biochemical failure following radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy in men with clinically localized prostate cancer: recommendations of the R.T.O.G.-Astro phoenix consensus conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, M.; Hanks, G.; Thames, H.; Schellhammer, P.; Shipley, W.U.; Sokol, G.H.; Sandler, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) sponsored a Consensus Conference to establish a definition of biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The ASTRO definition defined prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure as occurring after three consecutive PSA rises after a nadir with the date of failure as the point halfway between the nadir date and the first rise or any rise great enough to provoke initiation of therapy. This definition was not linked to clinical progression or survival; it performed poorly in patients undergoing hormonal therapy (HT), and back-dating biased the Kaplan-Meier estimates of event-free survival. A second Consensus Conference was sponsored by ASTRO and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in Phoenix, Arizona, on January 21, 2005, to revise the ASTRO definition. The panel recommended: (1) a rise by 2 ng/mL or more above the nadir PSA be considered the standard definition for biochemical failure after EBRT with or without HT; (2) the date of failure be determined 'at call' (not back-dated). They recommended that investigators be allowed to use the ASTRO Consensus Definition after EBRT alone (no hormonal therapy) with strict adherence to guidelines as to 'adequate follow-up.' To avoid the artifacts resulting from short follow-up, the reported date of control should be listed as 2 years short of the median follow-up. For example, if the median follow-up is 5 years, control rates at 3 years should be cited. Retaining a strict version of the ASTRO definition would allow comparisons with a large existing body of literature. (authors)

  4. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, B. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zöllner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures: The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with

  5. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Consensus statement from the Health of the Health Professional Conference, November 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, Susan J; Huggard, Peter; Alley, Patrick; Clark, Angela; Moir, Fiona

    2012-04-20

    This article presents a consensus statement that arose from the views of participants that attended the multidisciplinary conference "The Health of the Health Professional", in Auckland in November 2011. A healthy workforce is the key to improving the health of all New Zealanders. Yet health practitioners' health is of concern, and despite the evidence of real problems little has been done to constructively and systematically address these issues. This consensus statement provides some potential ways to move forward.

  7. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Boelens, Petra G.; Borras, Josep M.; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; van den Broek, Colette B. M.; Brown, Gina; van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H.; van Krieken, J. Han; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J.; Smith, Jason J.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A.; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore,

  8. Summary of the 2010 AHPBA/SSO/SSAT Consensus Conference on HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitonga Munene

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the auspices of the American Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, an expert consensus conference was convened in January 2010 on the multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma. The goals of the conference were to address knowledge gaps in the optimal preparation of patients with HCC for operative therapy, best methods to control HCC while awaiting liver transplantation, and developing a multidisciplinary approach to these patients with implementation of novel systemic therapies.

  9. ESMO Consensus conferences : guidelines on malignant lymphoma. part 2: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyling, M.; Thieblemont, C.; Gallamini, A.; Arcaini, L.; Campo, E.; Hermine, O.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; Ladetto, M.; Le Gouill, S.; Iannitto, E.; Pileri, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wotherspoon, A.; Zinzani, P.; Zucca, E.

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organizes consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. In this setting, a consensus conference on the management of lymphoma was held on 18 June 2011 in Lugano, next to the 11th International

  10. Changes in biochemical disease-free survival rates as a result of adoption of the consensus conference definition in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external-beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, Ronald D.; Malyszko, Bozena K.; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Rubin, Mark A.; O'Toole, Kathleen M.; Schiff, Peter B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal definition of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy remains elusive. Different institutions have developed their own definitions, and a consensus conference (CC) sponsored by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology has recently proposed another definition. This study compares the definition previously used at our institution with the definition proposed by the CC. Methods: Two hundred and eight patients were treated for localized prostate cancer with conformal external-beam radiotherapy between 1989-1993 at our institution and followed for at least 24 months. Patients were categorized as failures according to our institutional definition and the CC definition. Our definition (CPMC) required two increases in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) over at least a 3-month period with a final value of at least 1 ng/ml or a single value resulting in clinical intervention. The CC definition required three consecutive increases in PSA. This was modified to also consider those patients with one or two increases leading to clinical intervention as failures. Differences in the failure rates between the two definitions were evaluated and factors influencing these differences were explored. In an additional analysis, CC was modified such that patients with one or two PSA increases were censored at the time of the PSA prior to the increases (CC-II), rather than at the last PSA (CC). The median follow-up time was 31 months. Results: There were 36 fewer failures according to CC (n = 96) compared with CPMC (n = 132) (p < 0.001). Twenty cases called failures by CPMC subsequently had a decrease in PSA ('false failures'). The other 16 patients have had two increases in PSA, but are awaiting their next follow-up visit to obtain a third PSA ('pending failures'). Analysis of factors predicting 'pending failures' showed Gleason score to be the sole predictor of this change in status in multivariate analysis (p = 0

  11. Cardio-renal syndromes : report from the consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter; Anker, Stefan D.; Anand, Inder; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; Hillege, Hans; House, Andrew A.; Katz, Nevin; Maisel, Alan; Mankad, Sunil; Zanco, Pierluigi; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ronco, Federico; Shaw, Andrew; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ponikowski, Piotr

    A consensus conference on cardio-renal syndromes (CRS) was held in Venice Italy, in September 2008 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). The following topics were matter of discussion after a systematic literature review and the appraisal of the best available evidence:

  12. Recommendations for liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: an international consensus conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Lesurtel, Mickael; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Gores, Gregory J.; Langer, Bernard; Perrier, Arnaud; Abecassis, M.; Balabaud, C.; Bhoori, S.; Breitenstein, S.; Broelsch, C.; Burra, P.; Cherqui, D.; Colombo, M.; d'Albuquerque, C.; D'Alessandro, A.; de Santibanes, E.; Dufour, J. F.; Durand, F.; Dutkowski, P.; El-Serag, H.; Fan, S. T.; Fisher, R.; Forner, A.; Fung, J.; Geier, A.; Germani, G.; Gouw, A. S. H.; Gurusamy, K.; Heaton, N.; Heim, M.; Hemming, A.; Hubscher, S.; Ichida, T.; Kahn, D.; Kew, M.; Kita, Y.; Kiuchi, T.; Kudo, M.; Lee, S. G.; Lencioni, R.; Livraghi, T.; Lodge, P.; McCaughan, G.; Madoff, D.; Marrero, J.; Mergental, H.; Merle, P.; Miksad, R.; Mornex, F.; Paradis, V.; Pestalozzi, B.; Poon, R.; Porte, R.; Prasad, K. R.; Roskams, T.; Rossi, M.; Schlitt, H.; Shaked, A.; Sherman, M.; Siegler, M.; Suh, K.; Todo, S.; Toso, C.; Trevisani, F.; Valdecasas, J. C. G.; Vauthey, J. N.; Vilgrain, V.; Villamil, F.; Wald, C.; Weber, A.; Wiesner, R.; Wright, L.; Zheng, S.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Bertschi, V.; Clavien, P. A.; Meyer, M.; Müllhaupt, B.; Munson, A.; Lesurtel, M.; Raptis, D.; Vonlanthen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although liver transplantation is a widely accepted treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), much controversy remains and there is no generally accepted set of guidelines. An international consensus conference was held on Dec 2-4, 2010, in Zurich, Switzerland, with the aim of reviewing current

  13. Canadian Consensus Conference on the Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Adults – Update 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is the most prevalent acid-related disorder in Canada and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. Since the last Canadian Consensus Conference in 1996, GERD management has evolved substantially.

  14. Pleural mesothelioma: epidemiological and public health issues. Report from the Second Italian Consensus Conference on Pleural Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Corrado; Fubini, Bice; Mirabelli, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Bianchi, Claudio; Chellini, Elisabetta; Gennaro, Valerio; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Menegozzo, Massimo; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Musti, Marina; Pira, Enrico; Romanelli, Antonio; Terracini, Benedetto; Zona, Amerigo

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is closely connected to asbestos exposure, with epidemiological patterns closely reshaping the geography and history of asbestos exposure. Mechanisms of causation and of interaction of asbestos fibres with pleura are complex and currently not yet completely understood. Curative efforts so far provided little results. Italy shows one of the highest incidence of MM and developed a network of specialized cancer registries in order to monitor disease occurrence and describe its epidemiology in details. The second Italian Consensus Conference on Pleural Mesothelioma convened in Torino on November 24th-25th, 2011. Besides the main consensus report summarizing the contribution of the different expertises, that was published elsewhere, the participants in 'Public Health and Epidemiology' section decided to report in major details the evidence and the conclusions regarding epidemiology, causative mechanisms and the public health impact of the disease.

  15. Revised classification/nomenclature of vitiligo and related issues: the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, K; Lim, H W; Suzuki, T; Katayama, I; Hamzavi, I; Lan, C C E; Goh, B K; Anbar, T; Silva de Castro, C; Lee, A Y; Parsad, D; van Geel, N; Le Poole, I C; Oiso, N; Benzekri, L; Spritz, R; Gauthier, Y; Hann, S K; Picardo, M; Taieb, A

    2012-05-01

    During the 2011 International Pigment Cell Conference (IPCC), the Vitiligo European Taskforce (VETF) convened a consensus conference on issues of global importance for vitiligo clinical research. As suggested by an international panel of experts, the conference focused on four topics: classification and nomenclature; definition of stable disease; definition of Koebner's phenomenon (KP); and 'autoimmune vitiligo'. These topics were discussed in seven working groups representing different geographical regions. A consensus emerged that segmental vitiligo be classified separately from all other forms of vitiligo and that the term 'vitiligo' be used as an umbrella term for all non-segmental forms of vitiligo, including 'mixed vitiligo' in which segmental and non-segmental vitiligo are combined and which is considered a subgroup of vitiligo. Further, the conference recommends that disease stability be best assessed based on the stability of individual lesions rather than the overall stability of the disease as the latter is difficult to define precisely and reliably. The conference also endorsed the classification of KP for vitiligo as proposed by the VETF (history based, clinical observation based, or experimentally induced). Lastly, the conference agreed that 'autoimmune vitiligo' should not be used as a separate classification as published evidence indicates that the pathophysiology of all forms of vitiligo likely involves autoimmune or inflammatory mechanisms. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Revised classification/nomenclature of vitiligo and related issues: the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, K.; Lim, H. W.; Suzuki, T.; Katayama, I.; Hamzavi, I.; Lan, C. C. E.; Goh, B. K.; Anbar, T.; de Castro, C. Silva; Lee, A. Y.; Parsad, D.; van Geel, N.; Le Poole, I. C.; Oiso, N.; Benzekri, L.; Spritz, R.; Gauthier, Y.; Hann, S. K.; Picardo, M.; Taieb, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary During the 2011 International Pigment Cell Conference (IPCC), the Vitiligo European Taskforce (VETF) convened a consensus conference on issues of global importance for vitiligo clinical research. As suggested by an international panel of experts, the conference focused on four topics: classification and nomenclature; definition of stable disease; definition of Koebner’s phenomenon (KP); and ‘autoimmune vitiligo’. These topics were discussed in seven working groups representing different geographical regions. A consensus emerged that segmental vitiligo be classified separately from all other forms of vitiligo and that the term ‘vitiligo’ be used as an umbrella term for all non-segmental forms of vitiligo, including ‘mixed vitiligo’ in which segmental and non-segmental vitiligo are combined and which is considered a subgroup of vitiligo. Further, the conference recommends that disease stability be best assessed based on the stability of individual lesions rather than the overall stability of the disease as the latter is difficult to define precisely and reliably. The conference also endorsed the classification of KP for vitiligo as proposed by the VETF (history based, clinical observation based, or experimentally induced). Lastly, the conference agreed that ‘autoimmune vitiligo’ should not be used as a separate classification as published evidence indicates that the pathophysiology of all forms of vitiligo likely involves autoimmune or inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:22417114

  17. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation: rationale and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamburin S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Tamburin,1 Stefano Paolucci,2 Francesca Magrinelli,1 Massimo Musicco,2,3 Giorgio Sandrini4,5 On behalf of the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN 1Department of Neurological, Biomedical and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, 2Santa Lucia Foundation, IRCCS, Rome, 3Institute of Biomedical Technologies (IBT National Research Council of Italy (CNR, Segrate, Milan, 4C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology Foundation, IRCCS, 5Department of Brain and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Pain is very common in the neurorehabilitation setting, where it may not only represent a target for treatment but can also negatively influence rehabilitation procedures directly or through the side effects of painkillers. To date, there are neither guidelines nor consensus on how to assess and treat pain in neurorehabilitation. Because of the very scanty pieces of evidence on this topic, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN was promoted under the auspices of different scientific societies. This article illustrates the rationale, methodology, and topics of the ICCPN. The recommendations of the ICCPN will offer some information on how to deal with pain in neurorehabilitation and may represent the starting point for further studies.Keywords: assessment, consensus conference, neurology, pain, rehabilitation, treatment

  18. Reaching consensus on drug resistance conferring mutations (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    A user-friendly interface designed for nonexpert or expert operability.A standardized and validated analysis pipeline for variant analyses of M. tuberculosis next-generation sequencing (NGS data.Access to data beyond the published literature with dynamic and iterative updates of new data generated by global surveillance and clinical trials.A well-developed legal structure to ensure intellectual property rights and data ownership remain with contributors.A structured data-sharing architecture to restrict access to sensitive or unpublished data sets.Metadata standardization using CDISC: supports global, platform-independent data standards that enable information system interoperability.An emphasis on data quality and rigorous, expert curation with multiple quality control checks for whole-genome sequencing and other metadata.Validation of NGS analysis output by an expert committee with grading of resistance conferring mutations based on rigorous statistical standards.Regulatory-compliant analysis pipeline and database architecture. Successful execution of such an extensive database platform requires substantial collaboration from scientists investigating the genetic basis for drug resistance worldwide, and from developers with expertise in database design and implementation.

  19. Clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology: Results of an interdisciplinary consensus conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reske, S.N.; Bares, R.; Buell, U.; Guhlmann, A.; Moser, E.; Wannenmacher, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical value of PET in oncology was evaluated by a panel of recognized experts in the framework of an interdisciplinary consensus conference. On the basis of PET studies, well documented in the international literature, the value of PET for solving clinical questions was classified according to the following categories 'appropriate' (1a), 'mostly acceptable' (1b), 'helpful' (2a), 'value as yet unknown' (2b), 'useless' (3). 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) acts as the radiopharmaceutical of choice for PET in clinical oncology. PET is indicated (1a) for diagnosing relapse in high grade glioma (FDG) or low grade glioma (C-11 methionine or F-18 fluorotyrosine), differential diagnosis of solitary peripheral pulponary nodules in high risk patients and for diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PET may be clinically used (1b): In 'low-grade' glioma, search for unknown primary in head and neck tumors, suspicion of relapse in nonsmall cell bronchial carcinoma (NSCBC) and colorectal carcinoma, lymphnode staging in NSCBC, pancreatic carcinoma, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma and testicular cancer. Staging of Hodgkin's disease (HD, stage I/II vs III), early therapy control in patients with a residual mass or suspicion of relapse in HD and in high grade NHL, lymph node staging and search for distant metastases in malignant melanoma (Breslow>1,5 mm), search for lymph node or distant metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer with elevated hTG and a negative radioiodide whole body scan. Many further indications are emerging, but are not yet sufficiently well documented in the literature. For most indications beside scientific studies, an individual cost benefit utility evaluation by the responsible physician is recommended. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Report from the UK consensus conference on radioactive waste management, May 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiett, A.

    2000-01-01

    A Consensus Conference took place in the UK in May 1999 to address the issue of Radioactive Waste Management. Sixteen members of the public were invited, at random, to take part in the conference, and initially were unaware of the topic. After two preparation weekends, the citizen's panel held a two day conference at which they cross examined expert 'witnesses' on issues which they felt to be relevant to the topic. The remit of the panel was as follows: ''The Consensus Conference is to focus on the effective and publicly acceptable long term management of nuclear waste in the UK, both civil and military, concentrating particularly on intermediate and high level waste. This will be considered by the citizens' panel in their capacity as members of the public, taking into account what they see as the relevant issues''. Following the conference itself, the panel produced a report on their findings and conclusions. Retrievability was just one of the many areas that the panel covered. In relation to the area of public acceptance for long term management of radioactive waste, the recommendations of the panel were as follows: ''In conclusion the panel was unanimous that in order for a solution to be publicly acceptable, the waste MUST remain accessible and monitorable to give future generations a chance to deal with the problem if/when a solution is found''. (author)

  1. WSES consensus conference: Guidelines for first-line management of intra-abdominal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppaniemi Ari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intra-abdominal infections are still associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of patients with intra-abdominal infections may be an important factor in the quality of care. The presence of a team of health professionals from various disciplines, working in concert, may improve efficiency, outcome, and the cost of care. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES Consensus Conference was held in Bologna on July 2010, during the 1st congress of the WSES, involving surgeons, infectious disease specialists, pharmacologists, radiologists and intensivists with the goal of defining recommendations for the early management of intra-abdominal infections. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference.

  2. Guidelenines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES) and peritoneum and surgery (PnS) society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC) is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS) Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B). Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+); Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C). Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A). Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A). In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B). Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B). Conclusions Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of anastomotic

  3. Guidelenines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES and peritoneum and surgery (PnS society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna Antonio D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B. Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+; Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C. Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A. Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A. In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B. Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B. Conclusions Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of

  4. Risk analysis by citizens? Analysis of the first consensus conference held in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marris, C.; Joly, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: the French Parliamentary Office for the evaluation of scientific and technological choices (OPECST) is currently organizing a consensus conference. Following the model developed by the Danish Board of Technology, a panel of 15 French citizens is being asked to evaluate the use of genetically modified organisms in agriculture and food. This Danish model for direct citizen participation in technology assessment has gained growing support in other European countries and even further afield, such as Japan and Australia. This is, however, a novel experience for France, which has very little tradition for participatory technology assessment. The final and public phase of the 'conference citoyenne' will take place in Paris on 20-22 June 1998, therefore it is too early to outline our results in this abstract. Our paper will present an analysis of the impact and role of this conference in the wider public debate in France about agricultural bio-technologies. This will be based on interviews with key actors in this debate (scientists, consumer and environmental organisations, politicians), media reports, and video footage of the entire procedure of the consensus conference. (authors)

  5. First International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rageth, Christoph J; O'Flynn, Elizabeth Am; Comstock, Christopher; Kurtz, Claudia; Kubik, Rahel; Madjar, Helmut; Lepori, Domenico; Kampmann, Gert; Mundinger, Alexander; Baege, Astrid; Decker, Thomas; Hosch, Stefanie; Tausch, Christoph; Delaloye, Jean-François; Morris, Elisabeth; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a consensus for the therapy of B3 lesions. The first International Consensus Conference on lesions of uncertain malignant potential in the breast (B3 lesions) including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), classical lobular neoplasia (LN), papillary lesions (PL), benign phyllodes tumors (PT), and radial scars (RS) took place in January 2016 in Zurich, Switzerland organized by the International Breast Ultrasound School and the Swiss Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy group-a subgroup of the Swiss Society of Senology. Consensus recommendations for the management and follow-up surveillance of these B3 lesions were developed and areas of research priorities were identified. The consensus recommendation for FEA, LN, PL, and RS diagnosed on core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) is to therapeutically excise the lesion seen on imaging by VAB and no longer by open surgery, with follow-up surveillance imaging for 5 years. The consensus recommendation for ADH and PT is, with some exceptions, therapeutic first-line open surgical excision. Minimally invasive management of selected B3 lesions with therapeutic VAB is acceptable as an alternative to first-line surgical excision.

  6. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan; Hillman, Charles; Andersen, Lars Bo; Weiss, Maureen; Williams, Craig A; Lintunen, Taru; Green, Ken; Hansen, Peter Riis; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Nielsen, Glen; Froberg, Karsten; Bugge, Anna; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Schipperijn, Jasper; Dagkas, Symeon; Agergaard, Sine; von Seelen, Jesper; Østergaard, Charlotte; Skovgaard, Thomas; Busch, Henrik; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord on the effects of physical activity on children's and youth's fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process that began with presentation of the state-of-the art in each domain followed by plenary and group discussions. Ultimately, Consensus Conference participants reached agreement on the 21-item consensus statement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Guidelines for the ethical use of neuroimages in medical testimony: report of a multidisciplinary consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, C C; Sze, G; Rommelfanger, K S; Kinlaw, K; Banja, J D; Wolpe, P R

    2014-04-01

    With rapid advances in neuroimaging technology, there is growing concern over potential misuse of neuroradiologic imaging data in legal matters. On December 7 and 8, 2012, a multidisciplinary consensus conference, Use and Abuse of Neuroimaging in the Courtroom, was held at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Through this interactive forum, a highly select group of experts-including neuroradiologists, neurologists, forensic psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, neuroscientists, legal scholars, imaging statisticians, judges, practicing attorneys, and neuroethicists-discussed the complex issues involved in the use of neuroimaging data entered into legal evidence and for associated expert testimony. The specific contexts of criminal cases, child abuse, and head trauma were especially considered. The purpose of the conference was to inform the development of guidelines on expert testimony for the American Society of Neuroradiology and to provide principles for courts on the ethical use of neuroimaging data as evidence. This report summarizes the conference and resulting recommendations.

  8. The Management of Chronic Viral Hepatitis: A Canadian Consensus Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Sherman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several government and nongovernment organizations held a consensus conference on the management of acute and chronic viral hepatitis to update previous management recommendations. The conference became necessary because of the introduction of new forms of therapy for both hepatitis B and hepatitis C. The conference issued recommendations on the investigation and management of chronic hepatitis B, including the use of lamivudine, adefovir and interferon. The treatment of hepatitis B in several special situations was also discussed. There were also recommendations on the investigation and treatment of chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis C-HIV coinfection. In addition, the document makes some recommendations about the provision of services by provincial governments to facilitate the delivery of care to patients with hepatitis virus infection. The present document is meant to be used by practitioners and other health care providers, including public health staff and others not directly involved in patient care.

  9. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jürg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific and targeted interventions. We aim to establish a European consensus guideline on mechanical ventilation of critically children. The European Society for Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care initiated a consensus conference of international European experts in paediatric mechanical ventilation to provide recommendations using the Research and Development/University of California, Los Angeles, appropriateness method. An electronic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed using a combination of medical subject heading terms and text words related to mechanical ventilation and disease-specific terms. The Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC) consisted of a panel of 15 experts who developed and voted on 152 recommendations related to the following topics: (1) general recommendations, (2) monitoring, (3) targets of oxygenation and ventilation, (4) supportive measures, (5) weaning and extubation readiness, (6) normal lungs, (7) obstructive diseases, (8) restrictive diseases, (9) mixed diseases, (10) chronically ventilated patients, (11) cardiac patients and (12) lung hypoplasia syndromes. There were 142 (93.4%) recommendations with "strong agreement". The final iteration of the recommendations had none with equipoise or disagreement. These recommendations should help to harmonise the approach to paediatric mechanical ventilation and can be proposed as a standard-of-care applicable in daily clinical practice and clinical research.

  10. Repigmentation in vitiligo: position paper of the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Emily Y; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Esmat, Samia; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Passeron, Thierry; Böhm, Markus; Anbar, Tag; Goh, Boon Kee; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Lui, Harvey; Ramam, M; Raboobee, Noufal; Katayama, Ichiro; Suzuki, Tamio; Parsad, Davinder; Seth, Vaneeta; Lim, Henry W; van Geel, Nanja; Mulekar, Sanjeev; Harris, John; Wittal, Richard; Benzekri, Laila; Gauthier, Yvon; Kumarasinghe, Prasad; Thng, Steven T G; Silva de Castro, Caio Cesar; Abdallah, Marwa; Vrijman, Charlotte; Bekkenk, Marcel; Seneschal, Julien; Pandya, Amit G; Ezzedine, Khaled; Picardo, Mauro; Taïeb, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference (VGICC), through an international e-Delphi consensus, concluded that 'repigmentation' and 'maintenance of gained repigmentation' are essential core outcome measures in future vitiligo trials. This VGICC position paper addresses these core topics in two sections and includes an atlas depicting vitiligo repigmentation patterns and color match. The first section delineates mechanisms and characteristics of vitiligo repigmentation, and the second section summarizes the outcomes of international meeting discussions and two e-surveys on vitiligo repigmentation, which had been carried out over 3 yr. Treatment is defined as successful if repigmentation exceeds 80% and at least 80% of the gained repigmentation is maintained for over 6 months. No agreement was found on the best outcome measure for assessing target or global repigmentation, therefore highlighting the limitations of e-surveys in addressing clinical measurements. Until there is a clear consensus, existing tools should be selected according to the specific needs of each study. A workshop will be conducted to address the remaining issues so as to achieve a consensus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Colorectal Cancer Screening Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiliadis, Denis; Khoruts, Alexander; Zauber, Ann G; Hempstead, Sarah E; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2018-02-01

    Improved therapy has substantially increased survival of persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). But the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults with CF is 5-10 times greater compared to the general population, and 25-30 times greater in CF patients after an organ transplantation. To address this risk, the CF Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder task force to develop CRC screening recommendations. The 18-member task force consisted of experts including pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, a social worker, nurse coordinator, surgeon, epidemiologist, statistician, CF adult, and a parent. The committee comprised 3 workgroups: Cancer Risk, Transplant, and Procedure and Preparation. A guidelines specialist at the CF Foundation conducted an evidence synthesis February-March 2016 based on PubMed literature searches. Task force members conducted additional independent searches. A total of 1159 articles were retrieved. After initial screening, the committee read 198 articles in full and analyzed 123 articles to develop recommendation statements. An independent decision analysis evaluating the benefits of screening relative to harms and resources required was conducted by the Department of Public Health at Erasmus Medical Center, Netherlands using the Microsimulation Screening Analysis model from the Cancer Innervation and Surveillance Modeling Network. The task force included recommendation statements in the final guideline only if they reached an 80% acceptance threshold. The task force makes 10 CRC screening recommendations that emphasize shared, individualized decision-making and familiarity with CF-specific gastrointestinal challenges. We recommend colonoscopy as the preferred screening method, initiation of screening at age 40 years, 5-year re-screening and 3-year surveillance intervals (unless shorter interval is indicated by individual findings), and a CF-specific intensive bowel preparation. Organ transplant recipients with CF should initiate CRC screening

  12. A new spin on research translation: the Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica W; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Altman, Rebecca Gasior; Webster, Thomas F; Ozonoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    Translating research to make it more understandable and effective (research translation) has been declared a priority in environmental health but does not always include communication to the public or residents of communities affected by environmental hazards. Their unique perspectives are also commonly missing from discussions about science and technology policy. The consensus conference process, developed in Denmark, offers a way to address this gap. The Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring, held in Boston, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2006, was designed to educate and elicit input from 15 Boston-area residents on the scientifically complex topic of human biomonitoring for environmental chemicals. This lay panel considered the many ethical, legal, and scientific issues surrounding biomonitoring and prepared a report expressing their views. The lay panel's findings provide a distinct and important voice on the expanding use of biomonitoring. In some cases, such as a call for opt-in reporting of biomonitoring results to study participants, they mirror recommendations raised elsewhere. Other conclusions have not been heard previously, including the recommendation that an individual's results should be statutorily exempted from the medical record unless permission is granted, and the opportunity to use biomonitoring data to stimulate green chemistry. The consensus conference model addresses both aspects of a broader conception of research translation: engaging the public in scientific questions, and bringing their unique perspectives to bear on public health research, practice, and policy. In this specific application, a lay panel's recommendations on biomonitoring surveillance, communication, and ethics have practical implications for the conduct of biomonitoring studies and surveillance programs.

  13. CT features of vasculitides based on the 2012 international chapel hill consensus conference revised classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jee Hye; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Hae Young; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Kyung Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo; Yoo, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Vasculitis, characterized by inflammation of vessel walls, is comprised of heterogeneous clinicopathological entities, and thus poses a diagnostic challenge. The most widely used approach for classifying vasculitides is based on the International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature system. Based on the recently revised CHCC 2012, we propose computed tomography (CT) features of vasculitides and a differential diagnosis based on location and morphological characteristics. Finally, vasculitis mimics should be differentiated, because erroneous application of immunosuppressive drugs on vasculitis mimics may be ineffective, even deteriorating. This article presents the utility of CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vasculitides

  14. CT features of vasculitides based on the 2012 international chapel hill consensus conference revised classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jee Hye; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Hae Young; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Kyung Won [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Vasculitis, characterized by inflammation of vessel walls, is comprised of heterogeneous clinicopathological entities, and thus poses a diagnostic challenge. The most widely used approach for classifying vasculitides is based on the International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature system. Based on the recently revised CHCC 2012, we propose computed tomography (CT) features of vasculitides and a differential diagnosis based on location and morphological characteristics. Finally, vasculitis mimics should be differentiated, because erroneous application of immunosuppressive drugs on vasculitis mimics may be ineffective, even deteriorating. This article presents the utility of CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vasculitides.

  15. First Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Anna; Perucho, Manuel; Esteller, Manel; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer (BCEC) entitled “Challenges, opportunities and perspectives” took place November 21–22, 2013 in Barcelona. The 2013 BCEC is the first edition of a series of annual conferences jointly organized by five leading research centers in Barcelona. These centers are the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer (IMPPC), the Biomedical Campus Bellvitge with its Program of Epigenetics and Cancer Biology (PEBC), the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), the Institute for Biomedical Research (IRB), and the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB). Manuel Perucho and Marcus Buschbeck from the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer put together the scientific program of the first conference broadly covering all aspects of epigenetic research ranging from fundamental molecular research to drug and biomarker development and clinical application. In one and a half days, 23 talks and 50 posters were presented to a completely booked out audience counting 270 participants. PMID:24413145

  16. An updated Asia Pacific Consensus Recommendations on colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, J J Y; Ng, S C; Chan, F K L; Chiu, H M; Kim, H S; Matsuda, T; Ng, S S M; Lau, J Y W; Zheng, S; Adler, S; Reddy, N; Yeoh, K G; Tsoi, K K F; Ching, J Y L; Kuipers, E J; Rabeneck, L; Young, G P; Steele, R J; Lieberman, D; Goh, K L

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the first Asia Pacific Consensus on Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in 2008, there are substantial advancements in the science and experience of implementing CRC screening. The Asia Pacific Working Group aimed to provide an updated set of consensus recommendations. Members from 14 Asian regions gathered to seek consensus using other national and international guidelines, and recent relevant literature published from 2008 to 2013. A modified Delphi process was adopted to develop the statements. Age range for CRC screening is defined as 50-75 years. Advancing age, male, family history of CRC, smoking and obesity are confirmed risk factors for CRC and advanced neoplasia. A risk-stratified scoring system is recommended for selecting high-risk patients for colonoscopy. Quantitative faecal immunochemical test (FIT) instead of guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) is preferred for average-risk subjects. Ancillary methods in colonoscopy, with the exception of chromoendoscopy, have not proven to be superior to high-definition white light endoscopy in identifying adenoma. Quality of colonoscopy should be upheld and quality assurance programme should be in place to audit every aspects of CRC screening. Serrated adenoma is recognised as a risk for interval cancer. There is no consensus on the recruitment of trained endoscopy nurses for CRC screening. Based on recent data on CRC screening, an updated list of recommendations on CRC screening is prepared. These consensus statements will further enhance the implementation of CRC screening in the Asia Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing excellence in translational cancer research: a consensus based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Caldas, Carlos; van Luenen, Henri; Saghatchian, Mahasti; van Harten, Wim H

    2013-10-29

    It takes several years on average to translate basic research findings into clinical research and eventually deliver patient benefits. An expert-based excellence assessment can help improve this process by: identifying high performing Comprehensive Cancer Centres; best practices in translational cancer research; improving the quality and efficiency of the translational cancer research process. This can help build networks of excellent Centres by aiding focused partnerships. In this paper we report on a consensus building exercise that was undertaken to construct an excellence assessment framework for translational cancer research in Europe. We used mixed methods to reach consensus: a systematic review of existing translational research models critically appraised for suitability in performance assessment of Cancer Centres; a survey among European stakeholders (researchers, clinicians, patient representatives and managers) to score a list of potential excellence criteria, a focus group with selected representatives of survey participants to review and rescore the excellence criteria; an expert group meeting to refine the list; an open validation round with stakeholders and a critical review of the emerging framework by an independent body: a committee formed by the European Academy of Cancer Sciences. The resulting excellence assessment framework has 18 criteria categorized in 6 themes. Each criterion has a number of questions/sub-criteria. Stakeholders favoured using qualitative excellence criteria to evaluate the translational research "process" rather than quantitative criteria or judging only the outputs. Examples of criteria include checking if the Centre has mechanisms that can be rated as excellent for: involvement of basic researchers and clinicians in translational research (quality of supervision and incentives provided to clinicians to do a PhD in translational research) and well designed clinical trials based on ground-breaking concepts (innovative

  19. Critical thinking in health professions education: summary and consensus statements of the Millennium Conference 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Newman, Lori R; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking is central to the function of health care professionals. However, this topic is not explicitly taught or assessed within current programs, yet the need is greater than ever, in an era of information explosion, spiraling health care costs, and increased understanding about metacognition. To address the importance of teaching critical thinking in health professions education, the Shapiro Institute for Education and Research and the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation jointly sponsored the Millennium Conference 2011 on Critical Thinking. Teams of physician and nurse educators were selected through an application process. Attendees proposed strategies for integrating principles of critical thinking more explicitly into health professions curricula. Working in interprofessional, multi-institutional groups, participants tackled questions about teaching, assessment, and faculty development. Deliberations were summarized into consensus statements. Educational leaders participated in a structured dialogue about the enhancement of critical thinking in health professions education and recommend strategies to teach critical thinking.

  20. Esophageal cancer screening in achalasia: is there a consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2015-04-01

    Achalasia is an important but relatively uncommon disorder. While highly effective therapeutic options exist, esophageal cancer remains a long-term potential complication. The risk of esophageal cancer in achalasia remains unclear, with current guidelines recommending against routine endoscopic screening. However, given limited data and conflicting opinion, it is unknown whether consensus regarding screening practices in achalasia among experts exists. A 10-question survey to assess screening practices in achalasia was created and distributed to 28 experts in the area of achalasia. Experts were identified based on publications and meeting presentations in the field. Survey responses were received from 17 of 28 (61%) experts. Wide geographic distribution was seen among respondents, with eight (47%) from Europe or Australia, seven (41%) from the United States, and two (12%) from Asia. Screening for esophageal cancer was inconsistent, with nine (53%) experts endorsing the practice and eight (47%) not. Screening practices did not differ among geographic regions. No consensus regarding the risk for esophageal cancer in achalasia was seen, with three experts reporting no increased risk compared with the general population, eight experts a lifetime risk of 0.1-0.5%, three experts a 0.5-1% risk, two experts a 1-2% risk, and one expert a 3-5% risk. However, these differences in perception of risk did not influence screening practices. Upper endoscopy was utilized among all experts who endorsed screening. However, practices still varied with screening commencing at or within 1 year of diagnosis in two practices compared with 5 and 10 years in three respective practices each. Surveillance intervals also varied, performed every 2 years in four practices, every 3 years in four practices, and every 5 years in one practice. Practice variation in the management of achalasia itself was also seen, with initial treatment with Heller myotomy endorsed by eight experts, pneumatic

  1. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  2. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus G K McNair

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs; however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard "core" set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery.The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods. Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78% centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35% patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%. Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained after the first and

  3. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  4. Reasons for holding a Consensus Conference on neuropsychological rehabilitation in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Làdavass, E; Paolucci, S; Umiltà, C

    2011-03-01

    Neuropsychological deficits are common in various cerebrovascular, neurodegenerative and traumatic pathologies. Neuropsychological rehabilitation refers to a set of interventions that aim to improve a person's ability to perform cognitive tasks by retraining previously learned skills and teaching compensatory strategies. However, today there are some relevant points that need of further investigations. In 2007, a Task Force was set up under the auspices of several scientific societies that operate in the field of psychology, neuropsychology, rehabilitation and neurology (AIP, GIRN, SIMFER, SIN, SINP, and SPAN) with the aim to clarify the theoretical background of neuropsychological rehabilitation and to assess the diagnostic instruments and the treatments available to date. This consensus conference (CC), using methods derived from those of Evidence-Based-Medicine (EMB), evaluated several points, including: a) legal aspects; b) epidemiological aspects; c) neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional and executive disorders; d) neuropsychological rehabilitation of speech/language disorders; e) neuropsychological rehabilitation of visual field defects; f) neuropsychological rehabilitation of neglect; g) neuropsychological rehabilitation of memory disorders; h) cognitive rehabilitation of arm apraxia; i) neuropsychological rehabilitation of Alzheimer disease; j) rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis; k) rehabilitation of severe brain injuries; l) rehabilitation of mild to moderate brain injuries; m) rehabilitation of behavioral disorders in severe brain injuries. Then, CC submitted to a specific Jury a final report with summary tables and questions. The final meeting of the Jury was held in Siena in February 2010.

  5. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  6. The Berlin 2016 process: a summary of methodology for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwisse, Willem H; Schneider, Kathryn J; Dvořák, Jiří; Omu, Onutobor Tobi; Finch, Caroline F; Hayden, K Alix; McCrory, Paul

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarise the methodology for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport. The 18 months of preparation included engagement of a scientific committee, an expert panel of 33 individuals in the field of concussion and a modified Delphi technique to determine the primary questions to be answered. The methodology also involved the writing of 12 systematic reviews to inform the consensus conference and submission and review of scientific abstracts. The meeting itself followed a 2-day open format, a 1-day closed expert panel meeting and two additional half day meetings to develop the Concussion Recognition Tool 5 (Pocket CRT5), Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5 (SCAT5) and Child SCAT5. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Using Simulations to Improve Electronic Health Record Use, Clinician Training and Patient Safety: Recommendations From A Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Vishnu; Woodcock, Deborah; McGrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; Pranaat, Robert; Doberne, Julie W.; Chase, Dian A.; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Ash, Joan S.

    2017-01-01

    A group of informatics experts in simulation, biomedical informatics, patient safety, medical education, and human factors gathered at Corbett, Oregon on April 30 and May 1, 2015. Their objective: to create a consensus statement on best practices for the use of electronic health record (EHR) simulations in education and training, to improve patient safety, and to outline a strategy for future EHR simulation work. A qualitative approach was utilized to analyze data from the conference and gene...

  8. College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytology: background, rationale, and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworek, Joseph A; Henry, Michael R; Blond, Barbara; Jones, Bruce Allen

    2013-02-01

    Gynecologic cytopathology is a heavily regulated field, with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 mandating the collection of many quality metrics. There is a lack of consensus regarding methods to collect, monitor, and benchmark these data and how these data should be used in a quality assurance program. Furthermore, the introduction of human papilloma virus testing and proficiency testing has provided more data to monitor. To determine good laboratory practices in quality assurance of gynecologic cytopathology. Data were collected through a written survey consisting of 98 questions submitted to 1245 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-licensed or Department of Defense laboratories. There were 541 usable responses. Additional input was sought through a Web posting of results and questions on the College of American Pathologists Web site. Four senior authors who authored the survey and 28 cytopathologists and cytotechnologists were assigned to 5 working groups to analyze data and present statements on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytopathology at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference. Ninety-eight attendees at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference discussed and voted on good laboratory practice statements to obtain consensus. This paper describes the rationale, background, process, and strengths and limitations of a series of papers that summarize good laboratory practice statements in quality assurance in gynecologic cytopathology.

  9. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  10. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  11. Consensus on the clinical management, screening-to-treat, and surveillance of Helicobacter pylori infection to improve gastric cancer control on a nationwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lo, Jing-Chuan; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Wu, Chun-Ying; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Lee, Yi-Chia; Hsu, Ping-I; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2017-06-01

    Previous international consensus statements provided general policies for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are geographic differences in the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, and in the availability of medications and endoscopy. Thus, nationwide or regional consensus statements are needed to improve control of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. This consensus statement for management of H. pylori in Taiwan has three major sections: (1) optimal diagnosis and indications; (2) current treatment strategies; and (3) screening-to-treat and surveillance for control of gastric cancer. The literature review emphasized recent data for development of draft statements and determination of levels of evidence. Twenty-five Taiwan experts conducted a consensus conference, by a modified Delphi process, to modify the draft statements. Consensus, defined as an agreement of least 80% of the experts, and recommendation grade were determined by anonymous voting. There were 24 consensus statements. Section 1 has seven statements on recommendations for the diagnosis and indications for treatment of H. pylori infection. Section 2 has 10 statements that provide an updated treatment algorithm for first-line, second-line, and third-line regimens. Section 3 has seven statements regarding H. pylori eradication for reducing the risk of gastric cancer, with a cost-benefit analysis. After H. pylori eradication, the consensus highlights the use of endoscopic surveillance and/or chemoprevention to further reduce the burden of gastric cancer. This consensus statement has updated recommendations for improving the clinical management of H. pylori infection in areas such as Taiwan, which have high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Using new media for online consensus conferences and open external review of guidelines - results of two pilot studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Alexander; Rosumeck, Stefanie; Sporbeck, Birte; Rzany, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The development of guidelines almost always requires considerable time and financial resources. An important task is therefore to identify and evaluate online methods that facilitate guideline work. ONLINE CONSENSUS CONFERENCE: During the development of the S2k guideline for the management of staphylococcus aureus infections an online consensus conference was held using an online tool provided by the Deutsche Forschungsnetz in combination with a telephone conference. During the 2-hour meeting, no technical difficulties occurred. A survey among the participants showed that this format had a high rate of acceptance. ONLINE REVIEW: During the development of the update of the German S3-Guidelines for the therapy of psoriasis an external open review was performed. An online platform allowing direct visible commenting was chosen. During the five week period of commenting, 26 users added 160 comments. After the review process, the comments were assessed by the editors and the original authors. The selected instrument provides a suitable means for online commenting of guidelines and facilitates the revision of the text. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Using Simulations to Improve Electronic Health Record Use, Clinician Training and Patient Safety: Recommendations From A Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Vishnu; Woodcock, Deborah; McGrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; Pranaat, Robert; Doberne, Julie W; Chase, Dian A; Gold, Jeffrey A; Ash, Joan S

    2016-01-01

    A group of informatics experts in simulation, biomedical informatics, patient safety, medical education, and human factors gathered at Corbett, Oregon on April 30 and May 1, 2015. Their objective: to create a consensus statement on best practices for the use of electronic health record (EHR) simulations in education and training, to improve patient safety, and to outline a strategy for future EHR simulation work. A qualitative approach was utilized to analyze data from the conference and generate recommendations in five major categories: (1) Safety, (2) Education and Training, (3) People and Organizations, (4) Usability and Design, and (5) Sociotechnical Aspects.

  14. The 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: Definition of Grading Patterns and Proposal for a New Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Egevad, Lars; Amin, Mahul B; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Humphrey, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    In November, 2014, 65 prostate cancer pathology experts, along with 17 clinicians including urologists, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists from 19 different countries gathered in a consensus conference to update the grading of prostate cancer, last revised in 2005. The major conclusions were: (1) Cribriform glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (2) Glomeruloid glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (3) Grading of mucinous carcinoma of the prostate should be based on its underlying growth pattern rather than grading them all as pattern 4; and (4) Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate without invasive carcinoma should not be assigned a Gleason grade and a comment as to its invariable association with aggressive prostate cancer should be made. Regarding morphologies of Gleason patterns, there was clear consensus on: (1) Gleason pattern 4 includes cribriform, fused, and poorly formed glands; (2) The term hypernephromatoid cancer should not be used; (3) For a diagnosis of Gleason pattern 4, it needs to be seen at 10x lens magnification; (4) Occasional/seemingly poorly formed or fused glands between well-formed glands is insufficient for a diagnosis of pattern 4; (5) In cases with borderline morphology between Gleason pattern 3 and pattern 4 and crush artifacts, the lower grade should be favored; (6) Branched glands are allowed in Gleason pattern 3; (7) Small solid cylinders represent Gleason pattern 5; (8) Solid medium to large nests with rosette-like spaces should be considered to represent Gleason pattern 5; and (9) Presence of unequivocal comedonecrosis, even if focal is indicative of Gleason pattern 5. It was recognized by both pathologists and clinicians that despite the above changes, there were deficiencies with the Gleason system. The Gleason grading system ranges from 2 to 10, yet 6 is the lowest score currently assigned. When patients are told that they have a Gleason score 6 out

  15. Recommendations for clinical practice and research in severe brain injury in intensive rehabilitation: the Italian Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tanti, A; Zampolini, M; Pregno, S

    2015-02-01

    The paper reports the final statements of the jury of a National Consensus Conference organized in November 2010 at Salsomaggiore (Parma) to draw up recommendations on the rehabilitation programs for acquired brain injury (sABI) patients in the intensive hospital phase. Because of the few clinical studies of good quality found by means of the literature research we choose a mixed approach: a systematic review of the published studies and a consensus conference in order to obtain recommendations that come from the clinical evidence and the expert opinion. The final recommendations of the jury, based on the best available evidence combined with clinical expertise and the experience of persons with disabilities and other stakeholders, cover 13 topics: 1) Management of paroxysmal manifestations (sympathetic storms); 2) management of neuroendocrine problems; 3) nutrition; 4) swallowing; 5) ventilation/respiration, 6) clinical and instrument diagnosis and prognosis of vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS), 7) rehabilitative and pharmacological facilitation of renewed contact with surroundings; 8) neurosurgical complications and hydrocephalus; 9) sensorimotor impairment and disability; 10) rehabilitation methods; 11) assessment and treatment of cognitive-behavioural impairment and disability; 12) methodology and organization of care; 13) involving family and caregivers in rehabilitation.

  16. Compression of digital images in radiology. Results of a consensus conference; Kompression digitaler Bilddaten in der Radiologie. Ergebnisse einer Konsensuskonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Braunschweig, R. [BG Kliniken Bergmannstrost, Halle/Saale (Germany). Klinik fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Interventionsradiologie; Kotter, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Mildenberger, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Simmler, R.; Wucherer, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Recommendations for lossy compression of digital radiological DICOM images in Germany by means of a consensus conference. The compression of digital radiological images was evaluated in many studies. Even though the results demonstrate full diagnostic image quality of modality-dependent compression between 1:5 and 1:200, there are only a few clinical applications. Materials and Methods: A consensus conference with approx. 80 interested participants (radiology, industry, physics, and agencies) without individual invitation was organized by the working groups AGIT and APT of the German Roentgen Society DRG to determine compression factors without loss of diagnostic image quality for different anatomical regions for CT, CR/DR, MR, RF/XA examinations. The consent level was specified as at least 66 %. Results: For individual modalities the following compression factors were recommended: CT (brain) 1:5, CT (all other applications) 1:8, CR/DR (all applications except mammography) 1:10, CR/DR (mammography) 1:15, MR (all applications) 1:7, RF/XA (fluoroscopy, DSA, cardiac angio) 1:6. The recommended compression ratios are valid for JPEG and JPEG 2000 /Wavelet compressions. Conclusion: The results may be understood as recommendations and indicate limits of compression factors with no expected reduction of diagnostic image quality. They are similar to the current national recommendations for Canada and England. (orig.)

  17. Overcoming burdens in the regulation of clinical research in children. Proceedings of a consensus conference, in historical context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many investigators are concerned that the modes of implementation and enforcement of the federal regulations designed to protect children are unduly impeding pediatric clinical research. Objective To assess regulatory impediments to clinical research involving children and to develop recommendations to ameliorate them. Participants The Pediatric Endocrine Society and The Endocrine Society convened a consensus conference involving experts and stakeholders in patient-oriented research involving children and adolescents in 2008. Consensus process Following presentations that reviewed problematic issues around key regulations, participants divided into working groups to develop potential solutions that could be adopted at local and federal levels. Presentations to the full assembly were then debated. A writing committee then drafted a summary of the discussions and main conclusions, placing them in historical context, and submitted it to all participants for comment with the aim of developing consensus. Conclusions Recommendations designed to facilitate the ethical conduct of research involving children addressed the interpretation of ambiguous regulatory terms such as "minimal risk" and "condition" and called for the development by professional societies of best practice primers for common research procedures that would be informative to both investigators and institutional review boards. A call was issued for improved guidance from the Office for Human Research Protections and Food and Drug Administration as well as for the development by professional societies of a process to monitor progress in improving human subject research regulation. Finally, a need for systematic research to define the nature and extent of institutional obstacles to pediatric research was recognized.

  18. Tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance and management: recommendations of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Darcy A; Northrup, Hope

    2013-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder affecting every organ system, but disease manifestations vary significantly among affected individuals. The diverse and varied presentations and progression can be life-threatening with significant impact on cost and quality of life. Current surveillance and management practices are highly variable among region and country, reflective of the fact that last consensus recommendations occurred in 1998 and an updated, comprehensive standard is lacking that incorporates the latest scientific evidence and current best clinical practices. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group, comprising 79 specialists from 14 countries, was organized into 12 separate subcommittees, each led by a clinician with advanced expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex and the relevant medical subspecialty. Each subcommittee focused on a specific disease area with important clinical management implications and was charged with formulating key clinical questions to address within its focus area, reviewing relevant literature, evaluating the strength of data, and providing a recommendation accordingly. The updated consensus recommendations for clinical surveillance and management in tuberous sclerosis complex are summarized here. The recommendations are relevant to the entire lifespan of the patient, from infancy to adulthood, including both individuals where the diagnosis is newly made as well as individuals where the diagnosis already is established. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Recommendations provide an evidence-based, standardized approach for optimal clinical care provided for individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 77 FR 38844 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... diabetes mellitus should be recommended, if any? 7. What are the key research gaps in the diagnostic... pregnancy). It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance, which is the inability of the body to adequately... for Healthcare Research and Quality's Evidence-based Practice Centers program, and a Consensus...

  20. Practical consensus recommendations regarding the management of hormone receptor positive early breast cancer in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Babu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women, and its incidence increases with age. Currently the treatment of breast cancer in older patients is almost identical to their younger counterparts. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at these practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists regarding the management of early breast cancer specifically in elderly women.

  1. Involving patients in a multidisciplinary European consensus process and in the development of a 'patient summary of the consensus document for colon and rectal cancer care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Petra G; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-01-01

    High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of cancer care by reducing variation in the diagnostic and treatment process. EURECCA acknowledges the important role of patients in implementation of consensus information in clinical practice. The aim of this article is to describe the process of involving patients in the consensus process and in developing the patient summary of the consensus for colon and rectal cancer care. The Delphi method for achieving consensus was used. Three online voting rounds and one tele-voting round were offered to an expert panel of oncology professionals and patient representatives. At four different stages, patients and/or patient representatives were involved in the process: (1) during the consensus process, (2) lecturing about the role of the patient, (3) development of the patient summary, and (4) testing the patient summary. Representatives were invited to the voting and commenting rounds of this process and given an equal vote. Although patients were not consulted during the planning stages of this process, patient involvement increased following the panel's discussion of the implementation of the consensus among the patient population. After the consensus meeting, the patient summary was written by patient representatives, oncologists and nurses. A selection of proactive patients reviewed the draft patient summary; responses were positive and several patient-reported outcomes were added. Questionnaires to evaluate the use and implementation of the patient summary in daily practice are currently being developed and tested. Patient consultation will be needed in future planning for selection of topics. The present study may function as a model for future consensus processes to involve patients

  2. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  3. Sentinel node biopsy for prostate cancer: report from a consensus panel meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, Henk G; Wit, Esther M; Acar, Cenk; van den Berg, Nynke S; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Valdes Olmos, Renato A; Winter, Alexander; Wawroschek, Friedhelm; Liedberg, Fredrik; Maclennan, Steven; Lam, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    To explore the evidence and knowledge gaps in sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in prostate cancer through a consensus panel of experts. A two-round Delphi survey among experts was followed by a consensus panel meeting of 16 experts in February 2016. Agreement voting was performed using the research and development project/University of California, Los Angeles Appropriateness Methodology on 150 statements in nine domains. The disagreement index based on the interpercentile range, adjusted for symmetry score, was used to assess consensus and non-consensus among panel members. Consensus was obtained on 91 of 150 statements (61%). The main outcomes were: (1) the results from an extended lymph node dissection (eLND) are still considered the 'gold standard', and sentinel node (SN) detection should be combined with eLND, at least in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer; (2) the role of SN detection in low-risk prostate cancer is unclear; and (3) future studies should contain oncological endpoints as number of positive nodes outside the eLND template, false-negative and false-positive SN procedures, and recurrence-free survival. A high rate of consensus was obtained regarding outcome measures of future clinical trials on SNB (89%). Consensus on tracer technology was only obtained in 47% of statements, reflecting a need for further research and standardization in this area. The low-level evidence in the available literature and the composition of mainly SNB users in the panel constitute the major limitations of the study. Consensus on a majority of elementary statements on SN detection in prostate cancer was obtained.; therefore, the results from this consensus report will provide a basis for the design of further studies in the field. A group of experts identified evidence and knowledge gaps on SN detection in prostate cancer and its application in daily practice. Information from the consensus statements can be used to direct further studies. © 2017 The

  4. 75 FR 43535 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy for Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    .... Babies born before the 28th week of pregnancy--more than 30,000 per year in the United States--are... charged with reviewing the available published literature in advance of the conference, including a systematic literature review commissioned through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The first...

  5. [Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Hereditary colorectal cancer can be divded into two categories based on the presence or absence of polyps. The first category is characterized by the development of polyposis, which includes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP); The second category is nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, which is represented by Lynch syndrome. "Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China" developed by the Genetics Group of the Committee of Colorectal Cancer, Chinese Anti-cancer Association, is composed of three sections, including hereditary nonpolyposis syndrome, polyposis syndrome as well as genetic evaluation of hereditary colorectal cancer. The consensus aims to provide recommendations on management of the respective hereditary syndromes in terms of definition, clinical and pathological features, diagnostic standards, treatment, and follow-ups. In addition to describing diagnostic and treatment strategies, prophylactic treatment as well as genetic screening and pedigree monitoring is highly recommended. Through the establishment of this expert consensus, we hope to promote better understanding of hereditary colorectal cancer for clinicians and encourage standardized treatment through multidisciplinery approaches, eventually improving clinical treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China.

  6. Information beyond the forum: Motivations, strategies, and impacts of citizen participants seeking information during a consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A; Delborne, Jason; Kleinman, Daniel Lee

    2013-11-01

    During traditional consensus conferences, organizers control the formal information available to participants-by compiling structured background materials and recruiting expert panelists. Less formally, however, participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences into the deliberations, and in doing so, they often seek outside information. We explore this heretofore understudied phenomenon of information seeking during a deliberative event: the U.S. National Citizens' Technology Forum (2008), which addressed the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science on the potential development of human-enhancement technologies. Through interviews with participants and observation of in-person and online deliberations, we identify outside information-seeking strategies and motivations. Our study demonstrates that conceptualizing models of deliberation as standalone settings of communication exchange ignores the reality of the complex information environment from which deliberative participants draw when making sense of technical issues. Future citizen deliberations must incorporate outside information seeking in the design of the exercises.

  7. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A

    2011-01-01

    The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices....... This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context...... and needs, the need for better evidence to support use of technologies in health profession education assessment, and a number of challenges, particularly validity threats, that need to be addressed while incorporating technology in assessment. Our recommendations are intended for all practitioners across...

  8. The International Conference on the Great Lakes Region and the implementation of the Ezulwini Consensus: Challenges and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirambere P. Tunamsifu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is evaluative assessing the implementation of the Ezulwini Consensus by the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR. In early April 2012, a mutiny started in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC, resulting in the creation of the rebel group known as the Mouvement du 23 Mars (M23. The spread of M23 constituted a serious threat to peace, security and stability in the entire African Great Lakes region. On the basis of the Ezulwini Consensus, which emphasises that regional organisations in areas of proximity to conflicts should be empowered to take action, the ICGLR resolved to intervene. Through several summits attempting to find a home-grown solution, the ICGLR faced two main challenges in implementing the Ezulwini Consensus. The first was related to the lack of actions and sanctions against member states that violated fundamental principles and the second was related to the lack of neutrality of the chairperson of the ICGLR during the dialogue between the government of the DRC and M23. The intervention of the ICGLR is important, but in such circumstances, it is crucial that member states demonstrate their political will to respect fundamental principles and sanction members that allegedly ignore these principles. In the mediation process, where there is sufficient evidence to indicate that a member state is allegedly providing support to rebel groups that are destabilising another member state, it is important that the ICGLR adopt a policy of requesting such a country to avoid taking the lead in or mediating the conflict. However, when regional organisations in areas of conflict face such challenges, the African Union must take responsibility for comediating or sending African experts to resolve the conflict impartially.

  9. The Consensus from the Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP Conference 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Todd Kuenstner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On March 24 and 25, 2017 researchers and clinicians from around the world met at Temple University in Philadelphia to discuss the current knowledge of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP and its relationship to human disease. The conference was held because of shared concern that MAP is a zoonotic bacterium that poses a threat not only to animal health but also human health. In order to further study this problem, the conferees discussed ways to improve MAP diagnostic tests and discussed potential future anti-MAP clinical trials. The conference proceedings may be viewed on the www.Humanpara.org website. A summary of the salient work in this field is followed by recommendations from a majority of the conferees.

  10. Consensus conference on core radiological parameters to describe lumbar stenosis - an initiative for structured reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian F.X. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Deyo, Richard A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Porchet, Francois [Schulthess Klinik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Steurer, Johann [University Hospital Zurich, Horten Center for patient oriented research and knowledge transfer, Zurich (Switzerland); Collaboration: On behalf of the LSOS working group

    2014-12-15

    To define radiological criteria and parameters as a minimum standard in a structured radiological report for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to identify criteria and parameters for research purposes. All available radiological criteria and parameters for LSS were identified using systematic literature reviews and a Delphi survey. We invited to the consensus meeting, and provided data, to 15 internationally renowned experts from different countries. During the meeting, these experts reached consensus in a structured and systematic discussion about a core list of radiological criteria and parameters for standard reporting. We identified a total of 27 radiological criteria and parameters for LSS. During the meeting, the experts identified five of these as core items for a structured report. For central stenosis, these were ''compromise of the central zone'' and ''relation between fluid and cauda equina''. For lateral stenosis, the group agreed that ''nerve root compression in the lateral recess'' was a core item. For foraminal stenosis, we included ''nerve root impingement'' and ''compromise of the foraminal zone''. As a minimum standard, five radiological criteria should be used in a structured radiological report in LSS. Other parameters are well suited for research. (orig.)

  11. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation : Emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options Executive summary* of the report from the 3rd AFNET/EHRA consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Vardas, Panos; Breithardt, Guenter; Camm, A. John

    2011-01-01

    There are exciting new developments in several areas of atrial fibrillation (AF) management that carry the hope of improving outcomes in AF patients. This paper is an executive summary that summarises the proceedings from the 3rd AFNET/EHRA consensus conference on atrial fibrillation, held in Sophia

  12. Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer-Report from a Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J.; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.; Johansen, T. Bjerklund; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; de Reijke, T.; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  13. Focal therapy in prostate cancer-report from a consensus panel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Johansen, T.B.; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; Reijke, T. de; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  14. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  15. Consensus Conference: A reappraisal of Gaucher disease - diagnosis and disease management algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K.; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Lukina, Elena; Özsan, Hayri; Pascual, Sara Mach; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Solano, Maria Helena; Spigelman, Zachary; Villarrubia, Jesús; Watman, Nora Patricia; Massenkeil, Gero

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 (non neuronopathic) Gaucher disease was the first lysosomal storage disorder for which an effective enzyme replacement therapy was developed and it has become a prototype for treatments for related orphan diseases. There are currently four treatment options available to patients with Gaucher disease, nevertheless, almost 25% of type 1 Gaucher patients do not gain timely access to therapy because of delays in diagnosis after the onset of symptoms. Diagnosis of Gaucher disease by enzyme testing is unequivocal, but the rarity of the disease and non-specific and heterogeneous nature of Gaucher disease symptoms may impede consideration of this disease in the differential diagnosis. To help promote timely diagnosis and optimal management of the protean presentations of Gaucher disease, a consensus meeting was convened to develop algorithms for diagnosis and disease management for Gaucher disease. PMID:21080341

  16. Research in assessment: Consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Colliver, Jerry; Gruppen, Larry

    2011-01-01

    educational research, a plethora of methodologies is available to cater to many different research questions. This article contains consensus positions and suggestions on various elements of medical education (assessment) research. Overarching is the position that without a good theoretical underpinning...... and good knowledge of the existing literature, good research and sound conclusions are impossible to produce, and that there is no inherently superior methodology, but that the best methodology is the one most suited to answer the research question unambiguously. Although the positions should...... not be perceived as dogmas, they should be taken as very serious recommendations. Topics covered are: types of research, theoretical frameworks, designs and methodologies, instrument properties or psychometrics, costs/acceptability, ethics, infrastructure and support....

  17. Pitfalls of consensus-orientated dialogue: the German Islam Conference (Deutsche Islam Konferenz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirin Amir-Moazami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses one deliberative approach to dialogue as conceptualized by the philosopher Jürgen Habermas and brings this into a conversation with the current dialogue practice of the Deutsche Islam Konferenz (DIK in Germany. This ongoing dialogue forum was initiated by the Ministry of the Interior in the autumn of 2006 in order to enact a structured conversation with Muslims and as a means of recognising them as ‘German Muslims’. My main argument is twofold. Focusing on Habermas’s ideal of dialogue as a consensus oriented rational discourse of equal citizens in non-hegemonic structures, I will argue, on the one hand, that much of the promise of the DIK to enact a dialogue with Muslims at eyelevel and to recognise them as equal citizens on the basis of the liberal-democratic order has not been fulfilled. With its top-down approach to Muslims as mere re-actors the DIK has so far turned out to be much more a governmental technique which aims at reshaping Muslims according to liberal/secular norms. On the other hand, I claim that although the DIK obviously runs counter to Habermas’s principles in many ways, it also shares and simultaneously lays bare the difficulties entailed in his consensus orientation, and, more importantly, in the secular bias of his approach.Schirin Amir-Moazai is Assistant Professor for Islam in Europe in the Department of Islamic Studies at Free University Berlin. Website: http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/e/islamwiss/mitarbeiterinnen/professorinnen/Amir-Moazami/index.html.

  18. STRATEGIC PRIORITIES FOR INCREASING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG ADULTS AGE 50 AND OLDER: THE NATIONAL BLUEPRINT CONSENSUS CONFERENCE SUMMARY REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Bazzarre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available On May 1, 2001, a coalition of national organizations released a major planning document designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was developed with input from 46 organizations with expertise in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, gerontology/geriatrics, clinical science, public policy, marketing, medical systems, community organization, and environmental issues. The Blueprint notes that, despite a wealth of evidence about the benefits of physical activity for mid-life and older persons, there has been little success in convincing age 50+ Americans to adopt physically active lifestyles. The Blueprint identifies barriers in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical systems, public policy and advocacy, and marketing and communications. In addition to identifying barriers, the Blueprint proposes a number of concrete strategies that could be employed in order to overcome the barriers to physical activity in society at large. This report summarizes the outcome of the National Blueprint Consensus Conference that was held in October 2002. In this conference, representatives of more than 50 national organizations convened in Washington, D.C. with the goal of identifying high priority and high feasibility strategies which would advance the National Blueprint and which could be initiated within the next 12 to 24 months. Participants in the consensus conference were assigned to one of five breakout groups: home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. Each breakout group was charged with identifying the three highest priority strategies within their area for effectively increasing physical activity levels in the mid-life and older adult population. In addition to the 15 strategies identified by the

  19. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Galsky, Matthew D; Konety, Badrinath R; Lamm, Donald L; Langham, David; Lee, Cheryl T; Milowsky, Matthew I; O'Donnell, Michael A; O'Donnell, Peter H; Petrylak, Daniel P; Sharma, Padmanee; Skinner, Eila C; Sonpavde, Guru; Taylor, John A; Abraham, Prasanth; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2017-08-15

    The standard of care for most patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is immunotherapy with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which activates the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant cells and has demonstrated durable clinical benefit. Urologic best-practice guidelines and consensus reports have been developed and strengthened based on data on the timing, dose, and duration of therapy from randomized clinical trials, as well as by critical evaluation of criteria for progression. However, these reports have not penetrated the community, and many patients do not receive appropriate therapy. Additionally, several immune checkpoint inhibitors have recently been approved for treatment of metastatic disease. The approval of immune checkpoint blockade for patients with platinum-resistant or -ineligible metastatic bladder cancer has led to considerations of expanded use for both advanced and, potentially, localized disease. To address these issues and others surrounding the appropriate use of immunotherapy for the treatment of bladder cancer, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a Task Force of experts, including physicians, patient advocates, and nurses, to address issues related to patient selection, toxicity management, clinical endpoints, as well as the combination and sequencing of therapies. Following the standard approach established by the Society for other cancers, a systematic literature review and analysis of data, combined with consensus voting was used to generate guidelines. Here, we provide a consensus statement for the use of immunotherapy in patients with bladder cancer, with plans to update these recommendations as the field progresses.

  20. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, Denise

    2005-01-01

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site

  1. Assessing excellence in translational cancer research: a consensus based framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, A.; Caldas, C.; van Luenen, H.; Saghatchian, M.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It takes several years on average to translate basic research findings into clinical research and eventually deliver patient benefits. An expert-based excellence assessment can help improve this process by: identifying high performing Comprehensive Cancer Centres; best practices in

  2. A smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer: establishing system requirements and a pain care algorithm based on literature review, interviews, and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibb, Lindsay A; Stevens, Bonnie J; Nathan, Paul C; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2014-03-19

    Pain that occurs both within and outside of the hospital setting is a common and distressing problem for adolescents with cancer. The use of smartphone technology may facilitate rapid, in-the-moment pain support for this population. To ensure the best possible pain management advice is given, evidence-based and expert-vetted care algorithms and system design features, which are designed using user-centered methods, are required. To develop the decision algorithm and system requirements that will inform the pain management advice provided by a real-time smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer. A systematic approach to algorithm development and system design was utilized. Initially, a comprehensive literature review was undertaken to understand the current body of knowledge pertaining to pediatric cancer pain management. A user-centered approach to development was used as the results of the review were disseminated to 15 international experts (clinicians, scientists, and a consumer) in pediatric pain, pediatric oncology and mHealth design, who participated in a 2-day consensus conference. This conference used nominal group technique to develop consensus on important pain inputs, pain management advice, and system design requirements. Using data generated at the conference, a prototype algorithm was developed. Iterative qualitative testing was conducted with adolescents with cancer, as well as pediatric oncology and pain health care providers to vet and refine the developed algorithm and system requirements for the real-time smartphone app. The systematic literature review established the current state of research related to nonpharmacological pediatric cancer pain management. The 2-day consensus conference established which clinically important pain inputs by adolescents would require action (pain management advice) from the app, the appropriate advice the app should provide to adolescents in pain, and the functional requirements of the app

  3. Research in assessment: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Colliver, Jerry; Gruppen, Larry; Kreiter, Clarence; Mennin, Stewart; Onishi, Hirotaka; Pangaro, Louis; Ringsted, Charlotte; Swanson, David; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Wagner-Menghin, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Medical education research in general is a young scientific discipline which is still finding its own position in the scientific range. It is rooted in both the biomedical sciences and the social sciences, each with their own scientific language. A more unique feature of medical education (and assessment) research is that it has to be both locally and internationally relevant. This is not always easy and sometimes leads to purely ideographic descriptions of an assessment procedure with insufficient general lessons or generalised scientific knowledge being generated or vice versa. For medical educational research, a plethora of methodologies is available to cater to many different research questions. This article contains consensus positions and suggestions on various elements of medical education (assessment) research. Overarching is the position that without a good theoretical underpinning and good knowledge of the existing literature, good research and sound conclusions are impossible to produce, and that there is no inherently superior methodology, but that the best methodology is the one most suited to answer the research question unambiguously. Although the positions should not be perceived as dogmas, they should be taken as very serious recommendations. Topics covered are: types of research, theoretical frameworks, designs and methodologies, instrument properties or psychometrics, costs/acceptability, ethics, infrastructure and support.

  4. Application of fuzzy consensus for oral pre-cancer and cancer susceptibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Banerjee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health questionnaire data assessment conventionally relies upon statistical analysis in understanding disease susceptibility using discrete numbers and fails to reflect physician’s perspectives and missing narratives in data, which play subtle roles in disease prediction. In addressing such limitations, the present study applies fuzzy consensus in oral health and habit questionnaire data for a selected Indian population in the context of assessing susceptibility to oral pre-cancer and cancer. Methodically collected data were initially divided into age based small subgroups and fuzzy membership function was assigned to each. The methodology further proposed the susceptibility to oral precancers (viz. leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and squamous cell carcinoma in patients considering a fuzzy rulebase through If-Then rules with certain conditions. Incorporation of similarity measures using the Jaccard index was used during conversion into the linguistic output of fuzzy set to predict the disease outcome in a more accurate manner and associated condition of the relevant features. It is also expected that this analytical approach will be effective in devising strategies for policy making through real-life questionnaire data handling.

  5. Light deficiency confers breast cancer risk by endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2012-09-01

    North-America and northern European countries exhibit the highest incidence rate of breast cancer, whereas women in southern regions are relatively protected. Immigrants from low cancer incidence regions to high-incidence areas might exhibit similarly higher or excessive cancer risk as compared with the inhabitants of their adoptive country. Additional cancer risk may be conferred by incongruence between their biological characteristics and foreign environment. Many studies established the racial/ethnic disparities in the risk and nature of female breast cancer in United States between African-American and Caucasian women. Mammary tumors in black women are diagnosed at earlier age, and are associated with higher rate of mortality as compared with cancers of white cases. Results of studies on these ethnic/racial differences in breast cancer incidence suggest that excessive pigmentation of dark skinned women results in a relative light-deficiency. Poor light exposure may explain the deleterious metabolic and hormonal alterations; such as insulin resistance, deficiencies of estrogen, thyroxin and vitamin-D conferring excessive cancer risk. The more northern the location of an adoptive country the higher the cancer risk for dark skinned immigrants. Recognition of the deleterious systemic effects of darkness and excessive melatonin synthesis enables cancer protection treatment for people living in light-deficient environment. Recent patents provide new methods for the prevention of hormonal and metabolic abnormities.

  6. CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING: A CONSENSUS CONFERENCE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Vivian A; Grunberger, George; Anhalt, Henry; Bailey, Timothy S; Blevins, Thomas; Garg, Satish K; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hirsch, Irl B; Orzeck, Eric A; Roberts, Victor Lawrence; Tamborlane, William

    2016-08-01

    Barriers to continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) use continue to hamper adoption of this valuable technology for the management of diabetes. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology convened a public consensus conference February 20, 2016, to review available CGM data and propose strategies for expanding CGM access. Conference participants agreed that evidence supports the benefits of CGM in type 1 diabetes and that these benefits are likely to apply whenever intensive insulin therapy is used, regardless of diabetes type. CGM is likely to reduce healthcare resource utilization for acute and chronic complications, although real-world analyses are needed to confirm potential cost savings and quality of life improvements. Ongoing technological advances have improved CGM accuracy and usability, but more innovations in human factors, data delivery, reporting, and interpretation are needed to foster expanded use. The development of a standardized data report using similar metrics across all devices would facilitate clinician and patient understanding and utilization of CGM. Expanded CGM coverage by government and private payers is an urgent need. CGM improves glycemic control, reduces hypoglycemia, and may reduce overall costs of diabetes management. Expanding CGM coverage and utilization is likely to improve the health outcomes of people with diabetes. A1C = glycated hemoglobin AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology ASPIRE = Automation to Simulate Pancreatic Insulin Response CGM = continuous glucose monitoring HRQOL = health-related quality of life ICER = incremental cost-effectiveness ratio JDRF = Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation MARD = mean absolute relative difference MDI = multiple daily injections QALY = quality-adjusted life years RCT = randomized, controlled trial SAP = sensor-augmented pump SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose STAR = Sensor

  7. First brazilian consensus of advanced prostate cancer: recommendations for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Deeke Sasse

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Prostate cancer still represents a major cause of morbidity, and still about 20% of men with the disease are diagnosed or will progress to the advanced stage without the possibility of curative treatment. Despite the recent advances in scientific and technological knowledge and the availability of new therapies, there is still considerable heterogeneity in the therapeutic approaches for metastatic prostate cancer. Objectives This article presents a summary of the I Brazilian Consensus on Advanced Prostate Cancer, conducted by the Brazilian Society of Urology and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology. Materials and Methods Experts were selected by the medical societies involved. Forty issues regarding controversial issues in advanced disease were previously elaborated. The panel met for consensus, with a threshold established for 2/3 of the participants. Results and Conclusions The treatment of advanced prostate cancer is complex, due to the existence of a large number of therapies, with different response profiles and toxicities. The panel addressed recommendations on preferred choice of therapies, indicators that would justify their change, and indicated some strategies for better sequencing of treatment in order to maximize the potential for disease control with the available therapeutic arsenal. The lack of consensus on some topics clearly indicates the absence of strong evidence for some decisions.

  8. COPD management as a model for all chronic respiratory conditions: report of the 4th Consensus Conference in Respiratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Stefano; De Benedetto, Fernando; Sanguinetti, Claudio M; Bellofiore, Salvatore; Carlone, Stefano; Privitera, Salvatore; Sagliocca, Luciano; Tupputi, Emmanuele; Baccarani, Claudio; Caiffa, Gennaro; Calabrese, Maria Consiglia; Capuozzo, Antonio; Cauchi, Salvatore; Conio, Valentina; Coratella, Giuseppe; Crismancich, Franco; Dal Negro, Roberto W; Dellarole, Franco; Delucchi, Maurizio; Favaretti, Carlo; Forte, Silvia; Gallo, Franca Matilde; Giuliano, Riccardo; Grandi, Marco; Grillo, Antonino; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Guffanti, Enrico; Locicero, Salvatore; Lombardo, Francesco Paolo; Mantero, Marco; Marasso, Roberto; Martino, Laura; Mastroberardino, Michele; Mereu, Carlo; Messina, Roberto; Neri, Margherita; Novelletto, Bruno Franco; Parente, Paolo; Pasquinucci, Sergio; Pistolesi, Massimo; Polverino, Mario; Posca, Agnese; Richeldi, Luca; Roccia, Fernando; Giustini, Ettore Saffi; Salemi, Michelangelo; Santacroce, Salvatore; Schisano, Mario; Schisano, Matteo; Selvi, Eleonora; Silenzi, Andrea; Soverina, Patrizio; Taranto, Claudio; Ugolini, Marta; Visaggi, Piero; Zanasi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) kill 40 million people each year. The management of chronic respiratory NCDs such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is particularly critical in Italy, where they are widespread and represent a heavy burden on healthcare resources. It is thus important to redefine the role and responsibility of respiratory specialists and their scientific societies, together with that of the whole healthcare system, in order to create a sustainable management of COPD, which could become a model for other chronic respiratory conditions. These issues were divided into four main topics (Training, Organization, Responsibilities, and Sustainability) and discussed at a Consensus Conference promoted by the Research Center of the Italian Respiratory Society held in Rome, Italy, 3-4 November 2016. Regarding training, important inadequacies emerged regarding specialist training - both the duration of practical training courses and teaching about chronic diseases like COPD. A better integration between university and teaching hospitals would improve the quality of specialization. A better organizational integration between hospital and specialists/general practitioners (GPs) in the local community is essential to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for chronic respiratory patients. Improving the care pathways is the joint responsibility of respiratory specialists, GPs, patients and their caregivers, and the healthcare system. The sustainability of the entire system depends on a better organization of the diagnostic-therapeutic pathways, in which also other stakeholders such as pharmacists and pharmaceutical companies can play an important role.

  9. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  10. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents--an evidence-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Billy; Ceponis, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Czinn, Steve; Ferraro, Richard; Fischbach, Lori; Gold, Ben; Hyunh, Hien; Jacobson, Kevan; Jones, Nicola L; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lebel, Sylvie; Moayyedi, Paul; Ridell, Robert; Sherman, Philip; van Zanten, Sander; Beck, Ivan; Best, Linda; Boland, Margaret; Bursey, Ford; Chaun, Hugh; Cooper, Geraldine; Craig, Brian; Creuzenet, Carole; Critch, Jeffrey; Govender, Krishnasamy; Hassall, Eric; Kaplan, Alan; Keelan, Monica; Noad, Garth; Robertson, Marli; Smith, Lesley; Stein, Markus; Taylor, Diane; Walters, Thomas; Persaud, Robin; Whitaker, Scott; Woodland, Robert

    2005-07-01

    As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H. pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H. pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H. pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H. pylori infection; H. pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H. pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H. pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H. pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H. pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two antibiotics

  11. Spanish consensus for the management of patients with advanced radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Grande, Enrique; Zafón Llopis, Carles; Ramón y Cajal Asensio, Teresa; Navarro González, Elena; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Santamaría Sandi, Javier; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Capdevila, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one third of the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who develop structurally-evident metastatic disease are refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI). Most deaths from thyroid cancer occur in these patients. The main objective of this consensus is to address the most controversial aspects of management of these patients. On behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology & Nutrition (SEEN) and the Spanish Group for Orphan and Infrequent Tumors (GETHI), the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer, consisting of endocrinologists and oncologists, reviewed the relevant literature and prepared a series of clinically relevant questions related to management of advanced RAI-refractory DTC. Ten clinically relevant questions were identified by the task force. In answering to these 10 questions, the task force included recommendations regarding the best definition of refractoriness; the best therapeutic options including watchful waiting, local therapies, and systemic therapy (e.g. kinase inhibitors), when sodium iodide symporter (NIS) restoration may be expected; and how recent advances in molecular biology have increased our understanding of the disease. In response to our appointment as a task force by the SEEN and GHETI, we developed a consensus to help in clinical management of patients with advanced RAI-refractory DTC. We think that this consensus will provide helpful and current recommendations that will help patients with this disorder to get optimal medical care. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Organization, execution and evaluation of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care - an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R

    2014-12-01

    With the goal of reducing inequalities in patient care, the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," convened a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, health care providers, patients, and representatives of federal agencies and policy-makers in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014. The executive and steering committees identified seven clinical domains as key to gender-specific emergency care: cardiovascular, neurological, trauma/injury, substance abuse, pain, mental health, and diagnostic imaging. The main aims of the conference were to: 1) summarize and consolidate current data related to sex- and gender-specific research for acute care and identify critical gender-related gaps in knowledge to inform an EM research agenda; 2) create a consensus-driven research agenda that advances sex- and gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases and identify strategies to investigate them; and 3) build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to disseminate and study the sex and gender medicine of acute conditions. Over a 2-year period, this collaborative network of stakeholders identified key areas where sex- and gender-specific research is most likely to improve clinical care and ultimately patient outcomes. The iterative consensus process culminated in a daylong conference on May 13, 2014, with a total of 133 registrants, with the majority being between ages 31 and 50 years (57%), females (71%), and whites (79%). Content experts led the consensus-building workshops at the conference and used the nominal group technique to consolidate consensus recommendations for priority research. In addition, panel sessions addressed funding mechanisms for gender-specific research as well as gender-specific regulatory challenges to product development and approval. This special issue of AEM reports the

  13. Somatic cancer variant curation and harmonization through consensus minimum variant level data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah I. Ritter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To truly achieve personalized medicine in oncology, it is critical to catalog and curate cancer sequence variants for their clinical relevance. The Somatic Working Group (WG of the Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen, in cooperation with ClinVar and multiple cancer variant curation stakeholders, has developed a consensus set of minimal variant level data (MVLD. MVLD is a framework of standardized data elements to curate cancer variants for clinical utility. With implementation of MVLD standards, and in a working partnership with ClinVar, we aim to streamline the somatic variant curation efforts in the community and reduce redundancy and time burden for the interpretation of cancer variants in clinical practice. Methods We developed MVLD through a consensus approach by i reviewing clinical actionability interpretations from institutions participating in the WG, ii conducting extensive literature search of clinical somatic interpretation schemas, and iii survey of cancer variant web portals. A forthcoming guideline on cancer variant interpretation, from the Association of Molecular Pathology (AMP, can be incorporated into MVLD. Results Along with harmonizing standardized terminology for allele interpretive and descriptive fields that are collected by many databases, the MVLD includes unique fields for cancer variants such as Biomarker Class, Therapeutic Context and Effect. In addition, MVLD includes recommendations for controlled semantics and ontologies. The Somatic WG is collaborating with ClinVar to evaluate MVLD use for somatic variant submissions. ClinVar is an open and centralized repository where sequencing laboratories can report summary-level variant data with clinical significance, and ClinVar accepts cancer variant data. Conclusions We expect the use of the MVLD to streamline clinical interpretation of cancer variants, enhance interoperability among multiple redundant curation efforts, and increase submission of

  14. Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in cancer patients: An expert consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocón Bretón, María Julia; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Álvarez Hernández, Julia; Jiménez Fonseca, Paula; Cervera Peris, Mercedes; Sendrós Madroño, María José; Grande, Enrique; Camblor Álvarez, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    Malnutrition is a common medical problem in cancer patients with a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to address different issues related to nutritional management of cancer patients in clinical practice. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Endocrinology and Nutrition prepared a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients and grouped them into three blocks: nutritional support, parenteral nutrition (PN), and home PN (HPN). A literature review was made of articles published in Spanish, English and French until April 2017. This consensus emphasizes several key elements that help physicians standardize management of the nutritional status of cancer patients in clinical practice, and establishes common guidelines for indication, monitoring, nutritional requirements, and access routes to PN. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Fertilizing a Patient Engagement Ecosystem to Innovate Healthcare: Toward the First Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guendalina Graffigna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently we observe a gap between theory and practices of patient engagement. If both scholars and health practitioners do agree on the urgency to realize patient engagement, no shared guidelines exist so far to orient clinical practice. Despite a supportive policy context, progress to achieve greater patient engagement is patchy and slow and often concentrated at the level of policy regulation without dialoguing with practitioners from the clinical field as well as patients and families. Though individual clinicians, care teams and health organizations may be interested and deeply committed to engage patients and family members in the medical course, they may lack clarity about how to achieve this goal. This contributes to a wide “system” inertia—really difficult to be overcome—and put at risk any form of innovation in this filed. As a result, patient engagement risk today to be a buzz words, rather than a real guidance for practice. To make the field clearer, we promoted an Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement (ICCPE in order to set the ground for drafting recommendations for the provision of effective patient engagement interventions. The ICCPE will conclude in June 2017. This document reports on the preliminary phases of this process. In the paper, we advise the importance of “fertilizing a patient engagement ecosystem”: an oversimplifying approach to patient engagement promotion appears the result of a common illusion. Patient “disengagement” is a symptom that needs a more holistic and complex approach to solve its underlined causes. Preliminary principles to promote a patient engagement ecosystem are provided in the paper.

  16. Impact of electronic-alerting of acute kidney injury: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, Eric A J; Kashani, Kianoush; Gibney, Noel; Wilson, F Perry; Ronco, Claudio; Goldstein, Stuart L; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Among hospitalized patients, acute kidney injury is common and associated with significant morbidity and risk for mortality. The use of electronic health records (EHR) for prediction and detection of this important clinical syndrome has grown in the past decade. The steering committee of the 15(th) Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) conference dedicated a workgroup with the task of identifying elements that may impact the course of events following Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) e-alert. Following an extensive, non-systematic literature search, we used a modified Delphi process to reach consensus regarding several aspects of the utilization of AKI e-alerts. Topics discussed in this workgroup included progress in evidence base practices, the characteristics of an optimal e-alert, the measures of efficacy and effectiveness, and finally what responses would be considered best practices following AKI e-alerts. Authors concluded that the current evidence for e-alert system efficacy, although growing, remains insufficient. Technology and human-related factors were found to be crucial elements of any future investigation or implementation of such tools. The group also concluded that implementation of such systems should not be done without a vigorous plan to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of e-alerts. Efficacy and effectiveness of e-alerts should be measured by context-specific process and patient outcomes. Finally, the group made several suggestions regarding the clinical decision support that should be considered following successful e-alert implementation. This paper reflects the findings of a non-systematic review and expert opinion. We recommend implementation of the findings of this workgroup report for use of AKI e-alerts.

  17. Fertilizing a Patient Engagement Ecosystem to Innovate Healthcare: Toward the First Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Riva, Giuseppe; Savarese, Mariarosaria; Menichetti, Julia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Corbo, Massimo; Tzannis, Alessandra; Aglione, Antonio; Bettega, Donato; Bertoni, Anna; Bigi, Sarah; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Carzaniga, Claudia; Del Campo, Laura; Donato, Silvia; Gilardi, Silvia; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Gulizia, Michele; Lastretti, Mara; Mastrilli, Valeria; Mazzone, Antonino; Muttillo, Giovanni; Ostuzzi, Silvia; Perseghin, Gianluca; Piana, Natalia; Pitacco, Giuliana; Polvani, Gianluca; Pozzi, Massimo; Provenzi, Livio; Quaglini, Giulia; Rossi, Mariagrazia; Varese, Paola; Visalli, Natalia; Vegni, Elena; Ricciardi, Walter; Bosio, A Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Currently we observe a gap between theory and practices of patient engagement. If both scholars and health practitioners do agree on the urgency to realize patient engagement, no shared guidelines exist so far to orient clinical practice. Despite a supportive policy context, progress to achieve greater patient engagement is patchy and slow and often concentrated at the level of policy regulation without dialoguing with practitioners from the clinical field as well as patients and families. Though individual clinicians, care teams and health organizations may be interested and deeply committed to engage patients and family members in the medical course, they may lack clarity about how to achieve this goal. This contributes to a wide "system" inertia-really difficult to be overcome-and put at risk any form of innovation in this filed. As a result, patient engagement risk today to be a buzz words, rather than a real guidance for practice. To make the field clearer, we promoted an Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement (ICCPE) in order to set the ground for drafting recommendations for the provision of effective patient engagement interventions. The ICCPE will conclude in June 2017. This document reports on the preliminary phases of this process. In the paper, we advise the importance of "fertilizing a patient engagement ecosystem": an oversimplifying approach to patient engagement promotion appears the result of a common illusion. Patient "disengagement" is a symptom that needs a more holistic and complex approach to solve its underlined causes. Preliminary principles to promote a patient engagement ecosystem are provided in the paper.

  18. Practical consensus recommendations on fertility preservation in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Bajpai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Young women diagnosed with cancer today have a greater chance of long-term survival than ever before. Successful survivorship for this group of patients includes maintaining a high quality of life after a cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, lifesaving treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery can impact survivors by impairing reproductive and endocrine health. Expert oncologists along with reproductive medicine specialists discuss fertility preservation options in this chapter since fertility preservation is becoming a priority for young women with breast cancer. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at these practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists.

  19. Practical consensus recommendations on management of triple-negative metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rangarao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with breast cancer along with metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR- and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-negative tumors are referred to as having metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC disease. Resistance to current standard therapies such as anthracyclines or taxanes limits the available options for previously treated patients with metastatic TNBC to a small number of non-cross-resistant regimens, and there is currently no preferred standard chemotherapy. Clinical experience suggests that many women with triple-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC relapse quickly. Expert oncologist discussed about new chemotherapeutic strategies and agents used in treatment of mTNBC and the expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at this practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists.

  20. Practical consensus recommendations on Her2 +ve breast cancer with solitary brain mets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Rohatgi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common cause of brain metastases, with metastases occurring in at least 10–16% of patients. Longer survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer and the use of better imaging techniques are associated with an increased incidence of brain metastases. Current therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, chemotherapy and targeted therapies. However, the timing and appropriate use of these therapies is controversial and careful patient selection by using available prognostic tools is extremely important. Expert oncologist discussed on the mode of treatment to extend the OS and improve the quality of life ofHER2-positivebreast cancer patients with Solitary brain metastases. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at this practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists.

  1. Right Versus Left Colon Cancer Biology: Integrating the Consensus Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Although clinical management of colon cancer generally has not accounted for the primary tumor site, left-sided and right-sided colon cancers harbor different clinical and biologic characteristics. Right-sided colon cancers are more likely to have genome-wide hypermethylation via the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), hypermutated state via microsatellite instability, and BRAF mutation. There are also differential exposures to potential carcinogenic toxins and microbiota in the right and left colon. Gene expression analyses further shed light on distinct biologic subtypes of colorectal cancers (CRCs), with 4 consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) identified. Importantly, these subtypes are differentially distributed between right- and left-sided CRCs, with greater proportions of the "microsatellite unstable/immune" CMS1 and the "metabolic" CMS3 subtypes found in right-sided colon cancers. This review summarizes important biologic distinctions between right- and left-sided CRCs that likely impact prognosis and may predict for differential responses to biologic therapy. Given the inferior prognosis of stage III-IV right-sided CRCs and emerging data suggesting that anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy is associated with worse survival in right-sided stage IV CRCs compared with left-sided cancers, these biologic differences between right- and left-sided CRCs provide critical context and may provide opportunities to personalize therapy. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  2. Challenging the Cancer Molecular Stratification Dogma: Intratumoral Heterogeneity Undermines Consensus Molecular Subtypes and Potential Diagnostic Value in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Philip D; McArt, Darragh G; Bradley, Conor A; O'Reilly, Paul G; Barrett, Helen L; Cummins, Robert; O'Grady, Tony; Arthur, Ken; Loughrey, Maurice B; Allen, Wendy L; McDade, Simon S; Waugh, David J; Hamilton, Peter W; Longley, Daniel B; Kay, Elaine W; Johnston, Patrick G; Lawler, Mark; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra

    2016-08-15

    A number of independent gene expression profiling studies have identified transcriptional subtypes in colorectal cancer with potential diagnostic utility, culminating in publication of a colorectal cancer Consensus Molecular Subtype classification. The worst prognostic subtype has been defined by genes associated with stem-like biology. Recently, it has been shown that the majority of genes associated with this poor prognostic group are stromal derived. We investigated the potential for tumor misclassification into multiple diagnostic subgroups based on tumoral region sampled. We performed multiregion tissue RNA extraction/transcriptomic analysis using colorectal-specific arrays on invasive front, central tumor, and lymph node regions selected from tissue samples from 25 colorectal cancer patients. We identified a consensus 30-gene list, which represents the intratumoral heterogeneity within a cohort of primary colorectal cancer tumors. Using a series of online datasets, we showed that this gene list displays prognostic potential HR = 2.914 (confidence interval 0.9286-9.162) in stage II/III colorectal cancer patients, but in addition, we demonstrated that these genes are stromal derived, challenging the assumption that poor prognosis tumors with stem-like biology have undergone a widespread epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Most importantly, we showed that patients can be simultaneously classified into multiple diagnostically relevant subgroups based purely on the tumoral region analyzed. Gene expression profiles derived from the nonmalignant stromal region can influence assignment of colorectal cancer transcriptional subtypes, questioning the current molecular classification dogma and highlighting the need to consider pathology sampling region and degree of stromal infiltration when employing transcription-based classifiers to underpin clinical decision making in colorectal cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 22(16); 4095-104. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Morris and

  3. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  4. mTOR Signaling Confers Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Yakir; Hall, Michael N

    2016-11-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Extensive research over decades has led to the development of therapies that target cancer-specific signaling pathways. However, the clinical benefits of such drugs are at best transient due to tumors displaying intrinsic or adaptive resistance. The underlying compensatory pathways that allow cancer cells to circumvent a drug blockade are poorly understood. We review here recent studies suggesting that mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is a major compensatory pathway conferring resistance to many cancer drugs. mTOR-mediated resistance can be cell-autonomous or non-cell-autonomous. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling should be monitored routinely in tumors and that an mTOR inhibitor should be considered as a co-therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inter society consensus for the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia, F.; Califano, I.; Vázquez, A.; Faire, E.; Gauna, A.; Orlandi, A.; Vanelli, A.; Novelli, J.L.; Mollerach, A.; Cabezón, C.; Fadel, A.; San Martín, A.; Figari, M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of differentiated thyroid cancer increased exponentially worldwide. Although these tumors usually have an excellent prognosis, multiple changes occurred in the therapeutic approach and follow-up in recent years. This situation, mainly related to the stratification by the risk of recurrence of the disease, made it necessary to build a consensus among representative members from the three Argentinean societies that are usually involved in the management of these patients, (Argentinean Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Argentinean Association of Head and Neck Surgery and Argentinean Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine). The recommendations were done according to personal experiences and review of bibliography. (authors) [es

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical management of colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tekkis, Paris; Vini, Louiza; Tzardi, Maria; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Karachaliou, Niki; Zoras, Odysseas; Agalianos, Christos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable improvement in the management of colon cancer, there is a great deal of variation in the outcomes among European countries, and in particular among different hospital centers in Greece and Cyprus. Discrepancy in the approach strategies and lack of adherence to guidelines for the management of colon cancer may explain the situation. The aim was to elaborate a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of colon cancer, based on European guidelines (ESMO and EURECCA), and also taking into account local special characteristics of our healthcare system. Following discussion and online communication among members of an executive team, a consensus was developed. Statements entered the Delphi voting system on two rounds to achieve consensus by multidisciplinary international experts. Statements with an agreement rate of ≥80% achieved a large consensus, while those with an agreement rate of 60-80% a moderate consensus. Statements achieving an agreement of colon cancer were subjected to the Delphi methodology. Voting experts were 109. The median rate of abstain per statement was 10% (range: 0-41%). In the end of the voting process, all statements achieved a consensus by more than 80% of the experts. A consensus on the management of colon cancer was developed by applying the Delphi methodology. Guidelines are proposed along with algorithms of diagnosis and treatment. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, and adherence to guidelines is emphasized.

  7. Management consensus guideline for hepatocellular carcinoma: 2016 updated by the Taiwan Liver Cancer Association and the Gastroenterological Society of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Lu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in Taiwan. To help clinical physicians to manage patients with HCC, the Taiwan Liver Cancer Association and the Gastroenterological Society of Taiwan produced the management consensus guideline for HCC. Methods: The recommendations focus on nine important issues on management of HCC, including surveillance, diagnosis, staging, surgery, local ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/transarterial radioembolization/hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, systemic therapy, radiotherapy, and prevention. Results: The consensus statements were discussed, debated and got consensus in each expert team. And then the statements were sent to all of the experts for further discussion and refinement. Finally, all of the experts were invited to vote for the statements, including the level of evidence and recommendation. Conclusion: With the development of the management consensus guideline, HCC patients could benefit from the optimal therapeutic modality. Keywords: Diagnosis, Hepatocellular carcinoma, Staging, Surveillance, Treatment

  8. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  9. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Brian I; McDermott, David F; Hammers, Hans; Bro, William; Bukowski, Ronald M; Faba, Bernard; Faba, Jo; Figlin, Robert A; Hutson, Thomas; Jonasch, Eric; Joseph, Richard W; Leibovich, Bradley C; Olencki, Thomas; Pantuck, Allan J; Quinn, David I; Seery, Virginia; Voss, Martin H; Wood, Christopher G; Wood, Laura S; Atkins, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has produced durable clinical benefit in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). In the past, patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have achieved complete responses, many of which have lasted for multiple decades. More recently, a large number of new agents have been approved for RCC, several of which attack tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and VEGF receptors (VEGFR), as well as tumor metabolism, inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Additionally, a new class of immunotherapy agents, immune checkpoint inhibitors, is emerging and will play a significant role in the treatment of patients with RCC. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a Task Force, which met to consider the current role of approved immunotherapy agents in RCC, to provide guidance to practicing clinicians by developing consensus recommendations and to set the stage for future immunotherapeutic developments in RCC.

  10. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  11. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group III - Peri-Implantitis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suárez-López del Amo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 3 was to review and update the existing data concerning non-surgical, surgical non-regenerative and surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the preventive and supporting therapy in case of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  12. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  13. The process and criteria for diagnosing specific learning disorders: indications from the Consensus Conference promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Lorusso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A Consensus Conference on Specific Learning Disorders has been promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS. The Consensus Conference consisted in a systematic review of the international literature addressing the issues of diagnosis, risk factors and prognosis, treatment, service delivery and organizational models for Specific Learning Disorders (reading, spelling/writing, calculation. Selected papers were examined by a group of Evaluators and then discussed by a Scientific and Technical Committee, whose conclusions were examined and approved by a Jury Panel. The part on diagnostic issues is presented here, encompassing a systematic discussion of the use and appropriateness of diagnostic criteria, parameters, tasks and psychometric indexes as illustrated in the literature, and providing recommendations for clinical practice. Special attention has been devoted to the collection, analysis and discussion of published data concerning languages with transparent orthography. Controversial issues such as discrepancy criteria, role of reading comprehension and importance of accuracy and fluency are discussed.

  14. Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Garofalo, Michael C.; El Naqa, Issam; Abrams, Ross A.; Apte, Aditya; Bosch, Walter R.; Das, Prajnan; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kim, J.J. John; Willett, Christopher G.; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning and for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.

  15. Australian and New Zealand three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy consensus guidelines for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Berry, M.; Kneebone, A.; Gogna, K.; Turner, S.; Rolfo, A.; Haworth, A.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) has been shown to reduce normal tissue toxicity and allow dose escalation in the curative treatment of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group initiated a consensus process to generate evidence-based guidelines for the safe and effective implementation of 3DCRT. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete a survey of their prostate practice and to send representatives to a consensus workshop. After a review of the evidence, key issues were identified and debated. If agreement was not reached, working parties were formed to make recommendations. Draft guidelines were circulated to workshop participants for approval prior to publication. Where possible, evidence-based recommendations have been made with regard to patient selection, risk stratification, simulation, planning, treatment delivery and toxicity reporting. This is the first time a group of radiation therapists, physicists and oncologists representing professional radiotherapy practice across Australia and New Zealand have worked together to develop best-practice guidelines. These guidelines should serve as a baseline for prospective clinical trials, outcome research and quality assurance. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. "Identifying the hospitalised patient in crisis"--a consensus conference on the afferent limb of rapid response systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVita, Michael A; Smith, Gary B; Adam, Sheila K

    2010-01-01

    Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patient deteriora...

  17. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  18. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  19. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  20. Standardization of terminology in dermoscopy/dermatoscopy: Results of the third consensus conference of the International Society of Dermoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Harald; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Carrera, Cristina; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Malvehy, Josep; Menzies, Scott; Puig, Susana; Rabinovitz, Harold; Stolz, Wilhelm; Saida, Toshiaki; Soyer, H Peter; Siegel, Eliot; Stoecker, William V; Scope, Alon; Tanaka, Masaru; Thomas, Luc; Tschandl, Philipp; Zalaudek, Iris; Halpern, Allan

    2016-06-01

    Evolving dermoscopic terminology motivated us to initiate a new consensus. We sought to establish a dictionary of standardized terms. We reviewed the medical literature, conducted a survey, and convened a discussion among experts. Two competitive terminologies exist, a more metaphoric terminology that includes numerous terms and a descriptive terminology based on 5 basic terms. In a survey among members of the International Society of Dermoscopy (IDS) 23.5% (n = 201) participants preferentially use descriptive terminology, 20.1% (n = 172) use metaphoric terminology, and 484 (56.5%) use both. More participants who had been initially trained by metaphoric terminology prefer using descriptive terminology than vice versa (9.7% vs 2.6%, P terminologies are suitable, that metaphoric terms need definitions, that synonyms should be avoided, and that the creation of new metaphoric terms should be discouraged. The expert panel proposed a dictionary of standardized terms taking account of metaphoric and descriptive terms. A consensus seeks a workable compromise but does not guarantee its implementation. The new consensus provides a revised framework of standardized terms to enhance the consistent use of dermoscopic terminology. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Safety of radioactive waste management: International conference in Spain seeks board platform of consensus among experts and regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives short information about the Conference on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (13-17 March 2000, Cordoba, Spain) organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the European Commission, the World Health Organization, and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development

  2. Collective knowledge: Using a Consensus Conference approach to develop recommendations for physical activity and nutrition programs for persons with Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya eBerry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this consensus conference was to have a lay panel of persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D work in collaboration with an expert panel of diabetes professionals to develop strategies designed to improve dietary and physical activity adherence in persons with T2D. Lay panel participants were 15 people living with T2D. The seven experts had expertise in exercise management, cardiovascular risk factors, community-based lifestyle interventions, healthy weight strategies, the glycemic index, exercise motivation, and social, environmental and cultural interactions. All meetings were facilitated by a professional, neutral facilitator. During the conference each expert gave a 15-minute presentation answering questions developed by the lay panel and all panel members worked to generate suggestions for programs and ways in which the needs of persons with T2D may be better met. A subgroup of the lay panel used the suggestions created from the conference to generate a final list of recommendations. Recommendations were categorized into 1 diagnosis/awareness (e.g., increasing awareness about T2D in the general public, need for lifelong self-monitoring post-diagnosis; 2 education for the person with diabetes (e.g., periodic refresher courses, professionals (e.g., regular interactions between researchers and persons with T2D so researchers better understand the needs of the affected population, and the community (e.g., support for families and employers; and 3 ongoing support (e.g., peer support groups. The recommendations from the conference can be used by researchers to design and evaluate physical activity and nutrition programs. The results can also be of use to policy makers and health promoters interested in increasing adherence to physical activity and nutrition guidelines among persons with T2D.

  3. Identifying patients with severe sepsis using administrative claims: patient-level validation of the angus implementation of the international consensus conference definition of severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashyna, Theodore J; Odden, Andrew; Rohde, Jeffrey; Bonham, Catherine; Kuhn, Latoya; Malani, Preeti; Chen, Lena; Flanders, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Severe sepsis is a common and costly problem. Although consistently defined clinically by consensus conference since 1991, there have been several different implementations of the severe sepsis definition using ICD-9-CM codes for research. We conducted a single center, patient-level validation of 1 common implementation of the severe sepsis definition, the so-called "Angus" implementation. Administrative claims for all hospitalizations for patients initially admitted to general medical services from an academic medical center in 2009-2010 were reviewed. On the basis of ICD-9-CM codes, hospitalizations were sampled for review by 3 internal medicine-trained hospitalists. Chart reviews were conducted with a structured instrument, and the gold standard was the hospitalists' summary clinical judgment on whether the patient had severe sepsis. Three thousand one hundred forty-six (13.5%) hospitalizations met ICD-9-CM criteria for severe sepsis by the Angus implementation (Angus-positive) and 20,142 (86.5%) were Angus-negative. Chart reviews were performed for 92 randomly selected Angus-positive and 19 randomly-selected Angus-negative hospitalizations. Reviewers had a κ of 0.70. The Angus implementation's positive predictive value was 70.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 51.2%, 90.5%]. The negative predictive value was 91.5% (95% CI: 79.0%, 100%). The sensitivity was 50.4% (95% CI: 14.8%, 85.7%). Specificity was 96.3% (95% CI: 92.4%, 100%). Two alternative ICD-9-CM implementations had high positive predictive values but sensitivities of Angus implementation of the international consensus conference definition of severe sepsis offers a reasonable but imperfect approach to identifying patients with severe sepsis when compared with a gold standard of structured review of the medical chart by trained hospitalists.

  4. American Burn Association Consensus Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    quality consensus conference was underwrit- ten in part by unrestricted educational grants from Molnlycke Health Care and Baxter Health Care. Address... nutrition , psychological outcomes, resuscitation, and wound repair. After reviewing the literature, debating the issues at the consensus conference and...need for intubation, concomitant trauma. 3. Resuscitation characteristics: Lab values (base defi- cit, lactate, hemoglobin /hematocrit, blood urea

  5. Delphi consensus of an expert committee in oncogeriatrics regarding comprehensive geriatric assessment in seniors with cancer in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Garrido, Maria-Jose; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Blanco, Remei; Saldaña, Juana; Feliú, Jaime; Antonio, Maite; López-Mongil, Rosa; Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; Gironés, Regina

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this work was to reach a national consensus in Spain regarding the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) domains in older oncological patients and the CGA scales to be used as a foundation for widespread use. The Delphi method was implemented to attain consensus. Representatives of the panel were chosen from among the members of the Oncogeriatric Working Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM). Consensus was defined as ≥66.7% coincidence in responses and by the stability of said coincidence (changes ≤15% between rounds). The study was conducted between July and December 2016. Of the 17 people invited to participate, 16 agreed. The panel concluded by consensus that the following domains should be included in the CGA:(and the scales to evaluate them): functional (Barthel Index, Lawton-Brody scale, gait speed), cognitive (Pfeiffer questionnaire), nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment - MNA), psychological/mood (Yesavage scale), social-familial (Gijon scale), comorbidity (Charlson index), medications, and geriatric syndromes (urinary and/or fecal incontinence, low auditory and/or visual acuity, presence of falls, pressure sores, insomnia, and abuse). Also by consensus, the CGA should be administered to older patients with cancer for whom there is a subsequent therapeutic intent and who scored positive on a previous frailty-screening questionnaire. After 3 rounds, consensus was reached regarding CGA domains to be used in older patients with cancer, the scales to be administered for each of these domains, as well as the timeline to be followed during consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [China expert consensus on the management of dyslipidemia in postmenopausal patients with early-stage breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Estrogen has an impact on the type of lipoproteins and the blood lipid levels, thus protecting the cardiovascular system. Postmenopausal breast cancer patients suffer a significant decrease in estrogen levels due to both physiological changes and the use of drugs, and thus have a higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, strict lipid management is required for postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving endocrine therapy. However, no guidelines have been developed in terms of lipid management and intervention for postmenopausal breast cancer patients. The Chinese expert group of multidisciplinary management of dyslipidemia in breast cancer patients with endocrine therapy, after deep investigation into the management of dyslipidemia in postmenopausal patients with early-stage breast cancer, has developed the China Expert Consensus on Dyslipidemia Management in Postmenopausal Patients with Early-stage Breast Cancer. The Consensus clearly defines the goals and measures of interventions for dyslipidemia, hoping to effectively reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal breast cancer patients and further improve the long-term survival of the patients.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients: recommendations from the 2012 European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barbaro, Brunella [Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luis [Coimbra University Hospitals, Coimbra (Portugal); Fenlon, Helen M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS FT, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hoeffel, Christine [Reims University Hospital, Reims (France); Kim, Seung Ho [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Maier, Andrea [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rafaelsen, Soeren R. [Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Torkzad, Michael R. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart [Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate or inappropriate (defined by {>=} 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by < 80 % consensus). Items not reaching 80 % consensus were noted. Consensus was reached for 88 % of items: recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences, angulation, criteria for MRI assessment and MRI reporting were constructed from these. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  8. Consensus for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment: basal cell carcinoma, including a cost analysis of treatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B; Cronin, Terrence; Roenigk, Randall; Hruza, George; Bennett, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US population affecting approximately 2.8 million people per year. Basal cell carcinomas are usually slow-growing and rarely metastasize, but they do cause localized tissue destruction, compromised function, and cosmetic disfigurement. To provide clinicians with guidelines for the management of BCC based on evidence from a comprehensive literature review, and consensus among the authors. An extensive review of the medical literature was conducted to evaluate the optimal treatment methods for cutaneous BCC, taking into consideration cure rates, recurrence rates, aesthetic and functional outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of the procedures. Surgical approaches provide the best outcomes for BCCs. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the highest cure rates while maximizing tissue preservation, maintenance of function, and cosmesis. Mohs micrographic surgery is an efficient and cost-effective procedure and remains the treatment of choice for high-risk BCCs and for those in cosmetically sensitive locations. Nonsurgical modalities may be used for low-risk BCCs when surgery is contraindicated or impractical, but the cure rates are lower.

  9. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gall bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Hari Shankar; Sirohi, Bhawna; Behari, Anu; Sharma, Atul; Majumdar, Jahar; Ganguly, Manomoy; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Sandeep; Saini, Sunil; Sahni, Peush; Singh, Tomcha; Kapoor, Vinay Kumar; Sucharita, V.; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.All postcholecystectomy gallbladder specimens should be opened and examined carefully by the operating surgeon and be sent for histopathological examination.All “incidental” gall bladder cancers (GBCs) picked up on histopathological examination should have an expert opinion.Evaluation of a patient with early GBC should include essential tests: A computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal and liver function tests. magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For early stage disease (up to Stage IVA), surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment would be guided by the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.Patients with Stage IVB/metastatic disease must be assessed for palliative e.g. endoscopic or radiological intervention, chemotherapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. These patients do not require extensive workup outside of a clinical trial setting.There is an urgent need for multicenter trials from India covering various aspects of epidemiology (viz., identification of population at high-risk, organized follow-up), clinical management (viz., bile spill during surgery, excision of all port sites, adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapy) and basic research (viz., what causes GBC). PMID:26157282

  10. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  11. Meeting Report of the Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference in Beijing, China, October 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G; Cui, Hengmi; Jen, Jin; Fuks, Francois; Brock, Malcolm V; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Croce, Carlo; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Guo, Mingzhou

    2017-07-01

    Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference, Beijing, China, 21-23 October 2016 This meeting reported many new findings in the field of cancer epigenetics, including basic science, translational and clinical studies. In this report, we summarize some of the main advancements and prospects in cancer epigenetics presented at this meeting.

  12. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement.

  13. Pragmatic, consensus-based minimum standards and structured interview to guide the selection and development of cancer support group leaders: a protocol paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomery, Amanda; Schofield, Penelope; Xhilaga, Miranda; Gough, Karla

    2017-06-30

    Across the globe, peer support groups have emerged as a community-led approach to accessing support and connecting with others with cancer experiences. Little is known about qualities required to lead a peer support group or how to determine suitability for the role. Organisations providing assistance to cancer support groups and their leaders are currently operating independently, without a standard national framework or published guidelines. This protocol describes the methods that will be used to generate pragmatic consensus-based minimum standards and an accessible structured interview with user manual to guide the selection and development of cancer support group leaders. We will: (A) identify and collate peer-reviewed literature that describes qualities of support group leaders through a systematic review; (B) content analyse eligible documents for information relevant to requisite knowledge, skills and attributes of group leaders generally and specifically to cancer support groups; (C) use an online reactive Delphi method with an interdisciplinary panel of experts to produce a clear, suitable, relevant and appropriate structured interview comprising a set of agreed questions with behaviourally anchored rating scales; (D) produce a user manual to facilitate standard delivery of the structured interview; (E) pilot the structured interview to improve clinical utility; and (F) field test the structured interview to develop a rational scoring model and provide a summary of existing group leader qualities. The study is approved by the Department Human Ethics Advisory Group of The University of Melbourne. The study is based on voluntary participation and informed written consent, with participants able to withdraw at any time. The results will be disseminated at research conferences and peer review journals. Presentations and free access to the developed structured interview and user manual will be available to cancer agencies. © Article author(s) (or their

  14. Summary and consensus in 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma: An update for the management of sporadic acoustic neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor arising from cochleovestibular nerve. Nowadays, various specialties and medical centers are treating this disease, and the multidisciplinary collaboration is the trend. In an effort to promote a uniform standard for reporting clinical results, even for treatment indications, the mainly controversies were posed and discussed during the 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma, and the agreement was summarized by the Committee of this conference. The main symptoms grading and tumor stage should note its name of classification for making them comparable. The goal of the modern managements for vestibular schwannoma is to improve the quality of life with lower mortality, lower morbidity and better neurological function preservation. The experience of surgical team and their preference might be a major factor for the outcome. Because of lacking of long-term follow-up large data after radiotherapy, and with the development of microsurgery, radiotherapy is now less recommended except for recurrent cases or elderly patients. Keywords: Sporadic acoustic neuroma, Vestibular schwannoma, Management, Symptoms grading, Tumor stage, Microsurgery, Radiotherapy

  15. Psychological treatments and psychotherapies in the neurorehabilitation of pain: evidences and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for an effective care of the person in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose to identify the best practices that can be used in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary approach for fostering a reduction in pain intensity. However, there is the need to elucidate what forms of psychotherapy could be matched with the specific pathologies that are taken in charge by the neurorehabilitation teams.ObjectivesTo extensively assess the available evidence which supports the use of psychological therapies for pain reduction in neurological diseases. MethodsA systematic review of the studies evaluating the effect of psychotherapies on pain intensity in neurological disorders was performed through an electronic search using PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on the level of evidence of the included studies, recommendations were outlined separately for the different conditions.ResultsThe literature search yielded 2352 results and the final database included 400 articles. The overall strength of the recommendations was medium/low. The different forms of psychological interventions, including Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy, cognitive or behavioral techniques, Mindfulness, hypnosis, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Brief Interpersonal Therapy, virtual reality interventions, the different forms of biofeedback and mirror therapy were found to be effective for pain reduction in pathologies such as musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Central Post – Stroke pain, Phantom Limb Pain, pain secondary to Spinal Cord Injury, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating syndromes

  16. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  17. Practical consensus recommendations on management of HR + ve early breast cancer with specific reference to genomic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Aggarwal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and patients are managed clinically based on ER, PR, HER2 expression, and key risk factors. The use of gene expression assays for early stage disease is already common practice. These tests have found a place in risk stratifying the heterogeneous group of stage I–II breast cancers for recurrence, for predicting chemotherapy response, and for predicting breast cancer-related mortality. Most guidelines for hormone receptor (HR–positive early breast cancer recommend addition of adjuvant chemotherapy for most women, leading to overtreatment, which causes considerable morbidity and cost. Expert oncologist discussed about strategies of gene expression assays and aid in chemotherapy recommendations for treatment of HR + ve EBC and the expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at this practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists.

  18. The Diabetes Surgery Summit consensus conference: recommendations for the evaluation and use of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Francesco; Kaplan, Lee M; Schauer, Philip R; Cummings, David E

    2010-03-01

    To develop guidelines for the use of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes and to craft an agenda for further research. Increasing evidence demonstrates that bariatric surgery can dramatically ameliorate type 2 diabetes. Not surprisingly, gastrointestinal operations are now being used throughout the world to treat diabetes in association with obesity, and increasingly, for diabetes alone. However, the role for surgery in diabetes treatment is not clearly defined and there are neither clear guidelines for these practices nor sufficient plans for clinical trials to evaluate the risks and benefits of such "diabetes surgery." A multidisciplinary group of 50 voting delegates from around the world gathered in Rome, Italy for the first International Conference on Gastrointestinal Surgery to Treat Type 2 Diabetes--(the "Diabetes Surgery Summit"). During the meeting, available scientific evidence was examined and critiqued by the entire group to assess the strength of evidence and to draft consensus statements. Through an iterative process, draft statements were then serially discussed, debated, edited, reassessed, and finally presented for formal voting. After the Rome meeting, statements that achieved consensus were summarized and distributed to all voting delegates for further input and final approval. These statements were then formally critiqued by representatives of several sientific societies at the 1st World Congress on Interventional Therapies for T2DM (New York, Sept 2008). Input from this discussion was used to generate the current position statement. A Diabetes Surgery Summit (DSS) Position Statement consists of recommendations for clinical and research issues, as well as general concepts and definitions in diabetes surgery. The DSS recognizes the legitimacy of surgical approaches to treat diabetes in carefully selected patients. For example, gastric bypass was deemed a reasonable treatment option for patients with poorly controlled diabetes and a

  19. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: definition, incidence, and epidemiology: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Robinder G; Smith, Lincoln S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Erickson, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Although there are similarities in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children, pediatric-specific practice patterns, comorbidities, and differences in outcome necessitate a pediatric-specific definition. We sought to create such a definition. A subgroup of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome investigators who drafted a pediatric-specific definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome based on consensus opinion and supported by detailed literature review tested elements of the definition with patient data from previously published investigations. International PICUs. Children enrolled in published investigations of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. None. Several aspects of the proposed pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome definition align with the Berlin Definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults: timing of acute respiratory distress syndrome after a known risk factor, the potential for acute respiratory distress syndrome to coexist with left ventricular dysfunction, and the importance of identifying a group of patients at risk to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. There are insufficient data to support any specific age for "adult" acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with "pediatric" acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, children with perinatal-related respiratory failure should be excluded from the definition of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Larger departures from the Berlin Definition surround 1) simplification of chest imaging criteria to eliminate bilateral infiltrates; 2) use of pulse oximetry-based criteria when PaO2 is unavailable; 3) inclusion of oxygenation index and oxygen saturation index instead of PaO2/FIO2 ratio with a minimum positive end-expiratory pressure level for invasively ventilated patients; 4) and specific inclusion of children with preexisting chronic lung disease or cyanotic congenital heart disease. This

  20. Knowledge translation: an overview and recommendations in relation to the Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The growing population of persons with dementia in Canada and the provision of quality care for this population is an issue that no healthcare authority will escape. Physicians often view dementia as a difficult and time-consuming condition to diagnose and manage. Current evidence must be effectively transformed into usable recommendations for physicians; however, we know that use of evidence-based practice recommendations is a challenge in all realms of medical care, and failure to utilize these leads to less than optimal care for patients. Despite this expanding need for readily available resources, knowledge translation (KT) is often seen as a daunting, if not confusing, undertaking for researchers. Here we offer a brief introduction to the processes around KT, including terms and definitions, and outline some common KT frameworks including the knowledge to action cycle, the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. We also outline practical steps for planning and executing a KT strategy particularly around the implementation of recommendations for practice, and offer recommendations for KT planning in relation to the Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia. PMID:24565407

  1. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L. S.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne M. G. R.; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brouwers, Barbara; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Collée, J. Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Lai, Kah-Nyin; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Milne, Roger L.; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Oosterwijk, Jan J. C.; Osorio, Ana; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhenius, Valerie; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Swerdlow, Anthony; teo, Soo H.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; van Asperen, Christi J.; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Leary, Jennifer; Walker, Logan; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Varesco, Liliana; Moghadasi, Setareh; Easton, Douglas F.; Spurdle, Amanda; Devilee, Peter; Vrieling, Harry; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Goldgar, David E.; Carreira, Aura; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk

  2. The Japan Lung Cancer Society–Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology consensus-based computed tomographic atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itazawa, Tomoko; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Komiyama, Takafumi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Yuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Sakai, Shuji; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a consensus-based computed tomographic (CT) atlas that defines lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer based on the lymph node map of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). A project group in the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) initially prepared a draft of the atlas in which lymph node Stations 1–11 were illustrated on axial CT images. Subsequently, a joint committee of the Japan Lung Cancer Society (JLCS) and the Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology (JASTRO) was formulated to revise this draft. The committee consisted of four radiation oncologists, four thoracic surgeons and three thoracic radiologists. The draft prepared by the JROSG project group was intensively reviewed and discussed at four meetings of the committee over several months. Finally, we proposed definitions for the regional lymph node stations and the consensus-based CT atlas. This atlas was approved by the Board of Directors of JLCS and JASTRO. This resulted in the first official CT atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer authorized by the JLCS and JASTRO. In conclusion, the JLCS–JASTRO consensus-based CT atlas, which conforms to the IASLC lymph node map, was established.

  3. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals....... on the implementation of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 1043 patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours, and in 1991 patients with pN+ M0 tumours. RESULTS: Hospital volume, i.e. the number of rectal cancer surgical procedures performed per year, was the major predictor for MDT evaluation. Patients treated...... at hospitals with

  4. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  5. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  6. Development and Validation of Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer After Radical Cystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Brian C. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Bahl, Amit [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Birtle, Alison J. [Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Breau, Rodney H. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Challapalli, Amarnath [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Chang, Albert J. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Choudhury, Ananya [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Heath Science Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Daneshmand, Sia [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); El-Gayed, Ali [Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon (Canada); Feldman, Adam [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa, Oklahoma (United States); Guzzo, Thomas J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hilman, Serena [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Jani, Ashesh [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Master, Viraj [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Mitra, Anita V. [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Murthy, Vedang [Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai (India); and others

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To develop multi-institutional consensus clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) for male and female bladder cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: We convened a multidisciplinary group of bladder cancer specialists from 15 centers and 5 countries. Six radiation oncologists and 7 urologists participated in the development of the initial contours. The group proposed initial language for the CTVs and OARs, and each radiation oncologist contoured them on computed tomography scans of a male and female cystectomy patient with input from ≥1 urologist. On the basis of the initial contouring, the group updated its CTV and OAR descriptions. The cystectomy bed, the area of greatest controversy, was contoured by another 6 radiation oncologists, and the cystectomy bed contouring language was again updated. To determine whether the revised language produced consistent contours, CTVs and OARs were redrawn by 6 additional radiation oncologists. We evaluated their contours for level of agreement using the Landis-Koch interpretation of the κ statistic. Results: The group proposed that patients at elevated risk for local-regional failure with negative margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes alone (internal/external iliac, distal common iliac, obturator, and presacral), whereas patients with positive margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes and cystectomy bed. Proposed OARs included the rectum, bowel space, bone marrow, and urinary diversion. Consensus language describing the CTVs and OARs was developed and externally validated. The revised instructions were found to produce consistent contours. Conclusions: Consensus descriptions of CTVs and OARs were successfully developed and can be used in clinical trials of adjuvant radiation therapy for bladder cancer.

  7. Statistical Inference for Cultural Consensus Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Social Network Conference XXXII , Redondo Beach, California, March 2012. Agrawal, K. (Presenter), and Batchelder, W. H. Cultural Consensus Theory...Aggregating Complete Signed Graphs Under a Balance Constraint -- Part 2. International Sunbelt Social Network Conference XXXII , Redondo Beach

  8. National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference Statement: Symptom management in cancer: pain, depression, and fatigue, July 15-17, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Daniel L; Ferketich, Sandra L; Frame, Paul S; Harris, Jesse J; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Levin, Bernard; Link, Michael P; Lustig, Craig; McLaughlin, Joseph; Reid, L Douglas; Turrisi, Andrew T; Unützer, Jürgen; Vernon, Sally W

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in early detection and effective treatment, cancer remains one of the most feared diseases. Among the most common side effects of cancer and treatments for cancer are pain, depression, and fatigue. Although research is producing increasingly hopeful insights into the causes and cures for cancer, efforts to manage the side effects of the disease and its treatments have not kept pace. The challenge that faces us is how to increase awareness of the importance of recognizing and actively addressing cancer-related distress. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a State-of-the-Science Conference on Symptom Management in Cancer: Pain, Depression, and Fatigue to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the management of pain, depression, and fatigue in individuals with cancer and to identify directions for future research. Specifically, the conference examined how to identify individuals who are at risk for cancer-related pain, depression, and/or fatigue; what treatments work best to address these symptoms when they occur; and what is the best way to deliver interventions across the continuum of care. STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE PROCESS: A non-advocate, non-Federal, 14-member panel of experts representing the fields of oncology, radiology, psychology, nursing, public health, social work, and epidemiology prepared the statement. In addition, 24 experts in medical oncology, geriatrics, pharmacology, psychology, and neurology presented data to the panel and to the conference audience during the first 1.5 days of the conference. The panel then prepared its statement, addressing the five predetermined questions and drawing on submitted literature, the speakers' presentations, and discussions held at the conference. The statement was presented to the conference audience, followed by a press conference to allow the panel to respond to questions from the media. After its release at the conference, the draft statement was made available on the Internet

  9. Core Clinical Data Elements for Cancer Genomic Repositories: A Multi-stakeholder Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Robert B; Dickson, Dane; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Al Naber, Jennifer; Messner, Donna A; Atasoy, Ajlan; Chaihorsky, Lena; Collyar, Deborah; Compton, Carolyn; Ferguson, Martin; Khozin, Sean; Klein, Roger D; Kotte, Sri; Kurzrock, Razelle; Lin, C Jimmy; Liu, Frank; Marino, Ingrid; McDonough, Robert; McNeal, Amy; Miller, Vincent; Schilsky, Richard L; Wang, Lisa I

    2017-11-16

    The Center for Medical Technology Policy and the Molecular Evidence Development Consortium gathered a diverse group of more than 50 stakeholders to develop consensus on a core set of data elements and values essential to understanding the clinical utility of molecularly targeted therapies in oncology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of Prevalence and Outcomes of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference Criteria and Berlin Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samriti; Sankar, Jhuma; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil K

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the prevalence and outcomes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome using the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference (PALICC) criteria and Berlin definitions. We screened case records of all children aged 1 month to 17 years of age admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 3-year period (2015-2017) for presence of any respiratory difficulty at admission or during PICU stay. We applied both PALICC and Berlin criteria to these patients. Data collection included definition and outcome related variables. Data were compared between the "PALICC only group" and the "Berlin with or without PALICC" group using Stata 11. Of a total of 615 admissions, 246 were identified as having respiratory difficulty at admission or during PICU stay. A total of 61 children (prevalence 9.9%; 95% CI: 7.8-12.4) fulfilled the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with either of the two criteria. While 60 children (98%) fulfilled PALICC criteria, only 26 children (43%) fulfilled Berlin definition. There was moderate agreement between the two definitions (Kappa: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.40-0.62; observed agreement 85%). Greater proportion of patients had severe ARDS in the "Berlin with or without PALICC group" as compared to the "PALICC only" group (50 vs. 19%). There was no difference between the groups with regard to key clinical outcomes such as duration of ventilation (7 vs. 8 days) or mortality [51.4 vs. 57.7%: RR (95% CI): 0.99 (0.64-1.5)]. In comparison to Berlin definition, the PALICC criteria identified more number of patients with ARDS. Proportion with severe ARDS and complications was greater in the "Berlin with or without PALICC" group as compared to the "PALICC only" group. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the groups.

  11. Essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI: 2016 consensus recommendation from the Korean society of abdominal radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-01-15

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI.

  12. Essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI: 2016 consensus recommendation from the Korean society of abdominal radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI

  13. I Conferencia Nacional de Consenso sobre el Injerto Óseo del Seno Maxilar 1st National Consensus Conference on maxillar sinus bone grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Villarreal

    2010-06-01

    en el seno maxilar.Objective: The objectives of the first Spanish Consensus Conference on Sinus Bone Graft were trying to reach agreements points on the major controversies of this technique, and translate them in a summary document. Material and method: During the 17th and 18th of October of 2008 took place in Oviedo (Spain the Conference, sponsored by the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. There, 50 national and international speakers reviewed in 6 workshops the major controversies of sinus bone grafts. Following the conferences, the moderators proposed the main conclusions of each workshop and opened a round of discussion where all attendees participated. Results: This document and its conclusions emanate from the presentations made by the speakers and the discussions and agreements of each workshop. Both have been approved after several corrections by all authors before being submitted for publication. They have also obtained the official scientific recognition of the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and should serve as a basis for future scientific studies and meetings. Conclusions: The main objective when we perform a sinus bone graft is vital bone formation in the maxillary sinus, to achieve long-term survival of the implants after prosthetic loading. To do this, the technique and sequence of treatment should aim to achieve predictable and stable results over time, although this involves a longer waiting time. The initial implant stability is the key factor for osseointegration and should be the main criterion to indicate simultaneous or delayed implants in the maxillary sinus.

  14. Developing a clinical pathway for the identification and management of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients: an online Delphi consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne M; Price, Melanie A; Clayton, Josephine M; Grimison, Peter; Shaw, Tim; Rankin, Nicole; Butow, Phyllis N

    2016-01-01

    People with cancer and their families experience high levels of psychological morbidity. However, many cancer services do not routinely screen patients for anxiety and depression, and there are no standardized clinical referral pathways. This study aimed to establish consensus on elements of a draft clinical pathway tailored to the Australian context. A two-round Delphi study was conducted to gain consensus among Australian oncology and psycho-oncology clinicians about the validity of 39 items that form the basis of a clinical pathway that includes screening, assessment, referral and stepped care management of anxiety and depression in the context of cancer. The expert panel comprised 87 multidisciplinary clinician members of the Australian Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG). Respondents rated their level of agreement with each statement on a 5-point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as >80% of respondents scoring within 2 points on the Likert scale. Consensus was reached for 21 of 39 items, and a further 15 items approached consensus except for specific contextual factors, after two Delphi rounds. Formal screening for anxiety and depression, a stepped care model of management and recommendations for inclusion of length of treatment and time to review were endorsed. Consensus was not reached on items related to roles and responsibilities, particularly those not applicable across cancer settings. This study identified a core set of evidence- and consensus-based principles considered essential to a stepped care model of care incorporating identification, referral and management of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients.

  15. Current state of the art, multimodality research and future visions for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer: consensus results from "Challenges and Chances in Prostate Cancer Research Meeting 2013".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Feick, Günter; Hadaschik, Boris; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schüle, Roland; Zacharias, Jens-Peter; Schwardt, Malte

    2014-11-04

    A brainstorming and consensus meeting organized by the German Cancer Aid focused on modern treatment of prostate cancer and promising innovative techniques and research areas. Besides optimization of screening algorithms, molecular-based stratification and individually tailored treatment regimens will be the future of multimodal prostate cancer management. Effective interdisciplinary structures, including biobanking and data collection mechanisms are the basis for such developments.

  16. On the path to translation: Highlights from the 2010 Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thériault Brigitte L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer continues to be the most lethal of the gynaecologic malignancies due to the lack of early detection, screening strategies and ineffective therapeutics for late-stage metastatic disease, particularly in the recurrent setting. The gathering of researchers investigating fundamental pathobiology of ovarian cancer and the clinicians who treat patients with this insidious disease is paramount to meeting the challenges we face. Since 2002, the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research, held every two years, has served this essential purpose. The objectives of this conference have been to disseminate new information arising from the most recent ovarian cancer research and identify the most pressing challenges we still face as scientists and clinicians. This is best accomplished through direct encounters and exchanges of innovative ideas among colleagues and trainees from the realms of basic science and clinical disciplines. This meeting has and continues to successfully facilitate rapid networking and establish new collaborations from across Canada. This year, more guest speakers and participants from other countries have extended the breadth of the research on ovarian cancer that was discussed at the meeting. This report summarizes the key findings presented at the fifth biennial Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research held in Toronto, Ontario, and includes the important issues and challenges we still face in the years ahead to make a significant impact on this devastating disease.

  17. Comparison of Prevalence and Outcomes of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference Criteria and Berlin Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samriti Gupta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesOur objective was to compare the prevalence and outcomes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome using the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference (PALICC criteria and Berlin definitions.MethodsWe screened case records of all children aged 1 month to 17 years of age admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU over a 3-year period (2015–2017 for presence of any respiratory difficulty at admission or during PICU stay. We applied both PALICC and Berlin criteria to these patients. Data collection included definition and outcome related variables. Data were compared between the “PALICC only group” and the “Berlin with or without PALICC” group using Stata 11.ResultsOf a total of 615 admissions, 246 were identified as having respiratory difficulty at admission or during PICU stay. A total of 61 children (prevalence 9.9%; 95% CI: 7.8–12.4 fulfilled the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with either of the two criteria. While 60 children (98% fulfilled PALICC criteria, only 26 children (43% fulfilled Berlin definition. There was moderate agreement between the two definitions (Kappa: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.40–0.62; observed agreement 85%. Greater proportion of patients had severe ARDS in the “Berlin with or without PALICC group” as compared to the “PALICC only” group (50 vs. 19%. There was no difference between the groups with regard to key clinical outcomes such as duration of ventilation (7 vs. 8 days or mortality [51.4 vs. 57.7%: RR (95% CI: 0.99 (0.64–1.5].ConclusionIn comparison to Berlin definition, the PALICC criteria identified more number of patients with ARDS. Proportion with severe ARDS and complications was greater in the “Berlin with or without PALICC” group as compared to the “PALICC only” group. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the groups.

  18. Consensus molecular subtypes and the evolution of precision medicine in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Vermeulen, Louis; Guinney, Justin; Kopetz, Scott; Tejpar, Sabine; Tabernero, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Critical driver genomic events in colorectal cancer have been shown to affect the response to targeted agents that were initially developed under the 'one gene, one drug' paradigm of precision medicine. Our current knowledge of the complexity of the cancer genome, clonal evolution patterns under

  19. UK quantitative WB-DWI technical workgroup: consensus meeting recommendations on optimisation, quality control, processing and analysis of quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Anna; Alonzi, Roberto; Blackledge, Matthew; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Collins, David J; Cook, Gary; Coutts, Glynn; Goh, Vicky; Graves, Martin; Kelly, Charles; Koh, Dow-Mu; McCallum, Hazel; Miquel, Marc E; O'Connor, James; Padhani, Anwar; Pearson, Rachel; Priest, Andrew; Rockall, Andrea; Stirling, James; Taylor, Stuart; Tunariu, Nina; van der Meulen, Jan; Walls, Darren; Winfield, Jessica; Punwani, Shonit

    2018-01-01

    Application of whole body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI) for oncology are rapidly increasing within both research and routine clinical domains. However, WB-DWI as a quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) has significantly slower adoption. To date, challenges relating to accuracy and reproducibility, essential criteria for a good QIB, have limited widespread clinical translation. In recognition, a UK workgroup was established in 2016 to provide technical consensus guidelines (to maximise accuracy and reproducibility of WB-MRI QIBs) and accelerate the clinical translation of quantitative WB-DWI applications for oncology. A panel of experts convened from cancer centres around the UK with subspecialty expertise in quantitative imaging and/or the use of WB-MRI with DWI. A formal consensus method was used to obtain consensus agreement regarding best practice. Questions were asked about the appropriateness or otherwise on scanner hardware and software, sequence optimisation, acquisition protocols, reporting, and ongoing quality control programs to monitor precision and accuracy and agreement on quality control. The consensus panel was able to reach consensus on 73% (255/351) items and based on consensus areas made recommendations to maximise accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI studies performed at 1.5T. The panel were unable to reach consensus on the majority of items related to quantitative WB-DWI performed at 3T. This UK Quantitative WB-DWI Technical Workgroup consensus provides guidance on maximising accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI for oncology. The consensus guidance can be used by researchers and clinicians to harmonise WB-DWI protocols which will accelerate clinical translation of WB-DWI-derived QIBs.

  20. BRCA2 hypomorphic missense variants confer moderate risks of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L.s.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calleja, Fabienne Mgr; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case–control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ances...

  1. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy LS; Von, Nicolai Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne MGR; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the $\\textit{BRCA1}$ and $\\textit{BRCA2}$ genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine ...

  2. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  3. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes...... the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper...

  4. Consensus Statement on Proton Therapy in Early-Stage and Locally Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Rutgers, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); De Ruysscher, Dirk [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Khan, Atif J. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Rutgers, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong R. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lomax, Antony J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hoppe, Bradford S. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve local control and survival in patients with non–small cell lung cancer in some studies, but randomized data have not supported this premise, possibly owing to adverse effects. Because of the physical characteristics of the Bragg peak, proton therapy (PT) delivers minimal exit dose distal to the target volume, resulting in better sparing of normal tissues in comparison to photon-based radiation therapy. This is particularly important for lung cancer given the proximity of the lung, heart, esophagus, major airways, large blood vessels, and spinal cord. However, PT is associated with more uncertainty because of the finite range of the proton beam and motion for thoracic cancers. PT is more costly than traditional photon therapy but may reduce side effects and toxicity-related hospitalization, which has its own associated cost. The cost of PT is decreasing over time because of reduced prices for the building, machine, maintenance, and overhead, as well as newer, shorter treatment programs. PT is improving rapidly as more research is performed particularly with the implementation of 4-dimensional computed tomography–based motion management and intensity modulated PT. Given these controversies, there is much debate in the oncology community about which patients with lung cancer benefit significantly from PT. The Particle Therapy Co-operative Group (PTCOG) Thoracic Subcommittee task group intends to address the issues of PT indications, advantages and limitations, cost-effectiveness, technology improvement, clinical trials, and future research directions. This consensus report can be used to guide clinical practice and indications for PT, insurance approval, and clinical or translational research directions.

  5. Consensus Statement on Proton Therapy in Early-Stage and Locally Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Jabbour, Salma K.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Schild, Steven E.; Simone, Charles B.; Rengan, Ramesh; Feigenberg, Steven; Khan, Atif J.; Choi, Noah C.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Lomax, Antony J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve local control and survival in patients with non–small cell lung cancer in some studies, but randomized data have not supported this premise, possibly owing to adverse effects. Because of the physical characteristics of the Bragg peak, proton therapy (PT) delivers minimal exit dose distal to the target volume, resulting in better sparing of normal tissues in comparison to photon-based radiation therapy. This is particularly important for lung cancer given the proximity of the lung, heart, esophagus, major airways, large blood vessels, and spinal cord. However, PT is associated with more uncertainty because of the finite range of the proton beam and motion for thoracic cancers. PT is more costly than traditional photon therapy but may reduce side effects and toxicity-related hospitalization, which has its own associated cost. The cost of PT is decreasing over time because of reduced prices for the building, machine, maintenance, and overhead, as well as newer, shorter treatment programs. PT is improving rapidly as more research is performed particularly with the implementation of 4-dimensional computed tomography–based motion management and intensity modulated PT. Given these controversies, there is much debate in the oncology community about which patients with lung cancer benefit significantly from PT. The Particle Therapy Co-operative Group (PTCOG) Thoracic Subcommittee task group intends to address the issues of PT indications, advantages and limitations, cost-effectiveness, technology improvement, clinical trials, and future research directions. This consensus report can be used to guide clinical practice and indications for PT, insurance approval, and clinical or translational research directions.

  6. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  7. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L S; Von Nicolai, Catharina

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk ......, moderately increased risks of breast cancer, with potential implications for risk management guidelines in women with these specific variants. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2789-99. ©2017 AACR....... were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ancestry (6,269 cases and 6,624 controls). The BRCA2 c.9104A>C, p.Tyr3035Ser (OR = 2.52; P = 0.04), and BRCA...... of breast cancer among Asians. Functional characterization of the BRCA2 variants using four quantitative assays showed reduced BRCA2 activity for p.Tyr3035Ser compared with wild-type. Overall, our results show how BRCA2 missense variants that influence protein function can confer clinically relevant...

  8. Consensus review of discordant findings maximizes cancer detection rate in double-reader screening mammography: Irish National Breast Screening Program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Colette M; Flanagan, Fidema L; Fenlon, Helen M; McNicholas, Michelle M

    2009-02-01

    To assesses consensus review of discordant screening mammography findings in terms of its sensitivity, safety, and effect on overall performance in the first 6 years of operation of the Irish National Breast Screening Program (NBSP). Women who participated in the Irish NBSP gave written informed consent for use of their data for auditing purposes. Local ethics committee approval was obtained. The study population consisted of women who participated in the Irish NBSP and underwent initial screening mammography at one of the two screening centers serving the eastern part of Ireland between 2000 and 2005. Independent double reading of mammograms was performed. When the readers disagreed regarding referral, the case was reviewed by a consensus panel. Of the 128 569 screenings performed, 1335 (1%) were discussed by consensus. Of the 1335 cases discussed by consensus, 606 (45.39%) were recalled for further assessment. This resulted in an overall recall rate of 4.41%. In those recalled to assessment, 71 cases of malignant disease were diagnosed (ductal carcinoma in situ, n = 24; invasive cancer, n = 47). The remaining 729 patients were returned to biennial screening. Of these 729 patients, seven had false-negative findings that were identified in the subsequent screening round. Use of the highest reader recall method, in which a patient is recalled if her findings are deemed abnormal by either reader, could potentially increase the cancer detection rate by 0.6 per 1000 women screened but would increase the recall rate by 12.69% and the number of false-positive findings by 15.37%. The consensus panel identified 71 (7.33%) of 968 cancers diagnosed. Consensus review substantially reduced the number of cases recalled and was associated with a low false-negative rate.

  9. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  10. Multidisciplinary management of head and neck cancer: First expert consensus using Delphi methodology from the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañós, M; Giralt, J; Rueda, A; Cabrera, J; Martinez-Trufero, J; Marruecos, J; Lopez-Pousa, A; Rodrigo, J P; Castelo, B; Martínez-Galán, J; Arias, F; Chaves, M; Herranz, J J; Arrazubi, V; Baste, N; Castro, A; Mesía, R

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most frequent malignances worldwide. Despite the site-specific multimodality therapy, up to half of the patients will develop recurrence. Treatment selection based on a multidisciplinary tumor board represents the cornerstone of head and neck cancer, as it is essential for achieving the best results, not only in terms of outcome, but also in terms of organ-function preservation and quality of life. Evidence-based international and national clinical practice guidelines for head and neck cancer not always provide answers in terms of decision-making that specialists must deal with in their daily practice. This is the first Expert Consensus on the Multidisciplinary Approach for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) elaborated by the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer and based on a Delphi methodology. It offers several specific recommendations based on the available evidence and the expertise of our specialists to facilitate decision-making of all health-care specialists involved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. American brachytherapy society (ABS) consensus guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Laurie E.; Nag, Subir; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Rao; Speiser, Burton

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, treatment regimens, and dosimetry for brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. No guidelines for optimal therapy currently exist. Methods and Materials: Utilizing published reports and clinical experience, representatives of the Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) formulated guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Recommendations were made for brachytherapy in the definitive and palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. (A) Definitive treatment: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal thoracic adeno- or squamous cancers ≤ 10 cm in length, with no evidence of intra-abdominal or metastatic disease. Contraindications include tracheal or bronchial involvement, cervical esophagus location, or stenosis that cannot be bypassed. The esophageal brachytherapy applicator should have an external diameter of 6-10 mm. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 45-50-Gy external beam are used, recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10 Gy in two weekly fractions of 5 Gy each; or (ii) LDR 20 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. All doses are specified 1 cm from the midsource or middwell position. Brachytherapy should follow external beam radiation therapy and should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy. (B) Palliative treatment: Patients with adeno- or squamous cancers of the thoracic esophagus with distant metastases or unresectable local disease progression/recurrence after definitive radiation treatment should be considered for brachytherapy with palliative intent. After limited dose (30 Gy) EBRT, the recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10-14 Gy in one or two fractions; or (ii) LDR 20-25 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. The need for external beam radiation in newly diagnosed patients with a life expectancy of less than 3 months is controversial. In these cases, HDR of 15-20 Gy in two to four fractions or

  12. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  13. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-01-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites

  14. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC and investigated the synergize photothermal and immunological effects. Here, we improve the SWNT-GC nano system and design a new synergistic nano-particle, both have the photothermal effects and immunological effects. We investigate the therapeutic effects and detect the immune response with metastatic mouse tumor models. We also study the therapeutic mechanism after treatment in vitro and in vivo. With the enhancement of nano-materials on photothermal effects, laser treatment could destroy primary tumor and protect normal tissue with low dose laser irradiation. With the immunological effects of nano-materials, the treatment could trigger specific antitumor immune response, to eliminate the metastasis tumor. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the metastatic cancers.

  15. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cutsem, E; Cervantes, A; Adam, R

    2016-01-01

    for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team...... based on the current available evidence to provide a series of evidence-based recommendations to assist in the treatment and management of patients with mCRC in this rapidly evolving treatment setting.......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred...

  16. Consensus statement on essential patient characteristics in systemic treatment trials for metastatic colorectal cancer: Supported by the ARCAD Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goey, Kaitlyn K H; Sørbye, Halfdan; Glimelius, Bengt; Adams, Richard A; André, Thierry; Arnold, Dirk; Berlin, Jordan D; Bodoky, György; de Gramont, Aimery; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Eng, Cathy; Falcone, Alfredo; Grothey, Axel; Heinemann, Volker; Hochster, Howard S; Kaplan, Richard S; Kopetz, Scott; Labianca, Roberto; Lieu, Christopher H; Meropol, Neal J; Price, Timothy J; Schilsky, Richard L; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Shacham-Shmueli, Einat; Shi, Qian; Sobrero, Alberto F; Souglakos, John; Van Cutsem, Eric; Zalcberg, John; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Punt, Cornelis J A; Koopman, Miriam

    2018-06-21

    Patient characteristics and stratification factors are key features influencing trial outcomes. However, there is substantial heterogeneity in reporting of patient characteristics and use of stratification factors in phase 3 trials investigating systemic treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to develop a minimum set of essential baseline characteristics and stratification factors to include in such trials. We performed a modified, two-round Delphi survey among international experts with wide experience in the conduct and methodology of phase 3 trials of systemic treatment of mCRC. Thirty mCRC experts from 15 different countries completed both consensus rounds. A total of 14 patient characteristics were included in the recommended set: age, performance status, primary tumour location, primary tumour resection, prior chemotherapy, number of metastatic sites, liver-only disease, liver involvement, surgical resection of metastases, synchronous versus metachronous metastases, (K)RAS and BRAF mutation status, microsatellite instability/mismatch repair status and number of prior treatment lines. A total of five patient characteristics were considered the most relevant stratification factors: RAS/BRAF mutation status, performance status, primary tumour sidedness and liver-only disease. This survey provides a minimum set of essential baseline patient characteristics and stratification factors to include in phase 3 trials of systemic treatment of mCRC. Inclusion of these patient characteristics and strata in study protocols and final study reports will improve interpretation of trial results and facilitate cross-study comparisons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Applications for detection of acute kidney injury using electronic medical records and clinical information systems: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Matthew T; Hobson, Charles E; Darmon, Michael; Mohan, Sumit; Hudson, Darren; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Electronic medical records and clinical information systems are increasingly used in hospitals and can be leveraged to improve recognition and care for acute kidney injury. This Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup was convened to develop consensus around principles for the design of automated AKI detection systems to produce real-time AKI alerts using electronic systems. AKI alerts were recognized by the workgroup as an opportunity to prompt earlier clinical evaluation, further testing and ultimately intervention, rather than as a diagnostic label. Workgroup members agreed with designing AKI alert systems to align with the existing KDIGO classification system, but recommended future work to further refine the appropriateness of AKI alerts and to link these alerts to actionable recommendations for AKI care. The consensus statements developed in this review can be used as a roadmap for development of future electronic applications for automated detection and reporting of AKI.

  18. Scrutiny of the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure in irradiated prostate cancer patients demonstrates its usefulness and robustness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study are: (1) to establish the robustness of the Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions of failure by comparing biochemical estimates under various modifications of the censoring and failure time components to their respective unaltered definitions; (2) to isolate the source of variation between the two definitions of failure; and (3) to describe the hazard of failure over time for each definition. Methods: Between May 1989 and May 1997, 670 men were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center for localized prostate cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). These men were stratified into three groups for analysis: 111 men treated with adjuvant hormones; 204 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with more favorable prognosis tumor characteristics; 255 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with less favorable prognosis tumor characteristics. For each group, biochemical failure was estimated and compared using the FCCC and ASTRO definitions of failure. The robustness of each definition was evaluated by comparing estimates under the definition as stated to those under various modifications of the censoring and failure components. Analyses were also performed while excluding slow-progressing patients. To isolate the source of variation between the two failure definitions, estimates were compared for patients with agreement in failure status. Estimates of biochemical failure, and thus hazard rates, were made using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: ASTRO biochemical failure estimates were higher than the FCCC failure estimates in the first 5 years post-treatment. Beyond 5 years, ASTRO estimates level off, while the FCCC failure estimates continued to increase. These failure patterns were similar in all patient groups; however, patients treated with adjuvant hormones had a much higher risk of failure

  19. A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume for pelvic lymph nodes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline as well as an atlas defining pelvic nodal clinical target volumes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. A working subgroup to establish the consensus-based guideline on clinical target volumes for uterine cervical cancer was formulated by the Radiation Therapy Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group in July 2008. The working subgroup consisted of seven radiation oncologists. The process resulting in the consensus included a comparison of contouring on CT images among the members, reviewing of published textbooks and the relevant literature and a distribution analysis of metastatic nodes on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of actual patients. The working subgroup defined the pelvic nodal clinical target volumes for cervical cancer and developed an associated atlas. As a basic criterion, the lymph node clinical target volume was defined as the area encompassed by a 7 mm margin around the applicable pelvic vessels. Modifications were made in each nodal area to cover adjacent adipose tissues at risk of microscopic nodal metastases. Although the bones and muscles were excluded, the bowel was not routinely excluded in the definition. Each of the following pelvic node regions was defined: common iliac, external iliac, internal iliac, obturator and presacral. Anatomical structures bordering each lymph node region were defined for six directions; anterior, posterior, lateral, medial, cranial and caudal. Drafts of the definition and the atlas were reviewed by members of the JCOG Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG). We developed a consensus-based guideline defining the pelvic node clinical target volumes that included an atlas. The guideline will be continuously updated to reflect the ongoing changes in the field. (author)

  20. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Lascorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9% had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation.

  1. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in focal therapy for prostate cancer: recommendations from a consensus panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Berrend G.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; Gupta, Rajan T.; Katz, Aaron; Kirkham, Alexander; Kurhanewicz, John; Moul, Judd W.; Pinto, Peter A.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Robertson, Cary; de la Rosette, Jean; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Jones, J. Stephen; Ukimura, Osamu; Verma, Sadhna; Wijkstra, Hessel; Marberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To establish a consensus on the utility of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to identify patients for focal therapy. Urological surgeons, radiologists, and basic researchers, from Europe and North America participated in a consensus meeting about the use of mpMRI in focal therapy of

  2. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  4. MENA Confers Resistance to Paclitaxel in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Madeleine J; Barbier, Lucie; Schäfer, Claudia; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Miller, Miles A; Han, Sangyoon; Jonas, Oliver; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2017-01-01

    Taxane therapy remains the standard of care for triple-negative breast cancer. However, high frequencies of recurrence and progression in treated patients indicate that metastatic breast cancer cells can acquire resistance to this drug. The actin regulatory protein MENA and particularly its invasive isoform, MENA INV , are established drivers of metastasis. MENA INV expression is significantly correlated with metastasis and poor outcome in human patients with breast cancer. We investigated whether MENA isoforms might play a role in driving resistance to chemotherapeutics. We find that both MENA and MENA INV confer resistance to the taxane paclitaxel, but not to the widely used DNA-damaging agents doxorubicin or cisplatin. Furthermore, paclitaxel treatment does not attenuate growth of MENA INV -driven metastatic lesions. Mechanistically, MENA isoform expression alters the ratio of dynamic and stable microtubule populations in paclitaxel-treated cells. MENA expression also increases MAPK signaling in response to paclitaxel treatment. Decreasing ERK phosphorylation by co-treatment with MEK inhibitor restored paclitaxel sensitivity by driving microtubule stabilization in MENA isoform-expressing cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of taxane resistance in highly metastatic breast cancer cells and identify a combination therapy to overcome such resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 143-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options—a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G.; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A. John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  6. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group I - Peri-Implantitis Aetiology, Risk Factors and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stacchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 1 was to review and update the existing data concerning aetiology, risk factors and pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Previous history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking and presence of general diseases have been considered among the aetiological risk factors for the onset of peri-implant pathologies, while late dental implant failures are commonly associated with peri-implantitis and/or with the application of incorrect biomechanical forces. Special interest was paid to the bone cells dynamics as part of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas indagated by this group were as follows: influence of smoking, history of periodontitis and general diseases on peri-implantitis development, bio-mechanics of implant loading and its influence on peri-implant bone and cellular dynamics related to the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. The systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was screened and reported following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. Method of preparation of the systematic reviews, based on comprehensive search strategies, was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. One systematic review with meta-analysis, three systematic reviews and one theoretical analysis were performed. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  7. Establishing a Continuum of Acute Kidney Injury – Tracing AKI Using Data Source Linkage and Long-Term Follow-Up: Workgroup Statements from the 15th ADQI Consensus Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Mehta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is independently associated with the development of chronic kidney disease, endstage kidney disease and increased all-cause and cardiovascular-specific mortality. The severity of the renal insult and the development of multiple AKI episodes increase the risk of occurrence of these outcomes. Despite these long-term effects, only a minority of patients receive nephrologist follow up after an episode of AKI; those that do may have improved outcomes. Furthermore, relatively simple quality improvement strategies have the potential to change this status quo. Methods: On this background, a working group of the 15 th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI conference applied the consensus-building process informed by review of English language articles identified through PubMed search to address questions related to the opportunities, methodological requirements and barriers for longitudinal follow-up of patients with AKI in the era of electronic health records and Big Data. Results: Four consensus statements answering the key questions identified by the working group are developed. Conclusions: We have identified minimal data elements and potential data sources necessary to trace the natural history of patients from onset of AKI to long-term outcome. Minimum infrastructure and key barriers to achieving these goals are outlined together with proposed solutions.

  8. External Validation and Optimization of International Consensus Clinical Target Volumes for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Abhinav V. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wu, Tianming [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Norman D.; Steinberg, Gary D. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: International consensus (IC) clinical target volumes (CTVs) have been proposed to standardize radiation field design in the treatment of patients at high risk of locoregional failure (LRF) after radical cystectomy. The purpose of this study was to externally validate the IC CTVs in a cohort of postsurgical patients followed up for LRF and identify revisions that might improve the IC CTVs' performance. Methods and Materials: Among 334 patients with pT3 to pT4 bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy, LRF developed in 58 (17%), of whom 52 had computed tomography scans available for review. Images with LRF were exported into a treatment planning system, and IC CTVs were contoured and evaluated for adequacy of coverage of each LRF with respect to both the patient and each of 6 pelvic subsites: common iliac (CI) region, obturator region (OR), external and internal iliac region, presacral region, cystectomy bed, or other pelvic site. Revisions to the IC contours were proposed based on the findings. Results: Of the 52 patients with documented LRF, 13 (25%) had LRFs that were outside of the IC CTV involving 17 pelvic subsites: 5 near the CI CTV, 5 near the OR CTV, 1 near the external and internal iliac region, and 6 near the cystectomy bed. The 5 CI failures were located superior to the CTV, and the 5 OR failures were located medial to the CTV. Increasing the superior boundary of the CI to a vessel-based definition of the aortic bifurcation, as well as increasing the medial extension of the OR by an additional 9 mm, decreased the number of patients with LRF outside of the IC CTV to 7 (13%). Conclusions: Modified IC CTVs inclusive of a slight adjustment superiorly for the CI region and medially for the OR may reduce the risk of pelvic failure in patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy.

  9. A consensus-based guideline defining clinical target volume for primary disease in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline to define clinical target volume for primary disease (clinical target volume primary) in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. The working subgroup of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Radiation Therapy Study Group began developing a guideline for primary clinical target volume in November 2009. The group consisted of 10 radiation oncologists and 2 gynecologic oncologists. The process started with comparing the contouring on computed tomographic images of actual cervical cancer cases among the members. This was followed by a comprehensive literature review that included primary research articles and textbooks as well as information on surgical procedures. Extensive discussion occurred in face-to-face meetings (three occasions) and frequent e-mail communications until a consensus was reached. The working subgroup reached a consensus on the definition for the clinical target volume primary. The clinical target volume primary consists of the gross tumor volume, uterine cervix, uterine corpus, parametrium, vagina and ovaries. Definitions for these component structures were determined. Anatomical boundaries in all directions were defined for the parametrium. Examples delineating these boundaries were prepared for the posterior border of the parametrium for various clinical situations (id est (i.e.) central tumor bulk, degree of parametrial involvement). A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume primary was developed for external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. This guideline will serve as a template for radiotherapy protocols in future clinical trials. It may also be used in actual clinical practice in the setting of highly precise external beam radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (author)

  10. The Gestalt of functioning in autism spectrum disorder: Results of the international conference to develop final consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölte, Sven; Mahdi, Soheil; de Vries, Petrus J; Granlund, Mats; Robison, John E; Shulman, Cory; Swedo, Susan; Tonge, Bruce; Wong, Virginia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Segerer, Wolfgang; Selb, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is associated with diverse social, educational, and occupational challenges. To date, no standardized, internationally accepted tools exist to assess autism spectrum disorder-related functioning. World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can serve as foundation for developing such tools. This study aimed to identify a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. Four international preparatory studies yielded in total 164 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health candidate categories. Based on this evidence, 20 international autism spectrum disorder experts applied an established iterative decision-making consensus process to select from the candidate categories the most relevant ones to constitute the autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. The consensus process generated 111 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories in the Comprehensive Core Set for autism spectrum disorder-one body structure, 20 body functions, 59 activities and participation categories, and 31 environmental factors. The Common Brief Core Set comprised 60 categories, while the age-appropriate core sets included 73 categories in the preschool version (0- to 5-year-old children), 81 in the school-age version (6- to 16-year-old children and adolescents), and 79 in the older adolescent and adult version (⩾17-year-old individuals). The autism spectrum disorder Core Sets mark a milestone toward the standardized assessment of autism spectrum disorder-related functioning in educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings.

  11. Crafting consensus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, 1–2 (2017), s. 169-200 ISSN 0048-5829 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-27902P Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : consensus building * agenda setting * vote buying Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 0.788, year: 2016

  12. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Which benefits and harms of preoperative radiotherapy should be addressed? A Delphi consensus study among rectal cancer patients and radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Pieterse, Arwen H.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously found considerable variation in information provision on preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) in rectal cancer. Our aims were to reach consensus among patients and oncologists on which benefits/harms of PRT should be addressed during the consultation, and to assess congruence with daily clinical practice. Materials and methods: A four-round Delphi-study was conducted with two expert panels: (1) 31 treated rectal cancer patients and (2) 35 radiation oncologists. Thirty-seven possible benefits/harms were shown. Participants indicated whether addressing the benefit/harm was (1) essential, (2) desired, (3) not necessary, or (4) to be avoided. Consensus was assumed when ⩾80% of the panel agreed. Results were compared to 81 audio-taped consultations. Results: The panels reached consensus that six topics should be addressed in all patients (local control, survival, long term altered defecation pattern and faecal incontinence, perineal wound healing problems, advice to avoid pregnancy), three in male patients (erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorder, infertility), and four in female patients (vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, menopause, infertility). On average, less than half of these topics were addressed in daily clinical practice. Conclusions: This study showed substantial overlap between benefits/harms that patients and oncologists consider important to address during the consultation, and at the same time poor congruence with daily clinical practice

  14. A novel series of conferences tackling the hurdles confronting the translation of novel cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bot Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While there has been significant progress in advancing novel immune therapies to the bedside, much more needs to be done to fully tap into the potential of the immune system. It has become increasingly clear that besides practical and operational challenges, the heterogeneity of cancer and the limited efficacy profile of current immunotherapy platforms are the two main hurdles. Nevertheless, the promising clinical data of several approaches point to a roadmap that carries the promise to significantly advance cancer immunotherapy. A new annual series sponsored by Arrowhead Publishers and Conferences aims at bringing together scientific and business leadership from academia and industry, to identify, share and discuss most current priorities in research and translation of novel immune interventions. This Editorial provides highlights of the first event held earlier this year and outlines the focus of the second meeting to be held in 2013 that will be dedicated to stem cells and immunotherapy.

  15. Two variants on chromosome 17 confer prostate cancer risk, and the one in TCF2 protects against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur

    2007-01-01

    attributable risk is substantial. One of the variants is in TCF2 (HNF1beta), a gene known to be mutated in individuals with maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. Results from eight case-control groups, including one West African and one Chinese, demonstrate that this variant confers protection against...... 17 with the disease. These two variants, 33 Mb apart, fall within a region previously implicated by family-based linkage studies on prostate cancer. The risks conferred by these variants are moderate individually (allele odds ratio of about 1.20), but because they are common, their joint population......We performed a genome-wide association scan to search for sequence variants conferring risk of prostate cancer using 1,501 Icelandic men with prostate cancer and 11,290 controls. Follow-up studies involving three additional case-control groups replicated an association of two variants on chromosome...

  16. Toxicity assessment of molecularly targeted drugs incorporated into multiagent chemotherapy regimens for pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL): review from an international consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Terzah M; Sposto, Richard; Brown, Patrick; Reynolds, C Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Winick, Naomi J; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Carroll, William L; Arceci, Robert J; Borowitz, Michael J; Gaynon, Paul S; Gore, Lia; Jeha, Sima; Maurer, Barry J; Siegel, Stuart E; Biondi, Andrea; Kearns, Pamela R; Narendran, Aru; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Malcolm A; Zwaan, C Michel; Whitlock, James A

    2010-07-01

    One of the challenges of incorporating molecularly targeted drugs into multi-agent chemotherapy (backbone) regimens is defining dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the targeted agent against the background of toxicities of the backbone regimen. An international panel of 22 pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) experts addressed this issue (www.ALLNA.org). Two major questions surrounding DLT assessment were explored: (1) how toxicities can be best defined, assessed, and attributed; and (2) how effective dosing of new agents incorporated into multi-agent ALL clinical trials can be safely established in the face of disease- and therapy-related systemic toxicities. The consensus DLT definition incorporates tolerance of resolving Grade 3 and some resolving Grade 4 toxicities with stringent safety monitoring. This functional DLT definition is being tested in two Children's Oncology Group (COG) ALL clinical trials. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. NRF2 Mutation Confers Malignant Potential and Resistance to Chemoradiation Therapy in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Shibata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cancer (ESC is one of the most aggressive tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. A combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CRT has improved the clinical outcome, but the molecular background determining the effectiveness of therapy remains unknown. NRF2 is a master transcriptional regulator of stress adaptation, and gain of-function mutation of NRF2 in cancer confers resistance to stressors including anticancer therapy. Direct resequencing analysis revealed that Nrf2 gain-of-function mutation occurred recurrently (18/82, 22% in advanced ESC tumors and ESC cell lines (3/10. The presence of Nrf2 mutation was associated with tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of NRF2 in ESC cells that harbor only mutated Nrf2 allele revealed that themutant NRF2 conferred increased cell proliferation, attachment-independent survival, and resistance to 5-fluorouracil and γ-irradiation. Based on the Nrf2 mutation status, gene expression signatures associated with NRF2 mutation were extracted from ESC cell lines, and their potential utility for monitoring and prognosis was examined in a cohort of 33 pre-CRT cases of ESC. The molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation were significantly predictive and prognostic for CRT response. In conclusion, recurrent NRF2 mutation confers malignant potential and resistance to therapy in advanced ESC, resulting in a poorer outcome. Molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation can be applied as predictive markers of response to CRT, and efficient inhibition of aberrant NRF2 activation could be a promising approach in combination with CRT.

  18. Reporting and Staging of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrill, Clare; Yilmaz, Asli; Srigley, John R; Amin, Mahul B; Compérat, Eva; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Berney, Daniel M; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference devoted to issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation and discussion led by the testis microscopic features working group. This conference focused on controversies related to staging and reporting of testicular tumors and was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urological Pathology members. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions were made by expert consensus rather than voting. A number of recommendations emerged from the conference, including that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) should always be reported and no distinction need be made between lymphatic or blood invasion. If LVI is equivocal, then it should be regarded as negative to avoid triggering unnecessary therapy. LVI in the spermatic cord is considered as category pT2, not pT3, unless future studies provide contrary evidence. At the time of gross dissection, a block should be taken just superior to the epididymis to define the base of the spermatic cord, and direct invasion of tumor in this block indicates a category of pT3. Pagetoid involvement of the rete testis epithelium must be distinguished from rete testis stromal invasion, with only the latter being prognostically useful. Percentages of different tumor elements in mixed germ cell tumors should be reported. Although consensus was reached on many issues, there are still areas of practice that need further evidence on which to base firm recommendations.

  19. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  20. Supportive care during treatment for breast cancer: resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fatima; Bese, Nuran; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; Ginsburg, Ophira; Grunberg, Steven M; Gralla, Richard J; Steyn, Ann; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Knaul, Felicia Marie; Aapro, Matti S; Andersen, Barbara L; Thompson, Beti; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer patients may have unmet supportive care needs during treatment, including symptom management of treatment-related toxicities, and educational, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. Delivery of supportive care is often a low priority in low- and middle-income settings, and is also dependent on resources available. This consensus statement describes twelve key recommendations for supportive care during treatment in low- and middle-income countries, identified by an expert international panel as part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit for Supportive Care, which was held in October 2012, in Vienna, Austria. Panel recommendations are presented in a 4-tier resource-stratified table to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services during treatment to breast cancer patients, starting at a basic level of resource allocation and incrementally adding program resources as they become available. These recommendations include: health professional and patient and family education; management of treatment related toxicities, management of treatment-related symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and non-specific pain, and management of psychosocial and spiritual issues related to breast cancer treatment. Establishing supportive care during breast cancer treatment will help ensure that breast cancer patients receive comprehensive care that can help 1) improve adherence to treatment recommendations, 2) manage treatment-related toxicities and other treatment related symptoms, and 3) address the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer and breast cancer treatments. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Singh, Saurabh; Rai, Yogesh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  2. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  3. Recommendations for the use of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) after TIA or stroke caused by atrial fibrillation (AF), after a consensus conference among Italian neurologists (the Venice group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Vito

    2014-05-01

    Vascular neurologists of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia, north-east regions of Italy, have sought an agreement on the two following questions: (A) what prophylactic treatment should we recommend to patients with a stroke ascribed to atrial fibrillation (AF), who were not previously on antithrombotic treatment, to prevent further strokes? (B) What should we do in the event of an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke associated with AF in patients who were already on antithrombotic treatment? There was a unanimous consensus for preferring the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients not taking any antithrombotics and in cases treated with antithrombotic drugs (coumadin and/or antiplatelets), due to a lower incidence of intracranial bleeding complications and a noninferiority for recurrent stroke or TIA. Even after intracranial bleeding complications, when it is useful or necessary to continue anticoagulant treatment, the group of experts preferred the NOACs, suggesting, however, to be very cautious in cases with widespread leukoaraiosis or microbleeds, practice frequent monitoring of creatinine clearance (CrCl) and avoid using NOACs when CrCl is <30 mL/min.

  4. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus in archival cervical cancer specimens by DNA amplification with consensus primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RESNICK, R. M.; Cornelissen, M. T.; WRIGHT, D. K.; EICHINGER, G. H.; FOX, H. S.; ter Schegget, J.; MANOS, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    We developed a polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification system using two distinct consensus oligonucleotide primer sets for the improved detection and typing of a broad spectrum of human genital papillomavirus (HPV) sequences, including those of novel viruses. The system incorporates one primer

  5. Geriatric Assessment-Guided Care Processes for Older Adults: A Delphi Consensus of Geriatric Oncology Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Velarde, Carla; Hurria, Arti; Magnuson, Allison; Lowenstein, Lisa; Pandya, Chintan; O'Donovan, Anita; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Dale, William

    2015-09-01

    Structured care processes that provide a framework for how oncologists can incorporate geriatric assessment (GA) into clinical practice could improve outcomes for vulnerable older adults with cancer, a growing population at high risk of toxicity from cancer treatment. We sought to obtain consensus from an expert panel on the use of GA in clinical practice and to develop algorithms of GA-guided care processes. The Delphi technique, a well-recognized structured and reiterative process to reach consensus, was used. Participants were geriatric oncology experts who attended NIH-funded U13 or Cancer and Aging Research Group conferences. Consensus was defined as an interquartile range of 2 or more units, or 66.7% or greater, selecting a utility/helpfulness rating of 7 or greater on a 10-point Likert scale. For nominal data, consensus was defined as agreement among 66.7% or more of the group. From 33 invited, 30 participants completed all 3 rounds. Most experts (75%) used GA in clinical care, and the remainder were involved in geriatric oncology research. The panel met consensus that "all patients aged 75 years or older and those who are younger with age-related health concerns" should undergo GA and that all domains (function, physical performance, comorbidity/polypharmacy, cognition, nutrition, psychological status, and social support) should be included. Consensus was met for how GA could guide nononcologic interventions and cancer treatment decisions. Algorithms for GA-guided care processes were developed. This Delphi investigation of geriatric oncology experts demonstrated that GA should be performed for older patients with cancer to guide care processes. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  6. [Recent history: 12th International Conference on Cancer, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1978].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    Using the approaches of history of the present, this article recovers the discussions surrounding the 12th International Conference on Cancer carried out in Buenos Aires in 1978, in reaction to which Georges Périès organized a "counter-conference" in Paris. In order to understand this discussion, the political situation of the time is described, as is the state of human rights at the time in Argentina, the role of the media - in particular the newspapers La Nación and Clarín and the magazine Gente - and the institutional position adopted by the National Academy of Medicine, as expressed in a letter sent to the presidents of the primary scientific societies of the world. The letter is reprinted in this text as a documentary source, taken from Memoria: Año 1978 (Presidencia de Dr. José E. Rivarola) [Acta: Year 1978 (Presidency of Dr. José E. Rivarola)]. The framework of the discussion makes reference to science's social policy versus science's supposed neutrality and the role of scientific societies.

  7. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  8. Prospective randomized double-blind pilot study of site-specific consensus atlas implementation for rectal cancer target volume delineation in the cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G. N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille; Harper, Jennifer L.; Chang, Daniel T.; Smalley, Stephen; Marshall, David T.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Variation in target volume delineation represents a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the impact of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring of target volumes. Methods A representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy were contoured (Scan1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert. Gross tumor volume (GTV), and 2 clinical target volumes (CTVA, comprising internal iliac, pre-sacral, and peri-rectal nodes, and CTVB, external iliac nodes) were contoured. Observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group_A) /non-receipt (Group_B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers, then instructed to re-contour the same case/images (Scan2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using conformation number (CN, where CN=1 equals a total agreement). Results In 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert, 7 Group_A, 6 Group_B), there was greater agreement for GTV (mean CN 0.75) than CTVs (mean CN 0.46–0.65). Atlas exposure for Group_A led to a significant increased inter-observer agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN 0.68, post-atlas 0.76; p=0.03), as well as increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN 0.58, 0.69 post-atlas; p=0.02). For GTV and CTVB, neither inter-observer nor expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in inter-observer agreement and greater approximation of expert volumes for CTVA, but not GTV or CTVB, in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal radiotherapy. PMID:20400244

  9. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Small, William; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  10. Consensus on management of metastatic colorectal cancer in Central America and the Caribbean: San José, Costa Rica, August 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Roberto Ivan; Castro, Jenny Lissette; Cedeño, Heidy; Cisneros, Dagoberto; Corrales, Luis; González-Herrera, Ileana; Lima-Pérez, Mayté; Prestol, Rogelio; Salinas, Roberto; Soriano-García, Jorge Luis; T Zavala, Alejandra; Zetina, Luis Miguel; Zúñiga-Orlich, Carlos Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common in women worldwide. In Latin America and the Caribbean, it has a mortality of 56%. The median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is currently estimated as ~30 months, which has substantially improved through strategic changes in treatment and in the management of patients. As opposed to other metastatic cancers where first-line regimens are often determined, mCRC requires special attention because there is controversy in the possible combinations of the available drugs and the different periods of duration for each patient. Each combination must seek to be effective and to generate the minimum adverse effects as possible. Instead of giving the first-line regimen until the tumour progresses, treatment is often individualised. Furthermore, up to 60% of colorectal tumours are considered non-mutated or wild-type CRC. Not harbouring mutations in the RAS family of genes or mutations in the signalling pathways of the epidermal growth factor receptor causes a null response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy, which implies even more complex considerations regarding its management. The primary objective of this consensus is to address the main scenarios of mCRC in order to warrant the most appropriate therapeutic intervention for these patients in the Central American and the Caribbean (CAC) region. This can lead to better clinical outcomes as well as quality of life for palliative patients. This document includes the formal expert consensus recommendations for scenarios of mutated and non-mutated mCRC, including synchronous or metachronous disease, management of mCRC with liver and lung metastasis, resectable, potentially resectable or non-resectable tumours and local in the CAC context. PMID:29636987

  11. What is the best technique in parenchymal transection in laparoscopic liver resection? Comprehensive review for the clinical question on the 2nd International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Hironori; Cleary, Sean P; Buell, Joseph F; Cai, Xiujun; Wakabayashi, Go

    2015-05-01

    The continuing evolution of technique and devices used in laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has allowed successful application of this minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of liver disease. However, the type of instruments by energy sources and technique used vary among each institution. We reviewed the literature to seek the best technique for parenchymal transection, which was proposed as one of the important clinical question in the 2nd International Consensus Conference on LLR held on October 2014. While publications have described transection techniques used in LLR from 1991 to June 2014, it is difficult to specify the best technique and device for laparoscopic hepatic parenchymal transection, owing to a lack of randomized trials with only a small number of comparative studies. However, it is clear that instruments should be used in combination with others based on their functions and the depth of liver resection. Most authors have reported using staplers to secure and divide major vessels. Preparation for prevention of unexpected hemorrhaging particularly in liver cirrhosis, the Pringle's maneuver and prompt technique for hemostasis should be performed. We conclude that hepatobiliary surgeons should select techniques based on their familiarity with a concrete understanding of instruments and individualize to the procedure of LLR. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  12. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part II of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and bicuspid aortic valve disease, coarctation of the aorta, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352138

  13. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19-21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.phpThe Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe.THE CORE PARTICIPANTING INSTITUTES INCLUDED: European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM)-IFOM-IEO Campus, MilanBeatson Institute for Cancer Research (BICR), GlasgowCambridge Research Institute (CRI), Cambridge, UKMRC Gray Institute of Radiation Biology (GIROB), OxfordLondon Research Institute (LRI), LondonPaterson Institute for Cancer Research (PICR), ManchesterThe Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam'You organizers have crushed all my prejudices towards Italians. Congratulations, I enjoyed the conference immensely!' Even if it might have sounded like rudeness for sure this was supposed to be a genuine compliment (at least, that's how we took it), also considering that it was told by a guy who himself was the fusion of two usually antithetical concepts: fashion style and English nationality.The year 2010 has marked an important event for Italian research in the international scientific panorama: the European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) had the honour to host the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference, which was held from 19-21 May 2010 at the IFOM-IEO-Campus (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php) in Milan.The conference was attended by more than one hundred students, coming from a selection of cutting edge European institutes devoted to cancer research. The rationale behind it is the promotion of cooperation among young scientists across Europe to debate about science and to exchange ideas and experiences. But that is not all, it is also designed for PhD students to get in touch

  14. AZIN1 RNA editing confers cancer stemness and enhances oncogenic potential in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toden, Shusuke; Miyoshi, Jinsei; Toiyama, Yuji; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Kusunoki, Masato; Takayama, Tetsuji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Chen, Leilei; Goel, Ajay

    2018-06-21

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, a process mediated by adenosine deaminases that act on the RNA (ADAR) gene family, is a recently discovered epigenetic modification dysregulated in human cancers. However, the clinical significance and the functional role of RNA editing in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. We have systematically and comprehensively investigated the significance of the expression status of ADAR1 and of the RNA editing levels of antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1), one of the most frequently edited genes in cancers, in 392 colorectal tissues from multiple independent CRC patient cohorts. Both ADAR1 expression and AZIN1 RNA editing levels were significantly elevated in CRC tissues when compared with corresponding normal mucosa. High levels of AZIN1 RNA editing emerged as a prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival and were an independent risk factor for lymph node and distant metastasis. Furthermore, elevated AZIN1 editing identified high-risk stage II CRC patients. Mechanistically, edited AZIN1 enhances stemness and appears to drive the metastatic processes. We have demonstrated that edited AZIN1 functions as an oncogene and a potential therapeutic target in CRC. Moreover, AZIN1 RNA editing status could be used as a clinically relevant prognostic indicator in CRC patients.

  15. The correlation between the astro consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Matter, Richard C.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The ASTRO Consensus Panel on PSA After Radiation Therapy recently recommended a definition of biochemical failure (BF) following treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy. We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the Consensus Panel definition correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS), cause specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates for a large group of patients from the PSA era. Methods And Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 653 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Of these patients, 568 had a minimum follow-up of 2 years and constitute the study population. The median pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score was 11 ng/ml and 6, respectively. The median dose to the prostate using megavoltage RT was 66.6 Gy (range: 60-70.4 Gy) using a four field or arc technique. No patient received hormonal therapy either prior to, during, or after radiotherapy unless local or distant failure was documented. Pre-treatment and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment PSA after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and first increase in PSA. Five year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Results: Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). The overall 5 year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly better in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p< 0.001). The median time to DM within the BF group was 21 months (range: 2-112 months). When stratifying by pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage, these

  16. Lung cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a survey of participants at a national conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bydder, S [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hasani, A [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Broderick, C [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). WA Cancer and Palliative Care Network; Semmens, J [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). Centr for Population Health Research

    2008-04-15

    Full text: Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are a useful aid for the development of comprehensive treatment plans for cancer patients. However, little is known about the requirements for effective MDM function. Attendees at a national lung cancer conference who participated at least weekly in lung cancer MDMs were surveyed. The survey addressed the attendees' perceptions regarding the aims of MDMs, and for their own institutional MDMs, the importance and need for improvement for each of: (i) the attendance of nine discipline groups; and (ii) 15 aspects related to MDM function derived from the literature. The survey also asked participants if MDMs met their needs. There was a general agreement on the aims of the meetings. There was also an agreement on the importance of various groups' attendance and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, many respondents reported their meetings required moderate or substantial improvements in one or more areas. More than 20% of the respondents indicated improvement was required for the attendance of three discipline groups (palliative care physicians, pathologists and cardiothoracic surgeons) and 10 of the 15 examined aspects (more than half in the case of computerised databases). Only 9% of the respondents reported that none of the features surveyed needed either moderate or substantial improvement. MDMs met the needs of 79% of the respondents. We found general agreement on the aims of the meetings, the importance of various groups' attendance at MDMs and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, moderate or substantial improvements were thought to be required by many respondents. The performance of individual institutions' MDMs and the resources they have available to achieve their aims should be assessed and periodically reviewed. The survey applied here may provide a framework for MDM members to do this.

  17. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  18. Objective consensus from decision trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Panje, Cedric M; Papachristofilou, Alexandros; Pra, Alan Dal; Hundsberger, Thomas; Plasswilm, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties

  19. Objective consensus from decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Panje, Cedric M; Papachristofilou, Alexandros; Dal Pra, Alan; Hundsberger, Thomas; Plasswilm, Ludwig

    2014-12-05

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties.

  20. A consensus plan for action to improve access to cancer care in the association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In many countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), cancer is an increasing problem due to ageing and a transition to Western lifestyles. Governments have been slow to react to the health consequences of these socioeconomic changes, leading to the risk of a cancer epidemic overwhelming the region. A major limitation to motivating change is the paucity of high-quality data on cancer, and its socioeconomic repercussions, in ASEAN. Two initiatives have been launched to address these issues. First, a study of over 9000 new cancer patients in ASEAN - the ACTION study - which records information on financial difficulties, as well as clinical outcomes, subsequent to the diagnosis. Second, a series of roundtable meetings of key stakeholders and experts, with the broad aim of producing advice for governments in ASEAN to take appropriate account of issues relating to cancer, as well as to generate knowledge and interest through engagement with the media. An important product of these roundtables has been the Jakarta Call to Action on Cancer Control. The growth and ageing of populations is a global challenge for cancer services. In the less developed parts of Asia, and elsewhere, these problems are compounded by the epidemiological transition to Western lifestyles and lack of awareness of cancer at the government level. For many years, health services in less developed countries have concentrated on infectious diseases and mother-and-child health; despite a recent wake-up call (United Nations, 2010), these health services have so far failed to allow for the huge increase in cancer cases to come. It has been estimated that, in Asia, the number of new cancer cases per year will grow from 6.1 million in 2008 to 10.6 million in 2030 (Sankaranarayanan et al., 2014). In the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), corresponding figures are 770 thousand in 2012 (Figure 1), rising to 1.3 million in 2030 (Ferlay et al., 2012). ASEAN

  1. A systematic review of dental disease in patients undergoing cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Catherine H. L.; Napnas, Joel J.; Hodgson, Brian D.; Stokman, Monique A.; Mathers-Stauffer, Vickie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    This purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the literature and update our current understanding of the impact of present cancer therapies on the dental apparatus (teeth and periodontium) since the 1989 NIH Development Consensus Conference on the Oral Complications of Cancer Therapies. A

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 confer susceptibility to esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Zhong; Ju, Hui-Xiang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Jin, Hao; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair genes like MSH2 and MLH1 confer increased risk of cancers. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MSH2 and MLH1 were investigated for their potential contribution to the risk of esophageal cancer. This study recruited 614 participants from Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, of which 289 were patients with esophageal cancer, and the remainder was healthy individuals who served as a control group. Two SNPs, MSH2 c.2063T>G and MLH1 IVS14-19A>G, were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Carriers of the MSH2 c.2063G allele were at significantly higher risk for esophageal cancer compared to individuals with the TT genotype [OR = 3.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-11.03]. The MLH1 IVS14-19A>G allele also conferred significantly increased (1.70-fold) for esophageal cancer compared to the AA genotype (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-5.06). Further, the variant alleles interacted such that individuals with the susceptible genotypes at both MSH2 and MLH1 had a significantly exacerbated risk for esophageal cancer (OR = 12.38, 95% CI: 3.09-63.11). In brief, SNPs in the DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 increase the risk of esophageal cancer. Molecular investigations are needed to uncover the mechanism behind their interaction effect.

  3. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR tyros...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging for the detection, localisation, and characterisation of prostate cancer: recommendations from a European consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, L.; Ahmed, H.U.; Allen, C.; Barentsz, J.O.; Carey, B.; Futterer, J.J.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hoskin, P.J.; Kirkham, A.; Padhani, A.R.; Persad, R.; Puech, P.; Punwani, S.; Sohaib, A.S.; Tombal, B.; Villers, A.; Meulen, J. van der; Emberton, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) may have a role in detecting clinically significant prostate cancer in men with raised serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Variations in technique and the interpretation of images have contributed to inconsistency in its reported

  5. The correlation between the ASTRO consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of biochemical failure (BF) following radiation therapy correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC). Methods and Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 568 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital (median total dose 66.6 Gy; range: 60-70.4 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of clinical DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). Results: Five-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly greater in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p < 0.001). In patients who were BC, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 99%, 99%, 98%, and 99% respectively. For patients who failed biochemically, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 74%, 64%, 89%, and 86% respectively. When stratifying by pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage these differences remained significant for DMFS, DFS, and CSS. The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that BC was the single most important predictor of clinical outcome for DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC. Pretreatment PSA and Gleason score were also independent predictors of outcome for DMFS and DFS. Conclusions: The ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of BF following radiation therapy correlates well with clinical DMFS, DFS

  6. Highlights from the first ecancer-Liga Colombiana contra el Cancer conference, 17-18 November 2016, Bogota, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The first oncology conference organised by e cancer and the Liga Colombiana contra el Cancer took place on 17-18 November 2016 in Bogota. It was a highly successful event owing to the number of participants, the quality of the speakers, and the academic programme. Around 48 professors from 8 different countries came and shared their knowledge and experience of cancer management. They also talked about the most recent developments noted or achieved in this area. The keynote speech from Dr Nubia Muñoz was of great interest which was related to the safety of a HPV vaccine and the implications of a mass vaccination programme in developing countries. Geriatric oncology and palliative care were also topics that sparked great interest during the event.

  7. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Anagnostopoulos, C.; Cerqueira, M.; Ell, P.J.; Flint, E.J.; Harbinson, M.; Kelion, A.D.; Al-Mohammad, A.; Prvulovich, E.M.; Shaw, L.J.; Tweddel, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  8. Psychological considerations in the assessment and treatment of pain in neurorehabilitation and psychological factors predictive of therapeutic response: evidence and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn order to provide effective care to patients suffering from chronic pain secondary to neurological diseases, health professionals must appraise the role of the psychosocial factors in the genesis and maintenance of this condition whilst considering how emotions and cognitions influence the course of treatment. Furthermore, it is important not only to recognize the psychological reactions to pain that are common to the various conditions, but also to evaluate how these syndromes differ with regards to the psychological factors that may be involved. As an extensive evaluation of these factors is still lacking, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation aimed to collate the evidence available across these topics. ObjectivesTo determine the psychological factors which are associated with or predictive of pain secondary to neurological conditions and to assess the influence of these aspects on the outcome of neurorehabilitation. MethodsTwo reviews were performed. In the first, a PUBMED search of the studies assessing the association between psychological factors and pain or the predictive value of these aspects with respect to chronic pain was conducted. The included papers were then rated with regards to their methodological quality and recommendations were made accordingly. In the second study, the same methodology was used to collect the available evidence on the predictive role of psychological factors on the therapeutic response to pain treatments in the setting of neurorehabilitation.ResultsThe first literature search identified 1170 results and the final database included 189 articles. Factors such as depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, coping strategies and cognitive functions were found to be associated with pain across the various conditions. However, there are differences between chronic musculoskeletal pain, migraine, neuropathy and conditions associated with complex disability with regards to the

  9. Psychological Considerations in the Assessment and Treatment of Pain in Neurorehabilitation and Psychological Factors Predictive of Therapeutic Response: Evidence and Recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Giusti, Emanuele M; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Saviola, Donatella; Gatti, Arianna; Gabrielli, Samantha; Lacerenza, Marco; Pietrabissa, Giada; Cattivelli, Roberto; Spatola, Chiara A M; Corti, Stefania; Novelli, Margherita; Villa, Valentina; Cottini, Andrea; Lai, Carlo; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelli, Lorys; Tavola, Mario; Torta, Riccardo; Arreghini, Marco; Zanini, Loredana; Brunani, Amelia; Capodaglio, Paolo; D'Aniello, Guido E; Scarpina, Federica; Brioschi, Andrea; Priano, Lorenzo; Mauro, Alessandro; Riva, Giuseppe; Repetto, Claudia; Regalia, Camillo; Molinari, Enrico; Notaro, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Simpson, Susan G; Wiederhold, Brenda; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide effective care to patients suffering from chronic pain secondary to neurological diseases, health professionals must appraise the role of the psychosocial factors in the genesis and maintenance of this condition whilst considering how emotions and cognitions influence the course of treatment. Furthermore, it is important not only to recognize the psychological reactions to pain that are common to the various conditions, but also to evaluate how these syndromes differ with regards to the psychological factors that may be involved. As an extensive evaluation of these factors is still lacking, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN) aimed to collate the evidence available across these topics. To determine the psychological factors which are associated with or predictive of pain secondary to neurological conditions and to assess the influence of these aspects on the outcome of neurorehabilitation. Two reviews were performed. In the first, a PUBMED search of the studies assessing the association between psychological factors and pain or the predictive value of these aspects with respect to chronic pain was conducted. The included papers were then rated with regards to their methodological quality and recommendations were made accordingly. In the second study, the same methodology was used to collect the available evidence on the predictive role of psychological factors on the therapeutic response to pain treatments in the setting of neurorehabilitation. The first literature search identified 1170 results and the final database included 189 articles. Factors such as depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, coping strategies, and cognitive functions were found to be associated with pain across the various conditions. However, there are differences between chronic musculoskeletal pain, migraine, neuropathy, and conditions associated with complex disability with regards to the psychological aspects that are involved. The

  10. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from Janua...

  11. Consensus for the management of IPMN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    International Consensus Guidelines for management of intraductal papillary mucious neoplasms (IPMIN) and mucious cystic neoplasms (MCN) of the pancreas defined their difference in 2006 Sendai Conference, and this paper describes about their still remaining problem in the consensus by referring related literatures. The author explains the macroscopic classification of IPMIN in types of brunch duct (BD), main duct (MD) and their mixture. Guidelines are obscure concerning which of the histology or preoperative imaging is appropriate for diagnosis of the mixed type and the author considers that the latter imaging is better as the method used has influence on indication of surgery thereafter. MD-IPMIN is easily diagnosed differentially from chronic pantreatitis, but differential diagnosis of BD-IPMIN and other cystic lesion is rather complex, particularly, for MCN tending to malignancy and macrocystic serous CN (SCN). For this, analysis of the intraductal mucious liquid obtained by endoscopic ultrasonography-fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) is useful but its safety to see the grade of malignancy for extending the indication leading to resection is not established. Diagnosis of the malignancy of BD-IPMIN can be done best based on the presence of mural nodules, and other markers are of low reliability. In fact, cysts with >3 cm, when resected, are found mostly (80%) benign, indicating the necessity of a more reliable sign and of detailed classification of sub-tissue type. The purpose of progress observation involves diagnoses of changing to malignancy, of concurrent cancer and of recurrence of resected lesion, and an author's case report of this is given with MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), CT and MRI images. Observatory approach, interval and period of the disease progression are yet unestablished. (T.T.)

  12. Use of ER/PR/HER2 subtypes in conjunction with the 2007 St Gallen Consensus Statement for early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parise Carol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2007 St Gallen international expert consensus statement describes three risk categories and provides recommendations for treatment of early breast cancer. The set of recommendations on how to best treat primary breast cancer is recognized and used by clinicians worldwide. We now examine the variability of five-year survival of the 2007 St Gallen Risk Classifications utilizing the ER/PR/HER2 subtypes. Methods Using the population-based California Cancer Registry, 114,786 incident cases of Stages 1-3 invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were identified. Cases were assigned to Low, Intermediate, or High Risk categories. Five-year-relative survival was computed for the three St Gallen risk categories and for the ER/PR/HER2 subtypes for further differentiation. Results and Discussion There were 9,124 (13% cases classified as Low Risk, 44,234 (65% cases as Intermediate Risk, and 14,340 (21% as High Risk. Within the Intermediate Risk group, 33,735 (76% were node-negative (Intermediate Risk 2 and 10,499 (24% were node-positive (Intermediate Risk 3. For the High Risk group, 6,149 (43% had 1 to 3 positive axillary lymph nodes (High Risk 4 and 8,191 (57% had four or more positive lymph nodes (High Risk 5. Using five-year relative survival as the principal criterion, we found the following: a There was very little difference between the Low Risk and Intermediate Risk categories; b Use of the ER/PR/HER2 subtypes within the Intermediate and High Risk categories separated each into a group with better five-year survival (ER-positive and a group with worse survival (ER-negative, irrespective of HER2-status; c The heterogeneity of the High Risk category was most evident when one examined the ER/PR/HER2 subtypes with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes; (d HER2-positivity did not always translate to worse survival, as noted when one compared the triple positive subtype (ER+/PR+/HER2+ to the triple negative subtype

  13. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Lin, Lilie L.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  14. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  15. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Dal Pra, Alan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bern (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chur (Switzerland); Papachristofilou, Alexandros [Universitaetsspital Basel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Basel (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Matzinger, Oscar [Hopital Riviera-Chablais, Department of Radiation Oncology, Vevey (Switzerland); Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.) [German] Die Radiotherapie (RT) ist als Monotherapie oder in Kombination mit einer Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) eine etablierte Behandlungsoption fuer das lokalisierte und lokal fortgeschrittene Prostatakarzinom. Trotz der guten Evidenzlage durch zahlreiche

  16. CA-125–indicated asymptomatic relapse confers survival benefit to ovarian cancer patients who underwent secondary cytoreduction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus regarding the management of ovarian cancer patients, who have shown complete clinical response (CCR to primary therapy and have rising cancer antigen CA-125 levels but have no symptoms of recurrent disease. The present study aims to determine whether follow-up CA-125 levels can be used to identify the need for imaging studies and secondary cytoreductive surgery (CRS. Methods We identified 410 ovarian cancer patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1984 and 2011. These patients had shown CCR to primary therapy. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test to assess the associations between the follow-up CA-125 levels and secondary CRS and survival duration. Results The CA-125 level of 1.68 × nadir was defined as the indicator of recurrent disease (p  1.68 × nadir at relapse (55.7 and 10.4 months; p = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively. The overall and progression free survival duration of patients with asymptomatic relapse and underwent a secondary CRS was longer than that of patients with symptomatic relapse (p = 0.02 and 0.04 respectively. Conclusions The increase of serum CA-125 levels is an early warning of clinical relapse in ovarian cancer. Using CA-125 levels in guiding the treatment of patients with asymptomatic recurrent ovarian cancer, who have shown CCR to primary therapy, can facilitate optimal secondary CRS and extend the survival duration of the patients.

  17. ESMO Consensus Guidelines for management of patients with colon and rectal cancer. a personalized approach to clinical decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmoll, H J; Van Cutsem, E; Stein, A

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common tumour type in both sexes combined in Western countries. Although screening programmes including the implementation of faecal occult blood test and colonoscopy might be able to reduce mortality by removing precursor lesions and by making diagnosis...... be a multi-modal approach performed by an experienced multi-disciplinary expert team. Optimal choice of the individual treatment modality according to disease localization and extent, tumour biology and patient factors is able to maintain quality of life, enables long-term survival and even cure in selected...... at an earlier stage, the burden of disease and mortality is still high. Improvement of diagnostic and treatment options increased staging accuracy, functional outcome for early stages as well as survival. Although high quality surgery is still the mainstay of curative treatment, the management of CRC must...

  18. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  19. Consenso brasileiro sobre câncer gástrico: diretrizes para o câncer gástrico no Brasil Brazilian consensus in gastric cancer: guidelines for gastric cancer in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zilberstein

    2013-03-01

    staging of the tumor and number of lymph nodes resected and involved. AIM: The Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer promoted by ABCG was designed with the intention to issue guidelines that can guide medical professionals to care for patients with this disease. METHODS: Were summarized and answered 43 questions reflecting consensus or not on diagnosis and treatment that may be used as guidance for its multidisciplinary approach. The method involved three steps. Initially, 56 digestive surgeons and related medical specialties met to formulate the questions that were sent to participants for answers on scientific evidence and personal experience. Summaries were presented, discussed and voted in plenary in two other meetings. They covered 53 questions involving: diagnosis and staging (six questions; surgical treatment (35 questions; chemotherapy and radiotherapy (seven questions and anatomopathology, immunohistochemistry and perspective (five questions. It was considered consensus agreement on more than 70% of the votes in each item. RESULTS: All the answers were presented and voted upon, and in 42 there was consensus. CONCLUSION: It could be developed consensus on most issues that come with the care of patients with gastric cancer and they can be transformed in guidelines.

  20. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types

  1. Protocol of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project: formal consensus method for the development of guidelines for standardised time-to-event endpoints' definitions in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellera, Carine A; Pulido, Marina; Gourgou, Sophie; Collette, Laurence; Doussau, Adélaïde; Kramar, Andrew; Dabakuyo, Tienhan Sandrine; Ouali, Monia; Auperin, Anne; Filleron, Thomas; Fortpied, Catherine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Paoletti, Xavier; Mauer, Murielle; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Bonnetain, Franck

    2013-03-01

    In randomised phase III cancer clinical trials, the most objectively defined and only validated time-to-event endpoint is overall survival (OS). The appearance of new types of treatments and the multiplication of lines of treatment have resulted in the use of surrogate endpoints for overall survival such as progression-free survival (PFS), or time-to-treatment failure. Their development is strongly influenced by the necessity of reducing clinical trial duration, cost and number of patients. However, while these endpoints are frequently used, they are often poorly defined and definitions can differ between trials which may limit their use as primary endpoints. Moreover, this variability of definitions can impact on the trial's results by affecting estimation of treatments' effects. The aim of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project is to provide recommendations for standardised definitions of time-to-event endpoints in randomised cancer clinical trials. We will use a formal consensus methodology based on experts' opinions which will be obtained in a systematic manner. Definitions will be independently developed for several cancer sites, including pancreatic, breast, head and neck and colon cancer, as well as sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The DATECAN project should lead to the elaboration of recommendations that can then be used as guidelines by researchers participating in clinical trials. This process should lead to a standardisation of the definitions of commonly used time-to-event endpoints, enabling appropriate comparisons of future trials' results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Controversies and consensus in the innovation access for cancer therapy in the European countries: on the subject of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudard, S; Courbon, F

    2017-02-01

    Innovative cancer therapies and advances in drug development have created new hopes for patients and health providers. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the discrepancies in the assessment of the magnitude of benefit of four new drugs (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223 dichloride) for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The comparison was done among three European countries (UK, Germany and France) and Canada, according to the statement of each country and to the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale. Whereas those drugs are authorized by the European Medical Agency, one can observed that clear discrepancies in the magnitude of benefit assessment exist between selected countries, as well as between national pricing evaluation agencies and ESMO. However, price setting and reimbursement decisions remain national responsibility with differences in assessment of the medical value of new treatment across countries, leading to a heterogeneous accessibility to cancer treatments. In conclusion, several procedures have to be implemented to overcome the patchwork of administrative assessments. Among them, the assessment of medical value should be based on independent statements of learned societies, and the harmonization of access to cancer therapy in Europe has to be driven by a common European reimbursement and pricing policy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Nutritional links to plausible mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer: a conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, R Jean; Srivastava, Sudhir; Milner, John A; Ross, Sharon A

    2003-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is one of most catastrophic and least understood of cancers. Evidence from clinical studies indicates that the development of pancreas cancer progresses over many years before symptoms appear. Most people with pancreatic cancer die within six months of diagnosis. The lack of early disease markers, the paucity of direct subject/patient interview data and limited availability of high quality biological samples have slowed progress toward identifying environmental and genetic disease risk factors. Much remains to be learned about the development of pancreatic cancer and about potential interventions for disease prevention. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies examining risk factors for pancreatic cancer supply little consistent or strong evidence to provide a cohesive prevention strategy for this cancer, but offer clues for future research concerning the prevention and early detection of this devastating disease. This Executive Summary provides background discussion on pancreatic cancer and summaries of each of the topics discussed at the workshop, including 1) Molecular aspects, 2) Dietary and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, 3) The metabolic hypothesis for pancreatic cancer, 4) Preclinical studies on pancreatic cancer, 5) Methylation, 6) Oxidative stress and 7) Biomarker Profiling. This document also contains a compilation of recommendations for future research, concluding remarks, a list of speakers and participants attending the workshop, and a selection of key references to aid future research into nutritional links to mechanisms underlying pancreas cancer. The recommendations section suggests gaps in current knowledge and articulates future directions for this area of investigation.

  4. A definition for aggressive disease in patients with HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer: an expert consensus of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Lluch, A; Aba, E; Albanell, J; Antón, A; Álvarez, I; Ayala, F; Barnadas, A; Calvo, L; Ciruelos, E; Cortés, J; de la Haba, J; López-Vega, J M; Martínez, E; Muñoz, M; Peláez, I; Redondo, A; Rodríguez, Á; Rodríguez, C A; Ruíz, A; Llombart, A

    2017-05-01

    To converge on an expert opinion to define aggressive disease in patients with HER2-negative mBC using a modified Delphi methodology. A panel of 21 breast cancer experts from the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology agreed upon a survey which comprised 47 questions that were grouped into three sections: relevance for defining aggressive disease, aggressive disease criteria and therapeutic goals. Answers were rated using a 9-point Likert scale of relevance or agreement. Among the 88 oncologists that were invited to participate, 81 answered the first round (92%), 70 answered the second round (80%), and 67 answered the third round (76%) of the survey. There was strong agreement regarding the fact that identifying patients with aggressive disease needs to be adequately addressed to help practitioners to decide the best treatment options for patients with HER2-negative mBC. The factors that were considered to be strongly relevant to classifying patients with aggressive HER2-negative mBC were a high tumor burden, a disease-free interval of less than 12-24 months after surgery, the presence of progressive disease during adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and having a triple-negative phenotype. The main therapeutic goals were controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and increasing the time to progression and overall survival. High tumor burden, time to recurrence after prior therapy and having a triple-negative phenotype were the prognostic factors for which the greatest consensus was found for identifying patients with aggressive HER2-negative mBC. Identifying patients with aggressive disease leads to different therapeutic approaches.

  5. Promoting Cancer Control in Africa With "Ubuntu": A Report of the African Organization for Research and Training in Africa (AORTIC) 10th Conference, 2015 in Marrakech, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbiri, Kenneth O; Williams, Christopher K; Macaluso, Marcella; Giordano, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), includes bringing products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through local and international collaboration. The consistent and huge growth in participation in the conferences and the diversity of the nations is a witness to the success of the organization thus far. The theme for the Tenth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Morocco in 2015 was "Road map to Cancer Control in Africa" and topics of discussion of paramount importance for low- and middle-income African countries included childhood cancers such as BL, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate; cancers associated with HIV-infection such as cervical, vulvar, and anal; as well as cancer care challenges associated with palliative care. The role of environmental factors that underlie some epigenetic changes in some of the cancers was emphasized. Oral and poster presentations from various parts of the continent indicate the growth of basic and translational science of cancer in the region, with studies revealing regional diversity in the frequencies of the triple-negative breast cancer, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, HCC, and Burkitt's lymphoma. There was a sign that Africa is trying to keep pace with the paradigm shift and focusing on translational medicine. This was shown by suggestions for application of genome-wide association studies, new generation sequencing, as well as the evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms that may be responsible for variable susceptibility in some of the prevalent cancers in people of African descent. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2287-2295, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  7. Interdisciplinary consensus on diagnosis and treatment of testicular germ cell tumors. Results of an update conference based on evidence-based medicine (EBM); Interdisziplinaerer Konsensus zur Diagnostik und Therapie von Hodentumoren. Ergebnisse einer Update-Konferenz auf Grundlage evidenzbasierter Medizin (EBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) (Germany); Arbeitsgemeinschaft Radiologische Onkologie (ARO), Strahlenklinik AKH Hagen (Germany); Krege, S. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Urologie (DGU) (Germany); Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Urologie; Schmoll, H.J. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO), Zentrum fuer innere Medizin IV der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Albers, P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Beyer, J. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin; Bokemeyer, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2; Classen, J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Dieckmann, K.P. [Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Hartmann, M. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Heidenreich, A. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Hoeltl, W. [Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Spital Wien (Austria). Urologische Klinik; Kliesch, S. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Koehrmann, K.U. [Urologische Klinik des Klinikums der Stadt Mannheim (Germany); Kuczyk, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Schmidberger, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Weinknecht, S. [Krankenhaus am Urban Berlin (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Winter, E. [Klinikum Schwerin (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Wittekind, C. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie

    2000-09-01

    An 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus Statement' summarizes and defines the diagnostic and therapeutic standards according to the current scientific practices in testicular cancer. For 21 separate areas scientifically based decision criteria are suggested. For treatment areas where more than one option exist without a consensus being reached for a preferred strategy, such as in seminoma in clinical Stage I or in non-seminoma Stages CS I or CS IIA/B, all acceptable alternative strategies with their respecitve advantages and disadvantages are presented. This 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus' was presented at the 24th National Congress of the German Cancer Society on March 21st and subsequently evaluated and approved by the various German scientific medical societies. (orig.) [German] Der zu 21 Themenkomplexen anhand wissenschaftlich begruendeter Entscheidungskriterien erarbeitete 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' praezisiert und definiert diagnostische und therapeutische Standards entsprechend dem aktuellen Wissensstand ueber die Tumorentitaet. Fuer Therapiesituationen, bei denen mehrere Optionen bestehen und kein Konsens ueber die favorisierte Strategie erzielt wurde wie beim Seminom im klinischen Stadium I oder beim Nichtseminom in den Stadien CS I bzw. CS IIA/B, wurden jeweilige Alternativen mit deren Vor- und Nachteilen dargestellt. Der 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' wurde beim 24. Deutschen Krebskongress am 21.3.2000 vorgestellt, nachfolgend von den daran beteiligten wissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften geprueft und gebilligt. (orig.)

  8. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher KO; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 years, culminating in the organisation’s most recent conference held in Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013. The constant growth in the number of attendants and increasing diversity of the nations of their origin are consistent with advances, whereby the number of participants and the nations of their origin have grown from 24 in 1983 to almost 1000 in 2013, and from 14 to 70, respectively. While earlier AORTIC conferences used to assume the atmosphere of ‘jamborees’, more recent ones have morphed to problem-solving events, with the concerted collaboration of international organisations, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Africa Union (AU), the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), and others. The topics of discussion at the Ninth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Durban were those of paramount importance for low- and middle-income countries: childhood cancers, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate, as well as cancer care challenges resulting from ignorance, neglect, and economic deprivation. The role of environmental factors that underlie Burkitt’s lymphoma was the subject of the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors Workshop, highlighting the NCI research programme in East Africa, while the Workshop on Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of Cancer in Africa surmised that treating childhood cancers is

  9. IAEA Director General welcomes NPT consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs that the Director General of the IAEA welcomed the adoption with consensus by the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons of the final document on the review and operation of the Treaty, and that he was pleased by the vote of confidence shown in the IAEA and its role in the implementation of the Treaty

  10. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  11. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  12. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  13. Skin cancer margin analysis within minutes with full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Ogrich, Lauren; Morales, Diego; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Abdelmalek, Mark; Boccara, Claude; Durkin, John

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the skin cancer. Traditional excision involves the removal of the visible skin cancer with a significant margin of normal skin. On cosmetically sensitive areas, Mohs micrographic tissue is the standard of care. Mohs uses intraoperative microscopic margin assessment which minimizes the surgical defect and can help reduce the recurrence rate by a factor of 3. The current Mohs technique relies on frozen section tissue slide preparation which significantly lengthens operative time and requires on-site trained histotechnicians. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT) is a novel optical imaging technique which provides a quick and efficient method to visualize cancerous areas in minutes, without any preparation or destruction of the tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the analysis of skin cancer margins during Mohs surgery. Over 150 images of Mohs specimens were acquired intraoperatively with FFOCT before frozen section analysis. The imaging procedure took less than 5 minutes for each specimen. No artifacts on histological preparation were found arising from FFOCT manipulation; however frozen section artifact was readily seen on FFOCT. An atlas was established with FFOCT images and corresponding histological slides to reveal FFOCT reading criteria of normal and cancerous structures. Blind analysis showed high concordance between FFOCT and histology. FFOCT can potentially reduce recurrence rates while maintaining short surgery times, optimize clinical workflow, and decrease healthcare costs. For the patient, this translates into smaller infection risk, decreased stress, and better comfort.

  14. GTSE1 expression represses apoptotic signaling and confers cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Tan, Shi Hui; Tan, Woei Loon; Yeo, Mei Shi; Xie, Chen; Wong, Foong Ying; Kiat, Zee Ying; Lim, Robert; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    Platinum based therapy is commonly used in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. However, resistance to chemotherapy is a major challenge that causes marked variation in individual response rate and survival rate. In this study, we aimed to identify the expression of GTSE1 and its correlation with cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells. Methylation profiling was carried out in tissue samples from gastric cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvent therapy using docetaxel, cisplatin and 5FU (DCX) and in gastric cancer cell lines. The correlation between GTSE1 expression and methylation in gastric cancer cells was determined by RT-PCR and MSP respectively. GTSE1 expression was knocked-down using shRNA’s and its effects on cisplatin cytotoxicity and cell survival were detected by MTS, proliferation and clonogenic survival assays. Additionally, the effect of GTSE1 knock down in drug induced apoptosis was determined by western blotting and apoptosis assays. GTSE1 exhibited a differential methylation index in gastric cancer patients and in cell lines that correlated with DCX treatment response and cisplatin sensitivity, respectively. In-vitro, GTSE1 expression showed a direct correlation with hypomethylation. Interestingly, Cisplatin treatment induced a dose dependent up regulation as well as nuclear translocation of GTSE1 expression in gastric cancer cells. Knock down of GTSE1 enhanced cisplatin cytotoxity and led to a significant reduction in cell proliferation and clonogenic survival. Also, loss of GTSE1 expression caused a significant increase in P53 mediated apoptosis in cisplatin treated cells. Our study identifies GTSE1 as a biomarker for cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells. This study also suggests the repressive role of GTSE1 in cisplatin induced apoptosis and signifies its potential utility as a therapeutic target for better clinical management of gastric cancer patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885

  15. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  16. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Martini, C.; Boumans, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  17. The Multidisciplinary Team Conference's Decision on M-Staging in Patients with Gastric- and Gastroesophageal Cancer is not Accurate without Staging Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandby, Rune Broni; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Fallentin, E.

    2016-01-01

    in the period 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were retrieved by searching for specific diagnosis and operation codes in the in-house system. The inclusion criteria were as follows: biopsy-verified cancer of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction or stomach, and no suspicion of peritoneal......BACKGROUND: The implementation of the multidisciplinary team conference has been shown to improve treatment outcome for patients with gastric- and gastroesophageal cancer. Likewise, the staging laparoscopy has increased the detection of patients with disseminated disease, that is, patients who do...... carcinomatosis or liver metastases on multidisciplinary team conference before staging laparoscopy. Furthermore, an evaluation with staging laparoscopy was required. RESULTS: In total, 222 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most cancers were located in the gastroesophageal junction, n = 171 (77.0%), and most...

  18. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  19. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...... deacetylase inhibitors. As such drugs may serve as therapeutic agents for cancer, our findings support the use of HDAC2 mutational status in future pharmacogenetic treatment of these individuals....

  20. Harnessing Raman spectroimmunoassay for detection of serological breast cancer markers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Ishan; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Two critical, unmet needs in breast cancer are the early detection of cancer metastasis and recurrence, and the sensitive assessment of temporal changes in tumor burden in response to therapy. The present research is directed towards developing a non-invasive, ultrasensitive and specific tool that provides a comprehensive real-time picture of the metastatic tumor burden and provides a radically new route to address these overarching challenges. As the continuing search for better diagnostic and prognostic clues has shifted away from a singular focus on primary tumor lesions, circulating and disseminated biomarkers have surfaced as attractive candidates due to the intrinsic advantages of a non-invasive, repeatable "liquid biopsy" procedure. However, a reproducible, facile blood-based test for diagnosis and follow-up of breast cancer has yet to be incorporated into a clinical laboratory assay due to the limitations of existing assays in terms of sensitivity, extensive sample processing requirements and, importantly, multiplexing capability. Here, by architecting nano-structured probes for detection of specific molecular species, we engineer a novel plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopic platform that offers a paradigmatic shift from the capabilities of today's diagnostic test platforms. Specifically, quantitative single-droplet serum tests reveal ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of three key breast cancer biomarkers, cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), CA27-29 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), over several order of magnitude range of biomarker concentration and clear segmentation of the sera between normal and metastatic cancer levels.

  1. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Schnitt, Stuart J. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giuliano, Armando E. [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Khan, Seema A. [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Horton, Janet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Klimberg, Suzanne [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States); Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Houssami, Nehmat [School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Johnson, Peggy L. [Advocate in Science, Susan G. Komen, Wichita, Kansas (United States); Morrow, Monica, E-mail: morrowm@mskcc.org [Breast Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  2. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs

  3. Improved cancer risk stratification and diagnosis via quantitative phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Uttam, Shikhar; Pham, Hoa V.; Hartman, Douglas J.

    2017-02-01

    Pathology remains the gold standard for cancer diagnosis and in some cases prognosis, in which trained pathologists examine abnormality in tissue architecture and cell morphology characteristic of cancer cells with a bright-field microscope. The limited resolution of conventional microscope can result in intra-observer variation, missed early-stage cancers, and indeterminate cases that often result in unnecessary invasive procedures in the absence of cancer. Assessment of nanoscale structural characteristics via quantitative phase represents a promising strategy for identifying pre-cancerous or cancerous cells, due to its nanoscale sensitivity to optical path length, simple sample preparation (i.e., label-free) and low cost. I will present the development of quantitative phase microscopy system in transmission and reflection configuration to detect the structural changes in nuclear architecture, not be easily identifiable by conventional pathology. Specifically, we will present the use of transmission-mode quantitative phase imaging to improve diagnostic accuracy of urine cytology and the nuclear dry mass is progressively correlate with negative, atypical, suspicious and positive cytological diagnosis. In a second application, we will present the use of reflection-mode quantitative phase microscopy for depth-resolved nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) of clinically prepared formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. We demonstrated that the quantitative phase microscopy system detects a gradual increase in the density alteration of nuclear architecture during malignant transformation in animal models of colon carcinogenesis and in human patients with ulcerative colitis, even in tissue that appears histologically normal according to pathologists. We evaluated the ability of nanoNAM to predict "future" cancer progression in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  4. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  5. Democracy-based consensus in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Massimiliano; Zangrillo, Alberto; Mucchetti, Marta; Nobile, Leda; Landoni, Paolo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    High-quality evidence and derived guidelines, as typically published in major academic journals, are a major process that shapes physician decision-making worldwide. However, for many aspects of medical practice, there is a lack of High-quality evidence or an overload of somewhat contradictory low-quality information, which makes decision-making a difficult, uncertain, and unpredictable process. When the issues in question are important and evidence limited or controversial, the medical community seeks to establish common ground for "best practice" through consensus conferences and consensus statements or guidelines. Such consensus statements are seen as a useful tool to establish expert agreement, define the boundaries of acceptable practice, provide priorities for the research agenda, and obtain opinions from different countries and healthcare systems. This standard approach, however, can be criticized for being elitist, noninclusive, and poorly representative of the community of clinicians who will have to make decisions about the implementation of such recommendations. Accordingly, the authors propose a new model based on a combination of a local core meeting (detailed review and expert input) followed by a worldwide web-based network assessment (democracy-based consensus). The authors already have applied this approach to develop consensus on all nonsurgical interventions that increase or reduce perioperative mortality in critically ill patients and in those with acute kidney injury. The methodology was based on 5 sequential local and web-based steps. Both a panel of experts and a large number of professionals from all over the world were involved, giving birth to a new type of "democracy-based consensus." This new type of "democracy-based consensus" has the potential to increase grass-root clinician involvement, expand the reach to less-developed countries, provide a more global perspective on proposed interventions, and perhaps more importantly, increase

  6. Targeted sequencing identifies genetic alterations that confer primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Korean Lung Cancer Consortium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Min; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Eun Kyung; Min, Young Joo; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hye Cheol; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2016-06-14

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations may exhibit primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). We aimed to examine genomic alterations associated with de novo resistance to gefitinib in a prospective study of NSCLC patients. One-hundred and fifty two patients with activating EGFR mutations were included in this study and 136 patients' tumor sample were available for targeted sequencing of genomic alterations in 22 genes using the Colon and Lung Cancer panel (Ampliseq, Life Technologies). All 132 patients with EGFR mutation were treated with gefitinib for their treatment of advanced NSCLC. Twenty patients showed primary resistance to EGFR TKI, and were classified as non-responders. A total of 543 somatic single-nucleotide variants (498 missense, 13 nonsense) and 32 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 3 mutations per sample. TP53 was most commonly mutated (47%) and mutations in SMAD4 was also common (19%), as well as DDR2 (16%), PIK3CA (15%), STK11 (14%), and BRAF (7%). Genomic mutations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were commonly found in non-responders (45%) compared to responders (27%), and they had significantly shorter progression-free survival and overall survival compared to patients without mutations (2.1 vs. 12.8 months, P=0.04, 15.7 vs. not reached, PAkt/mTOR pathway were commonly identified in non-responders and may confer resistance to EGFR TKI. Screening lung adenocarcinoma patients with clinical cancer gene test may aid in selecting out those who show primary resistance to EGFR TKI (NCT01697163).

  7. Consensus paper on the "executive summary of the international conference on Mediterranean diet and health: a lifelong approach" an Italian initiative supported by the Mediterranean Diet Foundation and the Menarini Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Virginia; Calvani, Riccardo; Limongi, Federica; Marseglia, Anna; Mason, Alexandra; Noale, Marianna; Rogoli, Domenico; Veronese, Nicola; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Maggi, Stefania

    The Mediterranean Diet Foundation, in collaboration with the International Menarini Foundation, organized the "International Conference on Mediterranean Diet and Health: A Lifelong Approach." The Conference was held in Ostuni (Puglia, Italy) from March 30 to April 1, 2017. The event received the endorsement of the American Federation for Aging Research, the Research Consortium "Luigi Amaducci," the European Nutrition for Health Alliance, the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, the Clinical Section of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-European Region, the National Research Council Research Project on Aging, the Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics, and the Italian Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. During the conference, results were presented from major studies on dietary interventions aiming to assess the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet in the prevention of chronic diseases and the potential underlying mechanisms. Twenty-six international speakers, in seven different sessions, discussed the biological basis, clinical impact, health policy, and behavioral implications of the Mediterranean diet, and its use in potential interventions for health promotion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A coding variant in RARG confers susceptibility to anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aminkeng, Folefac; Bhavsar, Amit P.; Visscher, Henk; Rassekh, Shahrad R.; Li, Yuling; Lee, Jong W.; Brunham, Liam R.; Caron, Huib N.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Kremer, Leontien C.; van der Pal, Helena J.; Amstutz, Ursula; Rieder, Michael J.; Bernstein, Daniel; Carleton, Bruce C.; Hayden, Michael R.; Ross, Colin J. D.; MacLeod, Stuart; Smith, Anne; Hildebrand, Claudette; Ghannadan, Reza; Miao, Fudan; Higginson, Michelle; Massah, Nasim; Borrie, Adrienne; Hughes, Shevaun; Shaw, Kaitlyn; Dhoot, Satvir; Kowalec, Kaarina; Stortz, Jessica; Bendyshe-Walton, Tessa; Waltrip, Duncan; Bader, Rachel; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Johnson, David; Verbeek, Linda; Kaczowka, Rick; Stevenson, Patti; Zhuwaki, Carnation; Grundy, Paul; Stobart, Kent; Wilson, Bev; Desai, Sunil; Spavor, Maria; Churcher, Linda; Chow, Terence; Hall, Kevin; Honcharik, Nick; Israels, Sara; Chan, Shanna

    2015-01-01

    Anthracyclines are used in over 50% of childhood cancer treatment protocols, but their clinical usefulness is limited by anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) manifesting as asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction and congestive heart failure in up to 57% and 16% of patients, respectively. Candidate

  9. Reassurance against future risk of precancer and cancer conferred by a negative human papillomavirus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Julia C; Schiffman, Mark; Katki, Hormuzd A; Castle, Philip E; Fetterman, Barbara; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poitras, Nancy E; Lorey, Thomas; Cheung, Li C; Kinney, Walter K

    2014-08-01

    Primary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing (without concurrent Pap tests) every 3 years is under consideration in the United States as an alternative to the two recommended cervical cancer screening strategies: primary Pap testing every 3 years, or concurrent Pap and HPV testing ("cotesting") every 5 years. Using logistic regression and Weibull survival models, we estimated and compared risks of cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) for the three strategies among 1011092 women aged 30 to 64 years testing HPV-negative and/or Pap-negative in routine screening at Kaiser Permanente Northern California since 2003. All statistical tests were two sided. Three-year risks following an HPV-negative result were lower than 3-year risks following a Pap-negative result (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.19%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.020%, P < .0001) and 5-year risks following an HPV-negative/Pap-negative cotest (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.11%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.014%, P = .21). These findings suggest that primary HPV testing merits consideration as another alternative for cervical screening. © Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  10. InCVAX, a novel in situ autologous cancer vaccine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel Siu Kit; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is the concept of harnessing our own immune system to fight against cancer cells. The most attractive features of immunotherapy include relatively low toxicities compared to traditional therapies (surgery, chemotherapy and radiation), the possibility of eliminating distant metastases and the potential of preventing relapses. After decades of research, its therapeutic efficacy has finally been recognized and a number of approaches has been approved by the FDA over the past 10 years. Dendritic cell vaccine and checkpoint blockade strategies were among the first to enter the clinic, with many other strategies such as peptide vaccine, whole cell tumor vaccine, and adoptive T cell transfer (with Chimeric Antigen Receptors) etc. closely following in clinical trials. Immunophotonics is developing a novel in situ autologous cancer vaccine (InCVAX) by combining thermal laser phototherapy with immunotherapy. InCVAX is a two-step procedure: (1) Delivery of low-power thermal laser to any accessible tumor to cause partial cell death, increase tumor immunogenicity by releasing tumor antigens and Damage Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs). This is followed immediately by (2) injection of our proprietary immunostimulant, N-dihydro-acetylglucosamine (GC), into the laser-treated region to stimulate antigen presenting cells. These two steps work synergistically to enhance the systemic anti-tumor T cell response which is capable of eliminating both primary and metastatic cancers in some patients with advanced, stage III/IV, breast cancer with minimal toxicity. Our approach has the unique benefits of stimulating an immune response against a wide array of tumor antigens, and thus the potential to induce a strong, comprehensive and long-term anti-tumor protection in patients with minimal costs. Following early data showing efficacy in breast cancer patients, a multi-center, randomized clinical trial is currently underway in South America to consolidate the findings

  11. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest W.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    We employed a home-built ultrahigh resolution (UHR) OCT system at 800nm to image human breast cancer sample ex vivo. The system has an axial resolution of 2.72µm and a lateral resolution of 5.52µm with an extended imaging range of 1.78mm. Over 900 UHR OCT volumes were generated on specimens from 23 breast cancer cases. With better spatial resolution, detailed structures in the breast tissue were better defined. Different types of breast cancer as well as healthy breast tissue can be well delineated from the UHR OCT images. To quantitatively evaluate the advantages of UHR OCT imaging of breast cancer, features derived from OCT intensity images were used as inputs to a machine learning model, the relevance vector machine. A trained machine learning model was employed to evaluate the performance of tissue classification based on UHR OCT images for differentiating tissue types in the breast samples, including adipose tissue, healthy stroma and cancerous region. For adipose tissue, grid-based local features were extracted from OCT intensity data, including standard deviation, entropy, and homogeneity. We showed that it was possible to enhance the classification performance on distinguishing fat tissue from non-fat tissue by using the UHR images when compared with the results based on OCT images from a commercial 1300 nm OCT system. For invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and normal stroma differentiation, the classification was based on frame-based features that portray signal penetration depth and tissue reflectivity. The confusing matrix indicated a sensitivity of 97.5% and a sensitivity of 77.8%.

  12. Microparticle conferred microRNA profiles - implications in the transfer and dominance of cancer traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Ritu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microparticles (MPs are membrane vesicles which are released from normal and malignant cells following a process of budding and detachment from donor cells. MPs contain surface antigens, proteins and genetic material and serve as vectors of intercellular communication. MPs comprise the major source of systemic RNA including microRNA (miRNA, the aberrant expression of which appears to be associated with stage, progression and spread of many cancers. Our previous study showed that MPs carry both transcripts and miRNAs associated with the acquisition of multidrug resistance in cancer. Results Herein, we expand on our previous finding and demonstrate that MPs carry the transcripts of the membrane vesiculation machinery (floppase and scramblase as well as nucleic acids encoding the enzymes essential for microRNA biogenesis (Drosha, Dicer and Argonaute. We also demonstrate using microarray miRNA profiling analysis, the selective packaging of miRNAs (miR-1228*, miR-1246, miR-1308, miR-149*, miR-455-3p, miR-638 and miR-923 within the MP cargo upon release from the donor cells. Conclusions These miRNAs are present in both haematological and non-haematological cancer cells and are involved in pathways implicated in cancer pathogenesis, membrane vesiculation and cascades regulated by ABC transporters. Our recent findings reinforce our earlier reports that MP transfer ‘re-templates’ recipient cells so as to reflect donor cell traits. We now demonstrate that this process is likely to occur via a process of selective packaging of nucleic acid species, including regulatory nucleic acids upon MP vesiculation. These findings have significant implications in understanding the cellular basis governing the intercellular acquisition and dominance of deleterious traits in cancers.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  14. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells

  15. Indications, diagnostic tests and Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: Recommendations by the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference Indicaciones, métodos diagnósticos y tratamiento erradicador de Helicobacter pylori: Recomendaciones de la II Conferencia Española de Consenso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Monés

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference for appropriate practice regarding indications for eradication, diagnostic tests, and therapy regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection are summarized. The Conference was based on literature searches in Medline, abstracts from three international meetings, and abstracts from national meetings. Results were agreed upon and approved by the whole group. Results are supplemented by evidence grades and recommendation levels according to the classification used in the Clinical Practice Guidelines issued by Cochrane Collaboration. Convincing indications (peptic ulcer, duodenal erosions with no history of ASA or NSAIDs, MALT lymphoma, and not so convincing indications (functional dyspepsia, patients receiving low-dose ASA for platelet aggregation, gastrectomy stump in patients operated on for gastric cancer, first-degree relatives of patients with gastric cancer, lymphocytic gastritis, and Ménétrier's disease for H. pylori eradication are discussed. Diagnostic recommendations for various clinical conditions (peptic ulcer, digestive hemorrhage secondary to ulcer, eradication control, patients currently or recently receiving antibiotic or antisecretory therapy, as well as diagnostic tests requiring biopsy collection (histology, urease fast test, and culture when endoscopy is needed for clinical diagnosis, and non-invasive tests requiring no biopsy collection (13C-urea breath test, serologic tests, and fecal antigen tests when endoscopy is not needed are also discussed. As regards treatment, first-choice therapies (triple therapy using a PPI and two antibiotics, therapy length, quadruple therapy, and a number of novel antibiotic options as "rescue" therapy are prioritized, the fact that prolonging PPI therapy following effective eradication is unnecessary for patients with duodenal ulcer but not for all gastric ulcers is documented, the fact that cultures and antibiograms are not needed for all

  16. Cervical cancer prevention: new guidelines in the United States and new opportunities for low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Alan G

    2013-06-01

    Developments from late 2011 to early 2013, including consensus conferences and the introduction of low-cost, rapid-turnaround testing of human papillomavirus, will change prevention strategies for cervical cancer in the United States and in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adapting biomodulatory strategies for treatment in new contexts: pancreatic and oral cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbil, Sriram R.; Rizvi, Imran; Khan, Amjad P.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Biomodulation of cancer cell metabolism represents a promising approach to overcome tumor heterogeneity and poor selectivity, which contribute significantly to treatment resistance. To date, several studies have demonstrated that modulation of cell metabolism including the heme synthesis pathway serves as an elegant approach to improve the efficacy of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, the ability of biomodulation-enhanced PDT to improve outcomes in low resource settings and to address challenges in treating lethal tumors with exogenous photosensitizers remains underexplored. The ability of vitamin D or methotrexate to enhance PDT efficacy in a carcinogen-induced hamster cheek pouch model of oral squamous cell carcinoma and in 3D cell-based models for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is evaluated. Challenges associated with adapting PDT regimens to low resource settings, understanding the effects of biomodulatory agents on the metabolism of cancer cells, and the differential effects of biomodulatory agents on tumor and stromal cells will be discussed.

  18. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop...... a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high...... inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short (less than 18 months remissions) after primary therapy; and (6) Prospective randomized trials need to be performed to define the role of salvage...

  19. Pixel based SHG probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kirby R.; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Handel, Julia; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2017-02-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix in human ovarian cancer, can be reflected in increased collagen concentration, changes in alignment and/or up-regulation of different collagen isoforms, including Col III. Using fibrillar gel models, we demonstrate that Col I and Col III can be quantitatively distinguished by 3 distinct SHG polarization specific metrics: i) determination of helical pitch angle via the single axis molecular model, ii) dipole alignment via anisotropy, and iii) chirality via SHG circular dichroism (SHG-CD). These sub-resolution differentiations are possible due to differences in the α helix angles of the two isoforms, which co-mingle in the same fibrils. We also investigated the mechanism of the SHG-CD response and show that unlike conventional CD, it is dominated by electric dipole interactions and is consistent with the two state SHG model. We further applied these 3 polarization resolved analyses to human normal, high risk, benign tumors, and malignant human ovarian tissues. We found that these tissues could all be differentiated by these metrics, where high grade tissues had analogous α-helical pitch angles to the in the Col I/Col III gel model. This confirms literature suggestions based on immunofluorescence and gene expression that Col III is up-regulated in high grade ovarian cancers. The different tissues also displayed differing anisotropies, indicating the fibril assemblies are distinct and likely do not result from remodeling of existing collagen but synthesis of new collagen. Importantly, these SHG polarization methods provide structural information not otherwise possible and can serve as label-free biomarkers for ovarian and other cancers.

  20. COX-2 and PPAR-γ confer cannabidiol-induced apoptosis of human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Heinemann, Katharina; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Salamon, Achim; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of cannabidiol is still controversial. This study investigates the role of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in cannabidiol's proapoptotic and tumor-regressive action. In lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and primary cells from a patient with lung cancer, cannabidiol elicited decreased viability associated with apoptosis. Apoptotic cell death by cannabidiol was suppressed by NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor), GW9662 (PPAR-γ antagonist), and siRNA targeting COX-2 and PPAR-γ. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis was paralleled by upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression with a maximum induction of COX-2 mRNA after 8 hours and continuous increases of PPAR-γ mRNA when compared with vehicle. In response to cannabidiol, tumor cell lines exhibited increased levels of COX-2-dependent prostaglandins (PG) among which PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) caused a translocation of PPAR-γ to the nucleus and induced a PPAR-γ-dependent apoptotic cell death. Moreover, in A549-xenografted nude mice, cannabidiol caused upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in tumor tissue and tumor regression that was reversible by GW9662. Together, our data show a novel proapoptotic mechanism of cannabidiol involving initial upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ and a subsequent nuclear translocation of PPAR-γ by COX-2-dependent PGs.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  2. Informed consent -- Building consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovenheim, R.

    1990-01-01

    The author shares his observations and offers an approach to 'building consensus' for what he believes is the only environmentally sound option, i.e., safe, permanent disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). Consensus does not mean unanimity, acceptance, or harmony. The low-level radioactive waste disposal issue is fraught with fear and hysteria. The paper discusses major emotions that fracture public opinion regarding this issue. The author defines consensus as the informed consent of LLRW disposal strategies by a majority of citizens whose cooperation is required to achieve the goals of environmentally sound solution. The political aspects are reviewed. The need for US Department of Energy to fulfill its importance technical assistance role is discussed

  3. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  4. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family...... policy reflect changing conditions for employment and the minding of children and that there has been a high degree of continuity and consensus about the change, as indicated by the strong increase in female labour market involvement....

  5. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary mission statement on better care for patients with colon and rectal cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Aristei, Cynthia; Boelens, Petra G; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Blomqvist, Lennart; Borras, Josep M; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cutsem, Eric Van; Espin, Eloy; Gore-Booth, Jola; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Iversen, Lene H; Han van Krieken, J; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm J T; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Meldolesi, Elisa; Wiggers, Theo; Cervantes, Andres; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last twenty years however still considerable variation exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of cancer care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012 the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about colon and rectum was held looking for multidisciplinary consensus. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Experts commented and voted on the two web-based online voting rounds before the meeting (between 4th and 25th October and between the 20th November and 3rd December 2012) as well as one online round after the meeting (4th-20th March 2013) and were invited to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. All sentences that were voted on are available on the EURECCA website www.canceraudit.eu. The consensus document was divided in sections describing evidence based algorithms of diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical

  6. Implants and/or teeth: consensus statements and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Carlsson, G E; Jokstad, A

    2008-01-01

    In August 23-25, 2007, the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry in collaboration with the Danish Society of Oral Implantology arranged a consensus conference on the topic 'Implants and/or teeth'. It was preceded by a workshop in which eight focused questions were raised and answered in e...

  7. P-glycoprotein confers acquired resistance to 17-DMAG in lung cancers with an ALK rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Joung; Lee, Kye Young; Kim, Young Whan; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jung-Eun; Choi, Chang Min; Baek, In-Jeoung; Rho, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Because anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is dependent on Hsp90 for protein stability, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective in controlling growth of lung cancer cells with ALK rearrangement. We investigated the mechanism of acquired resistance to 17-(Dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a geldanamycin analogue Hsp90 inhibitor, in H3122 and H2228 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines with ALK rearrangement. Resistant cell lines (H3122/DR-1, H3122/DR-2 and H2228/DR) were established by repeated exposure to increasing concentrations of 17-DMAG. Mechanisms for resistance by either NAD(P)H/quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), previously known as a factor related to 17-DMAG resistance, or P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1/MDR1) were queried using RT-PCR, western blot analysis, chemical inhibitors, the MTT cell proliferation/survival assay, and cellular efflux of rhodamine 123. The resistant cells showed no cross-resistance to AUY922 or ALK inhibitors, suggesting that ALK dependency persists in cells with acquired resistance to 17-DMAG. Although expression of NQO1 was decreased in H3122/DR-1 and H3122/DR-2, NQO1 inhibition by dicumarol did not affect the response of parental cells (H2228 and H3122) to 17-DMAG. Interestingly, all resistant cells showed the induction of P-gp at the protein and RNA levels, which was associated with an increased efflux of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). Transfection with siRNA directed against P-gp or treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp, restored the sensitivity to the drug in all cells with acquired resistance to 17-DMAG. Furthermore, we also observed that the growth-inhibitory effect of 17-DMAG was decreased in A549/PR and H460/PR cells generated to over-express P-gp by long-term exposure to paclitaxel, and these cells recovered their sensitivity to 17-DMAG through the inhibition of P-gp. P-gp over-expression is a possible mechanism of acquired resistance to 17-DMAG in cells with ALK rearrangement. The online

  8. Loss of Bad expression confers poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Liu, Dan; Chen, Bojiang; Zeng, Jing; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shangfu; Mo, Xianming; Li, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Proapoptotic BH-3-only protein Bad (Bcl-Xl/Bcl-2-associated death promoter homolog, Bad) initiates apoptosis in human cells, and contributes to tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistant in malignancies. This study explored association between the Bad expression level and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, a cohort of 88 resected primary NSCLC cases were collected and analyzed. Bad expression level was determined via immunohistochemical staining assay. The prognostic significances of Bad expression were evaluated with univariate and multivariate survival analysis. The results showed that compared with normal lung tissues, Bad expression level significantly decreased in NSCLC (P Bad expression was associated with adjuvant therapy status. Loss of Bad independently predicted poor prognosis in whole NSCLC cohort and early stage subjects (T1 + T2 and N0 + N1) (all P Bad negative phenotype in NSCLC patients with smoking history, especially lung squamous cell carcinoma (all P Bad is an independent and powerful predictor of adverse prognosis in NSCLC. Bad protein could be a new biomarker for selecting individual therapy strategies and predicting therapeutic response in subjects with NSCLC.

  9. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  10. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: expert consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, John C; Aloia, Thomas A; Crane, Christopher H; Heimbach, Julie K; Nagino, Masato; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    An American Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association (AHPBA)-sponsored consensus meeting of expert panellists met on 15 January 2014 to review current evidence on the management of hilar cholangiocarcinoma in order to establish practice guidelines and to agree consensus statements. It was established that the treatment of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to optimize the chances for both durable survival and effective palliation. An adequate diagnostic and staging work-up includes high-quality cross-sectional imaging; however, pathologic confirmation is not required prior to resection or initiation of a liver transplant trimodal treatment protocol. The ideal treatment for suitable patients with resectable hilar malignancy is resection of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts, as well as resection of the involved ipsilateral liver. Preoperative biliary drainage is best achieved with percutaneous transhepatic approaches and may be indicated for patients with cholangitis, malnutrition or hepatic insufficiency. Portal vein embolization is a safe and effective strategy for increasing the future liver remnant (FLR) and is particularly useful for patients with an FLR of hilar cholangiocarcinoma should be evaluated for a standard trimodal protocol incorporating external beam and endoluminal radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and liver transplantation. Post-resection chemoradiation should be offered to patients who show high-risk features on surgical pathology. Chemoradiation is also recommended for patients with locally advanced, unresectable hilar cancers. For patients with locally recurrent or metastatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma, first-line chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin is recommended based on multiple Phase II trials and a large randomized controlled trial including a heterogeneous population of patients with biliary cancers. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  11. Low Tumor Infiltrating Mast Cell Density Confers Prognostic Benefit and Reflects Immunoactivation in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yihao; Feng, Qingyang; Zheng, Peng; Yang, Liangliang; Zhu, Dexiang; Chang, Wenju; Ji, Meiling; He, Guodong; Xu, Jianmin

    2018-06-06

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression was controversial. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the prognostic value of MCs as well as their correlation with immune microenvironment. A retrospective cohort of CRC patients of stage I-IV was enrolled in this study. 854 consecutive patients were divided into training set (427 patients) and validation set (427 patients) randomly. The findings were further validated in a GEO cohort, GSE39582 (556 patients). The mast cell density (MCD) was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tryptase or by CIBERSORT algorithm. Low MCD predicted prolonged overall survival (OS) in training and validation set. Moreover, MCD was identified as an independent prognostic indicator in both sets. Better stratification for CRC prognosis can be achieved by building a MCD based nomogram. The prognostic role of MCD was further validated in GSE39582. In addition, MCD predicted improved survival in stage II and III CRC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). Multiple immune pathways were enriched in low MCD group while cytokines/chemokines promoting anti-tumor immunity were highly expressed in such group. Furthermore, MCD was negatively correlated with CD8+ T cells infiltration. In conclusion, MCD was identified as an independent prognostic factor, as well as a potential biomarker for ACT benefit in stage II and III CRC. Better stratification of CRC prognosis could be achieved by building a MCD based nomogram. Moreover, immunoactivation in low MCD tumors may contributed to improved prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  12. EHD1 confers resistance to cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer by regulating intracellular cisplatin concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jing; Meng, Qingwei; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Xuesong; Cai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer. However, resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) remains a major challenge in NSCLC treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of EHD1 [Eps15 homology (EH) domain - containing protein 1] to confer CDDP resistance in NSCLC cells and to investigate mechanisms of this resistance. The associations between EHD1 expression in NSCLC specimens and clinicopathological features, including prognosis, were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using DNA microarrays, we performed a genome-wide analysis of cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells to identify the involvement of the EHD1 gene in this resistance. We overexpressed and knocked down EHD1 in cell lines to investigate the effect of this gene on proliferation and apoptosis. A quantitative analytical method for assessing CDDP in cells was developed. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the concentration of cisplatin in cells. The immunohistochemistry assay showed that adjuvant chemotherapy-treated NSCLC patients expressing EHD1 exhibited reduced OS compared with patients who did not express EHD1 (P = 0.01). Moreover, DNA microarrays indicated that the EHD1 gene was upregulated in CDDP- resistant NSCLC cells. The IC50 value of CDDP in cells that overexpressed EHD1 was 3.3-fold greater than that in the A549-control line, and the IC50 value of EHD1 knockdown cells was at least 5.2-fold lower than that of the control cells, as evidenced by a CCK-8 assay. We found that the percentage of early apoptotic cells was significantly decreased in A549-EHD1 cells, but the rates of early apoptosis were higher in the EHD1 knockdown cell line than in the A549/DDP control line, as indicated by a flow cytometry analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the total platinum level was lower in A549-EHD1 cells than in control cells, and the concentration of CDDP was higher in the EHD1 knockdown cells than in

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porquet, Nicolas; Huot, Jacques; Poirier, Andrée; Houle, François; Pin, Anne-Laure; Gout, Stéphanie; Tremblay, Pierre-Luc; Paquet, Éric R; Klinck, Roscoe; Auger, François A

    2011-01-01

    Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT29 and SW620 express higher levels of a splice variant of

  15. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  16. Survival Analysis in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery According to the International Consensus on the 2017 Definition of Borderline Resectable Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoi Hayasaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to validate a new definition of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC provided by the 2017 international consensus on the basis of three dimensions of anatomical (A, biological (B, and conditional (C factors, using the data of the patients who had been registered for our institutional protocol of chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (CRTS for localized patients with PDAC. Methods: Among 307 consecutive patients pathologically diagnosed with localized PDAC who were enrolled in our CRTS protocol from February 2005 to December 2016, we selected 285 patients who could be re-evaluated after CRT. These 285 patients were classified according to international consensus A definitions as follows: R (resectable; n = 62, BR-PV (borderline resectable, superior mesenteric vein (SMV/portal vein (PV involvement alone; n = 27, BR-A (borderline resectable, arterial involvement; n = 50, LA (locally advanced; n = 146. Disease-specific survival (DSS was analyzed according to A, B (serum CA 19-9 levels and lymph node metastasis diagnosed by computed tomography findings before CRT, and C factors (performance status (PS factors. Results: The rates of resection and R0 resection were similar between R (83.9 and 98.0% and BR-PV (85.2 and 95.5%, but much lower in BR-A (70.0 and 84.8% and LA (46.6 and 62.5%. DSS evaluated by median survival time (months showed a similar trend to surgical outcomes: 33.7 in R, 27.3 in BR-PV, 18.9 in BR-A and 19.3 in LA, respectively. DSS in R patients with CA 19-9 levels > 500 U/mL was significantly poorer than in patients with CA 19-9 levels ≤ 500 U/mL, but there were no differences in DSS among BR-PV, BR-A, and LA patients according to CA 19-9 levels. Regarding lymph node metastasis, there was no significant difference in DSS according to each resectability group. DSS in R patients with PS ≥ 2 was significantly worse than in patients with PS 0-1. Conclusions: The

  17. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on safety and quality indicators in endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Bridges, Ron; Carter, Rose; de Gara, Chris; Dube, Catherine; Enns, Robert; Hollingworth, Roger; Macintosh, Donald; Borgaonkar, Mark; Forget, Sylviane; Leontiadis, Grigorios; Meddings, Jonathan; Cotton, Peter; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality, highlight the need for clearly defined, evidence-based processes to support quality improvement in endoscopy. To identify processes and indicators of quality and safety relevant to high-quality endoscopy service delivery. A multidisciplinary group of 35 voting participants developed recommendation statements and performance indicators. Systematic literature searches generated 50 initial statements that were revised iteratively following a modified Delphi approach using a web-based evaluation and voting tool. Statement development and evidence evaluation followed the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation) and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidelines. At the consensus conference, participants voted anonymously on all statements using a 6-point scale. Subsequent web-based voting evaluated recommendations for specific, individual quality indicators, safety indicators and mandatory endoscopy reporting fields. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by 80% of participants. Consensus was reached on 23 recommendation statements addressing the following: ethics (statement 1: agreement 100%), facility standards and policies (statements 2 to 9: 90% to 100%), quality assurance (statements 10 to 13: 94% to 100%), training, education, competency and privileges (statements 14 to 19: 97% to 100%), endoscopy reporting standards (statements 20 and 21: 97% to 100%) and patient perceptions (statements 22 and 23: 100%). Additionally, 18 quality indicators (agreement 83% to 100%), 20 safety indicators (agreement 77% to 100%) and 23 recommended endoscopy-reporting elements (agreement 91% to 100%) were identified. The consensus process identified a clear need for high-quality clinical and outcomes research to support quality improvement in the delivery of endoscopy services. The

  18. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  19. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  20. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurstedt, H.A.; Jones, R.M.; Walker, J.A.; Middleman, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe a research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). They define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of their planned applied research, the authors first discuss nominal group technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities

  1. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  2. Hexaminolevulinate blue-light cystoscopy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: review of the clinical evidence and consensus statement on appropriate use in the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneshmand, S.; Schuckman, A.K.; Bochner, B.H.; Cookson, M.S.; Downs, T.M.; Gomella, L.G.; Grossman, H.B.; Kamat, A.M.; Konety, B.R.; Lee, C.T.; Pohar, K.S.; Pruthi, R.S.; Resnick, M.J.; Smith, N.D.; Witjes, J.A.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Steinberg, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is a tumour photosensitizer that is used in combination with blue-light cystoscopy (BLC) as an adjunct to white-light cystoscopy (WLC) in the diagnosis and management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Since being licensed in Europe in 2005, HAL has been used in

  3. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis,

  4. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment

  5. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  6. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup; Swanson, Robin; Heide, Felix; Wetzstein, Gordon; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaickingand 4D light field view synthesis.

  7. Consensus on quality indicators to assess the organisation of palliative cancer and dementia care applicable across national healthcare systems and selected by international experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet Paap, Jasper; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Radbruch, Lukas; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2014-09-17

    Large numbers of vulnerable patients are in need of palliative cancer and dementia care. However, a wide gap exists between the knowledge of best practices in palliative care and their use in everyday clinical practice. As part of a European policy improvement program, quality indicators (QIs) have been developed to monitor and improve the organisation of palliative care for patients with cancer and those with dementia in various settings in different European countries. A multidisciplinary, international panel of professionals participated in a modified RAND Delphi procedure to compose a set of palliative care QIs based on existing sets of QIs on the organisation of palliative care. Panellists participated in three written rounds, one feedback round and one meeting. The panel's median votes were used to identify the final set of QIs. The Delphi procedure resulted in 23 useful QIs. These QIs represent key elements of the organisation of good clinical practice, such as the availability of palliative care teams, the availability of special facilities to provide palliative care for patients and their relatives, and the presence of educational interventions for professionals. The final set also includes QIs that are related to the process of palliative care, such as documentation of pain and other symptoms, communication with patients in need of palliative care and their relatives, and end-of-life decisions. International experts selected a set of 23 QIs for the organisation of palliative care. Although we particularly focused on the organisation of cancer and dementia palliative care, most QIs are generic and are applicable for other types of diseases as well.

  8. Supportive and palliative care for metastatic breast cancer: resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, James; Ddungu, Henry; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Ripamonti, Carla; Rodin, Gary M; Bushnaq, Mohammad A; Clegg-Lamptey, Joe N; Connor, Stephen R; Diwani, Msemo B; Eniu, Alexandru; Harford, Joe B; Kumar, Suresh; Rajagopal, M R; Thompson, Beti; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Many women diagnosed with breast cancer in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) present with advanced-stage disease. While cure is not a realistic outcome, site-specific interventions, supportive care, and palliative care can achieve meaningful outcomes and improve quality of life. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert international panel identified thirteen key resource recommendations for supportive and palliative care for metastatic breast cancer. The recommendations are presented in three resource-stratified tables: health system resource allocations, resource allocations for organ-based metastatic breast cancer, and resource allocations for palliative care. These tables illustrate how health systems can provide supportive and palliative care services for patients at a basic level of available resources, and incrementally add services as more resources become available. The health systems table includes health professional education, patient and family education, palliative care models, and diagnostic testing. The metastatic disease management table provides recommendations for supportive care for bone, brain, liver, lung, and skin metastases as well as bowel obstruction. The third table includes the palliative care recommendations: pain management, and psychosocial and spiritual aspects of care. The panel considered pain management a priority at a basic level of resource allocation and emphasized the need for morphine to be easily available in LMICs. Regular pain assessments and the proper use of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions are recommended. Basic-level resources for psychosocial and spiritual aspects of care include health professional and patient and family education, as well as patient support, including community-based peer support. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. GP88 (PC-Cell Derived Growth Factor, progranulin stimulates proliferation and confers letrozole resistance to aromatase overexpressing breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabnis Gauri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase inhibitors (AI that inhibit breast cancer cell growth by blocking estrogen synthesis have become the treatment of choice for post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer. However, some patients display de novo or acquired resistance to AI. Interactions between estrogen and growth factor signaling pathways have been identified in estrogen-responsive cells as one possible reason for acquisition of resistance. Our laboratory has characterized an autocrine growth factor overexpressed in invasive ductal carcinoma named PC-Cell Derived Growth Factor (GP88, also known as progranulin. In the present study, we investigated the role GP88 on the acquisition of resistance to letrozole in ER+ breast cancer cells Methods We used two aromatase overexpressing human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7-CA cells and AC1 cells and their letrozole resistant counterparts as study models. Effect of stimulating or inhibiting GP88 expression on proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, survival and letrozole responsiveness was examined. Results GP88 induced cell proliferation and conferred letrozole resistance in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, naturally letrozole resistant breast cancer cells displayed a 10-fold increase in GP88 expression when compared to letrozole sensitive cells. GP88 overexpression, or exogenous addition blocked the inhibitory effect of letrozole on proliferation, and stimulated survival and soft agar colony formation. In letrozole resistant cells, silencing GP88 by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation and restored their sensitivity to letrozole. Conclusion Our findings provide information on the role of an alternate growth and survival factor on the acquisition of aromatase inhibitor resistance in ER+ breast cancer.

  10. Expert consensus document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehm, Ulrich; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder caused by the deficient production, secretion or action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is the master hormone regulating the reproductive axis. CHH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with >25 different...... migration of GnRH-synthesizing neurons. CHH can be challenging to diagnose, particularly when attempting to differentiate it from constitutional delay of puberty. A timely diagnosis and treatment to induce puberty can be beneficial for sexual, bone and metabolic health, and might help minimize some...... of the psychological effects of CHH. In most cases, fertility can be induced using specialized treatment regimens and several predictors of outcome have been identified. Patients typically require lifelong treatment, yet ∼10-20% of patients exhibit a spontaneous recovery of reproductive function. This Consensus...

  11. Recent progress in carcinogenesis, progression and therapy of breast cancer: the 20th Hiroshima Cancer Seminar--the 4th Three Universities' Consortium International Symposium, October 2010: 31 October 2010, International Conference Center Hiroshima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Masakazu; Yasui, Wataru; Ito, Hisao; Tahara, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    The 20th Hiroshima Cancer seminar focused upon breast cancer research and treatment particularly on the mechanism of tumorigenesis and drug resistance and development of novel therapeutics. Several molecules such as retinoblastoma and p16 were raised as key factors in tumorigenesis and invasiveness. Estrogen-related pathways seem to be closely involved in the process. For the tumor lacking hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2, some other mechanisms could be responsible. It seems that MicroRNA 22 directing some putative targets such as SIRT1, Sp1 and CDK6 plays a crucial role in breast tumor growth and metastasis. In addition, ribophorin and the associated molecules might be engaged in breast cancer stemness. Obviously, these molecules provide potential for therapeutic targets. It was also discussed about new drug development such as anti-human epidermal growth factor 2 therapy, anti-angiogenesis, pro-tumor aspects of anti-cancer therapy and application of circulating markers for monitoring, imaging and health-care system. Furthermore, we discussed risk factors, prevention and screening to reduce invasive cancers as well. Throughout the conference, panelists and attendee indicated the importance of translational research and biomarker exploration in order to realize efficient and individualized therapy for breast cancer.

  12. Pediatric psycho-oncology care: standards, guidelines, and consensus reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Lori; Viola, Adrienne; Koretski, Julia; Perper, Emily Diana; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify existing guidelines, standards, or consensus-based reports for psychosocial care of children with cancer and their families. Psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer can systematize the approach to care and create a replicable model that can be utilized in pediatric hospitals around the world. Determining gaps in existing standards in pediatric psycho-oncology can guide development of useful evidence-based and consensus-based standards. The MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched by investigators at two major pediatric oncology centers for existing guidelines, consensus-based reports, or standards for psychosocial care of patients with pediatric cancer and their families published in peer-reviewed journals in English between 1980 and 2013. We located 27 articles about psychosocial care that met inclusion criteria: 5 set forth standards, 19 were guidelines, and 3 were consensus-based reports. None was sufficiently up to date, comprehensive, specific enough, or evidence- or consensus-based to serve as a current standard for psychosocial care for children with cancer and their families. Despite calls by a number of international pediatric oncology and psycho-oncology professional organizations about the urgency of addressing the psychosocial needs of the child with cancer to reduce suffering, there remains a need for development of a widely acceptable, evidence-based and consensus-based, comprehensive standard of care to guide provision of essential psychosocial services to all patients with pediatric cancer. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  14. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs) as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 di...

  15. Microsatellite instability analysis in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer using the Bethesda consensus panel of microsatellite markers in the absence of proband normal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dourisboure Ricardo J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to the early development of various cancers including those of colon, rectum, endometrium, ovarium, small bowel, stomach and urinary tract. HNPCC is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly hMSH2 or hMLH1. In this study, we report the analysis for genetic counseling of three first-degree relatives (the mother and two sisters of a male who died of colorectal adenocarcinoma at the age of 23. The family fulfilled strict Amsterdam-I criteria (AC-I with the presence of extracolonic tumors in the extended pedigree. We overcame the difficulty of having a proband post-mortem non-tumor tissue sample for MSI testing by studying the alleles carried by his progenitors. Methods Tumor MSI testing is described as initial screening in both primary and metastasis tumor tissue blocks, using the reference panel of 5 microsatellite markers standardized by the National Cancer Institute (NCI for the screening of HNPCC (BAT-25, BAT-26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250. Subsequent mutation analysis of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes was performed. Results Three of five microsatellite markers (BAT-25, BAT-26 and D5S346 presented different alleles in the proband's tumor as compared to those inherited from his parents. The tumor was classified as high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H. We identified in the HNPCC family a novel germline missense (c.1864C>A mutation in exon 12 of hMSH2 gene, leading to a proline 622 to threonine (p.Pro622Thr amino acid substitution. Conclusion This approach allowed us to establish the tumor MSI status using the NCI recommended panel in the absence of proband's non-tumor tissue and before sequencing the obligate carrier. According to the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD and the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors (InSiGHT Database this is the first report of this mutation.

  16. Consensus statement on definition, diagnosis, and management of high-risk prostate cancer patients on behalf of the Spanish Groups of Uro-Oncology Societies URONCOR, GUO, and SOGUG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, I; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; Cassinello, J; Gonzalez San Segundo, C; Unda, M; Gallardo, E; López-Torrecilla, J; Juarez, A; Arranz, J

    2018-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent malignancy in men and the second cause of mortality in industrialized countries. Based on Spanish Register of PCa, the incidence of high-risk PCa is 29%, approximately. In spite of the evidence-based beneficial effect of radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy in high-risk PCa, these patients (pts) are still a therapeutic challenge for all specialists involved, in part due to the absence of comparative studies to establish which of the present disposable treatments offer better results. Nowadays, high-risk PCa definition is not well consensual through the published oncology guides. Clinical stage, tumour grade, and number of risk factors are relevant to be considered on PCa prognosis. However, these factors are susceptible to change depending on when surgical or radiation therapy is considered to be the treatment of choice. Other factors, such as reference pathologist, different diagnosis biopsy schedules, surgical or radiotherapy techniques, adjuvant treatments, biochemical failures, and follow-up, make it difficult to compare the results between different therapeutic options. This article reviews important issues concerning high-risk PCa. URONCOR, GUO, and SOGUG on behalf of the Spanish Groups of Uro-Oncology Societies have reached a consensus addressing a practical recommendation on definition, diagnosis, and management of high-risk PCa.

  17. Group consensus peer review in radiation oncology: commitment to quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggar, W Neil; Bhandari, Rahul; Yang, Chunli Claus; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2018-03-27

    Peer review, especially prospective peer review, has been supported by professional organizations as an important element in optimal Radiation Oncology practice based on its demonstration of efficacy at detecting and preventing errors prior to patient treatment. Implementation of peer review is not without barriers, but solutions do exist to mitigate or eliminate some of those barriers. Peer review practice at our institution involves three key elements: new patient conference, treatment planning conference, and chart rounds. The treatment planning conference is an adaptation of the group consensus peer review model from radiology which utilizes a group of peers reviewing each treatment plan prior to implementation. The peer group in radiation oncology includes Radiation Oncologists, Physician Residents, Medical Physicists, Dosimetrists, and Therapists. Thus, technical and clinical aspects of each plan are evaluated simultaneously. Though peer review is held in high regard in Radiation Oncology, many barriers commonly exist preventing optimal implementation such as time intensiveness, repetition, and distraction from clinic time with patients. Through the use of automated review tools and commitment by individuals and administration in regards to staffing, scheduling, and responsibilities, these barriers have been mitigated to implement this Group Consensus Peer Review model into a Radiation Oncology Clinic. A Group Consensus Peer Review model has been implemented with strategies to address common barriers to effective and efficient peer review.

  18. European Consensus Conference for external quality assessment in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krieken, J. H.; Siebers, A. G.; Normanno, N.; Timens, Wim

    Molecular testing of tumor samples to guide treatment decisions is of increasing importance. Several drugs have been approved for treatment of molecularly defined subgroups of patients, and the number of agents requiring companion diagnostics for their prescription is expected to rapidly increase.

  19. Brugada syndrome: report of the second consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Brugada, Pedro; Borggrefe, Martin; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon; Corrado, Domenico; Gussak, Ihor; LeMarec, Herve; Nademanee, Koonlawee; Perez Riera, Andres Ricardo; Shimizu, Wataru; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Tan, Hanno; Wilde, Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Since its introduction as a clinical entity in 1992, the Brugada syndrome has progressed from being a rare disease to one that is second only to automobile accidents as a cause of death among young adults in some countries. Electrocardiographically characterized by a distinct ST-segment elevation in

  20. Electroconvulsive Therapy. Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 5, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a treatment for severe mental illness in which a brief application of electric stimulus is used to produce a generalized seizure, has been in use for over 45 years. Controversies still exist today concerning the use of ECT. In 1985, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health held…

  1. Carbon dioxide research conference: carbon dioxide, science and consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The DOE program focuses on three areas each of which requires more research before the many CO 2 -related questions can be answered. These areas include the global carbon cycle, climate effects, and vegetation effects. Additional information is needed to understand the sources and sinks of CO 2 . Research efforts include an attempt to estimate regional and global changes in temperature and precipitation. Increased atmospheric CO 2 may be a potential benefit to vegetation and crops because it is an essential element required for plant growth. Eight separate papers are included

  2. Testing a consensus conference method by discussing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First, parents and teachers should be provided with guidelines or instructions about self-care following trauma. Second, teaching on the management of traumatic dental injuries at training institutions should be emphasised and third, dental practitioners at dental clinics in the country should get continuing education about ...

  3. Attitude extremity, consensus and diagnosticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; Ester, P.; van der Linden, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effects of attitude extremity on perceived consensus and willingness to ascribe trait terms to others with either pro- or antinuclear attitudes. 611 Ss rated their attitudes toward nuclear energy on a 5-point scale. Results show that attitude extremity affected consensus estimates. Trait

  4. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out...

  5. Eliciting Public Attitudes Regarding Bioremediation Cleanup Technologies: Lessons Learned from a Consensus Workshop in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denise Lach, Principle Investigator; Stephanie Sanford, Co-P.I.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, we developed and implemented a ''consensus workshop'' with Idaho citizens to elicit their concerns and issues regarding the use of bioremediation as a cleanup technology for radioactive nuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The consensus workshop is a derivation of a technology assessment method designed to ensure dialogue between experts and lay people. It has its origins in the United States in the form of ''consensus development conferences'' used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to elicit professional knowledge and concerns about new medical treatments. Over the last 25 years, NIH has conducted over 100 consensus development conferences. (Jorgensen 1995). The consensus conference is grounded in the idea that technology assessment and policy needs to be socially negotiated among many different stakeholders and groups rather than narrowly defined by a group of experts. To successfully implement new technology, the public requires access to information that addresses a full complement of issues including understanding the organization proposing the technology. The consensus conference method creates an informed dialogue, making technology understandable to the general public and sets it within perspectives and priorities that may differ radically from those of the expert community. While specific outcomes differ depending on the overall context of a conference, one expected outcome is that citizen panel members develop greater knowledge of the technology during the conference process and, sometimes, the entire panel experiences a change in attitude toward the technology and/or the organization proposing its use (Kluver 1995). The purpose of this research project was to explore the efficacy of the consensus conference model as a way to elicit the input of the general public about bioremediation of radionuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy sites. Objectives of the research included: (1

  6. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  7. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... tests is available in the United States. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends... disparity are complex. Unlike most other preventive services, in colorectal cancer screening there are... access to the tests. Successful completion of colorectal cancer screening requires effort on the part of...

  8. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 different sections, most popular of which were Environmental GIS-Projects: Development and Experience, Sustainable Development and Innovative Projects, GIS: the Theory and Methodology, Projects for Russia and Regions, and GIS-Technologies and Digital Mapping. The next annual InterCarto-InterGIS conference will take place in December 2011. The Russian component of the conference will be held in the Altay Kray followed by another meeting on Bali, Indonesia

  9. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup

    2017-12-01

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high-dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaicing and 4D light field view synthesis.

  10. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  11. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup

    2017-04-11

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaickingand 4D light field view synthesis.

  12. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup; Swanson, Robin; Heide, Felix; Wetzstein, Gordon; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high-dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaicing and 4D light field view synthesis.

  13. Consensus report - reconstructions on implants. The Third EAO Consensus Conference 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Wiskott, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    This group was assigned the task to review the current knowledge in the areas of implant connections to abutments/reconstructions, fixation methods (cement vs. screw retained) for implant-supported reconstructions, as well as the optimal number of implants for fixed dental prosthesis and implant...

  14. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  15. Connective tissue growth factor confers drug resistance in breast cancer through concomitant up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Yang; Chen, Pai-Sheng; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Hsu, Hsing-Chih; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Chang, King-Jen; Kuo, Min-Liang

    2009-04-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is elevated in advanced breast cancer and promotes metastasis. Chemotherapy response is only transient in most metastatic diseases. In the present study, we examined whether CTGF expression could confer drug resistance in human breast cancer. In breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, CTGF expression was inversely associated with chemotherapy response. Overexpression of CTGF in MCF7 cells (MCF7/CTGF) enhanced clonogenic ability, cell viability, and resistance to apoptosis on exposure to doxorubicin and paclitaxel. Reducing the CTGF level in MDA-MB-231 (MDA231) cells by antisense CTGF cDNA (MDA231/AS cells) mitigated this drug resistance capacity. CTGF overexpression resulted in resistance to doxorubicin- and paclitaxel-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1). Knockdown of Bcl-xL or cIAP1 with specific small interfering RNAs abolished the CTGF-mediated resistance to apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agents in MCF7/CTGF cells. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 effectively reversed the resistance to apoptosis as well as the up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1 in MCF7/CTGF cells. A neutralizing antibody against integrin alpha(v)beta(3) significantly attenuated CTGF-mediated ERK1/2 activation and up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1, indicating that the integrin alpha(v)beta(3)/ERK1/2 signaling pathway is essential for CTGF functions. The Bcl-xL level also correlated with the CTGF level in breast cancer patients. We also found that a COOH-terminal domain peptide from CTGF could exert activities similar to full-length CTGF, in activation of ERK1/2, up-regulation of Bcl-xL/cIAP1, and resistance to apoptosis. We conclude that CTGF expression could confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents through augmenting a survival pathway through ERK1/2-dependent Bcl-xL/cIAP1 up-regulation.

  16. Mexican consensus on dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carmona-Sánchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the 2007 dyspepsia guidelines of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología, there have been significant advances in the knowledge of this disease. A systematic search of the literature in PubMed (01/2007 to 06/2016 was carried out to review and update the 2007 guidelines and to provide new evidence-based recommendations. All high-quality articles in Spanish and English were included. Statements were formulated and voted upon using the Delphi method. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation of each statement were established according to the GRADE system. Thirty-one statements were formulated, voted upon, and graded. New definition, classification, epidemiology, and pathophysiology data were provided and include the following information: Endoscopy should be carried out in cases of uninvestigated dyspepsia when there are alarm symptoms or no response to treatment. Gastric and duodenal biopsies can confirm Helicobacter pylori infection and rule out celiac disease, respectively. Establishing a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as dietary and lifestyle changes, are useful initial measures. H2-blockers, proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics, and antidepressants are effective pharmacologic therapies. H. pylori eradication may be effective in a subgroup of patients. There is no evidence that complementary and alternative therapies are beneficial, with the exception of Iberogast and rikkunshito, nor is there evidence on the usefulness of prebiotics, probiotics, or psychologic therapies. The new consensus statements on dyspepsia provide guidelines based on up-to-date evidence. A discussion, level of evidence, and strength of recommendation are presented for each statement. Resumen: Desde la publicación de las guías de dispepsia 2007 de la Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología ha habido avances significativos en el conocimiento de esta enfermedad. Se realizó una revisión sistemática de la

  17. A rare variant P507L in TPP1 interrupts TPP1-TIN2 interaction, influences telomere length, and confers colorectal cancer risk in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaoyuan; Chang, Jiang; Tian, Jianbo; Ke, Juntao; Zhu, Ying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Yajie; Zou, Danyi; Peng, Xiating; Yang, Nan; Mei, Shufang; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Liming; Hu, Weiguo; Gong, Jing; Zhong, Rong; Miao, Xiaoping

    2018-06-11

    Telomere dysfunction triggers cellular senescence and constitutes a driving force for cancer initiation. Genetic variants in genes involved in telomere maintenance may contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility. In this study, we firstly captured germline mutations in 192 CRC patients by sequencing the coding regions of 13 core components implicated in telomere biology. Five potential functional variants were then genotyped and assessed in a case-control set with 3,761 CRC cases and 3,839 healthy controls. The promising association was replicated in additional 6,765 cases and 6,906 controls. Functional experiments were used to further clarify the potential function of the significant variant and uncover the underlying mechanism in CRC development. The two-stage association studies showed that a rare missense variant rs149418249 (c.C1520T, p.P507L) in the 11th exon of TPP1 (also known as ACD, gene ID 65057) was significantly associated with CRC risk with the ORs being 2.90 (95% CI:1.04-8.07, P=0.041), 2.50 (95% CI:1.04-6.04, P=0.042), and 2.66 (95%CI:1.36-5.18, P=0.004) in discovery, replication, and the combined samples, respectively. Further functional annotation indicated that the TPP1 P507L substitution interrupted TPP1-TIN2 interaction, impaired telomerase processivity, and shortened telomere length, which subsequently facilitated cell proliferation and promoted CRC development. A rare variant P507L in TPP1 confers increased risk of CRC through interrupting TPP1-TIN2 interaction, impairing telomerase processivity, and shrinking telomere length. These findings emphasize the important role of telomere dysfunction in CRC development, and provide new insights about the prevention of this type of cancer. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2018 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

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    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview ...

  20. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  1. Label-free vascular imaging in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model for pre-cancer detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Liu, Heather; Murphy, Helen; Farsiu, Sina; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-03-01

    Inducing angiogenesis is one hallmark of cancer. Tumor induced neovasculature is often characterized as leaky, tortuous and chaotic, unlike a highly organized normal vasculature. Additionally, in the course of carcinogenesis, angiogenesis precedes a visible lesion. Tumor cannot grow beyond 1-2 mm in diameter without inducing angiogenesis. Therefore, capturing the event of angiogenesis may aid early detection of pre-cancer -important for better treatment prognoses in regions that lack the resources to manage invasive cancer. In this study, we imaged the neovascularization in vivo in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model using a, non-invasive, label-free, high resolution, reflected-light spectral darkfield microscope. Hamsters' cheek pouches were painted with 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce pre-cancerous to cancerous changes, or mineral oil as control. High resolution spectral darkfield images were obtained over the course of pre-cancer development and in control cheek pouches. The vasculature was segmented with a multi-scale Gabor filter with an 85% accuracy compared with manually traced masks. Highly tortuous vasculature was observed only in the DMBA treated cheek pouches as early as 6 weeks of treatment. In addition, the highly tortuous vessels could be identified before a visible lesion occurred later during the treatment. The vessel patterns as determined by the tortuosity index were significantly different from that of the control cheek pouch. This preliminary study suggests that high-resolution darkfield microscopy is promising tool for pre-cancer and early cancer detection in low resource settings.

  2. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  3. 26th Hohenheim Concensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, van B.; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zollner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term “Hohenheim Consensus Conference” defines conferences dealing with

  4. II Brazilian consensus statement on endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf-Filho, Fauze; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Carbonari, Augusto; Maciente, Bruno Antônio; Salomão, Bruno Chaves; Medrado, Bruno Frederico; Dotti, Carlos Marcelo; Lopes, César Vivian; Braga, Cláudia Utsch; M Dutra, Daniel Alencar; Retes, Felipe; Nakao, Frank; de Sousa, Giovana Biasia; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Ardengh, Jose Celso; Dos Santos, Juliana Bonfim; Sampaio, Luciana Moura; Okawa, Luciano; Rossini, Lucio; de Brito Cardoso, Manoel Carlos; Ribeiro Camunha, Marco Antonio; Clarêncio, Marcos; Lera Dos Santos, Marcos Eduardo; Franco, Matheus; Schneider, Nutianne Camargo; Mascarenhas, Ramiro; Roda, Rodrigo; Matuguma, Sérgio; Guaraldi, Simone; Figueiredo, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    At the time of its introduction in the early 80s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was indicated for diagnostic purposes. Recently, EUS has been employed to assist or to be the main platform of complex therapeutic interventions. From a series of relevant new topics in the literature and based on the need to complement the I Brazilian consensus on EUS, twenty experienced endosonographers identified and reviewed the pertinent literature in databases. The quality of evidence, strength of recommendations, and level of consensus were graded and voted on. Consensus was reached for eight relevant topics: treatment of gastric varices, staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer, biliary drainage, tissue sampling of subepithelial lesions (SELs), treatment of pancreatic fluid collections, tissue sampling of pancreatic solid lesions, celiac neurolysis, and evaluation of the incidental pancreatic cysts. There is a high level of evidence for staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer; biopsy of SELs as the safest method; unilateral and bilateral injection techniques are equivalent for EUS-guided celiac neurolysis, and in patients with visible ganglia, celiac ganglia neurolysis appears to lead to better results. There is a moderate level of evidence for: yield of tissue sampling of pancreatic solid lesions is not influenced by the needle shape, gauge, or employed aspiration technique; EUS-guided and percutaneous biliary drainage present similar clinical success and adverse event rates; plastic and metallic stents are equivalent in the EUS-guided treatment of pancreatic pseudocyst. There is a low level of evidence in the routine use of EUS-guided treatment of gastric varices.

  5. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Outreach Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press ...

  7. [The first Mexican consensus of endometrial cancer. Grupo de Investigación en Cáncer de Ovario y Tumores Ginecológicos de México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba-Limón, Eva; Cantú-de-León, David; León-Rodríguez, Eucario; Cortés-Esteban, Patricia; Serrano-Olvera, Alberto; Morales-Vásquez, Flavia; Sosa-Sánchez, Ricardo; Poveda-Velasco, Andrés; Crismatt-Zapata, Alejandro; Santillán-Gómez, Antonio; Aguilar-Jiménez, Carmen; Alanís-López, Patricia; Alfaro-Ramírez, Paulino; Alvarez-Avitia, Miguel Angel; Aranda-Flores, Carlos Eduardo; Arias-Ceballos, José Héctor Reynaldo; Arrieta-Rodríguez, Oscar; Barragán-Curiel, Eduardo; Botello-Hernández, Daniel; Brom-Valladares, Rocío; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Cantón-Romero, Juan Carlos; Capdeville-García, Daniel; Cárdenas-Sánchez, Jesús; Castorena-Roji, Gerardo; Cepeda-López, Friedman Rafael; Cervantes-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cetina-Pérez, Lucely de Carmen; Coronel-Martínez, Jaime Alberto; Cortés-Cárdenas, Seir Alfonso; Cruz-López, Juan Carlos; de la Garza-Salazar, Jaime G; Díaz-Romero, Consuelo; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Valle-Solís, Aura Erazo; Escudero-de los Ríos, Pedro; Flores-Alvarez, Efrén; García-Matus, Rolando; Gerson-Cwilich, Raquel; González-Enciso, Aarón; González-de-León, César; Guevara-Torres, Alfonso Genaro; Herbert-Núñez, Guillermo Sidney; Hernández-Hernández, Carlos; Hernández-Hernández, Dulce María; Isla-Ortiz, David; Jesús-Sandoval, Ramiro; Jiménez-Cervantes, Carlos; Kuri-Exsome, Roberto; López-Obispo, José Luis; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Martínez-Barrera, Luis Manuel; Medina-Castro, Juan Manuel; Montalvo-Esquivel, Gonzalo; Mora-Aguilar, Víctor Hugo; Morales-Palomares, Miguel Angel; Morán-Mendoza, Andrés; Morgan-Villela, Gilberto; Mota-García, Aída; Muñoz-González, David Eduardo; Murillo-Cruz, Dino Alberto; Novoa-Vargas, Arturo; Ochoa-Carrillo, Francisco J; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando; Ortega-Rojo, Andrea; Palacios-Martínez, Alma Georgina; Palomeque-López, Antonio; Pérez-Montiel, María Delia; Quijano-Castro, Félix; Rivera-Rivera, Samuel; Rivera-Rubí, Lesbia María; Robles-Flores, Juan Ubaldo; Rodríguez-Trejo, Amelia; Salas-Gonzáles, Efraín; Silva, Juan Alejandro; Solorza-Luna, Gilberto; Souto-del-Bosque, Rosalía; Tirado-Gómez, Laura Leticia; Torrescano-González, Salvador; Torres-Lobatón, Alfonso; Trejo-Durán, Elizabeth; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the second most common gynecologic malignancy worldwide in the peri and postmenopausal period. Most often for the endometrioid variety. In early clinical stages long-term survival is greater than 80%, while in advanced stages it is less than 50%. In our country there is not a standard management between institutions. GICOM collaborative group under the auspice of different institutions have made the following consensus in order to make recommendations for the management of patients with this type of neoplasm. The following recommendations were made by independent professionals in the field of Gynecologic Oncology, questions and statements were based on a comprehensive and systematic review of literature. It took place in the context of a meeting of four days in which a debate was held. These statements are the conclusions reached by agreement of the participant members. Screening should be performed women at high risk (diabetics, family history of inherited colon cancer, Lynch S. type II). Endometrial thickness in postmenopausal patients is best evaluated by transvaginal US, a thickness greater than or equal to 5 mm must be evaluated. Women taking tamoxifen should be monitored using this method. Abnormal bleeding in the usual main symptom, all post menopausal women with vaginal bleeding should be evaluated. Diagnosis is made by histerescopy-guided biopsy. Magnetic resonance is the best image method as preoperative evaluation. Frozen section evaluates histologic grade, myometrial invasion, cervical and adnexal involvement. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo oophorectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy should be performed except in endometrial histology grades 1 and 2, less than 50% invasion of the myometrium without evidence of disease out of the uterus. Omentectomy should be done in histologies other than endometriod. Surgery should be always performed by a Gynecologic Oncologist or Surgical Oncologist, laparoscopy

  8. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  9. Lactate/pyruvate transporter MCT-1 is a direct Wnt target that confers sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowl-Tanio, Stephanie; Habowski, Amber N; Pate, Kira T; McQuade, Miriam M; Wang, Kehui; Edwards, Robert A; Grun, Felix; Lyou, Yung; Waterman, Marian L

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oncogenic Wnt signaling directs metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells to favor aerobic glycolysis or Warburg metabolism. In colon cancer, this reprogramming is due to direct regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 ( PDK1 ) gene transcription. Additional metabolism genes are sensitive to Wnt signaling and exhibit correlative expression with PDK1. Whether these genes are also regulated at the transcriptional level, and therefore a part of a core metabolic gene program targeted by oncogenic WNT signaling, is not known. Here, we identify monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT-1; encoded by SLC16A1 ) as a direct target gene supporting Wnt-driven Warburg metabolism. We identify and validate Wnt response elements (WREs) in the proximal SLC16A1 promoter and show that they mediate sensitivity to Wnt inhibition via dominant-negative LEF-1 (dnLEF-1) expression and the small molecule Wnt inhibitor XAV939. We also show that WREs function in an independent and additive manner with c-Myc, the only other known oncogenic regulator of SLC16A1 transcription. MCT-1 can export lactate, the byproduct of Warburg metabolism, and it is the essential transporter of pyruvate as well as a glycolysis-targeting cancer drug, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). Using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assays to follow cell proliferation, we tested a panel of colon cancer cell lines for sensitivity to 3-BP. We observe that all cell lines are highly sensitive and that reduction of Wnt signaling by XAV939 treatment does not synergize with 3-BP, but instead is protective and promotes rapid recovery. We conclude that MCT-1 is part of a core Wnt signaling gene program for glycolysis in colon cancer and that modulation of this program could play an important role in shaping sensitivity to drugs that target cancer metabolism.

  10. Transcription Factor KLF5 Binds a Cyclin E1 Polymorphic Intronic Enhancer to Confer Increased Bladder Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that environmental toxins, such as exposure to arsenic, are risk factors in the development of urinary bladder cancer, yet recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide compelling evidence that there is a strong genetic component associated with disease predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs8102137, was identified on chromosome 19q12, residing 6 kb upstream of the important cell cycle regulator and proto-oncogene, Cyclin E1 (CCNE1). However, the functional role of this variant in bladder cancer predisposition has been unclear since it lies within a non-coding region of the genome. Here, it is demonstrated that bladder cancer cells heterozygous for this SNP exhibit biased allelic expression of CCNE1 with 1.5-fold more transcription occurring from the risk allele. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, a novel enhancer element was identified within the first intron of CCNE1 that binds Kruppel-like Factor 5 (KLF5), a known transcriptional activator in bladder cancer. Moreover, the data reveal that the presence of rs200996365, a SNP in high linkage disequilibrium with rs8102137 residing in the center of a KLF5 motif, alters KLF5 binding to this genomic region. Through luciferase assays and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, a novel polymorphic intronic regulatory element controlling CCNE1 transcription is characterized. These studies uncover how a cancer-associated polymorphism mechanistically contributes to an increased predisposition for bladder cancer development. Implications A polymorphic KLF5 binding site near the CCNE1 gene explains genetic risk identified through genome wide association studies. PMID:27514407

  11. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  12. Therapeutic rationale to target highly expressed CDK7 conferring poor outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Bo; Chonghaile, Triona Ni; Fan, Yue; Madden, Stephen F.; Klinger, Rut; O'Connor, Aisling E.; Walsh, Louise; O'Hurley, Gillian; Udupi, Girish Mallya; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Tarrant, Finbarr; Conroy, Emer; Gaber, Alexander; Chin, Suet-Feung; Bardwell, Helen A; Provenzano, Elena; Crown, John; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine; Jirstrom, Karin; Caldas, Carlos; O'Connor, Darran P; Gallagher, William M

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients commonly exhibit poor prognosis and high relapse after treatment, but there remains a lack of biomarkers and effective targeted therapies for this disease. Here, we report evidence highlighting the cell-cycle–related kinase CDK7 as a driver and candidate

  13. International Conference on Risk Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Teresa; Rigas, Alexandros; Gulati, Sneh

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest results in the field of risk analysis. Presented topics include probabilistic models in cancer research, models and methods in longevity, epidemiology of cancer risk, engineering reliability and economical risk problems. The contributions of this volume originate from the 5th International Conference on Risk Analysis (ICRA 5). The conference brought together researchers and practitioners working in the field of risk analysis in order to present new theoretical and computational methods with applications in biology, environmental sciences, public health, economics and finance.

  14. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  15. Cervical cancer: summary of the NIH consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de examinar algunos aspectos aún no definidos del tratamiento del cáncer de cuello uterino y de la calidad de la vida de los pacientes, el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (EUA y la Oficina de Aplicaciones Médicas de la Investigación, pertenecientes a los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH, convocaron una Conferencia para el Desarrollo de Consenso sobre el Cáncer de Cuello de Útero. El panel de expertos, que se compuso de 13 miembros, se concentró en los siguientes interrogantes: 1 ¿Cómo se pueden fortalecer las iniciativas para prevenir el cáncer cervico-uterino? 2 ¿Cuál es el tratamiento apropiado del cáncer de cuello de útero en estadio temprano? 3 ¿Cuál es el tratamiento adecuado del cáncer cervicouterino recurrente o en estadio avanzado? 4 ¿Qué nuevos rumbos seguirán las investigaciones sobre el cáncer de cuello de útero? En este informe se resumen las conclusiones a las que se llegó en la Conferencia sobre estas cuestiones. La declaración de consenso se puede pedir gratuitamente a los NIH.

  16. A polymorphism in miR-1262 regulatory region confers the risk of lung cancer in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Chen, Mengxi; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Liang, Cheng; Song, Ci; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Lin, Dongxin; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2017-09-01

    It has been proposed that the majority of disease-associated loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are enriched in non-coding regions, such as the promoter, enhancer or non-coding RNA genes. Thus, we performed a two-stage case-control study to systematically evaluate the association of genetic variants in miRNA regulatory regions (promoter and enhancer) with lung cancer risk in 7,763 subjects (discovery stage: 2,331 cases and 3,077 controls; validation stage: 1,065 cases and 1,290 controls). As a result, we identified that rs12740674 (C > T) in miR-1262 enhancer was significantly associated with the increased risk of lung cancer (additive model in discovery stage: adjusted OR = 1.31, 95%CI = 1.13-1.53, p = 3.846 × 10 -4 in Nanjing GWAS; adjusted OR = 1.20, 95%CI = 1.00-1.44, p = 0.041 in Beijing GWAS; validation stage: adjusted OR = 1.20, 95%CI = 1.03-1.41, p = 0.024). In meta-analysis, the p value for the association between rs12740674 and lung cancer risk reached 6.204 × 10 -6 (adjusted OR = 1.24, 95%CI = 1.13-1.36). Using 3DSNP database, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and functional assays, we observed that the risk T allele of rs12740674 reduced the expression level of miR-1262 in lung tissue through chromosomal looping, and overexpression of miR-1262 inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation probably through targeting the expression levels of ULK1 and RAB3D. Our findings confirmed the important role that genetic variants of noncoding sequence play in lung cancer susceptibility and indicated that rs12740674 in miR-1262 may be biologically relevant to lung carcinogenesis. © 2017 UICC.

  17. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  18. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  19. Gold nanorods coupled with upconverting nanophosphors for targeted thermal ablation and imaging of bladder cancer cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suehyun K.; Su, Lih-Jen; Flaig, Thomas W.; Park, Wounjhang

    2016-09-01

    NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconverting nanophosphors (UCNPs) are robust and stable nanoparticles that absorb near-infrared (NIR) photons and emit green and red visible photons through energy transfer upconversion. This mechanism provides UCNPs several advantages as a bioimaging agent over traditional fluorescence imaging agent in that NIR excitation allows high-contrast imaging without autofluorescence and that they can be used for deep-tissue imaging. However, additional surface modification of UCNPs is necessary for them to be biocompatible. We use an amphiphilic polymer (poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene) (PMAO) and a hetero-functional polyethylene glycol with amine and thiol ends (NH2-PEG-SH)) to make the UCNPs water-soluble. This reaction yields a carboxylic group that allows functionalization with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (aEGFR), which provides specific binding of UCNPs to EGFR-expressing bladder cancer cells. Additionally, the thiol ends of the PEGylated UCNPs are able to bind with gold nanorods (AuNRs) to create UCNP-AuNR complexes. The localized surface plasmon of the AuNR then allow localized heating of HTB9 bladder cancer cells, enabling in situ cell killing upon detection by UCNP fluorescence. Here, we report a successful synthesis, surface modification and conjugation of aEGFR functionalized UCNP-AuNR complexes and in vitro imaging and thermal ablation studies using them. Synthesis and surface modification of UCNP-AuNR complexes are confirmed by electron microscopy. Then, a combination of brightfield, NIR confocal fluorescence, and darkfield microscopy on the UCNP-AuNR treated bladder cancer cells revealed successful cancer targeting and imaging capabilities of the complex. Finally, cell viability assay showed that NIR irradiation of UCNP-AuNR conjugated cells resulted highly selective cell killing.

  20. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  1. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  2. Global Consensus Recommendations on Prevention and Management of Nutritional Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Craig F; Shaw, Nick; Kiely, Mairead; Specker, Bonny L; Thacher, Tom D; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi; Tiosano, Dov; Mughal, M Zulf; Mäkitie, Outi; Ramos-Abad, Lorna; Ward, Leanne; DiMeglio, Linda A; Atapattu, Navoda; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Braegger, Christian; Pettifor, John M; Seth, Anju; Idris, Hafsatu Wasagu; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Fu, Junfen; Goldberg, Gail; Sävendahl, Lars; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Pludowski, Pawel; Maddock, Jane; Hyppönen, Elina; Oduwole, Abiola; Frew, Emma; Aguiar, Magda; Tulchinsky, Ted; Butler, Gary; Högler, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are common worldwide, causing nutritional rickets and osteomalacia, which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children, and adolescents; the consequences can be lethal or can last into adulthood. The goals of this evidence-based consensus document are to provide health care professionals with guidance for prevention, diagnosis, and management of nutritional rickets and to provide policy makers with a framework to work toward its eradication. A systematic literature search examining the definition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nutritional rickets in children was conducted. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system that describe the strength of the recommendation and the quality of supporting evidence. Thirty-three nominated experts in pediatric endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, epidemiology, public health, and health economics evaluated the evidence on specific questions within five working groups. The consensus group, representing 11 international scientific organizations, participated in a multiday conference in May 2014 to reach a global evidence-based consensus. This consensus document defines nutritional rickets and its diagnostic criteria and describes the clinical management of rickets and osteomalacia. Risk factors, particularly in mothers and infants, are ranked, and specific prevention recommendations including food fortification and supplementation are offered for both the clinical and public health contexts. Rickets, osteomalacia, and vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are preventable global public health problems in infants, children, and adolescents. Implementation of international rickets prevention programs, including supplementation and food fortification, is urgently required.

  3. Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Swift, Stephen; Liu, Xiaohui

    Ensemble Clustering has been developed to provide an alternative way of obtaining more stable and accurate clustering results. It aims to avoid the biases of individual clustering algorithms. However, it is still a challenge to develop an efficient and robust method for Ensemble Clustering. Based on an existing ensemble clustering method, Consensus Clustering (CC), this paper introduces an advanced Consensus Clustering algorithm called Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering (MOCC), which utilises an optimised Agreement Separation criterion and a Multi-Optimisation framework to improve the performance of CC. Fifteen different data sets are used for evaluating the performance of MOCC. The results reveal that MOCC can generate more accurate clustering results than the original CC algorithm.

  4. Consensus for the brain metastases treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabadan, Alejandra; Diez, Blanca; Martinez, Ana M.; Antico, Julio; Saidon, Patricia; Christiansen, Silvia; Rojas, Galeno

    2006-01-01

    The advancement in oncology therapies has made brain metastases treatment a major factor influencing the survival time and quality of life of patients with cancer. Although there are numerous publications on the issue, there is not yet to be consensus regarding the best strategy for treatment, which is probably due to population heterogeneity in terms of functional status, type of neoplasia, control of the systemic disease, and the number and localization of the lesions in the central nervous system. Our objective is to present general recommendations based on rational analysis in order to guide the practical management of brain metastases. With this purpose, a multidisciplinary team composed by neurosurgeons, neuro-oncologists, neuro-pathologist, radio therapist and neurologists was brought together, conducting a thorough search, in english and spanish, for publications in Pub- Med from 1980 to July 2006 (the starting period was set at the beginning of use of RM in medical practice). Review and original articles with n= or >20 were selected. Also, book chapters of renowned authors in the different consulted areas were included. The assessment of the literature, in addition to the experience of the authors allowed for the development of the 'Consensus for the brain metastases treatment'. Finally, the authors expect the present work will contribute to the multidisciplinary approach for the management of brain metastases with simple and practical recommendations, and probably stimulating future developments in this field. (author)

  5. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... In addition, there are persistent problems with leadership and planning, vaccine stock management, supply chain capacity and quality, provider-parent communication, and financial sustainability. The conference delegates agreed to move from talking to taking concrete actions around children's health, and ...

  6. Glasgow conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-10-15

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge.

  7. Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A brief review is given of the main results presented at the International Conference on Heavy Ion Sources, October 27--30, 1975. The sections are as follows: highlights, general observations, fundamental processes in sources, positive ion sources, negative ion sources, beam formation and emittance measurements, stripping, accelerators and experiments, and future prospects

  8. Lisbon Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Although no major physics discoveries were announced, the European Physical Society's International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Lisbon from 9-15 July, was significant in that it showed the emerging pattern of physics for the 1980s

  9. Conference report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    Bloomberg Philanthropies. The conference theme “from research to implementation” emphasised the importance of connecting knowledge around violence with injury prevention, while stressing the need to address the multitude of transnational public health challenges. In speaking to this theme, the. Tampere Declaration ...

  10. Conference Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of the management planning technique known as Break Even Analysis and outlines its use as a tool in financial planning for organizations intending to conduct or sponsor a conference, seminar, or workshop. Three figures illustrating Break Even Analysis concepts and a Break Even Analysis worksheet are included. (JL)

  11. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice .... while the implementation of family planning in African HIV programs will favor safe contraception ... equipment. The WHO-stepwise approach for the global strategy for the prevention ...

  12. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  13. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Modell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description: Among the two leading causes of death in the United States, each responsible for one in every four deaths, heart disease costs Americans $300 billion, while cancer costs Americans $216 billion per year. They also rank among the top three causes of death in Europe and Asia. In 2012 the University of Michigan Center for Public Health and Community Genomics and Genetic Alliance, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Public Health Genomics, hosted a conference in Atlanta, Georgia to consider related action strategies based on public health genomics. The aim of the conference was consensus building on recommendations to implement genetic screening for three major heritable contributors to these mortality and cost figures: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and Lynch syndrome (LS. Genetic applications for these three conditions are labeled with a “Tier 1” designation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they have been fully validated and clinical practice guidelines based on systematic review support them. Methodology: The conference followed a deliberative sequence starting with nationally recognized clinical and public health presenters for each condition, followed by a Patient and Community Perspectives Panel, working group sessions for each of the conditions, and a final plenary session. The 74 conference participants represented disease research and advocacy, public health, medicine and nursing, genetics, governmental health agencies, and industry. Participants drew on a public health framework interconnecting policy, clinical intervention, surveillance, and educational functions for their deliberations. Results: Participants emphasized the importance of collaboration between clinical, public health, and advocacy groups in implementing Tier 1 genetic screening. Advocacy groups could help with individual and institutional

  14. Wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy improves skin cancer diagnostic specificity at high sensitivity levels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan; Kalia, Sunil; Lui, Harvey

    2017-02-01

    Background: Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical technique which can measure molecular vibrational modes within tissue. A large-scale clinical study (n = 518) has demonstrated that real-time Raman spectroscopy could distinguish malignant from benign skin lesions with good diagnostic accuracy; this was validated by a follow-up independent study (n = 127). Objective: Most of the previous diagnostic algorithms have typically been based on analyzing the full band of the Raman spectra, either in the fingerprint or high wavenumber regions. Our objective in this presentation is to explore wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy for skin cancer diagnosis. Methods: A wavenumber selection algorithm was implemented using variably-sized wavenumber windows, which were determined by the correlation coefficient between wavenumbers. Wavenumber windows were chosen based on accumulated frequency from leave-one-out cross-validated stepwise regression or least and shrinkage selection operator (LASSO). The diagnostic algorithms were then generated from the selected wavenumber windows using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component and general discriminant analysis (PC-GDA) and partial least squares (PLS). A total cohort of 645 confirmed lesions from 573 patients encompassing skin cancers, precancers and benign skin lesions were included. Lesion measurements were divided into training cohort (n = 518) and testing cohort (n = 127) according to the measurement time. Result: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) improved from 0.861-0.891 to 0.891-0.911 and the diagnostic specificity for sensitivity levels of 0.99-0.90 increased respectively from 0.17-0.65 to 0.20-0.75 by selecting specific wavenumber windows for analysis. Conclusion: Wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy improves skin cancer diagnostic specificity at high sensitivity levels.

  15. [Effect of PMU hepatic arterial chemotherapy for liver metastases of gastric cancer. Hokuriku Cisplatin Round-table Conference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, H; Matsuki, N; Katayama, K; Hirosawa, H; Tomita, F; Takano, N; Tanaka, T; Sawa, T; Ueno, K; Uogishi, M

    1989-08-01

    We performed PMU hepatic arterial chemotherapy (a combination therapy consisting of intra-hepatic arterial infusion of CDDP and MMC, oral administration of UFT) in 20 patients with gastric cancer and liver metastases. In this method, 1-6 courses of one infusion of CDDP at 70-100 mg/body and MMC of 10 mg/body into the proper hepatic artery were administered at intervals of 3-4 weeks. UFT of 300-400 mg/day was orally administered with the infusion. The primary response for hepatic metastatic lesions was observed in one case of CR, 14 cases of PR, 4 cases of NC, and one case of PD. The efficacy for CR and PR was high at 75%. The median disease-free interval was 56 weeks in responders. The 50% survival period was 11.1 months; one-year survival rate, 42.1%; two-year survival rate, 12.3%; the longest survival period was 108 weeks. Mild and transient side effects were recognized in 17 cases (85%): gastrointestinal symptoms, sense of general malaise, fever, leukocytopenia, and elevated BUN. Thus, the results indicated that this combination chemotherapy was effective for liver metastases of gastric cancer.

  16. Decreased internalisation of erbB1 mutants in lung cancer is linked with a mechanism conferring sensitivity to gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, B S; Griffiths, G J; Benson, R; Kenyon, D; Lazzara, M; Swinton, J; Beck, S; Hickinson, M; Beusmans, J M; Lauffenburger, D; de Graaf, D

    2006-11-01

    A majority of gefitinib (IRESSA)-responsive tumours in non-small cell lung cancer have been found to carry mutations in ErbB1. Previously, it has been observed that internalisation-deficient ErbB1 receptors are strong drivers of oncogenesis. Using a computational model of ErbB1 trafficking and signalling, it is found that a deficiency in ErbB1 internalisation is sufficient to explain the observed signalling phenotype of these gefitinib-responsive ErbB1 mutants in lung cancer cell lines. Experimental tests confirm that gefitinib-sensitive cell lines with and without ErbB1 mutations exhibit markedly slower internalisation rates than gefitinib-insensitive cell lines. Moreover, the computational model demonstrates that reduced ErbB1 internalisation rates are mechanistically linked to upregulated AKT signalling. Experimentally it is confirmed that impaired internalisation of ErbB1 is associated with increased AKT activity, which can be blocked by gefitinib. On the basis of these experimental and computational results, it is surmised that gefitinib sensitivity is a marker of a reliance on AKT signalling for cell survival that may be brought about by impaired ErbB1 internalisation.

  17. Complete cytoreduction after five or more cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy confers a survival benefit in advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew; Sundar, Sudha; Singh, Kavita; Nevin, James; Elattar, Ahmed; Kehoe, Sean; Balega, Janos

    2018-06-01

    To assess the impact of 5 or more cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and cytoreductive outcomes on overall survival (OS) in patients undergoing interval debulking surgery (IDS) for advanced ovarian cancer. A retrospective review of patients receiving NACT followed by IDS between 2007 and 2017. Patients were analysed according to number of NACT cycles received: group 1 consisted of patients receiving ≤4 cycles and group 2 consisted of those receiving ≥5 cycles. Outcomes were stratified by cytoreductive outcome, surgical complexity, stage and chemotherapy exposure. 231 patients in group 1 and 167 in group 2 were identified. In group 1, the OS for those achieving Complete (R0), Optimalcycles to 24.3 (95%CI 14.4-34.2)months with ≥6 cycles. Surgery with utilisation of cytoreductive procedures to achieve complete clearance should be offered to all patients even after ≥5 cycles if R0 can be achieved. R1 cytoreduction has questionable value in those receiving ≤4 cycles and no value in those receiving ≥5 cycles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alex J; Meader, Nick; Davies, Evan; Clover, Kerrie; Carter, Gregory L; Loscalzo, Matthew J; Linden, Wolfgang; Grassi, Luigi; Johansen, Christoffer; Carlson, Linda E; Zabora, James

    2012-10-01

    To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer settings. We used a standardized rating system. We excluded 11 tools without at least two independent studies, leaving 8 tools for comparison. Across all cancer stages there were 56 diagnostic validity studies (n=10,009). For case-finding, one stem question, two stem questions and the BDI-II all had level 2 evidence (2a, 2b and 2c respectively) and given their better acceptability we gave the stem questions a grade B recommendation. For screening, two stem questions had level 1b evidence (with high acceptability) and the BDI-II had level 2c evidence. For every 100 people screened in advanced cancer, the two questions would accurately detect 18 cases, while missing only 1 and correctly reassure 74 with 7 falsely identified. For every 100 people screened in non-palliative settings the BDI-II would accurately detect 17 cases, missing 2 and correctly re-assure 70, with 11 falsely identified as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: Evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, A. J.; Meader, N.; Davies, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. Methods: We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer...... as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Conclusions: Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon...

  20. Building consensus in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.

    1994-01-01

    The importance for the development of UK renewable energy projects of building consensus in the community is discussed. After outlining the benefits of such an approach, some of the likely concerns and questions from a developer's viewpoint are explored. The key principles of good practice are considered and an example from a wind project examined. (UK)

  1. Consensus standard requirements and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents information from the ANS Criticality Alarm System Workshop relating to the consensus standard requirements and guidance. Topics presented include: definition; nomenclature; requirements and recommendations; purpose of criticality alarms; design criteria; signal characteristics; reliability, dependability and durability; tests; and emergency preparedness and planning

  2. Wavelength dependent SHG imaging and scattering probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campbell, Kirby R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate. To improve upon this situation, we utilized collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe structural differences in the extracellular matrix of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous (LGS and HGS) tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found strong wavelength dependent dependencies of these metrics that were different between the different tumors that are related to respective structural attributes in the collagen organization. These sub-resolution determinations are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. However, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. Moreover, our analyses are further consistent with LGS and benign tumors having similar etiology. We identified optimal wavelengths for the SHG metrics as well as optical scattering measurements. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were then used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy ( 90%) between the tissue types. This delineation is superior to current clinical performance and has potential applicability in supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool.

  3. A hematology consensus agreement on antifungal strategies for neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto, Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo, Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica, Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Sorveglianza Epidemiologica delle Infezioni Fungine nelle Emopatie Maligne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmenia, Corrado; Aversa, Franco; Busca, Alessandro; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Luppi, Mario; Pagano, Livio; Rossi, Giuseppe; Venditti, Adriano; Nosari, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    In the attempt to establish key therapy definitions and provide shared approaches to invasive fungal diseases in neutropenic patients, trials of empiric, preeemptive and targeted antifungal therapy (EAT, PAT and TAT) were reviewed, and a Consensus Development Conference Project was convened. The Expert-Panel concurred that all antifungal treatments, including EAT, should always follow an adequate diagnostic strategy and that the standard definition of PAT may be misleading: being PAT guided by the results of a diagnostic work-up, it should better be termed diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy (DDAT). The Expert-Panel agreed that radiological findings alone are insufficient for the choice of a TAT and that the identification of the etiologic pathogen is needed. The Consensus Agreement proceeded identifying which clinical and microbiological findings were sufficient to start a DDAT and which were not. Finally, an algorithm to rationalize the choice of antifungal drugs on the basis of clinical manifestations, antifungal prophylaxis, instrumental and laboratory findings was drawn up. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National and international aspects of climate change were the central concern of this conference organized by the Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives (AREA). AREA is a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada which was created to reflect the views and represent the interests of Canadians in the Climate Change Debate. Ways and means of optimizing Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge were discussed. Discussions emphasized issues regarding the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases, as opposed to government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets. The issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables can be implemented was also debated. The economic implications of climate change were outlined. Canada's national agenda and the likely outcomes of the Conference of Parties (COP 4) in Buenos Aires also received much attention. tabs., figs

  5. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  6. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  7. Glasgow conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-01-01

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge

  8. Washington Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 Particle Accelerator Conference was held in Washington from 11-13 March. It was the ninth in the series of meetings organized in the USA which differ from the 'International' meetings in their coverage of the full range of accelerator engineering and technology, including applications outside e field of high energy physics. The Conference took place under the cloud of further budget cuts for Fiscal Year 1982 in the USA which the Department of Energy has applied in line with the financial policy of the new administration. Coming on top of many years of budget trimming which have reduced the number of high energy physics Laboratories funded by the DOE to three (Brookhaven, Fermilab, Stanford - Cornell is funded by the National Science Foundation) and reduced the exploitation of these Laboratories to less than half of their potential, the new cuts did not exactly help to boost morale. Nevertheless, the huge amount of tailed work in accelerator physics and technology which was presented at the Conference showed how alive the field is

  9. Combination Cancer Therapy Can Confer Benefit via Patient-to-Patient Variability without Drug Additivity or Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Sorger, Peter K

    2017-12-14

    Combination cancer therapies aim to improve the probability and magnitude of therapeutic responses and reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in an individual patient. However, drugs are tested in clinical trials on genetically diverse patient populations. We show here that patient-to-patient variability and independent drug action are sufficient to explain the superiority of many FDA-approved drug combinations in the absence of drug synergy or additivity. This is also true for combinations tested in patient-derived tumor xenografts. In a combination exhibiting independent drug action, each patient benefits solely from the drug to which his or her tumor is most sensitive, with no added benefit from other drugs. Even when drug combinations exhibit additivity or synergy in pre-clinical models, patient-to-patient variability and low cross-resistance make independent action the dominant mechanism in clinical populations. This insight represents a different way to interpret trial data and a different way to design combination therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  11. Possibilities of consensus: toward democratic moral discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, B

    1991-08-01

    The concept of consensus is often appealed to in discussions of biomedical ethics and applied ethics, and it plays an important role in many influential ethical theories. Consensus is an especially influential notion among theorists who reject ethical realism and who frame ethics as a practice of discourse rather than a body of objective knowledge. It is also a practically important notion when moral decision making is subject to bureaucratic organization and oversight, as is increasingly becoming the case in medicine. Two models of consensus are examined and criticized: pluralistic consensus and overlapping consensus. As an alternative to these models, the paper argues that consensus refers to the dialogic aspects of a broader normative conception of democratic moral agency. When the preconditions for that dialogic democratic practice are met, consensus has a justificatory role in ethics; when they are not, consensus, as distinct from mere agreement, does not emerge and can have no moral authority.

  12. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Implicit Consensus: Blockchain with Unbounded Throughput

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhijie; Cong, Kelong; Pouwelse, Johan; Erkin, Zekeriya

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the blockchain technique was put in the spotlight as it introduced a systematic approach for multiple parties to reach consensus without needing trust. However, the application of this technique in practice is severely restricted due to its limitations in throughput. In this paper, we propose a novel consensus model, namely the implicit consensus, with a distinctive blockchain-based distributed ledger in which each node holds its individual blockchain. In our system, the consensus i...

  14. Trust, values and false consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Jeffrey V.; Giuliano, Paola; Guiso, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Trust beliefs are heterogeneous across individuals and, at the same time, persistent across generations. We investigate one mechanism yielding these dual patterns: false consensus. In the context of a trust game experiment, we show that individuals extrapolate from their own type when forming trust beliefs about the same pool of potential partners – i.e., more (less) trustworthy individuals form more optimistic (pessimistic) trust beliefs - and that this tendency continues to color trust beli...

  15. Endodontic retreatment decisions: no consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P; D'Hoore, W

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to: (i) evaluate the consensus, if any, amongst dental schools, students and their instructors managing the same clinical cases, all of which involved endodontically treated teeth; and (ii) determine the predominant proposed treatment option. Final year students, endodontic staff members and instructors of 10 European dental schools were surveyed as decision makers. Fourteen different radiographic cases of root canal treated teeth accompanied by a short clinical history were presented to them in a uniform format. For each case the decision makers were requested to: (i) choose only one out of nine treatment alternatives proposed, from 'no treatment' to 'extraction' via 'retreatment' and 'surgery' (ii) assess on two 5-point scales: the difficulty of making a decision, and the technical complexity of the retreatment procedure. The results indicate wide inter- and also intra-school disagreements in the clinical management of root canal treated teeth. Analysis of variance showed that the main source of variation was the 'school effect', explaining 1.8% (NS) to 18.6% (P < 0.0001) of the treatment variations. No other factor explained as much variance. Decision difficulty was moderately correlated to technical complexity (Pearsons' r ranging from 0.19 to 0.35, P < 0.0001). No clear consensus occurred amongst and within dental schools concerning the clinical management of the 14 cases. The lack of consensus amongst schools seems to be due mainly to chance or uncertainty, but can be partly explained by the 'school effect'.

  16. International consensus on safety principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been regularly requested by its Member States to provide evidence that radioactive waste can be managed safely and to help demonstrate a harmonization of approach at the international level by providing safety documents. In response, IAEA established a special series of safety documents devoted to radioactive waste management. These documents will be elaborated within the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme [1,2] which covers all aspects of radioactive waste management. The RADWASS programme develops a series of international consensus documents on all parts of the safe management of radioactive waste, including disposal. The purpose of the RADWASS programme is to (i) document existing international consensus in the approaches and methodologies for safe radioactive waste management, (ii) create a mechanism to establish consensus where it does not exist and (iii) provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed upon documents to complement national standards and criteria. This paper describes the RADWASS programme, and covers the structure, implementation plans and status of documents under preparation

  17. Attitude Importance and the False Consensus Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrigar, Leandre R.; Krosnick, Jon A.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the possibility that importance may regulate the magnitude of the false consensus effect. Analysis revealed a strong false consensus effect but no reliable relation between its magnitude and attitude importance. Results contradict assumptions that the false consensus effect arises from attitudes that directly or indirectly influence…

  18. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Association, Brazil, 17Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Departamento de Medicina Social Pelotas, RS, Brazil .... line with statements of the Minister of Public Health, Andre Mama ... The high cancer burden in Africa. (breast ...

  19. International consensus for a definition of disease flare in lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, N; Hanrahan, L M; Alarcón, G S; Belmont, H M; Brey, R L; Brunetta, P; Buyon, J P; Costner, M I; Cronin, M E; Dooley, M A; Filocamo, G; Fiorentino, D; Fortin, P R; Franks, A G; Gilkeson, G; Ginzler, E; Gordon, C; Grossman, J; Hahn, B; Isenberg, D A; Kalunian, K C; Petri, M; Sammaritano, L; Sánchez-Guerrero, J; Sontheimer, R D; Strand, V; Urowitz, M; von Feldt, J M; Werth, V P; Merrill, J T

    2011-04-01

    The Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) convened an international working group to obtain a consensus definition of disease flare in lupus. With help from the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO), two web-based Delphi surveys of physicians were conducted. Subsequently, the LFA held a second consensus conference followed by a third Delphi survey to reach a community-wide agreement for flare definition. Sixty-nine of the 120 (57.5%) polled physicians responded to the first survey. Fifty-nine of the responses were available to draft 12 preliminary statements, which were circulated in the second survey. Eighty-seven of 118 (74%) physicians completed the second survey, with an agreement of 70% for 9/12 (75%) statements. During the second conference, three alternative flare definitions were consolidated and sent back to the international community. One hundred and sixteen of 146 (79.5%) responded, with agreement by 71/116 (61%) for the following definition: "A flare is a measurable increase in disease activity in one or more organ systems involving new or worse clinical signs and symptoms and/or laboratory measurements. It must be considered clinically significant by the assessor and usually there would be at least consideration of a change or an increase in treatment." The LFA proposes this definition for lupus flare on the basis of its high face validity.

  20. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1991-01-01

    This summary will begin with short remarks, trying to recall some of the spirit of the presentations of each of the speakers during the first day, with no attempt at detail or completeness, given the need for a 20:1 compression relative to the original talk. The author hopes these idiosyncratic recollections do not infuriate the speakers too much. Since the speakers on the second day presented such interlocking topics, he simply tries to present some sort of consensus report, to which he adds some comments of his own. The two talks preceding this Summary on the final day dealt with the prospects for applications; since he had no chance to attempt to prepare a proper report on these, he says only a few words about those presentations

  2. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  3. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  4. Treatment of Osteoporosis in Australian Residential Aged Care Facilities: Update on Consensus Recommendations for Fracture Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Gustavo; Lord, Stephen R.; Mak, Jenson; Ganda, Kirtan; Close, Jacqueline J.T.; Ebeling, Peter; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Inderjeeth, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Older people living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are at a higher risk of suffering fractures than the community-dwelling older population. The first Consensus Conference on Treatment of Osteoporosis in RACFs in Australia, held in Sydney in July 2009, aimed to address some of the issues relating to the treatment of older residents with osteoporosis in RACFs. Considering that the field of osteoporosis diagnosis and management has significantly advanced in the last 5 years and that new evidence has been generated from studies performed within RACFs, a Second Consensus Conference was held in Sydney in November 2014. Methods An expert panel met in November 2014 in Penrith, NSW, Australia in an attempt to reach a consensus on diverse issues related to the treatment of osteoporosis at RACFs. Participants were selected by the scientific committee on the basis of their practice in an RACF and/or major published articles. The co-chairs distributed topics randomly to all participants, who then had to propose a statement on each topic for approval by the conference after a short, evidence-based presentation, when possible. Results This article provides an update on the most relevant evidence on osteoporosis in older people living in RACFs graded according to its level, quality, and relevance. Conclusion As with the first consensus, it is hoped that this statement will constitute an important guide to aid physicians in their decision making while practicing at RACFs. PMID:27349626

  5. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  6. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  7. Munich conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-10-15

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility.

  8. Munich conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility

  9. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  10. Title - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited)

    OpenAIRE

    Lohrey, MC; Lawrence, AS

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) "Notes" - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) In preparation (Publication status) Yes, full paperYes, abstract onlyNo (Peer reviewed?) "Add a comment" - EFARS - Conference - Uninvited

  11. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the unedited proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Managing Electricity Price Volatility. There were a total of eleven papers presented, dealing with a variety of issues affecting price volatility. Subjects treated included: new power generation development in Alberta; an analysis of electricity supply and demand to predict future price volatility; the effect of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market; risk management in volatile energy markets; an analysis of Alberta's capacity to supply its own internal electric power needs; the impact of increased electricity import and export capacity on price fluctuation in Alberta; improving market liquidity in Alberta; using weather derivatives to offset price risk; the impact of natural gas prices on electricity price volatility; capitalizing on advancements in online trading; and strategies for businesses to keep operating through times of price volatility. In most cases only overhead viewgraphs are available

  12. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  13. Eliciting Public Attitudes Regarding Bioremediation Cleanup Technologies: Lessons Learned from a Consensus Workshop in Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Lach, Principle Investigator; Stephanie Sanford, Co-P.I.

    2003-03-01

    During the summer of 2002, we developed and implemented a ''consensus workshop'' with Idaho citizens to elicit their concerns and issues regarding the use of bioremediation as a cleanup technology for radioactive nuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The consensus workshop is a derivation of a technology assessment method designed to ensure dialogue between experts and lay people. It has its origins in the United States in the form of ''consensus development conferences'' used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to elicit professional knowledge and concerns about new medical treatments. Over the last 25 years, NIH has conducted over 100 consensus development conferences. (Jorgensen 1995). The consensus conference is grounded in the idea that technology assessment and policy needs to be socially negotiated among many different stakeholders and groups rather than narrowly defined by a group of experts. To successfully implement new technology, the public requires access to information that addresses a full complement of issues including understanding the organization proposing the technology. The consensus conference method creates an informed dialogue, making technology understandable to the general public and sets it within perspectives and priorities that may differ radically from those of the expert community. While specific outcomes differ depending on the overall context of a conference, one expected outcome is that citizen panel members develop greater knowledge of the technology during the conference process and, sometimes, the entire panel experiences a change in attitude toward the technology and/or the organization proposing its use (Kluver 1995). The purpose of this research project was to explore the efficacy of the consensus conference model as a way to elicit the input of the general public about bioremediation of radionuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy sites

  14. Cairo conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-03

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern