WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer conference mechanisms

  1. Nutritional links to plausible mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer: a conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, R Jean; Srivastava, Sudhir; Milner, John A; Ross, Sharon A

    2003-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is one of most catastrophic and least understood of cancers. Evidence from clinical studies indicates that the development of pancreas cancer progresses over many years before symptoms appear. Most people with pancreatic cancer die within six months of diagnosis. The lack of early disease markers, the paucity of direct subject/patient interview data and limited availability of high quality biological samples have slowed progress toward identifying environmental and genetic disease risk factors. Much remains to be learned about the development of pancreatic cancer and about potential interventions for disease prevention. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies examining risk factors for pancreatic cancer supply little consistent or strong evidence to provide a cohesive prevention strategy for this cancer, but offer clues for future research concerning the prevention and early detection of this devastating disease. This Executive Summary provides background discussion on pancreatic cancer and summaries of each of the topics discussed at the workshop, including 1) Molecular aspects, 2) Dietary and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, 3) The metabolic hypothesis for pancreatic cancer, 4) Preclinical studies on pancreatic cancer, 5) Methylation, 6) Oxidative stress and 7) Biomarker Profiling. This document also contains a compilation of recommendations for future research, concluding remarks, a list of speakers and participants attending the workshop, and a selection of key references to aid future research into nutritional links to mechanisms underlying pancreas cancer. The recommendations section suggests gaps in current knowledge and articulates future directions for this area of investigation.

  2. International Conference on Computational Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Atluri, Satya

    1986-01-01

    It is often said that these days there are too many conferences on general areas of computational mechanics. mechanics. and numer ical methods. vJhile this may be true. the his tory of scientific conferences is itself quite short. According to Abraham Pais (in "Subtle is the Lord ...• " Oxford University Press. 1982. p.80). the first international scientific conference ever held was the Karlsruhe Congress of Chemists. 3-5 September 1860 in Karlsruhe. Germany. There were 127 chemists in attendance. and the participants came from Austria. Belgium. France. Germany. Great Britain. Italy. Mexico. Poland. Russia. Spain. Sweden. and Switzerland. At the top of the agenda of the points to be discussed at this conference was the question: "Shall a difference be made between the expressions molecule and atom?" Pais goes on to note: "The conference did not at once succeed in bringing chemists closer together ... It is possible that the older men were offended by the impetuous behavior and imposing manner of the younger...

  3. Fourth European Conference on Mechanism Science (EUCOMES 2012 Conference)

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, Marco; New Trends in Mechanism and Machine Science : Theory and Applications in Engineering

    2013-01-01

    This book contains the papers of the European Conference on Mechanisms Science (EUCOMES 2012 Conference). The book presents the most recent research developments in the mechanism and machine science field and their applications. Topics addressed are theoretical kinematics, computational kinematics, mechanism design, experimental mechanics, mechanics of robots, dynamics of machinery, dynamics of multi-body systems, control issues of mechanical systems, mechanisms for biomechanics, novel designs, mechanical transmissions, linkages and manipulators, micro-mechanisms, teaching methods, history of mechanism science and industrial and non-industrial applications. This volume will also serve as an interesting reference for European activity in the fields of Mechanism and Machine Science as well as a source of inspiration for future works and developments.

  4. 6th International Conference on Mechanism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    This book collects the most recent advances in mechanism science and machine theory with application to engineering. It contains selected peer-reviewed papers of the sixth International Conference on Mechanism Science, held in Nantes, France, 20-23 September 2016, covering topics on mechanism design and synthesis, mechanics of robots, mechanism analysis, parallel manipulators, tensegrity mechanisms, cable mechanisms, control issues in mechanical systems, history of mechanisms, mechanisms for biomechanics and surgery and industrial and nonindustrial applications.

  5. XXII Fluid Mechanics Conference (KKMP2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers that have been presented at XXII Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXII FMC) held in Słok near Bełchatów in Poland during llth-14th September of 2016. The Conference is organized by Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Polish Academy of Sciences - Committee of Mechanics and Foun-dation for Development of Wroclaw University of Science and Technology. Let us recall some historical facts: Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, which makes a total of forty-two years. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. We have already met in Bełchatów 10 years ago (XVII KKMP). It was a successful meeting. Since then the National Conference on Fluid Mechanics has changed title and has started to be named Fluid Mechanics Conference in the hopes that it will attract more participants from other countries. English became the Conference's first language and we started to invite world leading scientists - working in the field of fluid mechanics. At the 2006 conference we hosted for the first time prof. Keith Moffatt from the Cambridge University. In this year prof. Moffatt once again promised us to arrive to Bełchatów. The whole fluid mechanics community celebrates 9 2 anniversary of his birthday. So let us also wish happy anniversary to prof. Moffatt. In the mean time we had to pay last respects to our collages. Prof. Prosnak who is regarded as a founder of the Notational Conference on Fluid Mechanics and is well known through his books. Prof. Puzyrewski who was present at all conferences so far. He was providing via his discussions a special value to these conferences, and our colleague prof. Konrad Bajer who was intended to be the organizer and host of the present conference. Short memories to them will be given during the opening ceremony. Conference topics include, but are not limited

  6. Prostate cancer: ESMO Consensus Conference Guidelines 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horwich, A.; Hugosson, J.; de Reijke, T.; Wiegel, T.; Fizazi, K.; Kataja, V.; Parker, Chris; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Berthold, Dominik; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Carlsson, Sigrid; Daugaard, Gedske; de Meerleer, Gert; Dearnaley, David; Fizazi, Karim; Fonteyne, Valérie; Gillessen, Silke; Heinrich, Daniel; Horwich, Alan; Hugosson, Jonas; Kataja, Vesa; Kwiatkowski, Maciej; Nilsson, Sten; Padhani, Anwar; Papandreou, Christos; Roobol, Monique; Sella, Avishay; Valdagni, Riccardo; van der Kwast, Theo; Verhagen, Paul; Wiegel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The first ESMO Consensus Conference on prostate cancer was held in Zurich, Switzerland, on 17-19 November 2011, with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals including experts in methodological aspects. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically

  7. First Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Anna; Perucho, Manuel; Esteller, Manel; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer (BCEC) entitled “Challenges, opportunities and perspectives” took place November 21–22, 2013 in Barcelona. The 2013 BCEC is the first edition of a series of annual conferences jointly organized by five leading research centers in Barcelona. These centers are the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer (IMPPC), the Biomedical Campus Bellvitge with its Program of Epigenetics and Cancer Biology (PEBC), the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), the Institute for Biomedical Research (IRB), and the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB). Manuel Perucho and Marcus Buschbeck from the Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer put together the scientific program of the first conference broadly covering all aspects of epigenetic research ranging from fundamental molecular research to drug and biomarker development and clinical application. In one and a half days, 23 talks and 50 posters were presented to a completely booked out audience counting 270 participants. PMID:24413145

  8. Decreased internalisation of erbB1 mutants in lung cancer is linked with a mechanism conferring sensitivity to gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, B S; Griffiths, G J; Benson, R; Kenyon, D; Lazzara, M; Swinton, J; Beck, S; Hickinson, M; Beusmans, J M; Lauffenburger, D; de Graaf, D

    2006-11-01

    A majority of gefitinib (IRESSA)-responsive tumours in non-small cell lung cancer have been found to carry mutations in ErbB1. Previously, it has been observed that internalisation-deficient ErbB1 receptors are strong drivers of oncogenesis. Using a computational model of ErbB1 trafficking and signalling, it is found that a deficiency in ErbB1 internalisation is sufficient to explain the observed signalling phenotype of these gefitinib-responsive ErbB1 mutants in lung cancer cell lines. Experimental tests confirm that gefitinib-sensitive cell lines with and without ErbB1 mutations exhibit markedly slower internalisation rates than gefitinib-insensitive cell lines. Moreover, the computational model demonstrates that reduced ErbB1 internalisation rates are mechanistically linked to upregulated AKT signalling. Experimentally it is confirmed that impaired internalisation of ErbB1 is associated with increased AKT activity, which can be blocked by gefitinib. On the basis of these experimental and computational results, it is surmised that gefitinib sensitivity is a marker of a reliance on AKT signalling for cell survival that may be brought about by impaired ErbB1 internalisation.

  9. 4th International Conference on Nonlinear Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, G

    2003-01-01

    The mechanics of electromagnetic materials and structures has been developing rapidly with extensive applications in, e. g. , electronics industry, nuclear engineering, and smart materials and structures. Researchers in this interdisciplinary field are with diverse background and motivation. The Symposium on the Mechanics of Electromagnetic Materials and Structures of the Fourth International Conference on Nonlinear Mechanics in Shanghai, China in August 13-16, 2002 provided an opportunity for an intimate gathering of researchers and exchange of ideas. This volume contains papers based on most of the presentations at the symposium, and articles from a few invited contributors. These papers reflect some of the recent activities in the mechanics of electromagnetic materials and structures. The first twelve papers are in the order in which they were listed in the program of the conference. These are followed by six invited papers in alphabetical order of the last names of the first authors. We would like to exte...

  10. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mechanical Engineering and Technology

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Mechanical Engineering and Technology, held on London, UK, November 24-25, 2011.   Mechanical engineering technology is the application of physical principles and current technological developments to the creation of useful machinery and operation design. Technologies such as solid models may be used as the basis for finite element analysis (FEA) and / or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of the design. Through the application of computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), the models may also be used directly by software to create "instructions" for the manufacture of objects represented by the models, through computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining or other automated processes, without the need for intermediate drawings.   This volume covers the subject areas of mechanical engineering and technology, and also covers interdisciplinary subject areas of computers, communications, control and automation...

  11. Nuclear Mechanics in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, cancer metastasis remains an incompletely understood process that is as complex as it is devastating. In recent years, there has been an increasing push to investigate the biomechanical aspects of tumorigenesis, complementing the research on genetic and biochemical changes. In contrast to the high genetic variability encountered in cancer cells, almost all metastatic cells are subject to the same physical constraints as they leave the primary tumor, invade surrounding tissues, transit through the circulatory system, and finally infiltrate new tissues. Advances in live cell imaging and other biophysical techniques, including measurements of subcellular mechanics, have yielded stunning new insights into the physics of cancer cells. While much of this research has been focused on the mechanics of the cytoskeleton and the cellular microenvironment, it is now emerging that the mechanical properties of the cell nucleus and its connection to the cytoskeleton may play a major role in cancer metastasis, as deformation of the large and stiff nucleus presents a substantial obstacle during the passage through the dense interstitial space and narrow capillaries. Here, we present an overview of the molecular components that govern the mechanical properties of the nucleus and we discuss how changes in nuclear structure and composition observed in many cancers can modulate nuclear mechanics and promote metastatic processes. Improved insights into this interplay between nuclear mechanics and metastatic progression may have powerful implications in cancer diagnostics and therapy and may reveal novel therapeutic targets for pharmacological inhibition of cancer cell invasion. PMID:24563360

  12. 2014 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Korach, Chad; Zavattieri, Pablo; Prorok, Barton; Grande-Allen, K; Carroll, Jay; Daly, Samantha; Qi, H; Antoun, Bonnie; Hall, Richard; Lu, Hongbing; Arzoumanidis, Alex; Silberstein, Meredith; Furmanski, Jevan; Amirkhizi, Alireza; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Joamin; Jin, Helena; Sciammarella, Cesar; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Lamberti, Luciano; Sottos, Nancy; Rowlands, Robert; Dannemann, Kathryn; Tandon, Gyaneshwar; Song, Bo; Casem, Daniel; Kimberley, Jamie; Starman, LaVern; Hay, Jennifer; Shaw, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, the seventh volume of eight from the Conference, brings together contributions to this important area of research and engineering.  The collection presents early findings and case studies on a wide range of areas, including: Soft Tissues Mechanics Natural Materials & Bio-Inspiration Tissue Engineering Cells Mechanics

  13. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, D; Ng, T; Ahmad, C; Alfakeeh, A; Alruzug, I; Biagi, J; Brierley, J; Chaudhury, P; Cleary, S; Colwell, B; Cripps, C; Dawson, L A; Dorreen, M; Ferland, E; Galiatsatos, P; Girard, S; Gray, S; Halwani, F; Kopek, N; Mahmud, A; Martel, G; Robillard, L; Samson, B; Seal, M; Siddiqui, J; Sideris, L; Snow, S; Thirwell, M; Vickers, M; Goodwin, R; Goel, R; Hsu, T; Tsvetkova, E; Ward, B; Asmis, T

    2016-12-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016 was held in Montreal, Quebec, 5-7 February. Experts in radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, and infectious diseases involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses multiple topics: ■ Follow-up and survivorship of patients with resected colorectal cancer■ Indications for liver metastasectomy■ Treatment of oligometastases by stereotactic body radiation therapy■ Treatment of borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer■ Transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma■ Infectious complications of antineoplastic agents.

  14. The review conference mechanism in nuclear law: issues and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoiber, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to assess the major issues arising from reliance on the review conference mechanism as a measure for enhancing the effectiveness of multilateral legal instruments, particularly those in the nuclear field. In view of the perceived failure of the 2005 review conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and the need to avoid a similar result at the upcoming 2010 review conference, it is hoped that this analysis will provide a timely review of the review conference mechanism. (N.C.)

  15. International Conference on Research and Innovations in Mechanical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Paramjit; Singh, Harwinder; Brar, Gurinder

    2014-01-01

    This book comprises the proceedings of International Conference on Research and Innovations in Mechanical Engineering (ICRIME 2013) organized by Guru Nanak Dev Engineering College, Ludhiana with support from AICTE, TEQIP, DST and PTU, Jalandhar. This international conference served as a premier forum for communication of new advances and research results in the fields of mechanical engineering. The proceedings reflect the conference’s emphasis on strong methodological approaches and focus on applications within the domain of mechanical engineering. The contents of this volume aim to highlight new theoretical and experimental findings in the fields of mechanical engineering and closely related fields, including interdisciplinary fields such as robotics and mechatronics.

  16. International Conference on Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The International Conference on Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics was hosted by the University of Central Florida in Orlando from March 17-19, 1999. One of the conference days was dedicated to Professor V. Lakshmikantham in th honor of his 75 birthday. 50 well established professionals (in differential equations, nonlinear analysis, numerical analysis, and nonlinear mechanics) attended the conference from 13 countries. Twelve of the attendees delivered hour long invited talks and remaining thirty-eight presented invited forty-five minute talks. In each of these talks, the focus was on the recent developments in differential equations and nonlinear mechanics and their applications. This book consists of 29 papers based on the invited lectures, and I believe that it provides a good selection of advanced topics of current interest in differential equations and nonlinear mechanics. I am indebted to the Department of Mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Mechanical, Materials and Ae...

  17. XII International Conference on the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Bílek, Martin; Žabka, Petr

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the most recent advances in the research of machines and mechanisms. It collects 54 reviewed papers presented at the XII International Conference on the Theory of Machines and mechanisms (TMM 2016) held in Liberec, Czech Republic, September 6-8, 2016. This volume offers an international selection of the most important new results and developments, grouped in six different parts, representing a well-balanced overview, and spanning the general theory of machines and mechanisms, through analysis and synthesis of planar and spatial mechanisms, linkages and cams, robots and manipulators, dynamics of machines and mechanisms, rotor dynamics, computational mechanics, vibration and noise in machines, optimization of mechanisms and machines, mechanisms of textile machines, mechatronics to the control and monitoring systems of machines. This conference is traditionally organised every four year under the auspices of the international organisation IFToMM and the Czech Society for Mechanics.

  18. The Joint International Conference of the XII International Conference on Mechanisms and Mechanical Transmissions (MTM) and the XXIII International Conference on Robotics (Robotics ’16)

    CERN Document Server

    Lovasz, Erwin-Christian; Hüsing, Mathias; Maniu, Inocentiu; Gruescu, Corina

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the Joint International Conference of the XII International Conference on Mechanisms and Mechanical Transmissions (MTM) and the XXIII International Conference on Robotics (Robotics ’16), that was held in Aachen, Germany, October 26th-27th, 2016. It contains applications of mechanisms and transmissions in several modern technical fields such as mechatronics, biomechanics, machines, micromachines, robotics and apparatus. In connection with these fields, the work combines the theoretical results with experimental testing. The book presents reviewed papers developed by researchers specialized in mechanisms analysis and synthesis, dynamics of mechanisms and machines, mechanical transmissions, biomechanics, precision mechanics, mechatronics, micromechanisms and microactuators, computational and experimental methods, CAD in mechanism and machine design, mechanical design of robot architecture, parallel robots, mobile robots, micro and nano robots, sensors and actuators in ro...

  19. 2012 International Conference on Mechanical and Electronic Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; ICMEE2012; Advances in Mechanical and Electronic Engineering v.2

    2012-01-01

    This book includes the volume 2 of the proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Mechanical and Electronic Engineering(ICMEE2012), held at June 23-24,2012 in Hefei, China. The conference provided a rare opportunity to bring together worldwide researchers who are working in the fields. This volume 2 is focusing on Mechatronic Engineering and Technology,  Electronic Engineering and Electronic Information Technology .

  20. 2012 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Crone, Wendy; Jin, Helena; Sciammarella, Cesar; Furlong, Cosme; Furlong, Cosme; Chalivendra, Vijay; Song, Bo; Casem, Daniel; Antoun, Bonnie; Qi, H; Hall, Richard; Tandon, GP; Lu, Hongbing; Lu, Charles; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Shaw, Gordon; Prorok, Barton; Barthelat, François; Korach, Chad; Grande-Allen, K; Lipke, Elizabeth; Lykofatitits, George; Zavattieri, Pablo; Starman, LaVern; Patterson, Eann; Backman, David; Cloud, Gary; Vol.1 Dynamic Behavior of Materials; Vol.2 Challenges in Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials and Processes in Conventional and Multifunctional Materials; Vol.3 Imaging Methods for Novel Materials and Challenging Applications; Vol.4 Experimental and Applied Mechanics; Vol.5 Mechanics of Biological Systems and Materials; Vol.6 MEMS and Nanotechnology; Vol.7 Composite Materials and Joining Technologies for Composites

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Volume 4: Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, the fourth volume of seven from the Conference, brings together 54 contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Experimental and Applied Mechanics, including papers on:  Fracture & Fatigue Microscale & Microstructural Effects in Fatigue & Fracture Material Applications Composite Characterization Using Digital Image Correlation Techniques Multi-Scale Simulation and Testing of Composites Residual Stress Inverse Problems/Hybrid Methods Nano-Composites Microstructure Material Characterization Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification Impact Behavior of Composites.

  1. Mechanisms of Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI works to understand the mechanisms of cancer cell growth, survival, and metastasis. Get more information on how NCI supports basic scientific research that will lead to new ways to prevent, detect, and treat cancer.

  2. Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Dormancy--Another Hallmark of Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Albert C; Ramaswamy, Sridhar

    2015-12-01

    Disease relapse in cancer patients many years after clinical remission, often referred to as cancer dormancy, is well documented but remains an incompletely understood phenomenon on the biologic level. Recent reviews have summarized potential models that can explain this phenomenon, including angiogenic, immunologic, and cellular dormancy. We focus on mechanisms of cellular dormancy as newer biologic insights have enabled better understanding of this process. We provide a historical context, synthesize current advances in the field, and propose a mechanistic framework that treats cancer cell dormancy as a dynamic cell state conferring a fitness advantage to an evolving malignancy under stress. Cellular dormancy appears to be an active process that can be toggled through a variety of signaling mechanisms that ultimately downregulate the RAS/MAPK and PI(3)K/AKT pathways, an ability that is preserved even in cancers that constitutively depend on these pathways for their growth and survival. Just as unbridled proliferation is a key hallmark of cancer, the ability of cancer cells to become quiescent may be critical to evolving malignancies, with implications for understanding cancer initiation, progression, and treatment resistance. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. 2016 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberson, Leslie; Kimberley, Jamie; Korach, Chad; Tekalur, Srinivasan; Zavattieri, Pablo; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Lamberti, Luciano; Sciammarella, Cesar; Ralph, W; Singh, Raman; Tandon, Gyaneshwar; Thakre, Piyush; Zavattieri, Pablo; Zhu, Yong; Zehnder, Alan; Zehnder, Alan; Carroll, Jay; Hazeli, Kavan; Berke, Ryan; Pataky, Garrett; Cavalli, Matthew; Beese, Alison; Xia, Shuman; Starman, La; Hay, Jennifer; Karanjgaokar, Nikhil; Quinn, Simon; Balandraud, Xavier; Cloud, Gary; Patterson, Eann; Backman, David

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Behavior of Materials, Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the 2016 SEM Annual Conference& Exposition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, the first volume of ten from the Conference, brings together contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Experimental Mechanics, including papers on: Quantitative Visualization Fracture & Fragmentation Dynamic Behavior of Low Impedance Materials Shock & Blast Dynamic Behavior of Composites Novel Testing Techniques Hybrid Experimental & Computational Methods Dynamic Behavior of Geo-materials General Material Behavior.

  4. 5th European Conference on Mechanisms Science (EUCOMES)

    CERN Document Server

    Viadero, Fernando; New Trends in Mechanism and Machine Science : from Fundamentals to Industrial Applications

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the most recent research in the mechanism and machine science field and its applications. The topics covered include: theoretical kinematics, computational kinematics, mechanism design, experimental mechanics, mechanics of robots, dynamics of machinery, dynamics of multi-body systems, control issues of mechanical systems, mechanisms for biomechanics, novel designs, mechanical transmissions, linkages and manipulators, micro-mechanisms, teaching methods, history of mechanism science and industrial and non-industrial applications. This volume consists of the Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Mechanisms Science (EUCOMES), that was held in Guimarães, Portugal, from September 16 – 20, 2014. The EUCOMES is the main forum for the European community working in Mechanisms and Machine Science.

  5. Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Dormancy – Another Hallmark of Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Albert C.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Disease relapse in cancer patients many years after clinical remission, often referred to as cancer dormancy, is well documented but remains an incompletely understood phenomenon on the biological level. Recent reviews have summarized potential models that can explain this phenomenon, including angiogenic, immunologic, and cellular dormancy. We focus on mechanisms of cellular dormancy as newer biological insights have enabled better understanding of this process. We provide a historical context, synthesize current advances in the field, and propose a mechanistic framework that treats cancer cell dormancy as a dynamic cell state conferring a fitness advantage to an evolving malignancy under stress. Cellular dormancy appears to be an active process that can be toggled through a variety of signaling mechanisms that ultimately down-regulate the Ras/MAPK and PI(3)K/AKT pathways, an ability that is preserved even in cancers that constitutively depend on these pathways for their growth and survival. Just as unbridled proliferation is a key hallmark of cancer, the ability of cancer cells to become quiescent may be critical to evolving malignancies, with implications for understanding cancer initiation, progression, and treatment resistance. PMID:26354021

  6. Light deficiency confers breast cancer risk by endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2012-09-01

    North-America and northern European countries exhibit the highest incidence rate of breast cancer, whereas women in southern regions are relatively protected. Immigrants from low cancer incidence regions to high-incidence areas might exhibit similarly higher or excessive cancer risk as compared with the inhabitants of their adoptive country. Additional cancer risk may be conferred by incongruence between their biological characteristics and foreign environment. Many studies established the racial/ethnic disparities in the risk and nature of female breast cancer in United States between African-American and Caucasian women. Mammary tumors in black women are diagnosed at earlier age, and are associated with higher rate of mortality as compared with cancers of white cases. Results of studies on these ethnic/racial differences in breast cancer incidence suggest that excessive pigmentation of dark skinned women results in a relative light-deficiency. Poor light exposure may explain the deleterious metabolic and hormonal alterations; such as insulin resistance, deficiencies of estrogen, thyroxin and vitamin-D conferring excessive cancer risk. The more northern the location of an adoptive country the higher the cancer risk for dark skinned immigrants. Recognition of the deleterious systemic effects of darkness and excessive melatonin synthesis enables cancer protection treatment for people living in light-deficient environment. Recent patents provide new methods for the prevention of hormonal and metabolic abnormities.

  7. 2010 Thin Film & Small Scale Mechanical Behavior Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Thomas Balk

    2010-07-30

    Over the past decades, it has been well established that the mechanical behavior of materials changes when they are confined geometrically at least in one dimension to small scale. It is the aim of the 2010 Gordon Conference on 'Thin Film and Small Scale Mechanical Behavior' to discuss cutting-edge research on elastic, plastic and time-dependent deformation as well as degradation mechanisms like fracture, fatigue and wear at small scales. As in the past, the conference will benefit from contributions from fundamental studies of physical mechanisms linked to material science and engineering reaching towards application in modern applications ranging from optical and microelectronic devices and nano- or micro-electrical mechanical systems to devices for energy production and storage. The conference will feature entirely new testing methodologies and in situ measurements as well as recent progress in atomistic and micromechanical modeling. Particularly, emerging topics in the area of energy conversion and storage, such as material for batteries will be highlighted. The study of small-scale mechanical phenomena in systems related to energy production, conversion or storage offer an enticing opportunity to materials scientists, who can provide new insight and investigate these phenomena with methods that have not previously been exploited.

  8. 2nd Conference on Mechanisms, Transmissions and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Charles; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian

    2014-01-01

    The Second Conference on Mechanisms, Transmissions and Applications - MeTrApp 2013 was organised by the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of the Basque Country (Spain) under the patronage of the IFToMM Technical Committees Linkages and Mechanical Controls and Micromachines and the Spanish Association of Mechanical Engineering.  The aim of the workshop was to bring together researchers, scientists, industry experts and students to provide, in a friendly and stimulating environment, the opportunity to exchange know-how and promote collaboration in the field of Mechanism and Machine Science.  The topics treated in this volume are mechanism and machine design, biomechanics, mechanical transmissions, mechatronics, computational and experimental methods, dynamics of mechanisms and micromechanisms and microactuators.

  9. Second GAMM-conference on numerical methods in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschel, E.H.; Geller, W.

    1977-01-01

    Proceedings of the Second GAMM-Conference on Numerical Methods in Fluid Mechanics held at the DFVLR, Koeln, October 11 to 13, 1977. The conference was attended by approximately 100 participants from 13 European countries representing quite different fields ranging from Aerodynamics to Nuclear Energy. At the meeting 34 papers were presented, many of them concerned with basic problems in the field. It was well demonstrated that Numerical Methods in Fluid Mechanics do not only serve as means for the computation of flow fields but also as tools in the analysis of fluid mechanical phenomena, a role of large future importance if one considers the complexity especially of three-dimensional flows. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Molecular mechanisms of cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Georg F

    2007-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Section I. General Mechanisms of Transformation 1. Theories of Carcinogenesis...

  11. International Joint Conference on Mechanics, Design Engineering & Advanced Manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Nigrelli, Vincenzo; Oliveri, Salvatore; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Rizzuti, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    This book gathers papers presented at the International Joint Conference on Mechanics, Design Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing (JCM 2016), held on 14-16 September, 2016, in Catania, Italy. It reports on cutting-edge topics in product design and manufacturing, such as industrial methods for integrated product and process design; innovative design; and computer-aided design. Further topics covered include virtual simulation and reverse engineering; additive manufacturing; product manufacturing; engineering methods in medicine and education; representation techniques; and nautical, aeronautics and aerospace design and modeling. The book is divided into eight main sections, reflecting the focus and primary themes of the conference. The contributions presented here will not only provide researchers, engineers and experts in a range of industrial engineering subfields with extensive information to support their daily work; they are also intended to stimulate new research directions, advanced applications of t...

  12. mTOR Signaling Confers Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Yakir; Hall, Michael N

    2016-11-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Extensive research over decades has led to the development of therapies that target cancer-specific signaling pathways. However, the clinical benefits of such drugs are at best transient due to tumors displaying intrinsic or adaptive resistance. The underlying compensatory pathways that allow cancer cells to circumvent a drug blockade are poorly understood. We review here recent studies suggesting that mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is a major compensatory pathway conferring resistance to many cancer drugs. mTOR-mediated resistance can be cell-autonomous or non-cell-autonomous. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling should be monitored routinely in tumors and that an mTOR inhibitor should be considered as a co-therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  14. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference......, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  15. 2014 Joint Conference on Mechanical Design Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Daidie, Alain; Eynard, Benoit; Paredes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Covering key topics in the field such as technological innovation, human-centered sustainable engineering and manufacturing, and manufacture at a global scale in a virtual world, this book addresses both advanced techniques and industrial applications of key research in interactive design and manufacturing. Featuring the full papers presented at the 2014 Joint Conference on Mechanical Design Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing, which took place in June 2014 in Toulouse, France, it presents recent research and industrial success stories related to implementing interactive design and manufacturing solutions.

  16. 2013 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Casem, Dan; Kimberley, Jamie; Barthelat, François; Zavattieri, Pablo; Antoun, Bonnie; Qi, H; Hall, Richard; Tandon, G; Lu, Hongbing; Lu, Charles; Furmanski, Jevan; Amirkhizi, Alireza; Korach, Chad; Prorok, Barton; Grande-Allen, K; III, Gordon; Prorok, Barton; Starman, LaVern; Furlong, Cosme; Tandon, G; Tekalur, Srinivasan; Ralph, Carter; Sottos, Nancy; Blaiszik, Benjamin; Jay, Carroll; Rossi, Marco; Sasso, Marco; Connesson, Nathanael; Singh, Raman; DeWald, Adrian; Backman, David; Gloeckner, Paul; Jin, Helena; Sciammarella, Cesar; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Lamberti, Luciano; Vol.1 Dynamic Behavior of Materials; Vol.2 Challenges In Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials and Processes in Conventional and Multifunctional Materials; Vol.3 Advancement of Optical Methods in Experimental Mechanics; Vol.4 Mechanics of Biological Systems and Materials; Vol.5 MEMS and Nanotechnology; Vol.6 Experimental Mechanics of Composite, Hybrid, and Multifunctional Materials; Vol.7 Fracture and Fatigue; Vol.8 Residual Stress, Thermomechanics & Infrared Imaging, Hybrid Techniques and Inverse Problems; SEM 2013

    2014-01-01

    This critical collection examines a range of topics in fracture and fatigue, including environmental and loading effects in fracture and fatigue and DIC and fracture, as presented in early findings and case studies from the Proceedings of the 2013 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics. The collection includes papers in the following general technical research areas: • Microstructural Effects in Fatigue & Fracture • Fracture of Interfaces • Fracture of Composites and Interface Cracks • Fatigue & Fracture: Environmental & Loading Eff ects • Fracture & Digital Image Correlation Fracture and Fatigue

  17. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, M K; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Aoki, D

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC), reached at the fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), which was held in Tokyo, Japan, in November 2015. Three important questions were identified: (i) What are the subgroups for clinical trials i...... including pre-defined patient reported outcomes (PROs), time to second subsequent therapy (TSST), or time until definitive deterioration of quality of life (TUDD)....

  18. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  19. Role of genetic testing for inherited prostate cancer risk: Philadelphia prostate cancer consensus conference 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Giri (Veda); Knudsen, K.E. (Karen E.); Kelly, W.K. (William K.); Abida, W. (Wassim); G.L. Andriole (Gerald); C.H. Bangma (Chris); Bekelman, J.E. (Justin E.); Benson, M.C. (Mitchell C.); A. Blanco (Amie); Burnett, A. (Arthur); Catalona, W.J. (William J.); Cooney, K.A. (Kathleen A.); M.R. Cooperberg (Matthew); D. Crawford (David); Den, R.B. (Robert B.); Dicker, A.P. (Adam P.); S. Eggener (Scott); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); Freedman, M.L. (Matthew L.); F. Hamdy (Freddie); Hoffman-Censits, J. (Jean); Hurwitz, M.D. (Mark D.); Hyatt, C. (Colette); Isaacs, W.B. (William B.); Kane, C.J. (Christopher J.); Kantoff, P. (Philip); R.J. Karnes (Jeffrey); Karsh, L.I. (Lawrence I.); Klein, E.A. (Eric A.); Lin, D.W. (Daniel W.); Loughlin, K.R. (Kevin R.); Lu-Yao, G. (Grace); Malkowicz, S.B. (S. Bruce); Mann, M.J. (Mark J.); Mark, J.R. (James R.); McCue, P.A. (Peter A.); Miner, M.M. (Martin M.); Morgan, T. (Todd); Moul, J.W. (Judd W.); Myers, R.E. (Ronald E.); Nielsen, S.M. (Sarah M.); Obeid, E. (Elias); Pavlovich, C.P. (Christian P.); Peiper, S.C. (Stephen C.); D.F. Penson (David F.); D.P. Petrylak (Daniel P); Pettaway, C.A. (Curtis A.); R. Pilarski (Robert); P. Pinto (Peter); Poage, W. (Wendy); Raj, G.V. (Ganesh V.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M. Robson (Mark); Rosenberg, M.T. (Matt T.); Sandler, H. (Howard); A.O. Sartor (Oliver); Schaeffer, E. (Edward); Schwartz, G.F. (Gordon F.); Shahin, M.S. (Mark S.); N.D. Shore (Neal); Shuch, B. (Brian); Soule, H.R. (Howard R.); S.A. Tomlins (Scott A); Trabulsi, E.J. (Edouard J.); Uzzo, R. (Robert); Griend, D.J.V. (Donald J. Vander); P.C. Walsh (Patrick); Weil, C.J. (Carol J.); Wender, R. (Richard); Gomella, L.G. (Leonard G.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Guidelines are limited for genetic testing for prostate cancer (PCA). The goal of this conference was to develop an expert consensus-driven working framework for comprehensive genetic evaluation of inherited PCA in the multigene testing era addressing genetic counseling,

  20. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eCalero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 involved in the production of the amyloid  peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated to common genetic variants that have been associated to sporadic AD. Besides APOE, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR~4, the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated to AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes.

  1. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancer eventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexia and a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemic inflammation, negative protein and energy balance, and an involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidious syndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patient quality of life, but also is associated with poor responses to chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia is still largely an underestimated and untreated condition, despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported to be involved in its development, with a number of cytokines postulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistent catabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, including orexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation of symptoms and reduction of the distress of patients and families rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapies for the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinary approach. Combination therapy with diet modification and/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceutical agents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agents are reported to have improved survival rates as well as quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emerging understanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia, the current treatment options including multidisciplinary combination therapies, as well an update on new and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25897346

  2. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jürg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific and targeted interventions. We aim to establish a European consensus guideline on mechanical ventilation of critically children. The European Society for Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care initiated a consensus conference of international European experts in paediatric mechanical ventilation to provide recommendations using the Research and Development/University of California, Los Angeles, appropriateness method. An electronic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed using a combination of medical subject heading terms and text words related to mechanical ventilation and disease-specific terms. The Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC) consisted of a panel of 15 experts who developed and voted on 152 recommendations related to the following topics: (1) general recommendations, (2) monitoring, (3) targets of oxygenation and ventilation, (4) supportive measures, (5) weaning and extubation readiness, (6) normal lungs, (7) obstructive diseases, (8) restrictive diseases, (9) mixed diseases, (10) chronically ventilated patients, (11) cardiac patients and (12) lung hypoplasia syndromes. There were 142 (93.4%) recommendations with "strong agreement". The final iteration of the recommendations had none with equipoise or disagreement. These recommendations should help to harmonise the approach to paediatric mechanical ventilation and can be proposed as a standard-of-care applicable in daily clinical practice and clinical research.

  3. 2016 IFToMM Asian Conference on Mechanism and Machine Science (IFToMM Asian MMS 2016) & 2016 International Conference on Mechanism and Machine Science (CCMMS 2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nianfeng; Huang, Yanjiang

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the latest research results in mechanism and machine science, intended to reinforce and improve the role of mechanical systems in a variety of applications in daily life and industry. Gathering more than 120 academic papers, it addresses topics including: Computational kinematics, Machine elements, Actuators, Gearing and transmissions, Linkages and cams, Mechanism design, Dynamics of machinery, Tribology, Vehicle mechanisms, dynamics and design, Reliability, Experimental methods in mechanisms, Robotics and mechatronics, Biomechanics, Micro/nano mechanisms and machines, Medical/welfare devices, Nature and machines, Design methodology, Reconfigurable mechanisms and reconfigurable manipulators, and Origami mechanisms. This is the fourth installment in the IFToMM Asian conference series on Mechanism and Machine Science (ASIAN MMS 2016). The ASIAN MMS conference initiative was launched to provide a forum mainly for the Asian community working in Mechanism and Machine Science, in order to ...

  4. MENA Confers Resistance to Paclitaxel in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Madeleine J; Barbier, Lucie; Schäfer, Claudia; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Miller, Miles A; Han, Sangyoon; Jonas, Oliver; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2017-01-01

    Taxane therapy remains the standard of care for triple-negative breast cancer. However, high frequencies of recurrence and progression in treated patients indicate that metastatic breast cancer cells can acquire resistance to this drug. The actin regulatory protein MENA and particularly its invasive isoform, MENA INV , are established drivers of metastasis. MENA INV expression is significantly correlated with metastasis and poor outcome in human patients with breast cancer. We investigated whether MENA isoforms might play a role in driving resistance to chemotherapeutics. We find that both MENA and MENA INV confer resistance to the taxane paclitaxel, but not to the widely used DNA-damaging agents doxorubicin or cisplatin. Furthermore, paclitaxel treatment does not attenuate growth of MENA INV -driven metastatic lesions. Mechanistically, MENA isoform expression alters the ratio of dynamic and stable microtubule populations in paclitaxel-treated cells. MENA expression also increases MAPK signaling in response to paclitaxel treatment. Decreasing ERK phosphorylation by co-treatment with MEK inhibitor restored paclitaxel sensitivity by driving microtubule stabilization in MENA isoform-expressing cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of taxane resistance in highly metastatic breast cancer cells and identify a combination therapy to overcome such resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 143-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Meeting Report of the Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference in Beijing, China, October 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G; Cui, Hengmi; Jen, Jin; Fuks, Francois; Brock, Malcolm V; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Croce, Carlo; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Guo, Mingzhou

    2017-07-01

    Fifth International Cancer Epigenetics Conference, Beijing, China, 21-23 October 2016 This meeting reported many new findings in the field of cancer epigenetics, including basic science, translational and clinical studies. In this report, we summarize some of the main advancements and prospects in cancer epigenetics presented at this meeting.

  6. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG): clinical trial design for rare ovarian tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leary, A. F.; Quinn, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Coleman, R. L.; Kohn, E.; Sugiyama, T.; Glasspool, R.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Colombo, N.; Bacon, M.; Zeimet, A.; Westermann, A.; Gomez-Garcia, E.; Provencher, D.; Welch, S.; Small, W.; Millan, D.; Okamoto, A.; Stuart, G.; Ochiai, K.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements on designing clinical trials in rare ovarian tumours reached at the fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC) held in Tokyo, November 2015. Three important questions were identified concerning rare ovarian tumours (rare epithelial ovarian

  7. Meeting report on the ASM Conference on Mechanisms of Interbacterial Cooperation and Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lories, Bram; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Steenackers, Hans P

    2017-08-14

    The ASM Conference on Mechanisms of Interbacterial Cooperation and Competition was held in Washington DC, from 1 to 4 March 2017. The conference provided an international forum for sociomicrobiologists from different disciplines to present and discuss new findings. The meeting covered a wide range of topics, spanning molecular mechanisms, ecology, evolution, computation and manipulation of interbacterial interactions, and encompassed social communities in medicine, the natural environment, and industry. This report summarizes the presentations and emerging themes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research 2011 (ICMER2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Rosli

    2012-09-01

    The year 2010 represented a significant milestone in the history of the Mechanical Engineering community with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (National Conference in Mechanical Engineering for Research, 1st and 2nd NCMER) at Universiti Malaysia Pahang on 26-27 May and 3-4 December 2010. The conferences attracted a large number of delegates from different premier academic and research institutions in the country to participate and share their research experiences at the conference. The International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011) followed on from the first and second conferences due to good support from researchers. The ICMER 2011 is a good platform for researchers and postgraduate students to present their latest finding in research. The conference covers a wide range of topics including the internal combustion engine, machining processes, heat and mass transfer, fuel, biomechanical analysis, aerodynamic analysis, thermal comfort, computational techniques, design and simulation, automotive transmission, optimization techniques, hybrid electric vehicles, engine vibration, heat exchangers, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, green energy, vehicle dynamics renewable energy, combustion, design, product development, advanced experimentation techniques, to name but a few. The international conference has helped to bridge the gap between researchers working at different institutions and in different countries to share their knowledge and has helped to motivate young scientists with their research. This has also given some clear direction for further research from the deliberations of the conference. Several people have contributed in different ways to the success of the conference. We thank the keynote speakers and all authors of the contributed papers, for the cooperation rendered to us in the publication of the CD conference proceedings. In particular, we would like to place on record our

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Singh, Saurabh; Rai, Yogesh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  10. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P.S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M.R.; Soule, H.R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T.M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A.M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I.D.; Santis, M. de; Drake, C.G.; Eeles, R.A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M.E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N.D.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Logothetis, C.J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W.K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A.R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Scher, H.I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N.D.; Small, E.J.; Sternberg, C.N.; Suzuki, H; Sweeney, C.J.; Tannock, I.F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant

  11. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L. S.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne M. G. R.; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brouwers, Barbara; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Collée, J. Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Lai, Kah-Nyin; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Milne, Roger L.; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Oosterwijk, Jan J. C.; Osorio, Ana; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhenius, Valerie; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Swerdlow, Anthony; teo, Soo H.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; van Asperen, Christi J.; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Leary, Jennifer; Walker, Logan; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Varesco, Liliana; Moghadasi, Setareh; Easton, Douglas F.; Spurdle, Amanda; Devilee, Peter; Vrieling, Harry; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Goldgar, David E.; Carreira, Aura; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk

  12. 3rd IEEE/IFToMM International Conference on Reconfigurable Mechanisms and Robots

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xianwen; Dai, Jian; ReMAR 2015; Advances in Reconfigurable Mechanisms and Robots II

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the most recent advances in the research and applications of reconfigurable mechanisms and robots. It collects 93 independently reviewed papers presented at the Third ASME/IFToMM International Conference on Reconfigurable Mechanisms and Robots (ReMAR 2015) held in Beijing, China, 20-22 July 2015. The conference papers are organized into seven parts to cover the reconfiguration theory, topology, kinematics and design of reconfigurable mechanisms including reconfigurable parallel mechanisms. The most recent results on reconfigurable robots are presented including their analysis, design, simulation and control. Bio-inspired mechanisms are also explored in the challenging fields of rehabilitation and minimally invasive surgery. This book further addresses deployable mechanisms and origami-inspired mechanisms and showcases a wide range of successful applications of reconfigurable mechanisms and robots. Advances in Reconfigurable Mechanisms and Robots II should be of interest for researchers, eng...

  13. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals....... on the implementation of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 1043 patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours, and in 1991 patients with pN+ M0 tumours. RESULTS: Hospital volume, i.e. the number of rectal cancer surgical procedures performed per year, was the major predictor for MDT evaluation. Patients treated...... at hospitals with

  14. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  15. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). Methods: Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. The document was available to all Committee members as a web-based document customized for the consensus process. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by a topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each member commented and voted, sentence by sentence thrice. Sentences upon which an agreement was not reached after voting round no. 2 were openly debated during a Consensus Conference in Perugia (Italy) from 11 December to 13 December 2008. A hand-held televoting system collected the opinions of both the Committee members and the audience after each debate. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', and 'minimum consensus'. Results: The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only 3 (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Conclusions: This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines

  16. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC and investigated the synergize photothermal and immunological effects. Here, we improve the SWNT-GC nano system and design a new synergistic nano-particle, both have the photothermal effects and immunological effects. We investigate the therapeutic effects and detect the immune response with metastatic mouse tumor models. We also study the therapeutic mechanism after treatment in vitro and in vivo. With the enhancement of nano-materials on photothermal effects, laser treatment could destroy primary tumor and protect normal tissue with low dose laser irradiation. With the immunological effects of nano-materials, the treatment could trigger specific antitumor immune response, to eliminate the metastasis tumor. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the metastatic cancers.

  17. Disruptive environmental chemicals and cellular mechanisms that confer resistance to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Ali, Manaf; Barclay, Barry J; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; D'Abronzo, Leandro; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Ghosh, Paramita M; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J; Lee, Tae-Jin; Leung, Po Sing; Li, Lin; Luanpitpong, Suidjit; Ratovitski, Edward; Rojanasakul, Yon; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Romano, Simona; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Yedjou, Clement; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Salem, Hosni K; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Kim, Seo Yun; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-06-01

    Cell death is a process of dying within biological cells that are ceasing to function. This process is essential in regulating organism development, tissue homeostasis, and to eliminate cells in the body that are irreparably damaged. In general, dysfunction in normal cellular death is tightly linked to cancer progression. Specifically, the up-regulation of pro-survival factors, including oncogenic factors and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and the down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factors, including tumor suppressive factors, confers resistance to cell death in tumor cells, which supports the emergence of a fully immortalized cellular phenotype. This review considers the potential relevance of ubiquitous environmental chemical exposures that have been shown to disrupt key pathways and mechanisms associated with this sort of dysfunction. Specifically, bisphenol A, chlorothalonil, dibutyl phthalate, dichlorvos, lindane, linuron, methoxychlor and oxyfluorfen are discussed as prototypical chemical disruptors; as their effects relate to resistance to cell death, as constituents within environmental mixtures and as potential contributors to environmental carcinogenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 6th Conference on Design and Modeling of Mechanical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhfakh, Tahar; Daly, Hachmi; Aifaoui, Nizar; Chaari, Fakher

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a collection of original peer-reviewed contributions presented at the 6th International Congress on Design and Modeling of Mechanical Systems (CMSM’2015), held in Hammamet, Tunisia, from the 23rd to the 25th of March 2015. It reports on both recent research findings and innovative industrial applications in the fields of mechatronics and robotics, dynamics of mechanical systems, fluid structure interaction and vibroacoustics, modeling and analysis of materials and structures, and design and manufacturing of mechanical systems. Since its first edition in 2005, the CMSM Congress has been held every two years with the aim of bringing together specialists from universities and industry to present the state-of-the-art in research and applications, discuss the most recent findings and exchange and develop expertise in the field of design and modeling of mechanical systems. The CMSM Congress is jointly organized by three Tunisian research laboratories: the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of th...

  19. Phase imaging of mechanical properties of live cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Adam

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms by which cells respond to mechanical stimuli are essential for cell function yet not well understood. Many rheological tools have been developed to characterize cellular viscoelastic properties but these typically require direct mechanical contact, limiting their throughput. We have developed a new approach for characterizing the organization of subcellular structures using a label free, noncontact, single-shot phase imaging method that correlates to measured cellular mechanical stiffness. The new analysis approach measures refractive index variance and relates it to disorder strength. These measurements are compared to cellular stiffness, measured using the same imaging tool to visualize nanoscale responses to flow shear stimulus. The utility of the technique is shown by comparing shear stiffness and phase disorder strength across five cellular populations with varying mechanical properties. An inverse relationship between disorder strength and shear stiffness is shown, suggesting that cell mechanical properties can be assessed in a format amenable to high throughput studies using this novel, non-contact technique. Further studies will be presented which include examination of mechanical stiffness in early carcinogenic events and investigation of the role of specific cellular structural proteins in mechanotransduction.

  20. Molecular and neuroendocrine mechanisms of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Costa, Felipe O; Carvalheira, José B C

    2015-09-01

    Cancer and its morbidities, such as cancer cachexia, constitute a major public health problem. Although cancer cachexia has afflicted humanity for centuries, its underlying multifactorial and complex physiopathology has hindered the understanding of its mechanism. During the last few decades we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the understanding of cancer cachexia pathophysiology. Anorexia and muscle and adipose tissue wasting are the main features of cancer cachexia. These apparently independent symptoms have humoral factors secreted by the tumor as a common cause. Importantly, the hypothalamus has emerged as an organ that senses the peripheral signals emanating from the tumoral environment, and not only elicits anorexia but also contributes to the development of muscle and adipose tissue loss. Herein, we review the roles of factors secreted by the tumor and its effects on the hypothalamus, muscle and adipose tissue, as well as highlighting the key targets that are being exploited for cancer cachexia treatment. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 confer susceptibility to esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Zhong; Ju, Hui-Xiang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Jin, Hao; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair genes like MSH2 and MLH1 confer increased risk of cancers. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MSH2 and MLH1 were investigated for their potential contribution to the risk of esophageal cancer. This study recruited 614 participants from Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, of which 289 were patients with esophageal cancer, and the remainder was healthy individuals who served as a control group. Two SNPs, MSH2 c.2063T>G and MLH1 IVS14-19A>G, were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Carriers of the MSH2 c.2063G allele were at significantly higher risk for esophageal cancer compared to individuals with the TT genotype [OR = 3.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-11.03]. The MLH1 IVS14-19A>G allele also conferred significantly increased (1.70-fold) for esophageal cancer compared to the AA genotype (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-5.06). Further, the variant alleles interacted such that individuals with the susceptible genotypes at both MSH2 and MLH1 had a significantly exacerbated risk for esophageal cancer (OR = 12.38, 95% CI: 3.09-63.11). In brief, SNPs in the DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 increase the risk of esophageal cancer. Molecular investigations are needed to uncover the mechanism behind their interaction effect.

  2. Telomere Maintenance Mechanisms in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tiago Bordeira Gaspar; Ana Sá; José Manuel Lopes; Manuel Sobrinho-Simões; Paula Soares; João Vinagre

    2018-01-01

    Tumour cells can adopt telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs) to avoid telomere shortening, an inevitable process due to successive cell divisions. In most tumour cells, telomere length (TL) is maintained by reactivation of telomerase, while a small part acquires immortality through the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. In the last years, a great amount of data was generated, and different TMMs were reported and explained in detail, benefiting from g...

  3. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  4. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat, Riazalman; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mohd. Zuki Nik Mohamed, Nik; Che Ghani, Saiful Anwar; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan

    2015-12-01

    The 3rd ICMER2015 is the continuity of the NCMER2010. The year 2010 represents a significant milestone in the history for Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) Malaysia with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (1st and 2nd NCMER) at UMP on May 26-27 and Dec 3-4 2010. The Faculty then changed the name from National Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (NCMER) to International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER) in 2011 and this year, 2015 is our 3rd ICMER. These proceedings contain the selected scientific manuscripts submitted to the conference. It is with great pleasure to welcome you to the "International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER2015)" that is held at Zenith Hotel, Kuantan, Malaysia. The call for papers attracted submissions of over two hundred abstracts from twelve different countries including Japan, Iran, China, Kuwait, Indonesia, Norway, Philippines, Morocco, Germany, UAE and more. The scientific papers published in these proceedings have been revised and approved by the technical committee of the 3rd ICMER2015. All of the papers exhibit clear, concise, and precise expositions that appeal to a broad international readership interested in mechanical engineering, combustion, metallurgy, materials science as well as in manufacturing and biomechanics. The reports present original ideas or results of general significance supported by clear reasoning and compelling evidence, and employ methods, theories and practices relevant to the research. The authors clearly state the questions and the significance of their research to theory and practice, describe how the research contributes to new knowledge, and provide tables and figures that meaningfully add to the narrative. In this edition of ICMER representatives attending are from academia, industry, governmental and private sectors. The plenary and invited speakers will present, discuss, promote and

  5. Modeling mechanical interactions between cancerous mammary acini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Liphardt, Jan; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The rules and mechanical forces governing cell motility and interactions with the extracellular matrix of a tissue are often critical for understanding the mechanisms by which breast cancer is able to spread through the breast tissue and eventually metastasize. Ex vivo experimentation has demonstrated the the formation of long collagen fibers through collagen gels between the cancerous mammary acini responsible for milk production, providing a fiber scaffolding along which cancer cells can disorganize. We present a minimal mechanical model that serves as a potential explanation for the formation of these collagen fibers and the resultant motion. Our working hypothesis is that cancerous cells induce this fiber formation by pulling on the gel and taking advantage of the specific mechanical properties of collagen. To model this system, we employ a new Eulerian, fixed grid simulation method to model the collagen as a nonlinear viscoelastic material subject to various forces coupled with a multi-agent model to describe individual cancer cells. We find that these phenomena can be explained two simple ideas: cells pull collagen radially inwards and move towards the tension gradient of the collagen gel, while being exposed to standard adhesive and collision forces.

  6. On the path to translation: Highlights from the 2010 Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thériault Brigitte L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer continues to be the most lethal of the gynaecologic malignancies due to the lack of early detection, screening strategies and ineffective therapeutics for late-stage metastatic disease, particularly in the recurrent setting. The gathering of researchers investigating fundamental pathobiology of ovarian cancer and the clinicians who treat patients with this insidious disease is paramount to meeting the challenges we face. Since 2002, the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research, held every two years, has served this essential purpose. The objectives of this conference have been to disseminate new information arising from the most recent ovarian cancer research and identify the most pressing challenges we still face as scientists and clinicians. This is best accomplished through direct encounters and exchanges of innovative ideas among colleagues and trainees from the realms of basic science and clinical disciplines. This meeting has and continues to successfully facilitate rapid networking and establish new collaborations from across Canada. This year, more guest speakers and participants from other countries have extended the breadth of the research on ovarian cancer that was discussed at the meeting. This report summarizes the key findings presented at the fifth biennial Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research held in Toronto, Ontario, and includes the important issues and challenges we still face in the years ahead to make a significant impact on this devastating disease.

  7. Telomere Maintenance Mechanisms in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Bordeira Gaspar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumour cells can adopt telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs to avoid telomere shortening, an inevitable process due to successive cell divisions. In most tumour cells, telomere length (TL is maintained by reactivation of telomerase, while a small part acquires immortality through the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT mechanism. In the last years, a great amount of data was generated, and different TMMs were reported and explained in detail, benefiting from genome-scale studies of major importance. In this review, we address seven different TMMs in tumour cells: mutations of the TERT promoter (TERTp, amplification of the genes TERT and TERC, polymorphic variants of the TERT gene and of its promoter, rearrangements of the TERT gene, epigenetic changes, ALT, and non-defined TMM (NDTMM. We gathered information from over fifty thousand patients reported in 288 papers in the last years. This wide data collection enabled us to portray, by organ/system and histotypes, the prevalence of TERTp mutations, TERT and TERC amplifications, and ALT in human tumours. Based on this information, we discuss the putative future clinical impact of the aforementioned mechanisms on the malignant transformation process in different setups, and provide insights for screening, prognosis, and patient management stratification.

  8. Yosemite conference on ionospheric plasma in the magnetosphere: sources, mechanisms and consequences, meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, D.L.; Burch, J.L.; Klumpar, D.M.; Moore, T.E.; Waite, J.H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    The sixth biennial Yosemite topical conference and the first as a Chapman Conference was held on February 3 to 6, 1986. Although the solar wind was once thought to dominate the supply of plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere, it is now thought that the Earth's ionosphere is a significant contributor. Polar wind and other large volume outflows of plasma have been seen at relatively high altitudes over the polar cap and are now being correlated with outflows found in the magnetotail. The auroral ion fountain and cleft ion fountain are examples of ionospheric sources of plasma in the magnetosphere, observed by the Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) spacecraft. The conference was organized into six sessions: four consisting of prepared oral presentations, one poster session, and one session for open forum discussion. The first three oral sessions dealt separately with the three major topics of the conference, i.e., the sources, mechanisms, and consequences of ionospheric plasma in the magnetosphere. A special session of invited oral presentations was held to discuss extraterrestrial ionospheric/magnetospheric plasma processes. The poster session was extended over two evenings during which presenters discussed their papers on a one-on-one basis. The last session of the conferences was reserved for open discussions of those topics or ideas considered most interesting or controversial

  9. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  10. BRCA2 hypomorphic missense variants confer moderate risks of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L.s.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calleja, Fabienne Mgr; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case–control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ances...

  11. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy LS; Von, Nicolai Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne MGR; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the $\\textit{BRCA1}$ and $\\textit{BRCA2}$ genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine ...

  12. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. 2013 Gordon Research Conference, Inorganic reaction mechanisms, Galveston, TX, March 3-8 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-12-08

    The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

  14. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  15. Overview of mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Flora, Silvio; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological data provide evidence that it is possible to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases, some of which share common pathogenetic mechanisms, such as DNA damage, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. An obvious approach is avoidance of exposure to recognized risk factors. As complementary strategies, it is possible to render the organism more resistant to mutagens/carcinogens and/or to inhibit progression of the disease by administering chemopreventive agents. In a primary prevention setting, addressed to apparently healthy individuals, it is possible to inhibit mutation and cancer initiation by triggering protective mechanisms either in the extracellular environment or inside cells, e.g., by modifying transmembrane transport, modulating metabolism, blocking reactive species, inhibiting cell replication, maintaining DNA structure, modulating DNA metabolism and repair, and controlling gene expression. Tumor promotion can be counteracted by inhibiting genotoxic effects, favoring antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, inhibiting proteases and cell proliferation, inducing cell differentiation, modulating apoptosis and signal transduction pathways, and protecting intercellular communications. In a secondary prevention setting, when a premalignant lesion has been detected, it is possible to inhibit tumor progression via the same mechanisms, and in addition by affecting the hormonal status and the immune system in various ways, and by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Although tertiary prevention, addressed to cancer patients after therapy, is outside the classical definition of chemoprevention, it exploits similar mechanisms. It is also possible to affect cell-adhesion molecules, to activate antimetastasis genes, and to inhibit proteases involved in basement membrane degradation

  16. 2nd International Conference on Mechanical, Manufacturing and Process Plant Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents selected papers from the 2nd International Conference on Mechanical, Manufacturing and Process Plant Engineering (ICMMPE 2016) which was held from 23rd to 24th November, 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The proceedings discuss genuine problems of joining technologies that are heart of manufacturing sectors. It discusses the findings of experimental and numerical works from soldering, arc welding to solid state joining technology that faced by current industry. .

  17. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L S; Von Nicolai, Catharina

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk ......, moderately increased risks of breast cancer, with potential implications for risk management guidelines in women with these specific variants. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2789-99. ©2017 AACR....... were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ancestry (6,269 cases and 6,624 controls). The BRCA2 c.9104A>C, p.Tyr3035Ser (OR = 2.52; P = 0.04), and BRCA...... of breast cancer among Asians. Functional characterization of the BRCA2 variants using four quantitative assays showed reduced BRCA2 activity for p.Tyr3035Ser compared with wild-type. Overall, our results show how BRCA2 missense variants that influence protein function can confer clinically relevant...

  18. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  19. Mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Development of drug resist chemotherapy. For the past several years, investigators have been striving hard to unravel mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells. Using different experimental models of cancer, some of the major mechanisms of drug resistance identified in mammalian cells include: (a) Altered transport of the drug (decreased influx of the drug; increased efflux of the drug (role of P-glycoprotein; role of polyglutamation; role of multiple drug resistance associated protein)), (b) Increase in total amount of target enzyme/protein (gene amplification), (c) alteration in the target enzyme/protein (low affinity enzyme), (d) Elevation of cellular glutathione, (e) Inhibition of drug-induced apoptosis (mutation in p53 tumor suppressor gene; increased expression of bcl-xl gene). (author)

  20. Mechanism of immune evasion in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mozhi; Zhang, Changwang; Song, Yongxi; Wang, Zhenning; Wang, Yaojia; Luo, Fang; Xu, Yujie; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhonghua; Xu, Yingying

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignant tumor among women, with high morbidity and mortality. Its onset, development, metastasis, and prognosis vary among individuals due to the interactions between tumors and host immunity. Many diverse mechanisms have been associated with BC, with immune evasion being the most widely studied to date. Tumor cells can escape from the body’s immune response, which targets abnormal components and foreign bodies, using different approaches including modification of surface antigens and modulation of the surrounding environment. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and factors that impact the immunoediting process and analyze their functions in detail. PMID:28352189

  1. 2016 International Conference on Physics and Mechanics of New Materials and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Shun-Hsyung; Jani, Muaffaq

    2017-01-01

    This book presents 50 selected peer-reviewed reports from the 2016 International Conference on “Physics and Mechanics of New Materials and Their Applications”, PHENMA 2016 (Surabaya, Indonesia, 19–22 July, 2016). The Proceedings are devoted to processing techniques, physics, mechanics, and applications of advanced materials. As such, they examine a wide spectrum of nanostructures, ferroelectric crystals, materials and composites, as well as other promising materials with special properties. They present nanotechnology approaches, modern environmentally friendly piezoelectric and ferromagnetic techniques, and physical and mechanical studies of the structural and physical-mechanical properties of the materials discussed.  Further, a broad range of original mathematical and numerical methods is applied to solve various technological, mechanical and physical problems, which are inte resting for applications. Great attention is devoted to novel devices with high accuracy, longevity and extended possibilitie...

  2. Proceedings of 18th international conference on structural mechanics in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-07-01

    The 18th International Conference on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology was held on August 7-12, 2005 in Beijing, China, and Sponsored by International Association for Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology, Chinese Nuclear Society, Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Tsinghua University. 486 abstracts are Collected. The contents includes: opening, plenary and keynote presentations; computational mechanics; fuel and core structures; aging, life extension, and license renewal; design methods and rules for components; fracture mechanics; concrete material, containment and other structures; analysis and design for dynamic and extreme loads; seismic analysis, design and qualification; structural reliability and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA); operation, inspection and maintenance; severe accident management and structural evaluation; advanced reactors and generation IV reactors; decommissioning of nuclear facilities and waste management.

  3. Transactions of the 8th International Conference on Structure Mechanics in Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browzin, B.S.

    1985-06-01

    These Transactions of the JK-panel session include preprints of papers or abstracts which are listed in Volume A, ''Introduction, General Contents, Authors Index,'' Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology. These papers represent the body of the JK-panel session, ''Status of Research in Structural and Mechanical Engineering for Nuclear Power Plants,'' sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Additional papers are expected at this session, which will be available at the session. The purpose of publishing these Transactions is to inform the participants of the JK-panel session in advance on the papers to be presented and discussed at the session

  4. PREFACE: 10th International Conference on Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity (M2S-X)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, L. H.; Zhu, J.-X.; Wang, H.; Meen, J.; Lorenz, B.; Dong, X. L.; dela Cruz, C. R.; Carlson, E.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Bauer, E.; Paglione, J.

    2013-07-01

    The 2012 Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity Conference (M2S 2012), which occurs every three years, brought together world experts and young scientists to discuss open questions in the fundamental physics and applications of superconductors, and to disseminate the latest theoretical and experimental research results in superconductors and related novel materials. This conference of 600 participants acted as a valuable training ground in this technologically important area. We focused on key unanswered questions in high-temperature cuprate superconductors, high-temperature iron-based superconductors, topological superconductors, organic superconductors, and heavy-electron superconductors. The discovery of new materials and novel technological applications for electronic devices and for energy transmission and storage was emphasized. There were special sessions on superconductivity and energy, and outreach sessions, and an evening public lecture. There were also junior researcher symposia interspersed within the conference, thus providing an ideal environment for advanced graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to explore the latest theoretical and experimental methods used to investigate challenging questions in the physics of materials as it relates to both fundamental science and technological applications. These proceedings are an archival testament to the excitement in the field and provide a valuable snapshot of the cutting-edge research of 2012. We hope this will be a valuable resource to active researchers in the field as well as an encouraging volume to excite new researchers to the ever-growing, multifaceted field of superconductivity. We thank Bernd Lorenz and his Publications Committee for their tremendously creative and diligent work in putting this volume together. This Conference would not have been possible without the tireless work of our Program Committee, Chaired by Rick Greene and Co-Chaired by Mike Norman. Becky McDuffee, our

  5. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  6. 2015 International Conference on Physics and Mechanics of New Materials and their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Shun-Hsyung; Topolov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    This proceedings volume presents selected and peer reviewed 50 reports of the 2015 International Conference on “Physics and Mechanics of New Materials and Their Applications” (Azov, Russia, 19-22 May, 2015), devoted to 100th Anniversary of the Southern Federal University, Russia. The book presents processing techniques, physics, mechanics, and applications of advanced materials. The book is concentrated on some nanostructures, ferroelectric crystals, materials and composites and other materials with specific properties. In this book are presented nanotechnology approaches, modern piezoelectric techniques, physical and mechanical studies of the structure-sensitive properties of the materials. A wide spectrum of mathematical and numerical methods is applied to the solution of different technological, mechanical and physical problems for applications. Great attention is devoted to novel devices with high accuracy, longevity and extended possibilities to work in a large scale of  temperatures and pressure r...

  7. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  8. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jurg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G.; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific

  9. A novel series of conferences tackling the hurdles confronting the translation of novel cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bot Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While there has been significant progress in advancing novel immune therapies to the bedside, much more needs to be done to fully tap into the potential of the immune system. It has become increasingly clear that besides practical and operational challenges, the heterogeneity of cancer and the limited efficacy profile of current immunotherapy platforms are the two main hurdles. Nevertheless, the promising clinical data of several approaches point to a roadmap that carries the promise to significantly advance cancer immunotherapy. A new annual series sponsored by Arrowhead Publishers and Conferences aims at bringing together scientific and business leadership from academia and industry, to identify, share and discuss most current priorities in research and translation of novel immune interventions. This Editorial provides highlights of the first event held earlier this year and outlines the focus of the second meeting to be held in 2013 that will be dedicated to stem cells and immunotherapy.

  10. Two variants on chromosome 17 confer prostate cancer risk, and the one in TCF2 protects against type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur

    2007-01-01

    attributable risk is substantial. One of the variants is in TCF2 (HNF1beta), a gene known to be mutated in individuals with maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. Results from eight case-control groups, including one West African and one Chinese, demonstrate that this variant confers protection against...... 17 with the disease. These two variants, 33 Mb apart, fall within a region previously implicated by family-based linkage studies on prostate cancer. The risks conferred by these variants are moderate individually (allele odds ratio of about 1.20), but because they are common, their joint population......We performed a genome-wide association scan to search for sequence variants conferring risk of prostate cancer using 1,501 Icelandic men with prostate cancer and 11,290 controls. Follow-up studies involving three additional case-control groups replicated an association of two variants on chromosome...

  11. NRF2 Mutation Confers Malignant Potential and Resistance to Chemoradiation Therapy in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Shibata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal squamous cancer (ESC is one of the most aggressive tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. A combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CRT has improved the clinical outcome, but the molecular background determining the effectiveness of therapy remains unknown. NRF2 is a master transcriptional regulator of stress adaptation, and gain of-function mutation of NRF2 in cancer confers resistance to stressors including anticancer therapy. Direct resequencing analysis revealed that Nrf2 gain-of-function mutation occurred recurrently (18/82, 22% in advanced ESC tumors and ESC cell lines (3/10. The presence of Nrf2 mutation was associated with tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. Short hairpin RNA-mediated down-regulation of NRF2 in ESC cells that harbor only mutated Nrf2 allele revealed that themutant NRF2 conferred increased cell proliferation, attachment-independent survival, and resistance to 5-fluorouracil and γ-irradiation. Based on the Nrf2 mutation status, gene expression signatures associated with NRF2 mutation were extracted from ESC cell lines, and their potential utility for monitoring and prognosis was examined in a cohort of 33 pre-CRT cases of ESC. The molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation were significantly predictive and prognostic for CRT response. In conclusion, recurrent NRF2 mutation confers malignant potential and resistance to therapy in advanced ESC, resulting in a poorer outcome. Molecular signatures of NRF2 mutation can be applied as predictive markers of response to CRT, and efficient inhibition of aberrant NRF2 activation could be a promising approach in combination with CRT.

  12. Protein mislocalization: mechanisms, functions and clinical applications in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    The changes from normal cells to cancer cells are primarily regulated by genome instability, which foster hallmark functions of cancer through multiple mechanisms including protein mislocalization. Mislocalization of these proteins, including oncoproteins, tumor suppressors, and other cancer-related proteins, can interfere with normal cellular function and cooperatively drive tumor development and metastasis. This review describes the cancer-related effects of protein subcellular mislocalization, the related mislocalization mechanisms, and the potential application of this knowledge to cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:24709009

  13. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth facto...

  14. Climate change mitigation in Asia and financing Mechanisms.Proceedings of a Regional Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.R.; Deo, P.

    1998-12-01

    The three primary objectives of the conference, which was organized by the UNEP Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment (UCCEE) in conjunction with the Environment Department of the World Bank, at Goa in India from May 4 to 6, 1998, were: 1) to share the GHG mitigation experiences from Asian developing countries; 2) to disseminate the standard methodological approach for mitigation analysis developed by UNEP and its applications in different countries; and 3) assess the role and efficacy of financial mechanisms and to, specifically, seek feedback on the Prototype Carbon Fund proposed by the World Bank. Follwing these objectives, the workshop presentations and discussions were structured in three parts. In the first part, participants from eleven Asian developing countries made presentations that were followed by discussions. The second part included the presentations by the experts from UCCEE, UNFCCC and other invited experts who presented the mitigation methodology and the issues and experiences relating to various co-operative implementation mechanisms. The third part included the presentations by the World Bank representatives on the Prototype Carbon Fund and the discussions on financial mechanisms. (EG)

  15. Characterizing Mechanisms of Resistance to Androgen Deprivation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    of my training in cancer biology has included the attendance of regular seminars and conferences. Indeed, each Tuesday I have attended the meeting of...the Cancer Program of the Broad Institute, and on Tuesday afternoon the institute-wide series of Seminars in Oncology at DFCI, where invited speakers...24(6): p. 719-36. 23. Morris , T.A., R.J. DeLorenzo, and R.M. Tombes, CaMK-II inhibition reduces cyclin D1 levels and enhances the association of

  16. Therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer recurrence is believed to be one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer treatment strategies. Thisbiological phenomenon could arise from the incomplete eradication of tumour cells after chemo- and radiotherapy.Recent developments in the design of models reflecting cancer recurrence and in vivo imaging ...

  17. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  18. Metabolic and Target-Site Mechanisms Combine to Confer Strong DDT Resistance in Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sara N.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Dowd, Andrew J.; Lu, Fang; Wilding, Craig S.; Weetman, David; Dadzie, Samuel; Jenkins, Adam M.; Regna, Kimberly; Boko, Pelagie; Djogbenou, Luc; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark J. I.; Mayans, Olga; Donnelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of resistance to insecticides has become a classic exemplar of evolution occurring within human time scales. In this study we demonstrate how resistance to DDT in the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae is a result of both target-site resistance mechanisms that have introgressed between incipient species (the M- and S-molecular forms) and allelic variants in a DDT-detoxifying enzyme. Sequencing of the detoxification enzyme, Gste2, from DDT resistant and susceptible strains of An. gambiae, revealed a non-synonymous polymorphism (I114T), proximal to the DDT binding domain, which segregated with strain phenotype. Recombinant protein expression and DDT metabolism analysis revealed that the proteins from the susceptible strain lost activity at higher DDT concentrations, characteristic of substrate inhibition. The effect of I114T on GSTE2 protein structure was explored through X-ray crystallography. The amino acid exchange in the DDT-resistant strain introduced a hydroxyl group nearby the hydrophobic DDT-binding region. The exchange does not result in structural alterations but is predicted to facilitate local dynamics and enzyme activity. Expression of both wild-type and 114T alleles the allele in Drosophila conferred an increase in DDT tolerance. The 114T mutation was significantly associated with DDT resistance in wild caught M-form populations and acts in concert with target-site mutations in the voltage gated sodium channel (Vgsc-1575Y and Vgsc-1014F) to confer extreme levels of DDT resistance in wild caught An. gambiae. PMID:24675797

  19. Identification of the mechanism that confers superhydrophobicity on 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Ana M.; Llorca-Isern, Nuria; Rius-Ayra, Oriol

    2016-01-15

    This study develops a rapid method to confer superhydrophobicity on 316L stainless steel surfaces with an amphiphilic reagent such as dodecanoic acid. The highest contact angle (approaching 173°) was obtained after forming hierarchical structures with a non-aqueous electrolyte by an electrolytic process. Our goal was to induce superhydrophobicity directly on 316L stainless steel substrates and to establish which molecules cause the effect. The superhydrophobic behaviour is analysed by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The growth mechanism is analysed using FE-SEM, TOF-SIMS and XPS in order to determine the molecules involved in the reaction and the growth. The TOF-SIMS analysis revealed that the Ni{sup 2+} ions react with lauric acid to create an ester on the stainless steel surface. - Highlights: • This study develops a rapid and facile approach to impart superhydrophobicity properties to 316L stainless steel surfaces with an amphiphilic reagent such as dodecanoic acid. Surface character changes from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. • This process changes the surface character from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. • The process based on electrolysis of a nickel salt in lauric acid provides superhydrophobic behaviour in 316L stainless steel. • The growth mechanism is proposed as a mode island (Volmert- Weber mode). • TOF-SIMS and XPS provided the identification of the molecules involved in the surface modification reaction on AISI 316L inducing superhydrophobicity.

  20. Conference on support mechanisms evolution and renewable energies integration in France and in Germany markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praetorius, Barbara; Cruciani, Michel; Schwarz, Virginie; Nabe, Christian; Mayer, Joerg; Vogel, Wolfram; Abegg, Janosch; Lioret, Sonia; Avedissian, Franck; Cosse, Julien; Woodhouse, Stephen; Bradbury, Simon; Mollard, Matthieu; Solal, Lucie; Nodari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on the support mechanisms evolution and the renewable energies integration in France and in Germany markets. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, participants exchanged views on the current support mechanisms in both countries and on their forthcoming legal modifications. The legal framework of direct renewable energy selling in the German market and the impacts and challenges of this model were addressed as well. Technical aspects of auction sales of electricity were approached too and illustrated with experience feedbacks from direct selling operators. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Tenders for Renewable energy and the German Energiewende - Perspectives, challenges, debates (Barbara Praetorius); 2 - Promotion of energy from renewable sources - A short analysis of the French public policy 2000 -2014 (Michel Cruciani); 3 - Support schemes for renewables in France and their evolution as foreseen in the energy transition law (Virginie Schwarz); 4 - Direct electricity selling on the wholesale market: legal framework and perspective - a French-German comparison (Christian Nabe); 5 - Self-consumption and power purchase Business framework in Germany (Joerg Mayer); 6 - Successful Integration of Renewable energies in the Market: the Role of the Power exchange (Wolfram Vogel); 7 - Earn money and do good by marketing renewables (Janosch Abegg); 8 - Proposals for a new electricity market design (Sonia Lioret)

  1. [Recent history: 12th International Conference on Cancer, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1978].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    Using the approaches of history of the present, this article recovers the discussions surrounding the 12th International Conference on Cancer carried out in Buenos Aires in 1978, in reaction to which Georges Périès organized a "counter-conference" in Paris. In order to understand this discussion, the political situation of the time is described, as is the state of human rights at the time in Argentina, the role of the media - in particular the newspapers La Nación and Clarín and the magazine Gente - and the institutional position adopted by the National Academy of Medicine, as expressed in a letter sent to the presidents of the primary scientific societies of the world. The letter is reprinted in this text as a documentary source, taken from Memoria: Año 1978 (Presidencia de Dr. José E. Rivarola) [Acta: Year 1978 (Presidency of Dr. José E. Rivarola)]. The framework of the discussion makes reference to science's social policy versus science's supposed neutrality and the role of scientific societies.

  2. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  3. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  4. 8th Liblice Conference on the Statistical Mechanics of Liquids - Brno, Czech Republic, 13-18 June 2010 FOREWORD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jackson, G.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 190, 1 Sp.I:Sl (2011), s. 1-2 ISSN 0026-8976. [Liblice Conference on the Statistical Mechanics of Liquids /8./. Brno, 13.06.2010-18.06.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : editorial material * theories of liquids * statistical mechanics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.819, year: 2011

  5. International conference on theoretical approaches to heavy ion reaction mechanisms. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepage, F.

    1984-01-01

    This booklet contains copies of the short written contributions to the Paris Conference (14-18 May 1984). Some of the authors have wished to present it orally in a special session. Its program will be found in the proceedings of the Conference published by Nuclear Physics

  6. Recent progress in carcinogenesis, progression and therapy of breast cancer: the 20th Hiroshima Cancer Seminar--the 4th Three Universities' Consortium International Symposium, October 2010: 31 October 2010, International Conference Center Hiroshima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Masakazu; Yasui, Wataru; Ito, Hisao; Tahara, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    The 20th Hiroshima Cancer seminar focused upon breast cancer research and treatment particularly on the mechanism of tumorigenesis and drug resistance and development of novel therapeutics. Several molecules such as retinoblastoma and p16 were raised as key factors in tumorigenesis and invasiveness. Estrogen-related pathways seem to be closely involved in the process. For the tumor lacking hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2, some other mechanisms could be responsible. It seems that MicroRNA 22 directing some putative targets such as SIRT1, Sp1 and CDK6 plays a crucial role in breast tumor growth and metastasis. In addition, ribophorin and the associated molecules might be engaged in breast cancer stemness. Obviously, these molecules provide potential for therapeutic targets. It was also discussed about new drug development such as anti-human epidermal growth factor 2 therapy, anti-angiogenesis, pro-tumor aspects of anti-cancer therapy and application of circulating markers for monitoring, imaging and health-care system. Furthermore, we discussed risk factors, prevention and screening to reduce invasive cancers as well. Throughout the conference, panelists and attendee indicated the importance of translational research and biomarker exploration in order to realize efficient and individualized therapy for breast cancer.

  7. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19-21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.phpThe Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe.THE CORE PARTICIPANTING INSTITUTES INCLUDED: European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM)-IFOM-IEO Campus, MilanBeatson Institute for Cancer Research (BICR), GlasgowCambridge Research Institute (CRI), Cambridge, UKMRC Gray Institute of Radiation Biology (GIROB), OxfordLondon Research Institute (LRI), LondonPaterson Institute for Cancer Research (PICR), ManchesterThe Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam'You organizers have crushed all my prejudices towards Italians. Congratulations, I enjoyed the conference immensely!' Even if it might have sounded like rudeness for sure this was supposed to be a genuine compliment (at least, that's how we took it), also considering that it was told by a guy who himself was the fusion of two usually antithetical concepts: fashion style and English nationality.The year 2010 has marked an important event for Italian research in the international scientific panorama: the European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) had the honour to host the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference, which was held from 19-21 May 2010 at the IFOM-IEO-Campus (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php) in Milan.The conference was attended by more than one hundred students, coming from a selection of cutting edge European institutes devoted to cancer research. The rationale behind it is the promotion of cooperation among young scientists across Europe to debate about science and to exchange ideas and experiences. But that is not all, it is also designed for PhD students to get in touch

  8. Mechanisms of Reactive Stroma-Induced Tumorigenesis in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    type I receptor blocker (SI Appendix, Fig. S9). Together, these results further support the concept that TGF-β1–expressing prostate cancer cells induce...of NBT-II bladder carcinoma cells to condi- tioned medium from normal fetal urogenital sinus. Cancer Res 47(11):2955–2960. 22. Nimmo R, Woollard A...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0197 TITLE: Mechanisms of Reactive Stroma - Induced Tumorigenesis in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  9. Cisplatin in cancer therapy: molecular mechanisms of action

    OpenAIRE

    Dasari, Shaloam; Tchounwou, Paul Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin, cisplatinum, or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), is a well-known chemotherapeutic drug. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It is effective against various types of cancers, including carcinomas, germ cell tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas. Its mode of action has been linked to its ability to crosslink with the purine bases on the DNA; interfering with DNA repair mechanisms, causing DNA da...

  10. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porquet, Nicolas; Huot, Jacques; Poirier, Andrée; Houle, François; Pin, Anne-Laure; Gout, Stéphanie; Tremblay, Pierre-Luc; Paquet, Éric R; Klinck, Roscoe; Auger, François A

    2011-01-01

    Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT29 and SW620 express higher levels of a splice variant of

  11. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  12. Mechanisms of oncogenesis in colon versus rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, E.; Liefers, G.J.; Los, L.C.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hermans, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Moriya, Y.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Observations support the theory that development of left- and right-sided colorectal cancers may involve different mechanisms. This study investigated different genes involved in oncogenesis of colon and rectal cancers and analysed their prognostic value. The study group comprised 35 colon and 42

  13. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  14. Aberrant Chromatin Modification as a Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hongwu

    2004-01-01

    .... However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that aberrant chromatin modification plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression...

  15. AZIN1 RNA editing confers cancer stemness and enhances oncogenic potential in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toden, Shusuke; Miyoshi, Jinsei; Toiyama, Yuji; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Kusunoki, Masato; Takayama, Tetsuji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Chen, Leilei; Goel, Ajay

    2018-06-21

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, a process mediated by adenosine deaminases that act on the RNA (ADAR) gene family, is a recently discovered epigenetic modification dysregulated in human cancers. However, the clinical significance and the functional role of RNA editing in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. We have systematically and comprehensively investigated the significance of the expression status of ADAR1 and of the RNA editing levels of antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1), one of the most frequently edited genes in cancers, in 392 colorectal tissues from multiple independent CRC patient cohorts. Both ADAR1 expression and AZIN1 RNA editing levels were significantly elevated in CRC tissues when compared with corresponding normal mucosa. High levels of AZIN1 RNA editing emerged as a prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival and were an independent risk factor for lymph node and distant metastasis. Furthermore, elevated AZIN1 editing identified high-risk stage II CRC patients. Mechanistically, edited AZIN1 enhances stemness and appears to drive the metastatic processes. We have demonstrated that edited AZIN1 functions as an oncogene and a potential therapeutic target in CRC. Moreover, AZIN1 RNA editing status could be used as a clinically relevant prognostic indicator in CRC patients.

  16. A Physical Mechanism and Global Quantification of Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Yu

    Full Text Available Initiation and progression of cancer depend on many factors. Those on the genetic level are often considered crucial. To gain insight into the physical mechanisms of breast cancer, we construct a gene regulatory network (GRN which reflects both genetic and environmental aspects of breast cancer. The construction of the GRN is based on available experimental data. Three basins of attraction, representing the normal, premalignant and cancer states respectively, were found on the phenotypic landscape. The progression of breast cancer can be seen as switching transitions between different state basins. We quantified the stabilities and kinetic paths of the three state basins to uncover the biological process of breast cancer formation. The gene expression levels at each state were obtained, which can be tested directly in experiments. Furthermore, by performing global sensitivity analysis on the landscape topography, six key genes (HER2, MDM2, TP53, BRCA1, ATM, CDK2 and four regulations (HER2⊣TP53, CDK2⊣BRCA1, ATM→MDM2, TP53→ATM were identified as being critical for breast cancer. Interestingly, HER2 and MDM2 are the most popular targets for treating breast cancer. BRCA1 and TP53 are the most important oncogene of breast cancer and tumor suppressor gene, respectively. This further validates the feasibility of our model and the reliability of our prediction results. The regulation ATM→MDM2 has been extensive studied on DNA damage but not on breast cancer. We notice the importance of ATM→MDM2 on breast cancer. Previous studies of breast cancer have often focused on individual genes and the anti-cancer drugs are mainly used to target the individual genes. Our results show that the network-based strategy is more effective on treating breast cancer. The landscape approach serves as a new strategy for analyzing breast cancer on both the genetic and epigenetic levels and can help on designing network based medicine for breast cancer.

  17. COPING MECHANISM OF CAREER WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosnani Rosnani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cancer may experience psychological disorders such as depression, anxiety, anger, helplessness, and unappreciated, so in certain situations require defense mechanisms (coping mechanism to oppose or resist feelings of anxiety, fear or stress that haunt her. The aim of this study was to know the coping mechanism of career women with breast cancer reviewed by phenomenology in Palembang 2016. Method: Type of this study was a qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. Total samples were 8 participants with inclusion criteria: career women, productive age range, health physic and physiologic. Independent variable was a coping mechanism, and the dependent variable was breast cancer. The instrument used the voice recorder, and interview guides. Data analyze used verbatim transcript with credibility, dependability, and confirmability. Result: The results showed that working women who have breast cancer have a coping strategy that is adjusted to the psychological condition and physical reactions of the therapy in progress. Psychologically, the coping mechanism is in the form of rejecting, drawing closer to Allah SWT, seeking the opinion of other health workers, discussing conditions with spouse and family, seeking alternative treatment and asking for doctor's direction. The coping mechanism of the body's reaction to therapy is done by taking medicine according to the rules and remember Allah SWT. Conclusions: Need the support of the coping mechanism in patients with breast cancer and nursing care approach with the pattern of coping mechanisms with the involvement of the family.

  18. Lung cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a survey of participants at a national conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bydder, S [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hasani, A [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia (Australia). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Broderick, C [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). WA Cancer and Palliative Care Network; Semmens, J [Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of technology, Perth, Australia (Australia). Centr for Population Health Research

    2008-04-15

    Full text: Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are a useful aid for the development of comprehensive treatment plans for cancer patients. However, little is known about the requirements for effective MDM function. Attendees at a national lung cancer conference who participated at least weekly in lung cancer MDMs were surveyed. The survey addressed the attendees' perceptions regarding the aims of MDMs, and for their own institutional MDMs, the importance and need for improvement for each of: (i) the attendance of nine discipline groups; and (ii) 15 aspects related to MDM function derived from the literature. The survey also asked participants if MDMs met their needs. There was a general agreement on the aims of the meetings. There was also an agreement on the importance of various groups' attendance and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, many respondents reported their meetings required moderate or substantial improvements in one or more areas. More than 20% of the respondents indicated improvement was required for the attendance of three discipline groups (palliative care physicians, pathologists and cardiothoracic surgeons) and 10 of the 15 examined aspects (more than half in the case of computerised databases). Only 9% of the respondents reported that none of the features surveyed needed either moderate or substantial improvement. MDMs met the needs of 79% of the respondents. We found general agreement on the aims of the meetings, the importance of various groups' attendance at MDMs and each of the examined aspects of MDMs. However, moderate or substantial improvements were thought to be required by many respondents. The performance of individual institutions' MDMs and the resources they have available to achieve their aims should be assessed and periodically reviewed. The survey applied here may provide a framework for MDM members to do this.

  19. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7–20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground. PMID:23129611

  20. Mechanisms of Progranulin Action and Regulation in Genitourinary Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Lu, Kuojung G; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Buraschi, Simone; Belfiore, Antonino; Iozzo, Renato V; Morrione, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The growth factor progranulin has emerged in recent years as a critical regulator of transformation in several cancer models, including breast cancer, glioblastomas, leukemias, and hepatocellular carcinomas. Several laboratories, including ours, have also demonstrated an important role of progranulin in several genitourinary cancers, including ovarian, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and bladder tumors, where progranulin acts as an autocrine growth factor thereby modulating motility and invasion of transformed cells. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms of action and regulation of progranulin signaling in genitourinary cancers with a special emphasis on prostate and bladder tumors.

  1. Mechanisms of Progranulin Action and Regulation in Genitourinary Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tanimoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth factor progranulin has emerged in recent years as a critical regulator of transformation in several cancer models, including breast cancer, glioblastomas, leukemias and hepatocellular carcinomas. Several laboratories, including ours, have also demonstrated an important role of progranulin in several genitourinary cancers, including ovarian, endometrial, cervical, prostate and bladder tumors, where progranulin acts as an autocrine growth factor thereby modulating motility and invasion of transformed cells.In this review we will focus on the mechanisms of action and regulation of progranulin signaling in genitourinary cancers with a special emphasis on prostate and bladder tumors.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%-20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer.

  3. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  4. Proceedings of the 17th international conference on structural mechanics in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The conference was divided into the following divisions and subdivisions: DIVISION A: Plenary lectures and panel; DIVISION B: Computational mechanics (Structural and thermal analysis; High-non linear analysis, material behaviour; Vibration and fluid dynamics analysis); DIVISION C: Fuel and core structures (Fuel vibration and fretting; Fuel design and constitutive modelling; Fuel failure under operation and accident conditions; Fuel failure under operation and accident conditions; Components and material behaviour under irradiation; Integrity of fuel systems under transient conditions); DIVISION D: Aging, Life Extension and Licence Renewal (International Regulatory and Economic Perspectives; Utility perspectives, WWER technology; Fatigue, corrosion and crack issues; Component integrity; Aging assessment and monitoring; Containment and other structures); DIVISION F: Design methods and rules for components (International codes and standards; Tube, piping codes and standards; Analyses; Fatigue and life assessment; Creep; Bolted connections and gaskets); DIVISION G: Fracture mechanics (Reactor pressure vessel integrity; Dynamic loading; Fracture considerations for various applications; Failure assessment of Zr alloy; Pipe integrity; Integrity of welds; Failure of non-metallic materials; Leak before break (LBB); Corrosion aspects); DIVISION H: Concrete Containment and Other Structures (Concrete materials and performance; Tests of scale prestressed concrete containment vessel; Shear wall test and analysis; Structural analysis and containment design; Structural integrity and analysis); DIVISION J: Analysis and design for dynamic and extreme load (Vibration of shells and plates; Impact analysis; Piping vibration; Structural dynamics; Experimental and other topics); DIVISION K: Seismic analysis, design and qualification (General seismic issues; Ground motion and sitting; Soil-structure interaction; Seismic response of structures; Seismic re-evaluation; Seismic response and

  5. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; de Giorgi, U.; de Santis, M.; de Wit, M.; de Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-de Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  6. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  7. Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014 & Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution : Extended Abstracts Spring 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Cors, Josep; Llibre, Jaume; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The two parts of the present volume contain extended conference abstracts corresponding to selected talks given by participants at the "Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014" (HAMSYS2014) (15 abstracts) and at the "Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution" (12 abstracts), both held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona from June 2nd to 6th, 2014, and from June 23th to 27th, 2014, respectively. Most of them are brief articles, containing preliminary presentations of new results not yet published in regular research journals. The articles are the result of a direct collaboration between active researchers in the area after working in a dynamic and productive atmosphere. The first part is about Central Configurations, Periodic Orbits and Hamiltonian Systems with applications to Celestial Mechanics – a very modern and active field of research. The second part is dedicated to mathematical methods applied to viral dynamics and evolution. Mathematical modelling of biologi...

  8. Biophysical aspects of cancer - Electromagnetic mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří; Hašek, Jiří; Vaniš, Jan; Jelínek, František

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 5 (2008), s. 310-321 ISSN 0019-5189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Electromagnetic Fields * Biophysics * Cancer Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.599, year: 2008

  9. Current advances in mechanical design and production VII: proceedings of the Seventh Cairo University International MDP Conference ; Cairo-Egypt, February 15-17, 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megahed, Säıd M; Hassan, Mohamed F

    2000-01-01

    ... with keynote papers to enrich the sessions and to highlight the recent advances on the various fields of mechanical design and production. A total of 160 papers were submitted to MDP-7 conference from more than 21 countries from the 6 continents. All papers were thoroughly refereed by the conference scientific committee. Following the reviewing proces...

  10. Call for Nominations The Nusselt Reynolds Prize Sponsored by Assembly of World Conferences on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    2000-01-01

    The Nusselt Reynolds Prize has been established by the Assembly of World Conferences to commemorate outstanding contributions by Wilhelm Nusselt and Osborne Reynolds as experimentalists, researchers, educators, and authors. As many as three prizes may be bestowed at every World Conference, one in each of the areas of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, or any combination of these.

  11. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  12. Proceedings of the sixth international and forty third national conference on fluid mechanics and fluid power: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anuj; Paul, Akshoy Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP) Conference is an important meeting to promote all activities in the field of Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power in India. FMFP-2016 offers great opportunity to scientists, researchers, engineers and business executives from all parts of the world to share the recent advancements and future trends in all aspects of fluid mechanics and fluid power- be it theoretical, experimental, applied and computational, and build network. It covers theoretical and experimental fluid dynamics, flow instability, transition, turbulence and control, fluid machinery, turbomachinery and fluid power, IC engines and gas turbines, multiphase flows, fluid-structure interaction and flow-induced noise, micro and nano fluid mechanics, bio-inspired fluid mechanics, energy and environment, specialized topics (transport phenomena in materials processing and manufacturing, MHD and EHD flows, granular flows, nuclear reactor, thermal hydraulics, defence and space engineering, sustainable habitat. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  13. Polish Conference on the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, 11th, Zakopane, Poland, Apr. 27-30, 1987, Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the diagnostic classification of machinery conditions and their interpretation, the detection of parameter changes in a mechanical nonlinear rotational system, microcomputer-aided teaching of the fundamentals of machine steering, the basic functions of expert systems, and the basic requirements of a CAD system for designing robotized stands. Consideration is also given to the determination of the position function in link mechanisms, the application of the finite element method to the study of the human skeletal system, and a method of suboptimal decentralized control in robotics. Other topics include the principles and techniques of pragmatic simulation, polyoptimal synthesis, and bending vibrations of a shaft with thin disks.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. Keywords: cisplatin, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, microRNA, molecular mechanism, resistance

  15. Modeling the mechanics of cancer: effect of changes in cellular and extra-cellular mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katira, Parag; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2013-01-01

    Malignant transformation, though primarily driven by genetic mutations in cells, is also accompanied by specific changes in cellular and extra-cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and adhesivity. As the transformed cells grow into tumors, they interact with their surroundings via physical contacts and the application of forces. These forces can lead to changes in the mechanical regulation of cell fate based on the mechanical properties of the cells and their surrounding environment. A comprehensive understanding of cancer progression requires the study of how specific changes in mechanical properties influences collective cell behavior during tumor growth and metastasis. Here we review some key results from computational models describing the effect of changes in cellular and extra-cellular mechanical properties and identify mechanistic pathways for cancer progression that can be targeted for the prediction, treatment, and prevention of cancer.

  16. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng ZZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenzi Peng, Chunfang Zhang, Chaojun Duan Institute of Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. Keywords: ncRNA, tumorigenesis, biomarker, network, proliferation, apoptosis 

  17. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence and Mechanisms of Fat Depletion in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Maryam; Mazurak, Vera C.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of cancer patients experience wasting characterized by muscle loss with or without fat loss. In human and animal models of cancer, body composition assessment and morphological analysis reveals adipose atrophy and presence of smaller adipocytes. Fat loss is associated with reduced quality of life in cancer patients and shorter survival independent of body mass index. Fat loss occurs in both visceral and subcutaneous depots; however, the pattern of loss has been incompletely characterized. Increased lipolysis and fat oxidation, decreased lipogenesis, impaired lipid depositionand adipogenesis, as well as browning of white adipose tissue may underlie adipose atrophy in cancer. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) produced by the tumor or adipose tissue may also contribute to adipose depletion. Identifying the mechanisms and time course of fat mass changes in cancer may help identify individuals at risk of adipose depletion and define interventions to circumvent wasting. This review outlines current knowledge of fat mass in cancer and illustrates the need for further studies to assess alterations in visceral and subcutaneous adipose depots and possible mechanisms for loss of fat during cancer progression. PMID:25415607

  19. Cancer-related fatigue--mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E

    2014-10-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common adverse effects of cancer that might persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and might be a risk factor of reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in patients with cancer have been well characterized and there is growing understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation seems to have a key role in fatigue before, during, and after cancer-treatment. However, there is a considerable variability in the presentation of cancer-related fatigue, much of which is not explained by disease-related or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors might be important in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have identified genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioural risk factors associated with cancer-related fatigue. Although no current gold-standard treatment for fatigue is available, a variety of intervention approaches have shown beneficial effects in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. This Review describes the mechanisms, risk factors, and possible interventions for cancer-related fatigue, focusing on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients.

  20. InCVAX, a novel in situ autologous cancer vaccine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel Siu Kit; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    . In addition, we have extended our research of InCVAX to other tumor models and to better understand the mechanism of how GC stimulate the immune system, primarily through activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs). With our data showing therapeutic efficacy of inCVAX in animal and human models, we are confident that inCVAX can bring significant benefit to metastatic cancer patients in the near future.

  1. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  2. Using Mechanical Turk for research on cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J; Carr, Alaina L

    2017-10-01

    The successful recruitment and study of cancer survivors within psycho-oncology research can be challenging, time-consuming, and expensive, particularly for key subgroups such as young adult cancer survivors. Online crowdsourcing platforms offer a potential solution that has not yet been investigated with regard to cancer populations. The current study assessed the presence of cancer survivors on Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) and the feasibility of using MTurk as an efficient, cost-effective, and reliable psycho-oncology recruitment and research platform. During a <4-month period, cancer survivors living in the United States were recruited on MTurk to complete two assessments, spaced 1 week apart, relating to psychosocial and cancer-related functioning. The reliability and validity of responses were investigated. Within a <4-month period, 464 self-identified cancer survivors on MTurk consented to and completed an online assessment. The vast majority (79.09%) provided reliable and valid study data according to multiple indices. The sample was highly diverse in terms of U.S. geography, socioeconomic status, and cancer type, and reflected a particularly strong presence of distressed and young adult cancer survivors (median age = 36 years). A majority of participants (58.19%) responded to a second survey sent one week later. Online crowdsourcing represents a feasible, efficient, and cost-effective recruitment and research platform for cancer survivors, particularly for young adult cancer survivors and those with significant distress. We discuss remaining challenges and future recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Cisplatin in cancer therapy: molecular mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Shaloam; Tchounwou, Paul Bernard

    2014-10-05

    Cisplatin, cisplatinum, or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), is a well-known chemotherapeutic drug. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It is effective against various types of cancers, including carcinomas, germ cell tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas. Its mode of action has been linked to its ability to crosslink with the purine bases on the DNA; interfering with DNA repair mechanisms, causing DNA damage, and subsequently inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. However, because of drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects such as severe kidney problems, allergic reactions, decrease immunity to infections, gastrointestinal disorders, hemorrhage, and hearing loss especially in younger patients, other platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin and others, have also been used. Furthermore, combination therapies of cisplatin with other drugs have been highly considered to overcome drug-resistance and reduce toxicity. This comprehensive review highlights the physicochemical properties of cisplatin and related platinum-based drugs, and discusses its uses (either alone or in combination with other drugs) for the treatment of various human cancers. A special attention is paid to its molecular mechanisms of action, and its undesirable side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cisplatin in cancer therapy: molecular mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Shaloam; Tchounwou, Paul Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin, cisplatinum, or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), is a well-known chemotherapeutic drug. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It is effective against various types of cancers, including carcinomas, germ cell tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas. Its mode of action has been linked to its ability to crosslink with the purine bases on the DNA; interfering with DNA repair mechanisms, causing DNA damage, and subsequently inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. However, because of drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects such as severe kidney problems, allergic reactions, decrease immunity to infections, gastrointestinal disorders, hemorrhage, and hearing loss especially in younger patients, other platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin and others, have also been used. Furthermore, combination therapies of cisplatin with other drugs have been highly considered to overcome drug-resistance and reduce toxicity. This comprehensive review highlights the physicochemical properties of cisplatin and related platinum-based drugs, and discusses its uses (either alone or in combination with other drugs) for the treatment of various human cancers. A special attention is given to its molecular mechanisms of action, and its undesirable side effects. PMID:25058905

  5. Highlights from the first ecancer-Liga Colombiana contra el Cancer conference, 17-18 November 2016, Bogota, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The first oncology conference organised by e cancer and the Liga Colombiana contra el Cancer took place on 17-18 November 2016 in Bogota. It was a highly successful event owing to the number of participants, the quality of the speakers, and the academic programme. Around 48 professors from 8 different countries came and shared their knowledge and experience of cancer management. They also talked about the most recent developments noted or achieved in this area. The keynote speech from Dr Nubia Muñoz was of great interest which was related to the safety of a HPV vaccine and the implications of a mass vaccination programme in developing countries. Geriatric oncology and palliative care were also topics that sparked great interest during the event.

  6. Chemotherapy resistance mechanisms in advanced skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvanesh Sukhlal Kalal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma.

  7. COX-2 and PPAR-γ confer cannabidiol-induced apoptosis of human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Heinemann, Katharina; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Salamon, Achim; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of cannabidiol is still controversial. This study investigates the role of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in cannabidiol's proapoptotic and tumor-regressive action. In lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and primary cells from a patient with lung cancer, cannabidiol elicited decreased viability associated with apoptosis. Apoptotic cell death by cannabidiol was suppressed by NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor), GW9662 (PPAR-γ antagonist), and siRNA targeting COX-2 and PPAR-γ. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis was paralleled by upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression with a maximum induction of COX-2 mRNA after 8 hours and continuous increases of PPAR-γ mRNA when compared with vehicle. In response to cannabidiol, tumor cell lines exhibited increased levels of COX-2-dependent prostaglandins (PG) among which PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) caused a translocation of PPAR-γ to the nucleus and induced a PPAR-γ-dependent apoptotic cell death. Moreover, in A549-xenografted nude mice, cannabidiol caused upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in tumor tissue and tumor regression that was reversible by GW9662. Together, our data show a novel proapoptotic mechanism of cannabidiol involving initial upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ and a subsequent nuclear translocation of PPAR-γ by COX-2-dependent PGs.

  8. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs. Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules.

  9. Mechanisms of base substitution mutagenesis in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacolla, Albino; Cooper, David N; Vasquez, Karen M

    2014-03-05

    Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs). Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules.

  10. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the confer...

  11. Transactions of the 9th international conference on structural mechanics in reactor technology. Vol. B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    The area to be covered by Division B of SMIRT-Conferences can be briefly summarized as follows: Computational methods for static and dynamic analysis of solids and structures in linear and non-linear regimes: Finite elements, boundary elements, finite differences and other numerical techniques. Methods and software for computer-aided engineering including data bases, computer graphics and expert systems. Seventy eight papers have been separately indexed for the database (orig./GL)

  12. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  13. EHD1 confers resistance to cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer by regulating intracellular cisplatin concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jing; Meng, Qingwei; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Xuesong; Cai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer. However, resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) remains a major challenge in NSCLC treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of EHD1 [Eps15 homology (EH) domain - containing protein 1] to confer CDDP resistance in NSCLC cells and to investigate mechanisms of this resistance. The associations between EHD1 expression in NSCLC specimens and clinicopathological features, including prognosis, were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using DNA microarrays, we performed a genome-wide analysis of cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells to identify the involvement of the EHD1 gene in this resistance. We overexpressed and knocked down EHD1 in cell lines to investigate the effect of this gene on proliferation and apoptosis. A quantitative analytical method for assessing CDDP in cells was developed. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the concentration of cisplatin in cells. The immunohistochemistry assay showed that adjuvant chemotherapy-treated NSCLC patients expressing EHD1 exhibited reduced OS compared with patients who did not express EHD1 (P = 0.01). Moreover, DNA microarrays indicated that the EHD1 gene was upregulated in CDDP- resistant NSCLC cells. The IC50 value of CDDP in cells that overexpressed EHD1 was 3.3-fold greater than that in the A549-control line, and the IC50 value of EHD1 knockdown cells was at least 5.2-fold lower than that of the control cells, as evidenced by a CCK-8 assay. We found that the percentage of early apoptotic cells was significantly decreased in A549-EHD1 cells, but the rates of early apoptosis were higher in the EHD1 knockdown cell line than in the A549/DDP control line, as indicated by a flow cytometry analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the total platinum level was lower in A549-EHD1 cells than in control cells, and the concentration of CDDP was higher in the EHD1 knockdown cells than in

  14. International Conference on Gravitation Cosmology and Continuum Mechanics (dedicated to the centenary of Kirill Petrovich Staniukovich)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    International Conference - Gravitation, Cosmology and Mechanics of Continuous Environments (devoted to the 100th anniversary K.P. Stanyukovich's birth) was held in Bauman Moscow State Technical University on the 3th and 4th of March. More than 100 papers were presented by K.P. Stanyukovich's students, faculty, various universities staff and representatives of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Kirill Petrovich Stanyukovich (3 March, 1916 - 4 June, 1989) - an outstanding physicist, mathematician and engineer made a significant contribution to the development of various fields of science: gas dynamics, physics of explosion, magnetic hydrodynamics, astronomy. He developed a hydrodynamic model of gravity, the theory of gravity with a variation of the effective gravitational constant, with a variable number of particles, he offered one of the first Universe evolution scenarios from the initial vacuum stage. Kirill Petrovich was the author of a number of inventions and of 330 scientific and popular-science works. He came from an old noble family - the Stanyukovich. (The famous writer and marine painter Konstantin Stanyukovich was his granduncle). Not yet having finished school, K.P. Stanyukovich got seriously interested in astronomy and became a member of the observers’ team of the Moscow Society of Astronomy Fanciers (MSAF) where he met Leonid Alekseevich Kulik, the famous Tunguska meteorite investigator and one of the national meteoritics founders. In 1932 the first K.P. Stanyukovich's research article on meteor astronomy (in co-authorship with I.E. Vasilyev) “Lyrids in 1930” was published in the 'Bulletin of MSAF Observers. In 1931 K.P. Stanyukovich took part in the MSAF meteors observation expedition on the Karadag scientific station in the Crimea, and in 1932 proposed a new method for estimating the meteor extinction height, based on an empirical relationship between meteor brightness and path length. In the same year he was involved in the processing of bright

  15. Critical protein GAPDH and its regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Hong, Chao-Qun; Giuliano, Armando E.; Cui, Xiao-Jiang; Zhou, Guang-Ji; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Cui, Yu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), initially identified as a glycolytic enzyme and considered as a housekeeping gene, is widely used as an internal control in experiments on proteins, mRNA, and DNA. However, emerging evidence indicates that GAPDH is implicated in diverse functions independent of its role in energy metabolism; the expression status of GAPDH is also deregulated in various cancer cells. One of the most common effects of GAPDH is its inconsistent role in the determination of cancer cell fate. Furthermore, studies have described GAPDH as a regulator of cell death; other studies have suggested that GAPDH participates in tumor progression and serves as a new therapeutic target. However, related regulatory mechanisms of its numerous cellular functions and deregulated expression levels remain unclear. GAPDH is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, which are involved in the regulation of diverse GAPDH functions. Several cancer-related factors, such as insulin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), p53, nitric oxide (NO), and acetylated histone, not only modulate GAPDH gene expression but also affect protein functions via common pathways. Moreover, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occurring in GAPDH in cancer cells result in new activities unrelated to the original glycolytic function of GAPDH. In this review, recent findings related to GAPDH transcriptional regulation and PTMs are summarized. Mechanisms and pathways involved in GAPDH regulation and its different roles in cancer cells are also described

  16. Pixel based SHG probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kirby R.; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Handel, Julia; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2017-02-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix in human ovarian cancer, can be reflected in increased collagen concentration, changes in alignment and/or up-regulation of different collagen isoforms, including Col III. Using fibrillar gel models, we demonstrate that Col I and Col III can be quantitatively distinguished by 3 distinct SHG polarization specific metrics: i) determination of helical pitch angle via the single axis molecular model, ii) dipole alignment via anisotropy, and iii) chirality via SHG circular dichroism (SHG-CD). These sub-resolution differentiations are possible due to differences in the α helix angles of the two isoforms, which co-mingle in the same fibrils. We also investigated the mechanism of the SHG-CD response and show that unlike conventional CD, it is dominated by electric dipole interactions and is consistent with the two state SHG model. We further applied these 3 polarization resolved analyses to human normal, high risk, benign tumors, and malignant human ovarian tissues. We found that these tissues could all be differentiated by these metrics, where high grade tissues had analogous α-helical pitch angles to the in the Col I/Col III gel model. This confirms literature suggestions based on immunofluorescence and gene expression that Col III is up-regulated in high grade ovarian cancers. The different tissues also displayed differing anisotropies, indicating the fibril assemblies are distinct and likely do not result from remodeling of existing collagen but synthesis of new collagen. Importantly, these SHG polarization methods provide structural information not otherwise possible and can serve as label-free biomarkers for ovarian and other cancers.

  17. Transactions of the 10th international conference on structural mechanics in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of engineering mechanics pertaining to mechanical and structural components and the relevant systems in nuclear reactors. Subjects covered include: theoretical developments in structural mechanics, loading conditions, behavior of materials, fluid mechanics, operating experience, accident sequences, and calculational procedures. Problems of structural mechanics analysis are focused within the general context of the design, reliability, and safety of nuclear reactors. Operating plant performance and life extension, waste repository technology and regulatory research have been formalized as distinct Divisions

  18. The final checkpoint. Cancer as an adaptive evolutionary mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumena Petkova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for identification of DNA damage and repair usually manage DNA damage very efficiently. If damaged cells manage to bypass the checkpoints where the integrity of the genome is assessed and the decisions whether to proceed with the cell cycle are made, they may evade the imperative to stop dividing and to die. As a result, cancer may develop. Warding off the potential sequence-altering effects of DNA damage during the life of the individual or the existence span of the species is controlled by a set of larger checkpoints acting on a progressively increasing scale, from systematic removal of damaged cells from the proliferative pool by means of repair of DNA damage/programmed cell death through ageing to, finally, cancer. They serve different purposes and act at different levels of the life cycle, safeguarding the integrity of the genetic backup of the individual, the genetic diversity of the population, and, finally, the survival of the species and of life on Earth. In the light of the theory that cancer is the final checkpoint or the nature's manner to prevent complex organisms from living forever at the expense of genetic stagnation, the eventual failure of modern anti-cancer treatments is only to be expected. Nevertheless, the medicine of today and the near future has enough potential to slow down the progression to terminal cancer so that the life expectancy and the quality of life of cancer-affected individuals may be comparable to those of healthy aged individuals.

  19. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  20. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J; Albers, P; Altena, R; Aparicio, J; Bokemeyer, C; Busch, J; Cathomas, R; Cavallin-Stahl, E; Clarke, N W; Claßen, J; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Dahl, A A; Daugaard, G; De Giorgi, U; De Santis, M; De Wit, M; De Wit, R; Dieckmann, K P; Fenner, M; Fizazi, K; Flechon, A; Fossa, S D; Germá Lluch, J R; Gietema, J A; Gillessen, S; Giwercman, A; Hartmann, J T; Heidenreich, A; Hentrich, M; Honecker, F; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Kliesch, S; Kollmannsberger, C; Krege, S; Laguna, M P; Looijenga, L H J; Lorch, A; Lotz, J P; Mayer, F; Necchi, A; Nicolai, N; Nuver, J; Oechsle, K; Oldenburg, J; Oosterhuis, J W; Powles, T; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Rick, O; Rosti, G; Salvioni, R; Schrader, M; Schweyer, S; Sedlmayer, F; Sohaib, A; Souchon, R; Tandstad, T; Winter, C; Wittekind, C

    2013-04-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements.

  1. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to Trastuzumab Emtansine in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangmin; Guo, Jun; Shen, Ben-Quan; Bumbaca Yadav, Daniela; Sliwkowski, Mark X; Crocker, Lisa M; Lacap, Jennifer A; Lewis Phillips, Gail D

    2018-04-25

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancer, and its amplification is associated with reduced survival. Trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla®, T-DM1), an antibody-drug conjugate that is comprised of trastuzumab covalently linked to the anti-mitotic agent DM1 through a stable linker, was designed to selectively deliver DM1 to HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. T-DM1 is approved for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer following progression on trastuzumab and a taxane. Despite the improvement in clinical outcome, many patients who initially respond to T-DM1 treatment eventually develop progressive disease. The mechanisms that contribute to T-DM1 resistance are not fully understood. To this end, we developed T-DM1-resistant in vitro models to examine the mechanisms of acquired T-DM1 resistance. We demonstrate that decreased HER2 and up-regulation of MDR1 contribute to T-DM1 resistance in KPL-4 T-DM1 resistant cells. In contrast, both loss of SLC46A3 and PTEN deficiency play a role in conferring resistance in BT-474M1 T-DM1 resistant cells. Our data suggest that these two cell lines acquire resistance through distinct mechanisms. Furthermore, we show that the KPL-4 T-DM1 resistance can be overcome by treatment with an inhibitor of MDR1, whereas a PI3K inhibitor can rescue PTEN loss-induced resistance in T-DM1-resistant BT-474M1 cells. Our results provide a rationale for developing therapeutic strategies to enhance T-DM1 clinical efficacy by combining T-DM1 and other inhibitors that target signaling transduction or resistance pathways. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Bithionol inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth In Vitro - studies on mechanism(s) of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, Vijayalakshmi N; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a cause of ovarian cancer recurrence and low overall survival rates. There is a need for more effective treatment approaches because the development of new drug is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, the concept of ‘drug repurposing’ is promising. We focused on Bithionol (BT), a clinically approved anti-parasitic drug as an anti-ovarian cancer drug. BT has previously been shown to inhibit solid tumor growth in several preclinical cancer models. A better understanding of the anti-tumor effects and mechanism(s) of action of BT in ovarian cancer cells is essential for further exploring its therapeutic potential against ovarian cancer. The cytotoxic effects of BT against a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines were determined by Presto Blue cell viability assay. Markers of apoptosis such as caspases 3/7, cPARP induction, nuclear condensation and mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization were assessed using microscopic, FACS and immunoblotting methods. Mechanism(s) of action of BT such as cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, autotaxin (ATX) inhibition and effects on MAPK and NF-kB signalling were determined by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and colorimetric methods. BT caused dose dependent cytotoxicity against all ovarian cancer cell lines tested with IC 50 values ranging from 19 μM – 60 μM. Cisplatin-resistant variants of A2780 and IGROV-1 have shown almost similar IC 50 values compared to their sensitive counterparts. Apoptotic cell death was shown by expression of caspases 3/7, cPARP, loss of mitochondrial potential, nuclear condensation, and up-regulation of p38 and reduced expression of pAkt, pNF-κB, pIκBα, XIAP, bcl-2 and bcl-xl. BT treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1/M phase and increased ROS generation. Treatment with ascorbic acid resulted in partial restoration of cell viability. In addition, dose and time dependent inhibition of ATX was observed. BT exhibits cytotoxic effects on various

  3. Immune mechanisms and immuno therapy of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years the role of immune mechanisms in the induction and progress of cancer has been established. The importance of oncogenes, growth suppressor genes, gene regulation immune surveillance and the interactions of the various components of the immune system in the pathogenesis and progress of cancers is being extensively studied. In fact, the newer concepts of using immune reactions as a modality of therapy is being explored in conjunction with the treatments for cancer. The increased hope and enthusiasm for tumor immunotherapy is in a large part due to animal studies and a better understanding about surface antigens on tumors, major histocompatibility complex molecules, adhesion molecules, cytokines and a variety of newly discovered molecules which play a role in immune interactions

  4. Weight gain following breast cancer diagnosis: Implication and proposed mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makari-Judson, Grace; Braun, Barry; Jerry, D Joseph; Mertens, Wilson C

    2014-01-01

    Weight gain occurs in the majority of women following breast cancer treatment. An overview of studies describing weight gain amongst women treated with early to modern chemotherapy regimens is included. Populations at higher risk include women who are younger, closer to ideal body weight and who have been treated with chemotherapy. Weight gain ranges between 1 to 5 kg, and may be associated with change in body composition with gain in fat mass and loss in lean body mass. Women are unlikely to return to pre-diagnosis weight. Possible mechanisms including inactivity and metabolic changes are explored. Potential interventions are reviewed including exercise, dietary changes and pharmacologic agents. Although breast cancer prognosis does not appear to be significantly impacted, weight gain has negative consequences on quality of life and overall health. Future studies should explore change in body composition, metabolism and insulin resistance. Avoiding weight gain in breast cancer survivors following initial diagnosis and treatment should be encouraged. PMID:25114844

  5. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...... at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement on three of these areas: NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, the treatment of first-line...

  6. P-glycoprotein confers acquired resistance to 17-DMAG in lung cancers with an ALK rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Joung; Lee, Kye Young; Kim, Young Whan; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jung-Eun; Choi, Chang Min; Baek, In-Jeoung; Rho, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Because anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is dependent on Hsp90 for protein stability, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective in controlling growth of lung cancer cells with ALK rearrangement. We investigated the mechanism of acquired resistance to 17-(Dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a geldanamycin analogue Hsp90 inhibitor, in H3122 and H2228 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines with ALK rearrangement. Resistant cell lines (H3122/DR-1, H3122/DR-2 and H2228/DR) were established by repeated exposure to increasing concentrations of 17-DMAG. Mechanisms for resistance by either NAD(P)H/quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), previously known as a factor related to 17-DMAG resistance, or P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1/MDR1) were queried using RT-PCR, western blot analysis, chemical inhibitors, the MTT cell proliferation/survival assay, and cellular efflux of rhodamine 123. The resistant cells showed no cross-resistance to AUY922 or ALK inhibitors, suggesting that ALK dependency persists in cells with acquired resistance to 17-DMAG. Although expression of NQO1 was decreased in H3122/DR-1 and H3122/DR-2, NQO1 inhibition by dicumarol did not affect the response of parental cells (H2228 and H3122) to 17-DMAG. Interestingly, all resistant cells showed the induction of P-gp at the protein and RNA levels, which was associated with an increased efflux of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). Transfection with siRNA directed against P-gp or treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp, restored the sensitivity to the drug in all cells with acquired resistance to 17-DMAG. Furthermore, we also observed that the growth-inhibitory effect of 17-DMAG was decreased in A549/PR and H460/PR cells generated to over-express P-gp by long-term exposure to paclitaxel, and these cells recovered their sensitivity to 17-DMAG through the inhibition of P-gp. P-gp over-expression is a possible mechanism of acquired resistance to 17-DMAG in cells with ALK rearrangement. The online

  7. Abstracts of the Conference on Mechanisms of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis on the 100. Anniversary of the Discovery of Polonium and Radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference covered various aspects of mutagenesis and mechanisms of DNA repair. UV and ionizing radiation were use to induce DNA lesions in bacteria, yeast and cell cultures of higher organisms. This allows study of influence of mutations on particular processes in the cell. Mechanisms of resistance were also investigated. Biological investigations were performed using labelled compounds.

  8. Abstracts of the Conference on Mechanisms of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis on the 100. Anniversary of the Discovery of Polonium and Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The conference covered various aspects of mutagenesis and mechanisms of DNA repair. UV and ionizing radiation were use to induce DNA lesions in bacteria, yeast and cell cultures of higher organisms. This allows study of influence of mutations on particular processes in the cell. Mechanisms of resistance were also investigated. Biological investigations were performed using labelled compounds

  9. Abstracts of the Conference on Mechanisms of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis on the 100. Anniversary of the Discovery of Polonium and Radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The conference covered various aspects of mutagenesis and mechanisms of DNA repair. UV and ionizing radiation were use to induce DNA lesions in bacteria, yeast and cell cultures of higher organisms. This allows study of influence of mutations on particular processes in the cell. Mechanisms of resistance were also investigated. Biological investigations were performed using labelled compounds.

  10. HPV epigenetic mechanisms related to Oropharyngeal and Cervix cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Marina; Giovane, Giancarlo; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Iorio, Rosamaria; Romano, Maurizio; De Francesco, Francesco; Feola, Antonia; Siciliano, Camilla; Califano, Luigi; Giordano, Antonio

    2017-03-31

    Human Papilloma Virus infection is very frequent in humans and is mainly transmitted sexually. The majority of infections are transient and asymptomatic, however, if the infection persists, it can occur with a variety of injuries to skin and mucous membranes, depending on the type of HPV involved. Some types of HPV are classified as high oncogenic risk as associated with the onset of cancer. The tumors most commonly associated with HPV are cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, epigenetic mechanisms related to HPV infection include methylation changes to host and viral DNA and chromatin modification in host species. This review is focused about epigenethic mechanism, such as MiRNAs expression, related to cervix and oral cancer. Specifically it discuss about molecular markers associated to a more aggressive phenotype. In this way we will analyze genes involved in meiotic sinaptonemal complex, transcriptional factors, of orthokeratins, sinaptogirin, they are all expressed in cancer in a way not more dependent on cell differentiation but HPV-dependent.

  11. A rare variant P507L in TPP1 interrupts TPP1-TIN2 interaction, influences telomere length, and confers colorectal cancer risk in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaoyuan; Chang, Jiang; Tian, Jianbo; Ke, Juntao; Zhu, Ying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Yajie; Zou, Danyi; Peng, Xiating; Yang, Nan; Mei, Shufang; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Liming; Hu, Weiguo; Gong, Jing; Zhong, Rong; Miao, Xiaoping

    2018-06-11

    Telomere dysfunction triggers cellular senescence and constitutes a driving force for cancer initiation. Genetic variants in genes involved in telomere maintenance may contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility. In this study, we firstly captured germline mutations in 192 CRC patients by sequencing the coding regions of 13 core components implicated in telomere biology. Five potential functional variants were then genotyped and assessed in a case-control set with 3,761 CRC cases and 3,839 healthy controls. The promising association was replicated in additional 6,765 cases and 6,906 controls. Functional experiments were used to further clarify the potential function of the significant variant and uncover the underlying mechanism in CRC development. The two-stage association studies showed that a rare missense variant rs149418249 (c.C1520T, p.P507L) in the 11th exon of TPP1 (also known as ACD, gene ID 65057) was significantly associated with CRC risk with the ORs being 2.90 (95% CI:1.04-8.07, P=0.041), 2.50 (95% CI:1.04-6.04, P=0.042), and 2.66 (95%CI:1.36-5.18, P=0.004) in discovery, replication, and the combined samples, respectively. Further functional annotation indicated that the TPP1 P507L substitution interrupted TPP1-TIN2 interaction, impaired telomerase processivity, and shortened telomere length, which subsequently facilitated cell proliferation and promoted CRC development. A rare variant P507L in TPP1 confers increased risk of CRC through interrupting TPP1-TIN2 interaction, impairing telomerase processivity, and shrinking telomere length. These findings emphasize the important role of telomere dysfunction in CRC development, and provide new insights about the prevention of this type of cancer. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types

  13. Mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells with emphasis on thyroid cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHombach-Klonisch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance to anti-cancer treatments are common and main causes of death in cancer patients. Tumor cells mount complex and still poorly understood molecular defense mechanisms to counteract and evade oxygen deprivation, nutritional restrictions as well as radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens aimed at destabilizing their genomes and important cellular processes. In thyroid cancer, as in other tumors, such defense strategies include the reactivation in cancer cells of early developmental programs normally active exclusively in stem cells, the stimulation of cancer stem-like cells resident within the tumor tissue and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived progenitors into the tumor (Thomas et al., 2008;Klonisch et al., 2009;Derwahl, 2011. Metastasis and therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells involves the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition- (EMT- mediated enhancement in cellular plasticity, which includes coordinated dynamic biochemical and nuclear changes (Ahmed et al., 2010. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of the role of DNA repair mechanisms contributing to therapeutic resistance in thyroid cancer and highlight the emerging roles of autophagy and damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP responses in EMT and chemoresistance in tumor cells. Finally, we use the stem cell factor and nucleoprotein High Mobility Group A2 (HMGA2 as an example to demonstrate how factors intended to protect stem cells are wielded by cancer (stem cells to gain increased transformative cell plasticity which enhances metastasis, therapeutic resistance and cell survival. Wherever possible, we have included information on these cellular processes and associated factors as they relate to thyroid cancer cells.

  14. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  15. Adaptive plasma for cancer therapy: physics, mechanism and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2017-10-01

    One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is the cancer therapy. The uniqueness of plasma is in its ability to change composition in situ. Plasma self-organization could lead to formation of coherent plasma structures. These coherent structures tend to modulate plasma chemistry and composition, including reactive species, the electric field and charged particles. Formation of coherent plasma structures allows the plasma to adapt to external boundary conditions, such as different cells types and their contextual tissues. In this talk we will explore possibilities and opportunities that the adaptive plasma therapeutic system might offer. We shall define such an adaptive system as a plasma device that is able to adjust the plasma composition to obtain optimal desirable outcomes through its interaction with cells and tissues. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types such as lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin has been demonstrated. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. Recently mechanism of plasma selectivity based on aquaporin hypothesis has been proposed. Aquaporins (AQPs) are the confirmed membrane channels of H2O2 and other large molecules. We have demonstrated that the anti-cancer capacity of plasma could be inhibited by silencing the expression of AQPs. Additional possible cell feedback mechanism was recently discovered. It is associated with production of reactive species during direct CAP treatment by cancer cells. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide by different cells can lead to adaptation of chemistry at the plasma-cell interface based on the cellular input. In particular we have found that the discharge voltage is an important factor affecting the ratio of reactive oxygen species to reactive nitrogen species in the gas phase and this correlates well with effect of hydrogen peroxide production by cells. This work was

  16. Transactions of the 10th international conference on structual mechanics in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    In this book, a wide spectrum of subjects is covered, including theoretical developments in structural mechanics, loading conditions, behavior of materials, fluid mechanics, operating experience, accident sequences, and calculational procedures. As a result, problems of structural mechanics analysis are focused within the general context of the design, reliability, and safety of nuclear reactors. Operating plant performance and life extension, waste repository technology and regulatory research have been formalized as distinct Divisions. The papers are theoretical or applied, or they address both of these aspects to demonstrate application of developed methods to solve specific design problems and show how well actual behavior correlates with theory. These paper explore in detail the mechanical design and system integration of fusion power reactors; thermohydraulics, structural mechanics and life-time evaluations of reactor components as first wall diverter/limiter, plasma heating devices, breeding blanket and shielding, magnet coils and supports, and vacuum containment systems, and structural analysis and comparison with measured data

  17. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Felice F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca De Felice,1 Vincenzo Tombolini,1 Francesco Marampon,2 Angela Musella,3 Claudia Marchetti3 1Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, 2Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, 3Department of Gynecological and Obstetrical Sciences and Urological Sciences, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1 and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2 mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. Keywords: prostate cancer, metastatic disease, castration resistant, BRCA, DNA-repair, PARP, olaparib

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Anticancer Effects of Phytoestrogens in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2018-01-01

    Phytoestrogens derived from plants exert estrogenic as well as antiestrogenic effects and multiple actions within breast cancer cells. Chemopreventive properties of phytoestrogens have emerged from epidemiological observations. In recent clinical research studies, phytoestrogens are safe and may even protect against breast cancer. In this brief review, the molecular mechanisms of phytoestrogens on regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, estrogen receptors, cell signaling pathways, and epigenetic modulations in relation to breast cancer are discussed. Phytoestrogens have a preferential affinity for estrogen receptor (ER)-β, which appears to be associated with antiproliferative and anticarcinogenic effects. Moreover, while phytoestrogens not only inhibit ER-positive but also ER-negative breast cancer cells, the possibility of epigenetic modulation playing an important role is also discussed. In conclusion, as there are multiple targets and actions of phytoestrogens, extensive research is still necessary. However, due to low toxicity, low cost, and easy availability, their potent chemoprevention effects deserve further study. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. The cancer cell adhesion resistome: mechanisms, targeting and translational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickreuter, Ellen; Cordes, Nils

    2017-06-27

    Cell adhesion-mediated resistance limits the success of cancer therapies and is a great obstacle to overcome in the clinic. Since the 1990s, where it became clear that adhesion of tumor cells to the extracellular matrix is an important mediator of therapy resistance, a lot of work has been conducted to understand the fundamental underlying mechanisms and two paradigms were deduced: cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR) and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Preclinical work has evidently demonstrated that targeting of integrins, adapter proteins and associated kinases comprising the cell adhesion resistome is a promising strategy to sensitize cancer cells to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Moreover, the cell adhesion resistome fundamentally contributes to adaptation mechanisms induced by radiochemotherapy as well as molecular drugs to secure a balanced homeostasis of cancer cells for survival and growth. Intriguingly, this phenomenon provides a basis for synthetic lethal targeted therapies simultaneously administered to standard radiochemotherapy. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the cell adhesion resistome and highlight targeting strategies to override CAM-RR and CAM-DR.

  20. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  1. Developments in mechanics. Volume 15 - Midwestern Mechanics Conference, 21st, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Aug. 13-16, 1989, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, J.B.; Lord, H.W.; Vable, M.; Snyder, V.W.; Trevino, G.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental and analytical investigations in mechanics are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include smart CFD algorithms and adaptivity, the supersonic/hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition, cyclic plastic-strain measurements at a notch root under fully reversed loading, a new class of random processes applicable to helicopter noise, the buckling of thin-walled beams, gravity-decoupled robots, and the elastic stability of orthotropic plates under a follower force. Consideration is given to interlaminar stresses in thick-section composite plates and shells, the design of structural joints for dynamic response, forced shear-wave propagation in a layered viscoelastic half-space, the mechanical properties of sea ice, an experimental modal-analysis technique for large structures, boundary-layer flow of a particle-fluid suspension past a flat plate, slow crack growth in thermoplastic welds, BEMs for linear elasticity, and the effect of vibration on heat-transfer rate

  2. End-stage head and neck cancer coping mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Popescu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Coping mechanisms are patients’ means of adapting to stressful situations and involve psychological and physical changes in behavior. Patients adapt to head and neck cancer in a variety of ways. Head and neck cancers are extremely debilitating, especially in advanced stages of the disease or in end-of-life situations. While an oncology team needs to address the needs of all oncology patients, the advanced terminal patients require special attention. Most of these patients do not cope well with their situation and have a tendency to cease social interactions. Pain is the most frequentlyexperienced medical disability in patients having an end-stage illness experience, and thus an important medical endeavor is to afford dignity to the dying patient facingan incurable disease. In such cases, the medical community should never refuse therapy or to assist a dying patient.In some instances, the patient and family may derive benefit from their religious beliefs.

  3. Promoting Cancer Control in Africa With "Ubuntu": A Report of the African Organization for Research and Training in Africa (AORTIC) 10th Conference, 2015 in Marrakech, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbiri, Kenneth O; Williams, Christopher K; Macaluso, Marcella; Giordano, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), includes bringing products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through local and international collaboration. The consistent and huge growth in participation in the conferences and the diversity of the nations is a witness to the success of the organization thus far. The theme for the Tenth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Morocco in 2015 was "Road map to Cancer Control in Africa" and topics of discussion of paramount importance for low- and middle-income African countries included childhood cancers such as BL, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate; cancers associated with HIV-infection such as cervical, vulvar, and anal; as well as cancer care challenges associated with palliative care. The role of environmental factors that underlie some epigenetic changes in some of the cancers was emphasized. Oral and poster presentations from various parts of the continent indicate the growth of basic and translational science of cancer in the region, with studies revealing regional diversity in the frequencies of the triple-negative breast cancer, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, HCC, and Burkitt's lymphoma. There was a sign that Africa is trying to keep pace with the paradigm shift and focusing on translational medicine. This was shown by suggestions for application of genome-wide association studies, new generation sequencing, as well as the evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms that may be responsible for variable susceptibility in some of the prevalent cancers in people of African descent. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2287-2295, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A local mechanism by which alcohol consumption causes cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that 5.8% of cancer deaths world-wide are attributable to alcohol consumption. The risk of cancer is higher in tissues in closest contact on ingestion of alcohol, such as the oral cavity, pharynx and esophagus. However, since ethanol is not mutagenic and the carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol (acetaldehyde) is mostly produced in the liver, it is not clear why alcohol use preferentially exerts a local carcinogenic effect. It is well known that ethanol causes cell death at the concentrations present in alcoholic beverages; however, this effect may have been overlooked because dead cells cannot give rise to cancer. Here I discuss that the cytotoxic effect of ethanol on the cells lining the oral cavity, pharynx and esophagus activates the division of the stem cells located in deeper layers of the mucosa to replace the dead cells. Every time stem cells divide, they become exposed to unavoidable errors associated with cell division (e.g., mutations arising during DNA replication and chromosomal alterations occurring during mitosis) and also become highly vulnerable to the genotoxic activity of DNA-damaging agents (e.g., acetaldehyde and tobacco carcinogens). Alcohol consumption may increase the risk of developing cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx and esophagus by promoting the accumulation of cell divisions in the stem cells that maintain these tissues in homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenicity of alcohol is important to reinforce the epidemiological evidence and to raise public awareness of the strong link between alcohol consumption and cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the

  6. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012 : Science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the

  7. The African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer and its conferences: a historical perspective and highlights of the Ninth International Conference, Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher KO; Cristina Stefan, D; Rawlinson, Fiona; Simbiri, Kenneth; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC), both at its inception in the early 1980s, and at its reactivation in 2000 following a decade of inactivity, included bringing the products of decades of advances in cancer research to African populations through international collaboration. The historical perspective provided in this report illustrates progress in achieving these objectives through successive continent-wide activities over a period of 30 years, culminating in the organisation’s most recent conference held in Durban, South Africa, 21–24 November 2013. The constant growth in the number of attendants and increasing diversity of the nations of their origin are consistent with advances, whereby the number of participants and the nations of their origin have grown from 24 in 1983 to almost 1000 in 2013, and from 14 to 70, respectively. While earlier AORTIC conferences used to assume the atmosphere of ‘jamborees’, more recent ones have morphed to problem-solving events, with the concerted collaboration of international organisations, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Africa Union (AU), the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS), and others. The topics of discussion at the Ninth AORTIC International Conference on Cancer in Africa in Durban were those of paramount importance for low- and middle-income countries: childhood cancers, cancers of the cervix, breast, and prostate, as well as cancer care challenges resulting from ignorance, neglect, and economic deprivation. The role of environmental factors that underlie Burkitt’s lymphoma was the subject of the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors Workshop, highlighting the NCI research programme in East Africa, while the Workshop on Cost Effectiveness of Treatment of Cancer in Africa surmised that treating childhood cancers is

  8. Autophagic Mechanism in Anti-Cancer Immunity: Its Pros and Cons for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Feun, Lynn G; Thongkum, Angkana; Tu, Chiao-Hui; Chen, Shu-Mei; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Wu, Chunjing; Kuo, Macus T; Savaraj, Niramol

    2017-06-19

    Autophagy, a self-eating machinery, has been reported as an adaptive response to maintain metabolic homeostasis when cancer cells encounter stress. It has been appreciated that autophagy acts as a double-edge sword to decide the fate of cancer cells upon stress factors, molecular subtypes, and microenvironmental conditions. Currently, the majority of evidence support that autophagy in cancer cells is a vital mechanism bringing on resistance to current and prospective treatments, yet whether autophagy affects the anticancer immune response remains unclear and controversial. Accumulated studies have demonstrated that triggering autophagy is able to facilitate anticancer immunity due to an increase in immunogenicity, whereas other studies suggested that autophagy is likely to disarm anticancer immunity mediated by cytotoxic T cells and nature killer (NK) cells. Hence, this contradiction needs to be elucidated. In this review, we discuss the role of autophagy in cancer cells per se and in cancer microenvironment as well as its dual regulatory roles in immune surveillance through modulating presentation of tumor antigens, development of immune cells, and expression of immune checkpoints. We further focus on emerging roles of autophagy induced by current treatments and its impact on anticancer immune response, and illustrate the pros and cons of utilizing autophagy in cancer immunotherapy based on preclinical references.

  9. 14th International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration of Mechanical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Marinca, Vasile

    2018-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers presented at Acoustics and Vibration of Mechanical Structures 2017 – AVMS 2017 – highlighting the current trends and state-of-the-art developments in the field. It covers a broad range of topics, such as noise and vibration control, noise and vibration generation and propagation, the effects of noise and vibration, condition monitoring and vibration testing, modeling, prediction and simulation of noise and vibration, environmental and occupational noise and vibration, noise and vibration attenuators, as well as biomechanics and bioacoustics. The book also presents analytical, numerical and experimental techniques for evaluating linear and non-linear noise and vibration problems (including strong nonlinearity). It is primarily intended for academics, researchers and professionals, as well as PhD students in various fields of the acoustics and vibration of mechanical structures.

  10. Mechanisms of symbiont-conferred protection against natural enemies: an ecological and evolutionary framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardo, Nicole M; Parker, Benjamin J

    2014-10-01

    Many vertically-transmitted microbial symbionts protect their insect hosts from natural enemies, including host-targeted pathogens and parasites, and those vectored by insects to other hosts. Protection is often achieved through production of inhibiting toxins, which is not surprising given that toxin production mediates competition in many environments. Classical models of macroecological interactions, however, demonstrate that interspecific competition can be less direct, and recent research indicates that symbiont-protection can be mediated through exploitation of limiting resources, and through activation of host immune mechanisms that then suppress natural enemies. Available data, though limited, suggest that effects of symbionts on vectored pathogens and parasites, as compared to those that are host-targeted, are more likely to result from symbiont activation of the host immune system. We discuss these different mechanisms in light of their potential impact on the evolution of host physiological processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference Statement: Symptom management in cancer: pain, depression, and fatigue, July 15-17, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Daniel L; Ferketich, Sandra L; Frame, Paul S; Harris, Jesse J; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Levin, Bernard; Link, Michael P; Lustig, Craig; McLaughlin, Joseph; Reid, L Douglas; Turrisi, Andrew T; Unützer, Jürgen; Vernon, Sally W

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in early detection and effective treatment, cancer remains one of the most feared diseases. Among the most common side effects of cancer and treatments for cancer are pain, depression, and fatigue. Although research is producing increasingly hopeful insights into the causes and cures for cancer, efforts to manage the side effects of the disease and its treatments have not kept pace. The challenge that faces us is how to increase awareness of the importance of recognizing and actively addressing cancer-related distress. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a State-of-the-Science Conference on Symptom Management in Cancer: Pain, Depression, and Fatigue to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the management of pain, depression, and fatigue in individuals with cancer and to identify directions for future research. Specifically, the conference examined how to identify individuals who are at risk for cancer-related pain, depression, and/or fatigue; what treatments work best to address these symptoms when they occur; and what is the best way to deliver interventions across the continuum of care. STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE PROCESS: A non-advocate, non-Federal, 14-member panel of experts representing the fields of oncology, radiology, psychology, nursing, public health, social work, and epidemiology prepared the statement. In addition, 24 experts in medical oncology, geriatrics, pharmacology, psychology, and neurology presented data to the panel and to the conference audience during the first 1.5 days of the conference. The panel then prepared its statement, addressing the five predetermined questions and drawing on submitted literature, the speakers' presentations, and discussions held at the conference. The statement was presented to the conference audience, followed by a press conference to allow the panel to respond to questions from the media. After its release at the conference, the draft statement was made available on the Internet

  12. Book of abstracts of 13. national conference on nuclear structure and 9. symposium on 'nuclear structure and quantum mechanics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    13. national conference on nuclear structure and 9. symposium on 'nuclear structure and quantum mechanics' was held by China Nuclear Physics Society in Chifeng, 25 to 30 July, 2010. The proceedings collects the abstracts of 102 articles

  13. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  14. Skin cancer margin analysis within minutes with full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Ogrich, Lauren; Morales, Diego; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Abdelmalek, Mark; Boccara, Claude; Durkin, John

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the skin cancer. Traditional excision involves the removal of the visible skin cancer with a significant margin of normal skin. On cosmetically sensitive areas, Mohs micrographic tissue is the standard of care. Mohs uses intraoperative microscopic margin assessment which minimizes the surgical defect and can help reduce the recurrence rate by a factor of 3. The current Mohs technique relies on frozen section tissue slide preparation which significantly lengthens operative time and requires on-site trained histotechnicians. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT) is a novel optical imaging technique which provides a quick and efficient method to visualize cancerous areas in minutes, without any preparation or destruction of the tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the analysis of skin cancer margins during Mohs surgery. Over 150 images of Mohs specimens were acquired intraoperatively with FFOCT before frozen section analysis. The imaging procedure took less than 5 minutes for each specimen. No artifacts on histological preparation were found arising from FFOCT manipulation; however frozen section artifact was readily seen on FFOCT. An atlas was established with FFOCT images and corresponding histological slides to reveal FFOCT reading criteria of normal and cancerous structures. Blind analysis showed high concordance between FFOCT and histology. FFOCT can potentially reduce recurrence rates while maintaining short surgery times, optimize clinical workflow, and decrease healthcare costs. For the patient, this translates into smaller infection risk, decreased stress, and better comfort.

  15. GTSE1 expression represses apoptotic signaling and confers cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Tan, Shi Hui; Tan, Woei Loon; Yeo, Mei Shi; Xie, Chen; Wong, Foong Ying; Kiat, Zee Ying; Lim, Robert; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    Platinum based therapy is commonly used in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. However, resistance to chemotherapy is a major challenge that causes marked variation in individual response rate and survival rate. In this study, we aimed to identify the expression of GTSE1 and its correlation with cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells. Methylation profiling was carried out in tissue samples from gastric cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvent therapy using docetaxel, cisplatin and 5FU (DCX) and in gastric cancer cell lines. The correlation between GTSE1 expression and methylation in gastric cancer cells was determined by RT-PCR and MSP respectively. GTSE1 expression was knocked-down using shRNA’s and its effects on cisplatin cytotoxicity and cell survival were detected by MTS, proliferation and clonogenic survival assays. Additionally, the effect of GTSE1 knock down in drug induced apoptosis was determined by western blotting and apoptosis assays. GTSE1 exhibited a differential methylation index in gastric cancer patients and in cell lines that correlated with DCX treatment response and cisplatin sensitivity, respectively. In-vitro, GTSE1 expression showed a direct correlation with hypomethylation. Interestingly, Cisplatin treatment induced a dose dependent up regulation as well as nuclear translocation of GTSE1 expression in gastric cancer cells. Knock down of GTSE1 enhanced cisplatin cytotoxity and led to a significant reduction in cell proliferation and clonogenic survival. Also, loss of GTSE1 expression caused a significant increase in P53 mediated apoptosis in cisplatin treated cells. Our study identifies GTSE1 as a biomarker for cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells. This study also suggests the repressive role of GTSE1 in cisplatin induced apoptosis and signifies its potential utility as a therapeutic target for better clinical management of gastric cancer patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885

  16. PREVALENCE, MECHANISMS, AND MANAGEMENT OF CANCER-RELATED COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelsins, Michelle C.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Ahles, Tim A.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the current literature on cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) with a focus on prevalence, mechanisms, and possible interventions for CRCI in those who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for non-central nervous system tumors and is primarily focused on breast cancer. CRCI is characterized as deficits in areas of cognition including memory, attention, concentration, and executive function. Development of CRCI can impair quality of life and impact treatment decisions. CRCI is highly prevalent; these problems can be detected in up to 30% of patients prior to chemotherapy; up to 75% of patients report some form of CRCI during treatment, and CRCI is still present in up to 35% of patients many years following completion of treatment. While the trajectory of CRCI is becoming better understood, the mechanisms underlying the development of CRCI are still obscure; however, host characteristics, immune dysfunction, neural toxicity, and genetics may play key roles in the development and trajectory of CRCI. Intervention research is limited, though strategies to maintain function are being studied with promising preliminary findings. This review highlights key research being conducted in these areas, both in patient populations and in animals, which will ultimately result in better understanding and effective treatments for CRCI. PMID:24716504

  17. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb, infection, intensity of pain, and factors that improve and worsen the pain. The percentage of events was used for statistical analysis. About half the participants (52.1% performed modified radical surgery, with 91.3% removing only one breast; 82.6% of the participants did not perform breast reconstruction surgery. Insignificant pain was reported by 32.60% of the women and 67.3% said they suffered pain; it was mild in 28.8% of the cases (scale 1–5, moderate in 34.8% (scale 6–9, and severe in 4.3%. The main mechanisms used to cope with pain were painkillers in 41.30% of participants, rest in 21.73%, religious ceremonies in 17.39%, and chatting with friends in 8.69%. In conclusion, many mastectomized patients with lymphedema complain of pain, but pain is often underrecognized and undertreated.

  18. Mapping the mechanical heterogeneity of the brain, and why this matters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guck, Jochen R.

    2017-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that cells measure and respond to the mechanics of their environment. We are especially interested in this mechanosensing during CNS development and pathologies. Using quantitative scanning force microscopy we have shown that various neural tissues are very compliant (shear modulus brains, foreign body reactions were significantly enhanced around the stiff parts of the implant. It appears that the mechanical mismatch between a neural implant and native tissue might be at the root of foreign body reactions. Also oligodendrocytes are mechanosensitive as their survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in vitro depend on substrate stiffness. This finding might be linked to the failure of remyelination in chronic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. And finally, we have also shown retinal ganglion axon pathfinding in the early embryonic Xenopus brain development to be instructed by stiffness gradients. These results form the basis for further investigations into the mechanobiology of cell function in the CNS. Ultimately, this research could help treating previously incurable neuropathologies such as spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. The Multidisciplinary Team Conference's Decision on M-Staging in Patients with Gastric- and Gastroesophageal Cancer is not Accurate without Staging Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandby, Rune Broni; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Fallentin, E.

    2016-01-01

    in the period 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were retrieved by searching for specific diagnosis and operation codes in the in-house system. The inclusion criteria were as follows: biopsy-verified cancer of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction or stomach, and no suspicion of peritoneal......BACKGROUND: The implementation of the multidisciplinary team conference has been shown to improve treatment outcome for patients with gastric- and gastroesophageal cancer. Likewise, the staging laparoscopy has increased the detection of patients with disseminated disease, that is, patients who do...... carcinomatosis or liver metastases on multidisciplinary team conference before staging laparoscopy. Furthermore, an evaluation with staging laparoscopy was required. RESULTS: In total, 222 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most cancers were located in the gastroesophageal junction, n = 171 (77.0%), and most...

  20. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  1. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...... deacetylase inhibitors. As such drugs may serve as therapeutic agents for cancer, our findings support the use of HDAC2 mutational status in future pharmacogenetic treatment of these individuals....

  2. Harnessing Raman spectroimmunoassay for detection of serological breast cancer markers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Ishan; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Two critical, unmet needs in breast cancer are the early detection of cancer metastasis and recurrence, and the sensitive assessment of temporal changes in tumor burden in response to therapy. The present research is directed towards developing a non-invasive, ultrasensitive and specific tool that provides a comprehensive real-time picture of the metastatic tumor burden and provides a radically new route to address these overarching challenges. As the continuing search for better diagnostic and prognostic clues has shifted away from a singular focus on primary tumor lesions, circulating and disseminated biomarkers have surfaced as attractive candidates due to the intrinsic advantages of a non-invasive, repeatable "liquid biopsy" procedure. However, a reproducible, facile blood-based test for diagnosis and follow-up of breast cancer has yet to be incorporated into a clinical laboratory assay due to the limitations of existing assays in terms of sensitivity, extensive sample processing requirements and, importantly, multiplexing capability. Here, by architecting nano-structured probes for detection of specific molecular species, we engineer a novel plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopic platform that offers a paradigmatic shift from the capabilities of today's diagnostic test platforms. Specifically, quantitative single-droplet serum tests reveal ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of three key breast cancer biomarkers, cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), CA27-29 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), over several order of magnitude range of biomarker concentration and clear segmentation of the sera between normal and metastatic cancer levels.

  3. Transactions of the 9th international conference on structural mechanics in reactor technology. Vol. M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    For obvious reasons reliability plays a dominant role in reactor technology. The area to be covered by Division M which deals with this subject, can be briefly summarized as follows: Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of structures and uncertainty modelling in structural design. Pre-service and in-service inspection with respect to evaluation of the probability of failure in time of structure. Stochastic loads modelling. External events (earthquakes, aircraft-impacts, etc.). Stochastic damage models of materials and structures. Probabilistic fracture mechanics. Model for ageing of components and structures. Reliability analysis of large and complex systems. Benchmark exercises. Analysis of operational experience. Precursor-studies. Man-machine interactions. Relationship between availability and PSA. Using probabilistic methods in setting up codes, standards and safety goals. Risk assessment of nuclear power plants and of nuclear fuel cycle installations. All 65 papers are separately indexed in the database. (orig./HP)

  4. Improved cancer risk stratification and diagnosis via quantitative phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Uttam, Shikhar; Pham, Hoa V.; Hartman, Douglas J.

    2017-02-01

    Pathology remains the gold standard for cancer diagnosis and in some cases prognosis, in which trained pathologists examine abnormality in tissue architecture and cell morphology characteristic of cancer cells with a bright-field microscope. The limited resolution of conventional microscope can result in intra-observer variation, missed early-stage cancers, and indeterminate cases that often result in unnecessary invasive procedures in the absence of cancer. Assessment of nanoscale structural characteristics via quantitative phase represents a promising strategy for identifying pre-cancerous or cancerous cells, due to its nanoscale sensitivity to optical path length, simple sample preparation (i.e., label-free) and low cost. I will present the development of quantitative phase microscopy system in transmission and reflection configuration to detect the structural changes in nuclear architecture, not be easily identifiable by conventional pathology. Specifically, we will present the use of transmission-mode quantitative phase imaging to improve diagnostic accuracy of urine cytology and the nuclear dry mass is progressively correlate with negative, atypical, suspicious and positive cytological diagnosis. In a second application, we will present the use of reflection-mode quantitative phase microscopy for depth-resolved nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) of clinically prepared formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. We demonstrated that the quantitative phase microscopy system detects a gradual increase in the density alteration of nuclear architecture during malignant transformation in animal models of colon carcinogenesis and in human patients with ulcerative colitis, even in tissue that appears histologically normal according to pathologists. We evaluated the ability of nanoNAM to predict "future" cancer progression in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  5. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  6. Mechanisms of right heart disease in pulmonary hypertension (2017 Grover Conference Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asosingh, Kewal; Erzurum, Serpil

    2018-01-01

    Current dogma is that pathological hypertrophy of the right ventricle is a direct consequence of pulmonary vascular remodeling. However, progression of right ventricle dysfunction is not always lung-dependent. Increased afterload caused by pulmonary vascular remodeling initiates the right ventricle hypertrophy, but determinants leading to adaptive or maladaptive hypertrophy and failure remain unknown. Ischemia in a hypertrophic right ventricle may directly contribute to right heart failure. Rapidly enlarging cardiomyocytes switch from aerobic to anaerobic energy generation resulting in cell growth under relatively hypoxic conditions. Cardiac muscle reacts to an increased afterload by over-activation of the sympathetic system and uncoupling and downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors. Recent studies suggest that β blocker therapy in PH is safe, well tolerated, and preserves right ventricle function and cardiac output by reducing right ventricular glycolysis. Fibrosis, an evolutionary conserved process in host defense and wound healing, is dysregulated in maladaptive cardiac tissue contributing directly to right ventricle failure. Despite several mechanisms having been suggested in right heart disease, the causes of maladaptive cardiac remodeling remain unknown and require further research.

  7. A THz plasmonics perfect absorber and Fabry-Perot cavity mechanism (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiangfeng; Bhattarai, Khagendra; Silva, Sinhara; Jeon, Jiyeon; Kim, Junoh; Lee, Sang Jun; Ku, Zahyun

    2016-10-01

    The plasmonic metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) is a recently developed branch of metamaterial which exhibits nearly unity absorption within certain frequency range.[1-6] The optically thin MPA possesses characteristic features of angular-independence, high Q-factor and strong field localization that have inspired a wide range of applications including electromagnetic wave absorption,[3, 7, 8] spatial[6] and spectral[5] modulation of light,[9] selective thermal emission,[9] thermal detecting[10] and refractive index sensing for gas[11] and liquid[12, 13] targets. In this work, we demonstrate a MPA working at terahertz (THz) regime and characterize it using an ultrafast THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Our study reveal an ultra-thin Fabry-Perot cavity mechanism compared to the impedance matching mechanism widely adopted in previous study [1-6]. Our results also shows higher-order resonances when the cavities length increases. These higher order modes exhibits much larger Q-factor that can benefit potential sensing and imaging applications. [1] C. M. Watts, X. L. Liu, and W. J. Padilla, "Metamaterial Electromagnetic Wave Absorbers," Advanced Materials, vol. 24, pp. 98-120, Jun 19 2012. [2] M. Hedayati, F. Faupel, and M. Elbahri, "Review of Plasmonic Nanocomposite Metamaterial Absorber," Materials, vol. 7, pp. 1221-1248, 2014. [3] N. I. Landy, S. Sajuyigbe, J. J. Mock, D. R. Smith, and W. J. Padilla, "Perfect metamaterial absorber," Physical Review Letters, vol. 100, p. 207402, May 23 2008. [4] H. R. Seren, G. R. Keiser, L. Cao, J. Zhang, A. C. Strikwerda, K. Fan, et al., "Optically Modulated Multiband Terahertz Perfect Absorber," Advanced Optical Materials, vol. 2, pp. 1221-1226, 2014. [5] D. Shrekenhamer, J. Montoya, S. Krishna, and W. J. Padilla, "Four-Color Metamaterial Absorber THz Spatial Light Modulator," Advanced Optical Materials, vol. 1, pp. 905-909, 2013. [6] S. Savo, D. Shrekenhamer, and W. J. Padilla, "Liquid Crystal Metamaterial Absorber Spatial

  8. Origami-based mechanical metamaterials with tunable frequency band structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiromi; Pratt, Riley; Yang, Jinkyu

    2017-04-01

    We investigate wave dynamics in origami-based mechanical metamaterials composed of bellows-like origami structures, specifically the Tachi-Miura Polyhedron (TMP). One of the unique features of the TMP is that its structural deformations take place only along the crease lines, therefore the structure can be made of rigid plates and hinges. By utilizing this feature, we introduce linear torsional springs to model the crease lines and derive the force and displacement relationship of the TMP structure along the longitudinal direction. Our analysis shows strain softening/hardening behaviors in compression/tensile regions respectively, and the force-displacement curve can be manipulated by altering the initial configuration of the TMP (e.g., the initial folding angle). We also fabricate physical prototypes and measure the force-displacement behavior to verify our analytical model. Based on this static analysis on the TMP, we simplify the TMP structure into a linkage model, preserving the tunable strain softening/hardening behaviors. Dynamic analysis is also conducted numerically to analyze the frequency response of the simplified TMP unit cell under harmonic excitations. The simplified TMP exhibits a transition between linear and nonlinear behaviors, which depends on the amplitude of the excitation and the initial configuration. In addition, we design a 1D system composed of simplified TMP unit cells and analyze the relationship between frequency and wave number. If two different configurations of the unit cell (e.g., different initial folding angles) are connected in an alternating arrangement, the system develops frequency bandgaps. These unique static/dynamic behaviors can be exploited to design engineering devices which can handle vibrations and impact in an efficient manner.

  9. Cognitive and Neuroplasticity Mechanisms by Which Congenital or Early Blindness May Confer a Protective Effect Against Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Steven M.; Wang, Yushi; Keane, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Several authors have noted that there are no reported cases of people with schizophrenia who were born blind or who developed blindness shortly after birth, suggesting that congenital or early (C/E) blindness may serve as a protective factor against schizophrenia. By what mechanisms might this effect operate? Here, we hypothesize that C/E blindness offers protection by strengthening cognitive functions whose impairment characterizes schizophrenia, and by constraining cognitive processes that exhibit excessive flexibility in schizophrenia. After briefly summarizing evidence that schizophrenia is fundamentally a cognitive disorder, we review areas of perceptual and cognitive function that are both impaired in the illness and augmented in C/E blindness, as compared to healthy sighted individuals. We next discuss: (1) the role of neuroplasticity in driving these cognitive changes in C/E blindness; (2) evidence that C/E blindness does not confer protective effects against other mental disorders; and (3) evidence that other forms of C/E sensory loss (e.g., deafness) do not reduce the risk of schizophrenia. We conclude by discussing implications of these data for designing cognitive training interventions to reduce schizophrenia-related cognitive impairment, and perhaps to reduce the likelihood of the development of the disorder itself. PMID:23349646

  10. Cognitive and Neuroplasticity Mechanisms By Which Congenital or Early Blindness May Confer a Protective Effect Against Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven eSilverstein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have noted that there are no reported cases of people with schizophrenia who were born blind or who developed blindness shortly after birth, suggesting that congenital or early (C/E blindness may serve as a protective factor against schizophrenia. By what mechanisms might this effect operate? Here, we hypothesize that C/E blindness offers protection by strengthening cognitive functions whose impairment characterizes schizophrenia, and by constraining cognitive processes that exhibit excessive flexibility in schizophrenia. After briefly summarizing evidence that schizophrenia is fundamentally a cognitive disorder, we review areas of perceptual and cognitive function that are both impaired in the illness and augmented in C/E blindness, as compared to healthy sighted individuals. We next discuss: 1 the role of neuroplasticity in driving these cognitive changes in C/E blindness; 2 evidence that C/E blindness does not confer protective effects against other mental disorders; and 3 evidence that other forms of C/E sensory loss (e.g., deafness do not reduce the risk of schizophrenia. We conclude by discussing implications of these data for designing cognitive training interventions to reduce schizophrenia-related cognitive impairment, and perhaps to reduce the likelihood of the development of the disorder itself.

  11. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaile Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  12. Targeted sequencing identifies genetic alterations that confer primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Korean Lung Cancer Consortium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Min; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Eun Kyung; Min, Young Joo; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hye Cheol; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2016-06-14

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations may exhibit primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). We aimed to examine genomic alterations associated with de novo resistance to gefitinib in a prospective study of NSCLC patients. One-hundred and fifty two patients with activating EGFR mutations were included in this study and 136 patients' tumor sample were available for targeted sequencing of genomic alterations in 22 genes using the Colon and Lung Cancer panel (Ampliseq, Life Technologies). All 132 patients with EGFR mutation were treated with gefitinib for their treatment of advanced NSCLC. Twenty patients showed primary resistance to EGFR TKI, and were classified as non-responders. A total of 543 somatic single-nucleotide variants (498 missense, 13 nonsense) and 32 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 3 mutations per sample. TP53 was most commonly mutated (47%) and mutations in SMAD4 was also common (19%), as well as DDR2 (16%), PIK3CA (15%), STK11 (14%), and BRAF (7%). Genomic mutations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were commonly found in non-responders (45%) compared to responders (27%), and they had significantly shorter progression-free survival and overall survival compared to patients without mutations (2.1 vs. 12.8 months, P=0.04, 15.7 vs. not reached, PAkt/mTOR pathway were commonly identified in non-responders and may confer resistance to EGFR TKI. Screening lung adenocarcinoma patients with clinical cancer gene test may aid in selecting out those who show primary resistance to EGFR TKI (NCT01697163).

  13. A coding variant in RARG confers susceptibility to anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aminkeng, Folefac; Bhavsar, Amit P.; Visscher, Henk; Rassekh, Shahrad R.; Li, Yuling; Lee, Jong W.; Brunham, Liam R.; Caron, Huib N.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Kremer, Leontien C.; van der Pal, Helena J.; Amstutz, Ursula; Rieder, Michael J.; Bernstein, Daniel; Carleton, Bruce C.; Hayden, Michael R.; Ross, Colin J. D.; MacLeod, Stuart; Smith, Anne; Hildebrand, Claudette; Ghannadan, Reza; Miao, Fudan; Higginson, Michelle; Massah, Nasim; Borrie, Adrienne; Hughes, Shevaun; Shaw, Kaitlyn; Dhoot, Satvir; Kowalec, Kaarina; Stortz, Jessica; Bendyshe-Walton, Tessa; Waltrip, Duncan; Bader, Rachel; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Johnson, David; Verbeek, Linda; Kaczowka, Rick; Stevenson, Patti; Zhuwaki, Carnation; Grundy, Paul; Stobart, Kent; Wilson, Bev; Desai, Sunil; Spavor, Maria; Churcher, Linda; Chow, Terence; Hall, Kevin; Honcharik, Nick; Israels, Sara; Chan, Shanna

    2015-01-01

    Anthracyclines are used in over 50% of childhood cancer treatment protocols, but their clinical usefulness is limited by anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) manifesting as asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction and congestive heart failure in up to 57% and 16% of patients, respectively. Candidate

  14. Reassurance against future risk of precancer and cancer conferred by a negative human papillomavirus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Julia C; Schiffman, Mark; Katki, Hormuzd A; Castle, Philip E; Fetterman, Barbara; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poitras, Nancy E; Lorey, Thomas; Cheung, Li C; Kinney, Walter K

    2014-08-01

    Primary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing (without concurrent Pap tests) every 3 years is under consideration in the United States as an alternative to the two recommended cervical cancer screening strategies: primary Pap testing every 3 years, or concurrent Pap and HPV testing ("cotesting") every 5 years. Using logistic regression and Weibull survival models, we estimated and compared risks of cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) for the three strategies among 1011092 women aged 30 to 64 years testing HPV-negative and/or Pap-negative in routine screening at Kaiser Permanente Northern California since 2003. All statistical tests were two sided. Three-year risks following an HPV-negative result were lower than 3-year risks following a Pap-negative result (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.19%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.020%, P < .0001) and 5-year risks following an HPV-negative/Pap-negative cotest (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.11%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.014%, P = .21). These findings suggest that primary HPV testing merits consideration as another alternative for cervical screening. © Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  15. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-07-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  16. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest W.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    We employed a home-built ultrahigh resolution (UHR) OCT system at 800nm to image human breast cancer sample ex vivo. The system has an axial resolution of 2.72µm and a lateral resolution of 5.52µm with an extended imaging range of 1.78mm. Over 900 UHR OCT volumes were generated on specimens from 23 breast cancer cases. With better spatial resolution, detailed structures in the breast tissue were better defined. Different types of breast cancer as well as healthy breast tissue can be well delineated from the UHR OCT images. To quantitatively evaluate the advantages of UHR OCT imaging of breast cancer, features derived from OCT intensity images were used as inputs to a machine learning model, the relevance vector machine. A trained machine learning model was employed to evaluate the performance of tissue classification based on UHR OCT images for differentiating tissue types in the breast samples, including adipose tissue, healthy stroma and cancerous region. For adipose tissue, grid-based local features were extracted from OCT intensity data, including standard deviation, entropy, and homogeneity. We showed that it was possible to enhance the classification performance on distinguishing fat tissue from non-fat tissue by using the UHR images when compared with the results based on OCT images from a commercial 1300 nm OCT system. For invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and normal stroma differentiation, the classification was based on frame-based features that portray signal penetration depth and tissue reflectivity. The confusing matrix indicated a sensitivity of 97.5% and a sensitivity of 77.8%.

  17. Microparticle conferred microRNA profiles - implications in the transfer and dominance of cancer traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Ritu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microparticles (MPs are membrane vesicles which are released from normal and malignant cells following a process of budding and detachment from donor cells. MPs contain surface antigens, proteins and genetic material and serve as vectors of intercellular communication. MPs comprise the major source of systemic RNA including microRNA (miRNA, the aberrant expression of which appears to be associated with stage, progression and spread of many cancers. Our previous study showed that MPs carry both transcripts and miRNAs associated with the acquisition of multidrug resistance in cancer. Results Herein, we expand on our previous finding and demonstrate that MPs carry the transcripts of the membrane vesiculation machinery (floppase and scramblase as well as nucleic acids encoding the enzymes essential for microRNA biogenesis (Drosha, Dicer and Argonaute. We also demonstrate using microarray miRNA profiling analysis, the selective packaging of miRNAs (miR-1228*, miR-1246, miR-1308, miR-149*, miR-455-3p, miR-638 and miR-923 within the MP cargo upon release from the donor cells. Conclusions These miRNAs are present in both haematological and non-haematological cancer cells and are involved in pathways implicated in cancer pathogenesis, membrane vesiculation and cascades regulated by ABC transporters. Our recent findings reinforce our earlier reports that MP transfer ‘re-templates’ recipient cells so as to reflect donor cell traits. We now demonstrate that this process is likely to occur via a process of selective packaging of nucleic acid species, including regulatory nucleic acids upon MP vesiculation. These findings have significant implications in understanding the cellular basis governing the intercellular acquisition and dominance of deleterious traits in cancers.

  18. Mechanisms of Twist 1-Induced Invasion in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    affect breast cancer metastasis with a subcutaneous mouse tumor implantation model of breast cancer metastasis. HMLE -Twist1 cells expressing shRNAs...13 4 Introduction Distant metastases are responsible for the vast majority of breast cancer deaths. This process...to migrate and invade is therefore essential to the metastatic process. The initial steps of breast cancer metastasis, local invasion and

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Linking Exercise to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie; Christensen, Jesper F.

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of exercise training for cancer patients are becoming increasingly evident. Physical exercise has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and inhibit tumor growth. Here we provide the status of the current molecular understanding of the effect of exercise on cancer. We propose...... that exercise has a role in controlling cancer progression through a direct effect on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of anti-cancer treatment efficacy. These findings have wide-ranging societal implications......, as this understanding may lead to changes in cancer treatment strategies. Hojman et al. discuss the role of exercise in controlling cancer progression through direct effects on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of cancer...

  2. DNA repair mechanisms in cancer development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovnick, Alessandro; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents that trigger DNA damage checkpoints have been applied to halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy.

  3. DNA Repair Mechanisms in Cancer Development and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTorgovnick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: Mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents have been applied that trigger DNA damage checkpoints that halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy.

  4. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National and international aspects of climate change were the central concern of this conference organized by the Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives (AREA). AREA is a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada which was created to reflect the views and represent the interests of Canadians in the Climate Change Debate. Ways and means of optimizing Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge were discussed. Discussions emphasized issues regarding the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases, as opposed to government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets. The issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables can be implemented was also debated. The economic implications of climate change were outlined. Canada's national agenda and the likely outcomes of the Conference of Parties (COP 4) in Buenos Aires also received much attention. tabs., figs

  5. Physical Activity and Gastrointestinal Cancers: Primary and Tertiary Preventive Effects and Possible Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Steindorf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cancers account for 37% of all cancer deaths worldwide, underlining the need to further investigate modifiable factors for gastrointestinal cancer risk and prognosis. This review summarizes the corresponding evidence for physical activity (PA, including, briefly, possible biological mechanisms. Despite high public health relevance, there is still a scarcity of studies, especially for tertiary prevention. Besides the convincing evidence of beneficial effects of PA on colon cancer risk, clear risk reduction for gastroesophageal cancer was identified, as well as weak indications for pancreatic cancer. Inverse associations were observed for liver cancer, yet based on few studies. Only for rectal cancer, PA appeared to be not associated with cancer risk. With regard to cancer-specific mortality of the general population, published data were rare but indicated suggestive evidence of protective effects for colon and liver cancer, and to a lesser extent for rectal and gastroesophageal cancer. Studies in cancer patients on cancer-specific and total mortality were published for colorectal cancer only, providing good evidence of inverse associations with post-diagnosis PA. Overall, evidence of associations of PA with gastrointestinal cancer risk and progression is promising but still limited. However, the already available knowledge further underlines the importance of PA to combat cancer.

  6. Adapting biomodulatory strategies for treatment in new contexts: pancreatic and oral cancers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbil, Sriram R.; Rizvi, Imran; Khan, Amjad P.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Biomodulation of cancer cell metabolism represents a promising approach to overcome tumor heterogeneity and poor selectivity, which contribute significantly to treatment resistance. To date, several studies have demonstrated that modulation of cell metabolism including the heme synthesis pathway serves as an elegant approach to improve the efficacy of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, the ability of biomodulation-enhanced PDT to improve outcomes in low resource settings and to address challenges in treating lethal tumors with exogenous photosensitizers remains underexplored. The ability of vitamin D or methotrexate to enhance PDT efficacy in a carcinogen-induced hamster cheek pouch model of oral squamous cell carcinoma and in 3D cell-based models for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is evaluated. Challenges associated with adapting PDT regimens to low resource settings, understanding the effects of biomodulatory agents on the metabolism of cancer cells, and the differential effects of biomodulatory agents on tumor and stromal cells will be discussed.

  7. Newly Identified Wild Rice Accessions Conferring High Salt Tolerance Might Use a Tissue Tolerance Mechanism in Leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusty, Manas R.; Kim, Sung-Ryul; Vinarao, Ricky; Entila, Frederickson; Egdane, James; Diaz, Maria G. Q.; Jena, Kshirod K.

    2018-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) is very sensitive to salt stress. So far a few rice landraces have been identified as a source of salt tolerance and utilized in rice improvement. These tolerant lines primarily use Na+ exclusion mechanism in root which removes Na+ from the xylem stream by membrane Na+ and K+ transporters, and resulted in low Na+ accumulation in shoot. Identification of a new donor source conferring high salt tolerance is imperative. Wild relatives of rice having wide genetic diversity are regarded as a potential source for crop improvement. However, they have been less exploited against salt stress. Here, we simultaneously evaluated all 22 wild Oryza species along with the cultivated tolerant lines including Pokkali, Nona Bokra, and FL478, and sensitive check varieties under high salinity (240 mM NaCl). Based on the visual salt injury score, three species (O. alta, O. latifolia, and O. coarctata) and four species (O. rhizomatis, O. eichingeri, O. minuta, and O. grandiglumis) showed higher and similar level of tolerance compared to the tolerant checks, respectively. All three CCDD genome species exhibited salt tolerance, suggesting that the CCDD genome might possess the common genetic factors for salt tolerance. Physiological and biochemical experiments were conducted using the newly isolated tolerant species together with checks under 180 mM NaCl. Interestingly, all wild species showed high Na+ concentration in shoot and low concentration in root unlike the tolerant checks. In addition, the wild-tolerant accessions showed a tendency of a high tissue tolerance in leaf, low malondialdehyde level in shoot, and high retention of chlorophyll in the young leaves. These results suggest that the wild species employ tissue tolerance mechanism to manage salt stress. Gene expression analyses of the key salt tolerance-related genes suggested that high Na+ in leaf of wild species might be affected by OsHKT1;4-mediated Na+ exclusion in leaf and the following Na

  8. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  10. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Rödel, Claus; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Boelens, Petra G.; Aristei, Cynthia; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  11. Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2-Mutant Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0600 TITLE: Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2-Mutant Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2- Mutant Breast Cancers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0600 5b...therapeutic modality for targeting homologous recombination (HR) deficient tumors such as BRCA1 and BRCA2-mutated triple negative breast cancers

  12. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  13. Stress and Coping Mechanisms Among Breast Cancer Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    the leading cause of cancer mortality, representing. 14.1%. In Zambia ... focused on coping with breast cancer, 5 on stress and adaptation to .... relying on prayer, avoiding negative people, ... responses among women from three ethnic groups; ... common strategy among African Americans. .... Global Cancer Statistics, 2002.

  14. Molecular phenotyping of human ovarian cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Chen, Rui; Fu, Han-Hsuan

    2009-01-01

    A major burden in the treatment of ovarian cancer is the high percentage of recurrence and chemoresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) provide a reservoir of cells that can self-renew, can maintain the tumor by generating differentiated cells [non-stem cells (non-CSCs)] which make up the bulk...... to form spheroids in suspension, and the ability to recapitulate in vivo the original tumor. Chemotherapy eliminates the bulk of the tumor but it leaves a core of cancer cells with high capacity for repair and renewal. The molecular properties identified in these cells may explain some of the unique...... of the tumor and may be the primary source of recurrence. We describe the characterization of human ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs). These cells have a distinctive genetic profile that confers them with the capacity to recapitulate the original tumor, proliferate with chemotherapy, and promote recurrence...

  15. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  16. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  17. Loss of Bad expression confers poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Liu, Dan; Chen, Bojiang; Zeng, Jing; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shangfu; Mo, Xianming; Li, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Proapoptotic BH-3-only protein Bad (Bcl-Xl/Bcl-2-associated death promoter homolog, Bad) initiates apoptosis in human cells, and contributes to tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistant in malignancies. This study explored association between the Bad expression level and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, a cohort of 88 resected primary NSCLC cases were collected and analyzed. Bad expression level was determined via immunohistochemical staining assay. The prognostic significances of Bad expression were evaluated with univariate and multivariate survival analysis. The results showed that compared with normal lung tissues, Bad expression level significantly decreased in NSCLC (P Bad expression was associated with adjuvant therapy status. Loss of Bad independently predicted poor prognosis in whole NSCLC cohort and early stage subjects (T1 + T2 and N0 + N1) (all P Bad negative phenotype in NSCLC patients with smoking history, especially lung squamous cell carcinoma (all P Bad is an independent and powerful predictor of adverse prognosis in NSCLC. Bad protein could be a new biomarker for selecting individual therapy strategies and predicting therapeutic response in subjects with NSCLC.

  18. Low Tumor Infiltrating Mast Cell Density Confers Prognostic Benefit and Reflects Immunoactivation in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yihao; Feng, Qingyang; Zheng, Peng; Yang, Liangliang; Zhu, Dexiang; Chang, Wenju; Ji, Meiling; He, Guodong; Xu, Jianmin

    2018-06-06

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression was controversial. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the prognostic value of MCs as well as their correlation with immune microenvironment. A retrospective cohort of CRC patients of stage I-IV was enrolled in this study. 854 consecutive patients were divided into training set (427 patients) and validation set (427 patients) randomly. The findings were further validated in a GEO cohort, GSE39582 (556 patients). The mast cell density (MCD) was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tryptase or by CIBERSORT algorithm. Low MCD predicted prolonged overall survival (OS) in training and validation set. Moreover, MCD was identified as an independent prognostic indicator in both sets. Better stratification for CRC prognosis can be achieved by building a MCD based nomogram. The prognostic role of MCD was further validated in GSE39582. In addition, MCD predicted improved survival in stage II and III CRC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). Multiple immune pathways were enriched in low MCD group while cytokines/chemokines promoting anti-tumor immunity were highly expressed in such group. Furthermore, MCD was negatively correlated with CD8+ T cells infiltration. In conclusion, MCD was identified as an independent prognostic factor, as well as a potential biomarker for ACT benefit in stage II and III CRC. Better stratification of CRC prognosis could be achieved by building a MCD based nomogram. Moreover, immunoactivation in low MCD tumors may contributed to improved prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  19. Genetic Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Giannakis, Marios; Wells, Daniel K; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Quist, Michael; Nowak, Jonathan A; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Connolly, Charles; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Geybels, Milan S; Grady, William M; Hsu, Li; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Kim, Yeon Joo; Krystofinski, Paige; Leiserson, Mark D M; Montoya, Dennis J; Nadel, Brian B; Pellegrini, Matteo; Pritchard, Colin C; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Quist, Elleanor H; Raphael, Ben J; Salipante, Stephen J; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Shinbrot, Eve; Shirts, Brian; Shukla, Sachet; Stanford, Janet L; Sun, Wei; Tsoi, Jennifer; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Wheeler, David A; Wu, Catherine J; Yu, Ming; Zaidi, Syed H; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Garraway, Levi A; Hudson, Thomas J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ribas, Antoni; Ogino, Shuji; Peters, Ulrike

    2018-06-01

    To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer, we analyzed 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas colorectal cancer cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of colorectal cancer, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune-modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy-number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. WNT/β-catenin signaling genes were significantly mutated in all colorectal cancer subtypes, and activated WNT/β-catenin signaling was correlated with the absence of T-cell infiltration. This large-scale genomic analysis of colorectal cancer demonstrates that MSI-high cases frequently undergo an immunoediting process that provides them with genetic events allowing immune escape despite high mutational load and frequent lymphocytic infiltration and, furthermore, that colorectal cancer tumors have genetic and methylation events associated with activated WNT signaling and T-cell exclusion. Significance: This multi-omic analysis of 1,211 colorectal cancer primary tumors reveals that it should be possible to better monitor resistance in the 15% of cases that respond to immune blockade therapy and also to use WNT signaling inhibitors to reverse immune exclusion in the 85% of cases that currently do not. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 730-49. ©2018 AACR. This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Gold nanorods coupled with upconverting nanophosphors for targeted thermal ablation and imaging of bladder cancer cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suehyun K.; Su, Lih-Jen; Flaig, Thomas W.; Park, Wounjhang

    2016-09-01

    NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconverting nanophosphors (UCNPs) are robust and stable nanoparticles that absorb near-infrared (NIR) photons and emit green and red visible photons through energy transfer upconversion. This mechanism provides UCNPs several advantages as a bioimaging agent over traditional fluorescence imaging agent in that NIR excitation allows high-contrast imaging without autofluorescence and that they can be used for deep-tissue imaging. However, additional surface modification of UCNPs is necessary for them to be biocompatible. We use an amphiphilic polymer (poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene) (PMAO) and a hetero-functional polyethylene glycol with amine and thiol ends (NH2-PEG-SH)) to make the UCNPs water-soluble. This reaction yields a carboxylic group that allows functionalization with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (aEGFR), which provides specific binding of UCNPs to EGFR-expressing bladder cancer cells. Additionally, the thiol ends of the PEGylated UCNPs are able to bind with gold nanorods (AuNRs) to create UCNP-AuNR complexes. The localized surface plasmon of the AuNR then allow localized heating of HTB9 bladder cancer cells, enabling in situ cell killing upon detection by UCNP fluorescence. Here, we report a successful synthesis, surface modification and conjugation of aEGFR functionalized UCNP-AuNR complexes and in vitro imaging and thermal ablation studies using them. Synthesis and surface modification of UCNP-AuNR complexes are confirmed by electron microscopy. Then, a combination of brightfield, NIR confocal fluorescence, and darkfield microscopy on the UCNP-AuNR treated bladder cancer cells revealed successful cancer targeting and imaging capabilities of the complex. Finally, cell viability assay showed that NIR irradiation of UCNP-AuNR conjugated cells resulted highly selective cell killing.

  1. Translating Mechanism-Based Strategies to Break the Obesity-Cancer Link: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura A; O'Flanagan, Ciara H; Bowers, Laura W; Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2018-04-01

    Prevalence of obesity, an established risk factor for many cancers, has increased dramatically over the past 50 years in the United States and across the globe. Relative to normoweight cancer patients, obese cancer patients often have poorer prognoses, resistance to chemotherapies, and are more likely to develop distant metastases. Recent progress on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer connection suggests that obesity exerts pleomorphic effects on pathways related to tumor development and progression and, thus, there are multiple opportunities for primary prevention and treatment of obesity-related cancers. Obesity-associated alterations, including systemic metabolism, adipose inflammation, growth factor signaling, and angiogenesis, are emerging as primary drivers of obesity-associated cancer development and progression. These obesity-associated host factors interact with the intrinsic molecular characteristics of cancer cells, facilitating several of the hallmarks of cancer. Each is considered in the context of potential preventive and therapeutic strategies to reduce the burden of obesity-related cancers. In addition, this review focuses on emerging mechanisms behind the obesity-cancer link, as well as relevant dietary interventions, including calorie restriction, intermittent fasting, low-fat diet, and ketogenic diet, that are being implemented in preclinical and clinical trials, with the ultimate goal of reducing incidence and progression of obesity-related cancers. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased gut permeability in cancer cachexia: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Laure B; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Loumaye, Audrey; Catry, Emilie; Walgrave, Hannah; Cherbuy, Claire; Leclercq, Sophie; Van Hul, Matthias; Plovier, Hubert; Pachikian, Barbara; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D; Thissen, Jean-Paul; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2018-04-06

    Intestinal disorders often occur in cancer patients, in association with body weight loss, and this alteration is commonly attributed to the chemotherapy. Here, using a mouse model of cancer cachexia induced by ectopic transplantation of C26 cancer cells, we discovered a profound alteration in the gut functions (gut permeability, epithelial turnover, gut immunity, microbial dysbiosis) independently of any chemotherapy. These alterations occurred independently of anorexia and were driven by interleukin 6. Gut dysfunction was found to be resistant to treatments with an anti-inflammatory bacterium ( Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ) or with gut peptides involved in intestinal cell renewal (teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue). The translational value of our findings was evaluated in 152 colorectal and lung cancer patients with or without cachexia. The serum level of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, often presented as a reflection of the bacterial antigen load, was not only increased in cachectic mice and cancer patients, but also strongly correlated with the serum IL-6 level and predictive of death and cachexia occurrence in these patients. Altogether, our data highlight profound alterations of the intestinal homeostasis in cancer cachexia occurring independently of any chemotherapy and food intake reduction, with potential relevance in humans. In addition, we point out the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein as a new biomarker of cancer cachexia related to gut dysbiosis.

  3. Exploring the Mechanisms of Gastrointestinal Cancer Development Using Deep Sequencing Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomonori; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takai, Atsushi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer genomics due to their high throughput sequencing capacity. Reports of the gene mutation profiles of various cancers by many researchers, including international cancer genome research consortia, have increased over recent years. In addition to detecting somatic mutations in tumor cells, NGS technologies enable us to approach the subject of carcinogenic mechanisms from new perspectives. Deep sequencing, a method of optimizing the high throughput capacity of NGS technologies, allows for the detection of genetic aberrations in small subsets of premalignant and/or tumor cells in noncancerous chronically inflamed tissues. Genome-wide NGS data also make it possible to clarify the mutational signatures of each cancer tissue by identifying the precise pattern of nucleotide alterations in the cancer genome, providing new information regarding the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. In this review, we highlight these new methods taking advantage of NGS technologies, and discuss our current understanding of carcinogenic mechanisms elucidated from such approaches

  4. Exploring the Mechanisms of Gastrointestinal Cancer Development Using Deep Sequencing Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tomonori; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takai, Atsushi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki, E-mail: maru@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer genomics due to their high throughput sequencing capacity. Reports of the gene mutation profiles of various cancers by many researchers, including international cancer genome research consortia, have increased over recent years. In addition to detecting somatic mutations in tumor cells, NGS technologies enable us to approach the subject of carcinogenic mechanisms from new perspectives. Deep sequencing, a method of optimizing the high throughput capacity of NGS technologies, allows for the detection of genetic aberrations in small subsets of premalignant and/or tumor cells in noncancerous chronically inflamed tissues. Genome-wide NGS data also make it possible to clarify the mutational signatures of each cancer tissue by identifying the precise pattern of nucleotide alterations in the cancer genome, providing new information regarding the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. In this review, we highlight these new methods taking advantage of NGS technologies, and discuss our current understanding of carcinogenic mechanisms elucidated from such approaches.

  5. Mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction in cancer-associated cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Wagner, Erwin F.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction contributes to the clinical deterioration observed in advanced cancer patients and is characterized by weight loss, skeletal muscle wasting, and atrophy of the adipose tissue. This systemic syndrome, termed cancer-associated cachexia (CAC), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While once attributed solely to decreased food intake, the present description of cancer cachexia is a disorder of multiorgan energy imbalance. Here we review the molecules and pathways responsible for metabolic dysfunction in CAC and the ideas that led to the current understanding. PMID:26944676

  6. Shear-wave elastographic features of breast cancers: comparison with mechanical elasticity and histopathologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Chan; Kim, Hee Chan; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Park, In-Ae

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the quantitative and qualitative shear-wave elastographic (SWE) features of breast cancers with mechanical elasticity and histopathologic characteristics. This prospective study was conducted with institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained. Shear-wave elastography was performed for 30 invasive breast cancers in 30 women before surgery. The mechanical elasticity of a fresh breast tissue section, correlated with the ultrasound image, was measured using an indentation system. Quantitative (maximum, mean, minimum, and standard deviation of elasticity in kilopascals) and qualitative (color heterogeneity and presence of signal void areas in the mass) SWE features were compared with mechanical elasticity and histopathologic characteristics using the Pearson correlation coefficient and the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Maximum SWE values showed a moderate correlation with maximum mechanical elasticity (r = 0.530, P = 0.003). There were no significant differences between SWE values and mechanical elasticity in histologic grade I or II cancers (P = 0.268). However, SWE values were significantly higher than mechanical elasticity in histologic grade III cancers (P masses were present in 43% of breast cancers (13 of 30) and were correlated with dense collagen depositions (n = 11) or intratumoral necrosis (n = 2). Quantitative and qualitative SWE features reflect both the mechanical elasticity and histopathologic characteristics of breast cancers.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF INTERSPECIES CONCORDANCE OF MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC INDUCED BLADDER CANCER BY GENE EXPRESSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen that induces urinary bladder cancer. Several mechanisms have been proposed for arsenic-induced cancer. Although inorganic arsenic (iAs) does not induce tumors in adult rodents, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), a major metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder c...

  8. Mechanisms Down-Regulating Sprouty1, a Growth Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwabi-Addo, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    .... I have demonstrated that Sprouty1 is down-regulated in human prostate cancer (PCa). The purpose of the present study is to characterize the molecular mechanisms regulating Sprouty1 expression in the human PCa. Results...

  9. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Folate Nutrition in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    MDAMB231 clones that express non-leaky TetR systems. Test effects of folate deficiency on global and gene specific DNA methylation and gene...cellular differentiation and function. Aberrant DNA methylation is a characteristic of cancer cells, including mammary tumors. The B vitamin folate ...relationships between folate , one-carbon metabolism, DNA methylation , and gene expression within the context of breast cancer. We hypothesize that

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis and Potential Anti-metastatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungsukruthai, Sucharat; Petpiroon, Nalinrat; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2018-05-01

    Throughout the world, breast cancer is among the major causes of cancer-related death and is the most common cancer found in women. The development of cancer molecular knowledge has surpassed the novel concept of cancer biology and unraveled principle targets for anticancer drug developments and treatment strategies. Metastatic breast cancer cells acquire their aggressive features through several mechanisms, including augmentation of survival, proliferation, tumorigenicity, and motility-related cellular pathways. Clearly, natural product-derived compounds have since long been recognized as an important source for anticancer drugs, several of which have been shown to have promising anti-metastasis activities by suppressing key molecular features supporting such cell aggressiveness. This review provides the essential details of breast cancer, the molecular-based insights into metastasis, as well as the effects and mechanisms of potential compounds for breast cancer therapeutic approaches. As the abilities of cancer cells to invade and metastasize are addressed as the hallmarks of cancer, compounds possessing anti-metastatic effects, together with their defined molecular drug action could benefit the development of new drugs as well as treatment strategies. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  12. Mechanisms of environmental chemicals that enable the cancer hallmark of evasion of growth suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahta, Rita; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Bay, Sarah N; Brown, Dustin G; Calaf, Gloria M; Castellino, Robert C; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Colacci, Annamaria; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Dent, Paul; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Forte, Stefano; Goldberg, Gary S; Hamid, Roslida A; Krishnan, Harini; Laird, Dale W; Lasfar, Ahmed; Marignani, Paola A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Naus, Christian C; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Raju, Jayadev; Roy, Debasish; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Vento, Renza; Vondráček, Jan; Wade, Mark; Woodrick, Jordan; Bisson, William H

    2015-06-01

    As part of the Halifax Project, this review brings attention to the potential effects of environmental chemicals on important molecular and cellular regulators of the cancer hallmark of evading growth suppression. Specifically, we review the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape the growth-inhibitory signals of p53, retinoblastoma protein, transforming growth factor-beta, gap junctions and contact inhibition. We discuss the effects of selected environmental chemicals on these mechanisms of growth inhibition and cross-reference the effects of these chemicals in other classical cancer hallmarks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Base excision repair mechanisms and relevance to cancer susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogliotti, E.; Wilson, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is considered the predominant DNA repair system in mammalian cells for eliminating small DNA lesions generated at DNA bases either exogenously by environmental agents or endogenously by normal cellular metabolic processes (e.g. production of oxyradical species, alkylating agents, etc). The main goal of this project is the understanding of the involvement of BER in genome stability and in particular in sporadic cancer development associated with inflammation such as gastric cancer (GC). A major risk factor of GC is the infection by Helicobacter pylori, which causes oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by BER

  14. ASA conference on radiation and health: Coolfont 7: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings provide a summary of papers presented at the seventh annual ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held at the Coolfont Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. More than forty scientists, including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists, and physicists, participated in the conference. The 1987 conference focused on lung cancer risks, especially lung cancer risks due to radon. The BEIR IV report, which addresses health risks of radon and other internally deposited alpha-emitters, was summarized early in the conference. Results of analyses of data on miners in Colorado and in New Mexico were presented, as well as analyses of combined data from several studies, which were used as the basis of estimates in the BEIR IV report. Statistical issues related to appropriate analysis of chronic exposure and of smoking data received considerable attention and discussion. Papers describing models for lung cancer risks based on exposure to cigarette smoke, radiation, and other substances provided insights into general understanding of lung cancer mechanisms. Carcinogenic models were also the subject of a presentation on radiation-induced skin cancer in humans and animals. In addition, relevant data on animal experiments involving radon exposure were summarized. Understanding risks requires relating them to dose, and thus the presentation on dosimetry, both for miner populations and for residents of US homes, made an important contribution to the conference. Presentations on current efforts at the state and national level to assess radon levels in US homes were also of considerable interest to the participants. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  15. Mechanisms of redox metabolism and cancer cell survival during extracellular matrix detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mark A; Schafer, Zachary T

    2018-01-16

    Non-transformed cells that become detached from the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergo dysregulation of redox homeostasis and cell death. In contrast, cancer cells often acquire the ability to mitigate programmed cell death pathways and recalibrate the redox balance to survive after ECM detachment, facilitating metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, recent studies of the mechanisms by which cancer cells overcome ECM detachment-induced metabolic alterations have focused on mechanisms in redox homeostasis. The insights into these mechanisms may inform the development of therapeutics that manipulate redox homeostasis to eliminate ECM-detached cancer cells. Here, we review how ECM-detached cancer cells balance redox metabolism for survival. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  17. Fundamental mechanisms of telomerase action in yeasts and mammals: understanding telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christine A; Tomita, Kazunori

    2017-03-01

    Aberrant activation of telomerase occurs in 85-90% of all cancers and underpins the ability of cancer cells to bypass their proliferative limit, rendering them immortal. The activity of telomerase is tightly controlled at multiple levels, from transcriptional regulation of the telomerase components to holoenzyme biogenesis and recruitment to the telomere, and finally activation and processivity. However, studies using cancer cell lines and other model systems have begun to reveal features of telomeres and telomerase that are unique to cancer. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the mechanisms of telomerase recruitment and activation using insights from studies in mammals and budding and fission yeasts. Finally, we discuss the differences in telomere homeostasis between normal cells and cancer cells, which may provide a foundation for telomere/telomerase targeted cancer treatments. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Crowdsourcing awareness: exploration of the ovarian cancer knowledge gap through Amazon Mechanical Turk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca R Carter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic disease in the United States, with more women dying from this cancer than all gynecological cancers combined. Ovarian cancer has been termed the "silent killer" because some patients do not show clear symptoms at an early stage. Currently, there is a lack of approved and effective early diagnostic tools for ovarian cancer. There is also an apparent severe knowledge gap of ovarian cancer in general and of its indicative symptoms among both public and many health professionals. These factors have significantly contributed to the late stage diagnosis of most ovarian cancer patients (63% are diagnosed at Stage III or above, where the 5-year survival rate is less than 30%. The paucity of knowledge concerning ovarian cancer in the United States is unknown. METHODS: The present investigation examined current public awareness and knowledge about ovarian cancer. The study implemented design strategies to develop an unbiased survey with quality control measures, including the modern application of multiple statistical analyses. The survey assessed a reasonable proxy of the US population by crowdsourcing participants through the online task marketplace Amazon Mechanical Turk, at a highly condensed rate of cost and time compared to traditional recruitment methods. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of ovarian cancer was compared to that of breast cancer using repeated measures, bias control and other quality control measures in the survey design. Analyses included multinomial logistic regression and categorical data analysis procedures such as correspondence analysis, among other statistics. We confirmed the relatively poor public knowledge of ovarian cancer among the US population. The simple, yet novel design should set an example for designing surveys to obtain quality data via Amazon Mechanical Turk with the associated analyses.

  19. Crowdsourcing awareness: exploration of the ovarian cancer knowledge gap through Amazon Mechanical Turk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rebecca R; DiFeo, Analisa; Bogie, Kath; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sun, Jiayang

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic disease in the United States, with more women dying from this cancer than all gynecological cancers combined. Ovarian cancer has been termed the "silent killer" because some patients do not show clear symptoms at an early stage. Currently, there is a lack of approved and effective early diagnostic tools for ovarian cancer. There is also an apparent severe knowledge gap of ovarian cancer in general and of its indicative symptoms among both public and many health professionals. These factors have significantly contributed to the late stage diagnosis of most ovarian cancer patients (63% are diagnosed at Stage III or above), where the 5-year survival rate is less than 30%. The paucity of knowledge concerning ovarian cancer in the United States is unknown. The present investigation examined current public awareness and knowledge about ovarian cancer. The study implemented design strategies to develop an unbiased survey with quality control measures, including the modern application of multiple statistical analyses. The survey assessed a reasonable proxy of the US population by crowdsourcing participants through the online task marketplace Amazon Mechanical Turk, at a highly condensed rate of cost and time compared to traditional recruitment methods. Knowledge of ovarian cancer was compared to that of breast cancer using repeated measures, bias control and other quality control measures in the survey design. Analyses included multinomial logistic regression and categorical data analysis procedures such as correspondence analysis, among other statistics. We confirmed the relatively poor public knowledge of ovarian cancer among the US population. The simple, yet novel design should set an example for designing surveys to obtain quality data via Amazon Mechanical Turk with the associated analyses.

  20. Molecular mechanisms and theranostic potential of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Ma, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Wei; Cao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Zhiping; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Qingchuan; Fan, Daiming; Hong, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is a curative approach to inhibit gastric cancer cells proliferation. Despite the great progress in anti-cancer treatment achieved during the last decades, drug resistance and treatment refractoriness still extensively persists. Recently, accumulating studies have highlighted the role of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancers by modulating some drug resistance-related proteins and genes expression. Pre-clinical reports indicate that miRNAs might serve as ideal biomarkers and potential targets, thus holding great promise for developing targeted therapy and personalized treatment for the patients with gastric cancer. Areas covered: This review provide a comprehensive overview of the current advances of miRNAs and molecular mechanisms underlying miRNA-mediated drug resistance in gastric cancer. We particularly focus on the potential values of drug resistance-related miRNAs as biomarkers and novel targets in gastric cancer therapy and envisage the future research developments of these miRNAs and challenges in translating the new findings into clinical applications. Expert opinion: Although the concrete mechanisms of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer have not been fully clarified, miRNA may be a promising theranostic approach. Further studies are still needed to facilitate the clinical applications of miRNAs in drug resistant gastric cancer.

  1. In silico analysis of the potential mechanism of telocinobufagin on breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yi-Wu; Lin, Peng; Liu, Li-Min; He, Rong-Quan; Zhang, Li-Jie; Peng, Zhi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Jiao; Chen, Gang

    2018-05-01

    The extractives from a ChanSu, traditional Chinese medicine, have been discovered to possess anti-inflammatory and tumor-suppressing abilities. However, the molecular mechanism of telocinobufagin, a compound extracted from ChanSu, on breast cancer cells has not been clarified. The aim of this study is to investigate the underlying mechanism of telocinobufagin on breast cancer cells. The differentially expressed genes after telocinobufagin treatment on breast cancer cells were searched and downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), ArrayExpress and literatures. Bioinformatics tools were applied to further explore the potential mechanism of telocinobufagin in breast cancer using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway, Gene ontology (GO) enrichment, panther, and protein-protein interaction analyses. To better comprehend the role of telocinobufagin in breast cancer, we also queried the Connectivity Map using the gene expression profiles of telocinobufagin treatment. One GEO accession (GSE85871) provided 1251 differentially expressed genes after telocinobufagin treatment on MCF-7 cells. The pathway of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), intestinal immune network for IgA production, hematopoietic cell lineage and calcium signaling pathway were the key pathways from KEGG analysis. IGF1 and KSR1, owning to higher protein levels in breast cancer tissues, IGF1 and KSR1 could be the hub genes related to telocinobufagin treatment. It was indicated that the molecular mechanism of telocinobufagin resembled that of fenspiride. Telocinobufagin might regulate neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway to exert its influences in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and its molecular mechanism might share some similarities with fenspiride. This study only presented a comprehensive picture of the role of telocinobufagin in breast cancer MCF-7 cells using big data. However, more thorough and deeper researches are required to add

  2. Mechanism and regulation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guttilla Reed IK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irene K Guttilla ReedDepartment of Biology, University of Saint Joseph, West Hartford, CT, USAAbstract: During development and the pathogenesis of certain diseases, including cancer, the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT program is activated. It is hypothesized that EMT plays a major role in tumor invasion and the establishment of distant metastases. Metastatic disease is responsible for the vast majority of cancer-related deaths, which provides a precedent for elucidating pathways that regulate EMT. EMT is defined as the transition of cells with an epithelial phenotype into cells with a mesenchymal phenotype through a series of genetic and environmental events. This leads to the repression of epithelial-associated markers, upregulation of mesenchymal-associated markers, a loss of cell polarity and adhesion, and increased cell motility and invasiveness. EMT is a reversible and dynamic process, and can be regulated by signals from the microenvironment such as inflammation, hypoxia, and growth factors or epigenetically via microRNAs. These signals modulate key EMT-associated transcription factors and effector proteins that control cellular phenotype and regulate tumor plasticity in response to changing conditions in the microenvironment and the progressive nature of cancer. Understanding the complex regulatory networks controlling EMT can provide insight into tumor progression and metastasis.Keywords: EMT, metastasis, microRNA, transcription factor, growth factor, tumor progression

  3. [Sea urchin embryo, DNA-damaged cell cycle checkpoint and the mechanisms initiating cancer development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellé, Robert; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Morales, Julia; Cosson, Bertrand; Cormier, Patrick; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile

    2007-01-01

    Cell division is an essential process for heredity, maintenance and evolution of the whole living kingdom. Sea urchin early development represents an excellent experimental model for the analysis of cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms since embryonic cells contain a functional DNA-damage checkpoint and since the whole sea urchin genome is sequenced. The DNA-damaged checkpoint is responsible for an arrest in the cell cycle when DNA is damaged or incorrectly replicated, for activation of the DNA repair mechanism, and for commitment to cell death by apoptosis in the case of failure to repair. New insights in cancer biology lead to two fundamental concepts about the very first origin of cancerogenesis. Cancers result from dysfunction of DNA-damaged checkpoints and cancers appear as a result of normal stem cell (NCS) transformation into a cancer stem cell (CSC). The second aspect suggests a new definition of "cancer", since CSC can be detected well before any clinical evidence. Since early development starts from the zygote, which is a primary stem cell, sea urchin early development allows analysis of the early steps of the cancerization process. Although sea urchins do not develop cancers, the model is alternative and complementary to stem cells which are not easy to isolate, do not divide in a short time and do not divide synchronously. In the field of toxicology and incidence on human health, the sea urchin experimental model allows assessment of cancer risk from single or combined molecules long before any epidemiologic evidence is available. Sea urchin embryos were used to test the worldwide used pesticide Roundup that contains glyphosate as the active herbicide agent; it was shown to activate the DNA-damage checkpoint of the first cell cycle of development. The model therefore allows considerable increase in risk evaluation of new products in the field of cancer and offers a tool for the discovery of molecular markers for early diagnostic in cancer biology

  4. Developments in Mechanics. Volumes 14(a), 14(b), and 14(c) - Midwestern Mechanics Conference, 20th, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, Aug. 31-Sept. 2, 1987, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on beam vibration, turbulent flow, pressure vessels, plasticity, fracture mechanics, stochastics, elastic stability, and space structures and bridges. Also considered are shell vibration, design optimization, plate vibration, numerical methods in fluid mechanics, contact mechanics, constitutive models, turbulent and wake flow, and buckling. Other topics include composite shells, nonlinear vibrations, suspended particles, geomechanics, acoustics, chaotic motion, and dissimilar materials. Papers are also presented on fluid-structure interactions, tribology, thermoelasticity, active vibration control, creep, vehicle and tire mechanics, and residual stresses

  5. GP88 (PC-Cell Derived Growth Factor, progranulin stimulates proliferation and confers letrozole resistance to aromatase overexpressing breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabnis Gauri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase inhibitors (AI that inhibit breast cancer cell growth by blocking estrogen synthesis have become the treatment of choice for post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer. However, some patients display de novo or acquired resistance to AI. Interactions between estrogen and growth factor signaling pathways have been identified in estrogen-responsive cells as one possible reason for acquisition of resistance. Our laboratory has characterized an autocrine growth factor overexpressed in invasive ductal carcinoma named PC-Cell Derived Growth Factor (GP88, also known as progranulin. In the present study, we investigated the role GP88 on the acquisition of resistance to letrozole in ER+ breast cancer cells Methods We used two aromatase overexpressing human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7-CA cells and AC1 cells and their letrozole resistant counterparts as study models. Effect of stimulating or inhibiting GP88 expression on proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, survival and letrozole responsiveness was examined. Results GP88 induced cell proliferation and conferred letrozole resistance in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, naturally letrozole resistant breast cancer cells displayed a 10-fold increase in GP88 expression when compared to letrozole sensitive cells. GP88 overexpression, or exogenous addition blocked the inhibitory effect of letrozole on proliferation, and stimulated survival and soft agar colony formation. In letrozole resistant cells, silencing GP88 by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation and restored their sensitivity to letrozole. Conclusion Our findings provide information on the role of an alternate growth and survival factor on the acquisition of aromatase inhibitor resistance in ER+ breast cancer.

  6. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Costunolide (CE and dehydrocostuslactone (DE are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  7. Combination Cancer Therapy Can Confer Benefit via Patient-to-Patient Variability without Drug Additivity or Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Sorger, Peter K

    2017-12-14

    Combination cancer therapies aim to improve the probability and magnitude of therapeutic responses and reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in an individual patient. However, drugs are tested in clinical trials on genetically diverse patient populations. We show here that patient-to-patient variability and independent drug action are sufficient to explain the superiority of many FDA-approved drug combinations in the absence of drug synergy or additivity. This is also true for combinations tested in patient-derived tumor xenografts. In a combination exhibiting independent drug action, each patient benefits solely from the drug to which his or her tumor is most sensitive, with no added benefit from other drugs. Even when drug combinations exhibit additivity or synergy in pre-clinical models, patient-to-patient variability and low cross-resistance make independent action the dominant mechanism in clinical populations. This insight represents a different way to interpret trial data and a different way to design combination therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Roles of Ubiquitination and SUMOylation on Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbang Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and progression of human prostate cancer are highly associated with aberrant dysregulations of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Despite that deletions and mutations of tumor suppressors and aberrant elevations of oncogenes at the genetic level are reported to cause cancers, emerging evidence has revealed that cancer progression is largely regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs and epigenetic alterations. PTMs play critical roles in gene regulation, cellular functions, tissue development, diseases, malignant progression and drug resistance. Recent discoveries demonstrate that ubiquitination and SUMOylation are complicated but highly-regulated PTMs, and make essential contributions to diseases and cancers by regulation of key factors and signaling pathways. Ubiquitination and SUMOylation pathways can be differentially modulated under various stimuli or stresses in order to produce the sustained oncogenic potentials. In this review, we discuss some new insights about molecular mechanisms on ubiquitination and SUMOylation, their associations with diseases, oncogenic impact on prostate cancer (PCa and clinical implications for PCa treatment.

  9. New insights into Vinca alkaloids resistance mechanism and circumvention in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Shao-Hui; Guo, Xiu-Li

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, lung cancer, as a health problem in worldwide, has high mortality both in men and women. Despite advances in diagnosis and surgical techniques of lung cancer in recent decades, chemotherapy is still a fundamentally and extensively useful strategy. Vinca alkaloids are a class of important and widely used drugs in the treatment of lung cancer, targeting on the Vinca binding site at the exterior of microtubule plus ends. Either intrinsic or acquired resistance to chemotherapy of Vinca alkaloids has been a major obstacle to the treatment of lung cancer, which arose great interests in studies of understanding and overcoming resistance. In this review, we focused on the application and resistance mechanisms of the Vinca alkaloids such as vinblastine, vincristine, vinorelbine and vinflunine in lung cancer. We reviewed characteristic resistance mechanisms in lung cancer including over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein and structural, functional or expression alterations of β-tubulin (βII, βIII, βIV) which may devote to the development of acquired resistance to the Vinca alkaloids; multidrug-resistance proteins (MRP1, MRP2, MRP3) and RLIP76 protein have also been identified that probably play a significant role in intrinsic resistance. Lung resistance-related protein (LRP) is contributed to lung cancer therapy resistance, but is not deal with the Vinca alkaloids resistance in lung cancer. Understanding the principle of the Vinca alkaloids in clinical application and mechanisms of drug resistance will support individualized lung cancer therapy and improve future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Role and Mechanism of Structural Variation in Progression of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    of 87 (11%) neuro- blastomas showed chromothripsis ( Molenaar et al. 2012). Further clouding the issue, prostate cancer genome sequencing has re...mutation data ( Molenaar et al. 2012). The human genetics and cancer fields have converged with the description of chromothripsis events in the germline...al. 2011; Stephens et al. 2011; Molenaar et al. 2012; Rausch et al. 2012). Replication-based mechanisms such as MMBIR can in theory generate an

  11. Biophysical Approach to Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention and Treatment with Green Tea Catechins

    OpenAIRE

    Masami Suganuma; Atsushi Takahashi; Tatsuro Watanabe; Keisuke Iida; Takahisa Matsuzaki; Hiroshi Y. Yoshikawa; Hirota Fujiki

    2016-01-01

    Green tea catechin and green tea extract are now recognized as non-toxic cancer preventives for humans. We first review our brief historical development of green tea cancer prevention. Based on exciting evidence that green tea catechin, (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in drinking water inhibited lung metastasis of B16 melanoma cells, we and other researchers have studied the inhibitory mechanisms of metastasis with green tea catechins using biomechanical tools, atomic force microscopy (AF...

  12. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  13. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs) as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 di...

  14. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were...... treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells...... between 700–1800 cm-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased...

  15. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivukula VK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venkat Keshav Chivukula,1 Benjamin L Krog,1,2 Jones T Nauseef,2 Michael D Henry,2 Sarah C Vigmostad1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3 were used in this study. The Young's modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2 and low (510 dyn/cm2 FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young's modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young's modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young's modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young's modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study

  16. Proceedings of the establishment conference of Professional Committee on Waste Underground Disposal of Chinese Society for Rock Mechanics and Engineering and the first academic seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Approved by the China Association for Science and Technology, Chinese Society for Rock Mechanics and Engineering newly established 'Professional Committee on Waste Underground Disposal'. The committee will organise the national and international academic exchange, and provide advice on discipline development, sustainable industrial development, environmental protection, etc.. This is the establishing conference of the professional committee, as well as the first academic seminar. The following topics on waste underground disposal are discussed: the theory, practice and exploration, project examples, new technologies and new methods. The contents include: waste disposal technology in the new century, the geological disposal of high level radioactive waste, LLW and ILW underground waste disposal, urban and industrial waste underground disposal, and etc.

  17. Proceedings of the international conference on nascent technologies in the engineering fields of mechanical, electrical, electronics and telecommunication and computer/information technology: souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This conference contains papers on grid computing, advanced networking, data mining, biometric technologies, social networks and social aspects of information technology, robotics and mechatronics, advances in manufacturing technology, modelling and simulation of mechanical systems, recent trends in refrigeration and air conditioning, energy conservation and alternative fuels and advances in vibration control and its techniques. It also addresses issues in the field of power generation transmission and distribution, energy management and energy efficiency, applications of power electronics and solid state devices, renewable energy technology, distributed generation and micro grid, drives, controls and automation and power quality. The electronics and telecommunication track received good response in the fields of wired and wireless communication, advanced communications, digital signal processing and its applications, optical and microwave communication, embedded and VLSI technology, micro electronics and nano-technology, antenna applications and solid state devices. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  18. The evolution of prestige: freely conferred deference as a mechanism for enhancing the benefits of cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, J; Gil-White, F J.

    2001-05-01

    This paper advances an "information goods" theory that explains prestige processes as an emergent product of psychological adaptations that evolved to improve the quality of information acquired via cultural transmission. Natural selection favored social learners who could evaluate potential models and copy the most successful among them. In order to improve the fidelity and comprehensiveness of such ranked-biased copying, social learners further evolved dispositions to sycophantically ingratiate themselves with their chosen models, so as to gain close proximity to, and prolonged interaction with, these models. Once common, these dispositions created, at the group level, distributions of deference that new entrants may adaptively exploit to decide who to begin copying. This generated a preference for models who seem generally "popular." Building on social exchange theories, we argue that a wider range of phenomena associated with prestige processes can more plausibly be explained by this simple theory than by others, and we test its predictions with data from throughout the social sciences. In addition, we distinguish carefully between dominance (force or force threat) and prestige (freely conferred deference).

  19. Mechanical stress as the common denominator between chronic inflammation, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eLevy Nogueira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and cancer are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD and cancer.

  20. Mechanisms and Therapy for Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Franchino

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapies have improved survival in cancer patients with an increase of the incidence of newly diagnosed brain metastases (BMs. Intracranial metastases are symptomatic in 60–70% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with gadolinium is more sensitive than computed tomography and advanced neuroimaging techniques have been increasingly used in the detection, treatment planning, and follow-up of BM. Apart from the morphological analysis, the most effective tool for characterizing BM is immunohistochemistry. Molecular alterations not always reflect those of the primary tumor. More sophisticated methods of tumor analysis detecting circulating biomarkers in fluids (liquid biopsy, including circulating DNA, circulating tumor cells, and extracellular vesicles, containing tumor DNA and macromolecules (microRNA, have shown promise regarding tumor treatment response and progression. The choice of therapeutic approaches is guided by prognostic scores (Recursive Partitioning Analysis and diagnostic-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment-DS-GPA. The survival benefit of surgical resection seems limited to the subgroup of patients with controlled systemic disease and good performance status. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD can be a complication, especially in posterior fossa metastases undergoing a “piecemeal” resection. Radiosurgery of the resection cavity may offer comparable survival and local control as postoperative whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT. WBRT alone is now the treatment of choice only for patients with single or multiple BMs not amenable to surgery or radiosurgery, or with poor prognostic factors. To reduce the neurocognitive sequelae of WBRT intensity modulated radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing, and pharmacological approaches (memantine and donepezil have been investigated. In the last decade, a multitude of molecular abnormalities have been discovered. Approximately 33% of patients with non

  1. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Activation as the Main Mechanisms Underlying Graphene Toxicity against Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jarosz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of nanotechnology graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted the most attention owing to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Graphene can be applied in many fields among which biomedical applications especially diagnostics, cancer therapy, and drug delivery have been arousing a lot of interest. Therefore it is essential to understand better the graphene-cell interactions, especially toxicity and underlying mechanisms for proper use and development. This review presents the recent knowledge concerning graphene cytotoxicity and influence on different cancer cell lines.

  2. Multimodal Nanomedicine Strategies for Targeting Cancer Cells as well as Cancer Stem Cell Signalling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Samarasinghe, Rasika M; Kamalapuram, Sishir K; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that stem cells, a small population of cells with unique selfrenewable and tumour regenerative capacity, are aiding tumour re-growth and multidrug resistance. Conventional therapies are highly ineffective at eliminating these cells leading to relapse of disease and formation of chemoresistance tumours. Cancer and stem cells targeted therapies that utilizes nanotherapeutics to delivery anti-cancer drugs to specific sites are continuously investigated. This review focuses on recent research using nanomedicine and targeting entities to eliminate cancer cells and cancer stem cells. Current nanotherapeutics in clinical trials along with more recent publications on targeted therapies are addressed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Skin Cancer Chemoprevention by Silibinin: Mechanisms and Efficacy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) type, is a major health problem in the United States (US); annual BCC incidences alone are higher than all other cancer incidences combined (1.67 million/year). Most BCC cases are curable by surgery/radiation, but these can be painful and highly disfiguring and are not viable treatment options for BCC patients with

  4. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  5. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... tests is available in the United States. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends... disparity are complex. Unlike most other preventive services, in colorectal cancer screening there are... access to the tests. Successful completion of colorectal cancer screening requires effort on the part of...

  6. Reporting and Staging of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrill, Clare; Yilmaz, Asli; Srigley, John R; Amin, Mahul B; Compérat, Eva; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Berney, Daniel M; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference devoted to issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation and discussion led by the testis microscopic features working group. This conference focused on controversies related to staging and reporting of testicular tumors and was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urological Pathology members. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions were made by expert consensus rather than voting. A number of recommendations emerged from the conference, including that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) should always be reported and no distinction need be made between lymphatic or blood invasion. If LVI is equivocal, then it should be regarded as negative to avoid triggering unnecessary therapy. LVI in the spermatic cord is considered as category pT2, not pT3, unless future studies provide contrary evidence. At the time of gross dissection, a block should be taken just superior to the epididymis to define the base of the spermatic cord, and direct invasion of tumor in this block indicates a category of pT3. Pagetoid involvement of the rete testis epithelium must be distinguished from rete testis stromal invasion, with only the latter being prognostically useful. Percentages of different tumor elements in mixed germ cell tumors should be reported. Although consensus was reached on many issues, there are still areas of practice that need further evidence on which to base firm recommendations.

  7. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 different sections, most popular of which were Environmental GIS-Projects: Development and Experience, Sustainable Development and Innovative Projects, GIS: the Theory and Methodology, Projects for Russia and Regions, and GIS-Technologies and Digital Mapping. The next annual InterCarto-InterGIS conference will take place in December 2011. The Russian component of the conference will be held in the Altay Kray followed by another meeting on Bali, Indonesia

  8. Biophysics of cancer progression and high-throughput mechanical characterization of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lukas Dylan

    Cancer metastasis involves a series of events known as the metastatic cascade. In this complex progression, cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the surrounding stromal space, transmigrate the vascular system, and establish secondary tumors at distal sites. Specific mechanical phenotypes are likely adopted to enable cells to successfully navigate the mechanical environments encountered during metastasis. To examine the role of cell mechanics in cancer progression, I employed force-consistent biophysical and biochemical assays to characterize the mechanistic links between stiffness, stiffness response and cell invasion during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is an essential physiological process, whose abnormal reactivation has been implicated in the detachment of cancer cells from epithelial tissue and their subsequent invasion into stromal tissue. I demonstrate that epithelial-state cells respond to force by evoking a stiffening response, and that after EMT, mesenchymal-state cells have reduced stiffness but also lose the ability to increase their stiffness in response to force. Using loss and gain of function studies, two proteins are established as functional connections between attenuated stiffness and stiffness response and the increased invasion capacity acquired after EMT. To enable larger scale assays to more fully explore the connection between biomechanics and cancer, I discuss the development of an automated array high throughput (AHT) microscope. The AHT system is shown to implement passive microbead rheology to accurately characterize the mechanical properties of biomaterials. Compared to manually performed mechanical characterizations, the AHT system executes experiments in two orders of magnitude less time. Finally, I use the AHT microscope to study the effect of gain of function oncogenic molecules on cell stiffness. I find evidence that our assay can identify alterations in cell stiffness due to constitutive

  9. Proceedings of the 1985 pressure vessels and piping conference. Volume PVP-98-8. Fracture, fatigue and advanced mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, W.E.; Zamrik, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    State-of-the-art engineering practices in pressure vessel and piping technology are the result of continual efforts in the evaluation of problems which have been experienced and the development of appropriate design and analysis methods for those applications. The resulting advances in technology benefit industry with properly engineered, safe, cost-effective pressure vessels and piping systems. To this end, advanced study continues in specialized areas of mechanical engineering such as fracture mechanics, experimental stress analysis, high pressure applications and related material considerations, as well as advanced techniques for evaluation of commonly encountered design problems. This volume is comprised of current technical papers on various aspects of fracture, fatigue and advanced mechanics as related to the design and analysis of pressure vessels and piping

  10. The ICU trial: a new admission policy for cancer patients requiring mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, Lucien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thiery, Guillaume; Darmon, Michael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2007-03-01

    Cancer patients requiring mechanical ventilation are widely viewed as poor candidates for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We designed a prospective study evaluating a new admission policy titled The ICU Trial. Prospective study. Intensive care unit. One hundred eighty-eight patients requiring mechanical ventilation and having at least one other organ failure. Over a 3-yr period, all patients with hematologic malignancies or solid tumors proposed for ICU admission underwent a triage procedure. Bedridden patients and patients in whom palliative care was the only cancer treatment option were not admitted to the ICU. Patients at earliest phase of the malignancy (diagnosis ventilation, vasopressors, or dialysis after 3 days in the ICU died. Survival was 40% in mechanically ventilated cancer patients who survived to day 5 and 21.8% overall. If these results are confirmed in future interventional studies, we recommend ICU admission with full-code management followed by reappraisal on day 6 in all nonbedridden cancer patients for whom lifespan-extending cancer treatment is available.

  11. Connective tissue growth factor confers drug resistance in breast cancer through concomitant up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Yang; Chen, Pai-Sheng; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Hsu, Hsing-Chih; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Chang, King-Jen; Kuo, Min-Liang

    2009-04-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is elevated in advanced breast cancer and promotes metastasis. Chemotherapy response is only transient in most metastatic diseases. In the present study, we examined whether CTGF expression could confer drug resistance in human breast cancer. In breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, CTGF expression was inversely associated with chemotherapy response. Overexpression of CTGF in MCF7 cells (MCF7/CTGF) enhanced clonogenic ability, cell viability, and resistance to apoptosis on exposure to doxorubicin and paclitaxel. Reducing the CTGF level in MDA-MB-231 (MDA231) cells by antisense CTGF cDNA (MDA231/AS cells) mitigated this drug resistance capacity. CTGF overexpression resulted in resistance to doxorubicin- and paclitaxel-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1). Knockdown of Bcl-xL or cIAP1 with specific small interfering RNAs abolished the CTGF-mediated resistance to apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agents in MCF7/CTGF cells. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 effectively reversed the resistance to apoptosis as well as the up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1 in MCF7/CTGF cells. A neutralizing antibody against integrin alpha(v)beta(3) significantly attenuated CTGF-mediated ERK1/2 activation and up-regulation of Bcl-xL and cIAP1, indicating that the integrin alpha(v)beta(3)/ERK1/2 signaling pathway is essential for CTGF functions. The Bcl-xL level also correlated with the CTGF level in breast cancer patients. We also found that a COOH-terminal domain peptide from CTGF could exert activities similar to full-length CTGF, in activation of ERK1/2, up-regulation of Bcl-xL/cIAP1, and resistance to apoptosis. We conclude that CTGF expression could confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents through augmenting a survival pathway through ERK1/2-dependent Bcl-xL/cIAP1 up-regulation.

  12. Mechanisms of Cancer Induction by Tobacco-Specific NNK and NNN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiaping [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Yang, Suping; Seng, Seyha, E-mail: sseng@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Tobacco use is a major public health problem worldwide. Tobacco-related cancers cause millions of deaths annually. Although several tobacco agents play a role in the development of tumors, the potent effects of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are unique. Metabolically activated NNK and NNN induce deleterious mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppression genes by forming DNA adducts, which could be considered as tumor initiation. Meanwhile, the binding of NNK and NNN to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promotes tumor growth by enhancing and deregulating cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion, thereby creating a microenvironment for tumor growth. These two unique aspects of NNK and NNN synergistically induce cancers in tobacco-exposed individuals. This review will discuss various types of tobacco products and tobacco-related cancers, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which nitrosamines, such as NNK and NNN, induce cancer.

  13. Cancer multidrug resistance: mechanisms involved and strategies for circumvention using a drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the principal mechanism by which many cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy, is one of the major obstacles to the successful clinical treatment of various types of cancer. Several key regulators are responsible for mediating MDR, a process that renders chemotherapeutic drugs ineffective in the internal organelles of target cells. A nanoparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) is a potentially promising tool for circumventing such MDR, which can be achieved by targeting tumor cells themselves or tumor endothelial cells that support the survival of MDR cancer cells. The present article discusses key factors that are responsible for MDR in cancer cells, with a specific focus on the application of DDS to overcome MDR via the use of chemotherapy or macromolecules.

  14. LAMININS IN COLORECTAL CANCER: EXPRESSION, FUNCTION, PROGNOSTIC POWER AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Rodin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM proteins are a major component of the tumor stroma. Laminins emerge as one of the main families of ECM proteins with signaling properties. Apart from the structural function, laminins and products of their degradation affect survival and differentiation of cancer cells, motility of cancer and stromal cells, angiogenesis, invasion into distant organs, and other aspects of cancer development. Here, we discus expression of laminins in colorectal cancer (CRC, studying of laminin functions in in vitro and in vivo models of CRC, and using laminins as prognostic markers of CRC. Recently, we have reported a new approach to assessing prognostic power using classifiers constructed from sets of laminin genes. The method allows for accurate prognosis of CRC and provides additional information that may suggest possible molecular mechanisms of laminin function in CRC progression.

  15. Endogenous Control Mechanisms of FAK and PYK2 and Their Relevance to Cancer Development and Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Rayan Mohammad Mahmoud

    2018-05-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and its close paralogue, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), are key regulators of aggressive spreading and metastasis of cancer cells. While targeted small-molecule inhibitors of FAK and PYK2 are showing promising antitumor activity, their clinical long-term efficacy may be undermined by the strong capacity of cancer cells to evade anti-kinase drugs. In healthy cells, the expression and/or function of FAK and PYK2 is tightly controlled through modulation of gene expression, competing alternatively spliced forms, non-coding RNAs, and proteins that directly or indirectly affect kinase activation or protein stability. The molecular factors involved are frequently deregulated in cancer cells. Here, we review the endogenous mechanisms controlling FAK and PYK2, and discuss how these mechanisms could inspire or improve anticancer therapies.

  16. Endogenous Control Mechanisms of FAK and PYK2 and Their Relevance to Cancer Development and Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Rayan Mohammad Mahmoud; Aldehaiman, Abdullah; Diaz Galicia, Miriam Escarlet; Arold, Stefan T.

    2018-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and its close paralogue, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), are key regulators of aggressive spreading and metastasis of cancer cells. While targeted small-molecule inhibitors of FAK and PYK2 are showing promising antitumor activity, their clinical long-term efficacy may be undermined by the strong capacity of cancer cells to evade anti-kinase drugs. In healthy cells, the expression and/or function of FAK and PYK2 is tightly controlled through modulation of gene expression, competing alternatively spliced forms, non-coding RNAs, and proteins that directly or indirectly affect kinase activation or protein stability. The molecular factors involved are frequently deregulated in cancer cells. Here, we review the endogenous mechanisms controlling FAK and PYK2, and discuss how these mechanisms could inspire or improve anticancer therapies.

  17. Decreased glucose uptake by hyperglycemia is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chae Kyun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Hong, Mee Kyoung; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To clarify the difference in glucose uptake between human cancer cells and monocytes, we studied ({sup 18}F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in three human colon cancer cell lines (SNU-C2A, SNU-C4, SNU-C5), one human lung cancer cell line (NCI-H522), and human peripheral blood monocytes. The FDG uptake of both cancer cells and monocytes was increased in glucose-free medium, but decreased in the medium containing 16.7 mM glucose (hyperglycemic). The level of Glut1 mRNA decreased in human colon cancer cells and NCI-H522 under hyperglycemic condition. Glut1 protein expression was also decreased in the four human cancer cell lines under hyperglycemic condition, whereas it was consistently undetectable in monocytes. SNU-C2A, SNU-C4 and NCI-H522 showed a similar level of hexokinase activity (7.5-10.8 mU/mg), while SNU-C5 and moncytes showed lower range of hexokinase activity (4.3-6.5 mU/mg). These data suggest that glucose uptake is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes.

  18. Decreased glucose uptake by hyperglycemia is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chae Kyun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Hong, Mee Kyoung; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the difference in glucose uptake between human cancer cells and monocytes, we studied ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in three human colon cancer cell lines (SNU-C2A, SNU-C4, SNU-C5), one human lung cancer cell line (NCI-H522), and human peripheral blood monocytes. The FDG uptake of both cancer cells and monocytes was increased in glucose-free medium, but decreased in the medium containing 16.7 mM glucose (hyperglycemic). The level of Glut1 mRNA decreased in human colon cancer cells and NCI-H522 under hyperglycemic condition. Glut1 protein expression was also decreased in the four human cancer cell lines under hyperglycemic condition, whereas it was consistently undetectable in monocytes. SNU-C2A, SNU-C4 and NCI-H522 showed a similar level of hexokinase activity (7.5-10.8 mU/mg), while SNU-C5 and moncytes showed lower range of hexokinase activity (4.3-6.5 mU/mg). These data suggest that glucose uptake is regulated by different mechanisms in human cancer cells and monocytes

  19. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Schoenfeld, Joshua D.; Buatti, John M.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. PMID:25460731

  20. Diabetes mellitus and gynecologic cancer: molecular mechanisms, epidemiological, clinical and prognostic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Iavazzo, Christos; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Sifakis, Stavros; Alexandrou, Andreas; Siristatidis, Charalambos; Grigoriadis, Charalambos; Botsis, Dimitrios; Creatsas, George

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of which has increased dramatically worldwide, may put patients at a higher risk of cancer. The aim of our study is the clarification of the possible mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and gynecological cancer and their epidemiological relationship. This is a narrative review of the current literature, following a search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, from their inception until January 2012. Articles investigating gynecologic cancer (endometrial, ovarian, and breast) incidence in diabetic patients were extracted. The strong evidence for a positive association between diabetes mellitus and the risk for cancer indicates that energy intake in excess to energy expenditure, or the sequelae thereof, is involved in gynecological carcinogenesis. This risk may be further heightened by glucose which can directly promote the production of tumor cells by functioning as a source of energy. Insulin resistance accompanied by secondary hyperinsulinemia is hypothezised to have a mitogenic effect. Steroid hormones are in addition potent regulators of the balance between cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inflammatory pathways may also be implicated, as a correlation seems to exist between diabetes mellitus and breast or endometrial carcinoma pathogenesis, although an analogous correlation with ovarian carcinoma is still under investigation. Antidiabetic agents have been correlated with elevated cancer risk, while metformin seems to lower the risk. Diabetes mellitus is associated with an elevation in gynecologic cancer risk. Moreover, there are many studies exploring the prognosis of patients with diabetes and gynecological cancer, the outcome and the overall survival in well-regulated patients.

  1. I'm so tired: biological and genetic mechanisms of cancer-related fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsevick, Andrea; Frost, Marlene; Zwinderman, Aeilko; Hall, Per; Halyard, Michele; Abertnethy, Amy P.; Baas, Frank; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Chauhan, Cynthia; Cleeland, Charles S.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Klepstad, Pål; Martin, Nicholas G.; Miaskowski, Christine; Mosing, Miriam; Movsas, Benjamin; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Patrick, Donald L.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ropka, Mary E.; Shi, Quiling; Shinozaki, Gen; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Veenhoven, Ruut; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of this paper is to discuss cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and address issues related to the investigation into potential biological and genetic causal mechanisms. The objectives are to: (1) describe CRF as a component of quality of life (QOL); (2) address measurement issues that

  2. Antibody therapy of cancer : Fc receptor-mediated mechanisms of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, a class of malignant diseases characterized by unregulated cell growth, is still a leading cause of death worldwide. The high specificity of antibodies combined with the ability to engage multiple mechanisms of action (MoA) and minimal side-effects makes them attractive agents for targeted

  3. Early life exposure to famine and colorectal cancer risk: A role for epigenetic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, L.A.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Bruïne, A.P. de; Wouters, K.A.D.; Hulsmans, S.; Spiertz, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Herman, J.G.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Engeland, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Exposure to energy restriction during childhood and adolescence is associated with a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epigenetic dysregulation during this critical period of growth and development may be a mechanism to explain such observations. Within the Netherlands

  4. Exosomes isolated from cancer patients' sera transfer malignant traits and confer the same phenotype of primary tumors to oncosuppressor-mutated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdouh, Mohamed; Hamam, Dana; Gao, Zu-Hua; Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-08-30

    Horizontal transfer of malignant traits from the primary tumor to distant organs, through blood circulating factors, has recently become a thoroughly studied metastatic pathway to explain cancer dissemination. Recently, we reported that oncosuppressor gene-mutated human cells undergo malignant transformation when exposed to cancer patients' sera. We also observed that oncosuppressor mutated cells would show an increased uptake of cancer-derived exosomes and we suggested that oncosuppressor genes might protect the integrity of the cell genome by blocking integration of cancer-derived exosomes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cancer patients' sera-derived exosomes might be responsible for the malignant transformation of target cells and that oncosuppressor mutation would promote their increased uptake. We also sought to unveil the mechanisms behind the hypothesized phenomena. We used human BRCA1 knockout (BRCA1-KO) fibroblasts as target cells. Cells were treated in vitro with cancer patients' sera or cancer patients' sera-derived exosomes. Treated cells were injected into NOD-SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to determine the differentiation state of the xenotransplants. Mass spectrometry analyses of proteins from cancer exosomes and the BRCA1-KO fibroblasts' membrane were performed to investigate possible de novo expression of molecules involved in vesicles uptake. Blocking of the identified molecules in vitro was performed and in vivo experiments were conducted to confirm the role of these molecules in the malignant transformation carried out by cancer-derived exosomes. Cells treated with exosomes isolated from cancer patients' sera underwent malignant transformation and formed tumors when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Histological analyses showed that the tumors were carcinomas that differentiated into the same lineage of the primary tumors of blood donors. Oncosuppressor mutation promoted the de novo expression

  5. Immune Response Induction and New Effector Mechanisms Possibly Involved in Protection Conferred by the Cuban Anti-Meningococcal BC Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Oliver; Lastre, Miriam; Lapinet, José; Bracho, Gustavo; Díaz, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Taboada, Carlos; Sierra, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    This report explores the participation of some afferent mechanisms in the immune response induced by the Cuban anti-meningococcal vaccine VA-MENGOC-BC. The induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity in nursing babies and lymphocyte proliferation after immunization is demonstrated. The presence of gamma interferon IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNAs but absence of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 mRNAs were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from immunized subjects after in vitro challenge with outer membrane vesicles. In addition, some effector functions were also explored. The presence of opsonic activity was demonstrated in sera from vaccinees. The role of neutrophils as essential effector cells was shown. In conclusion, we have shown that, at least in the Cuban adult population, VA-MENGOC-BC induces mechanisms with a T-helper 1 pattern in the afferent and effector branches of the immune response. PMID:11401992

  6. Optimization of voltage output of energy harvesters with continuous mechanical rotation extracted from human motion (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Evan; Hamidi, Armita; Tadesse, Yonas

    2017-04-01

    With increasing popularity of portable devices for outdoor activities, portable energy harvesting devices are coming into spot light. The next generation energy harvester which is called hybrid energy harvester can employ more than one mechanism in a single device to optimize portion of the energy that can be harvested from any source of waste energy namely motion, vibration, heat and etc. In spite of few recent attempts for creating hybrid portable devices, the level of output energy still needs to be improved with the intention of employing them in commercial electronic systems or further applications. Moreover, implementing a practical hybrid energy harvester in different application for further investigation is still challenging. This proposal is projected to incorporate a novel approach to maximize and optimize the voltage output of hybrid energy harvesters to achieve a greater conversion efficiency normalized by the total mass of the hybrid device than the simple arithmetic sum of the individual harvesting mechanisms. The energy harvester model previously proposed by Larkin and Tadesse [1] is used as a baseline and a continuous unidirectional rotation is incorporated to maximize and optimize the output. The device harvest mechanical energy from oscillatory motion and convert it to electrical energy through electromagnetic and piezoelectric systems. The new designed mechanism upgrades the device in a way that can harvest energy from both rotational and linear motions by using magnets. Likewise, the piezoelectric section optimized to harvest at least 10% more energy. To the end, the device scaled down for tested with different sources of vibrations in the immediate environment, including machinery operation, bicycle, door motion while opening and closing and finally, human motions. Comparing the results from literature proved that current device has capability to be employed in commercial small electronic devices for enhancement of battery usage or as a backup

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2018 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview ...

  9. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Project Director Penelope Jeggo

    2003-02-15

    Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early

  10. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms: I. Report Outline

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  11. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  12. Label-free vascular imaging in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model for pre-cancer detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Liu, Heather; Murphy, Helen; Farsiu, Sina; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-03-01

    Inducing angiogenesis is one hallmark of cancer. Tumor induced neovasculature is often characterized as leaky, tortuous and chaotic, unlike a highly organized normal vasculature. Additionally, in the course of carcinogenesis, angiogenesis precedes a visible lesion. Tumor cannot grow beyond 1-2 mm in diameter without inducing angiogenesis. Therefore, capturing the event of angiogenesis may aid early detection of pre-cancer -important for better treatment prognoses in regions that lack the resources to manage invasive cancer. In this study, we imaged the neovascularization in vivo in a spontaneous hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model using a, non-invasive, label-free, high resolution, reflected-light spectral darkfield microscope. Hamsters' cheek pouches were painted with 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce pre-cancerous to cancerous changes, or mineral oil as control. High resolution spectral darkfield images were obtained over the course of pre-cancer development and in control cheek pouches. The vasculature was segmented with a multi-scale Gabor filter with an 85% accuracy compared with manually traced masks. Highly tortuous vasculature was observed only in the DMBA treated cheek pouches as early as 6 weeks of treatment. In addition, the highly tortuous vessels could be identified before a visible lesion occurred later during the treatment. The vessel patterns as determined by the tortuosity index were significantly different from that of the control cheek pouch. This preliminary study suggests that high-resolution darkfield microscopy is promising tool for pre-cancer and early cancer detection in low resource settings.

  13. 35. Conference of the DVM Working Group on Fracture Processes: Advances in fracture and damage mechanics - simulation methods of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Subjects of the meeting were: Simulation of fatigue crack growth in real strucures using FEA (M. Fulland, Paderborn); Modelling of ductile crack growth (W. Brocks, Geesthacht); Advances in non-local modelling of ductile damage (F. Reusch et al., Berlin, Dortmund); Fracture mechanics of ceramics (D. Munz, Karlsruhe); From materials testing to vehicle crash testing (J.G. Blauel, Freiburg); Analytical simulation of crack growth in thin-walled structures (U. Zerbst, Geesthacht); The influence of intrinsic stresses on fatigue crack growth (C. Dalle Donne etc., Cologne, Dortmund, Pisa, and M. Sander, Paderborn); Fracture mechanical strength calculation in case of mixed mode loads on cracks (H.A. Richard, Paderborn); Numeric simulation of intrinsic stresses during welding (C. Veneziano, Freiburg); New research fields of the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (P. Gumbsch, Head of the Institute, Freiburg); Modern developments and advances in fracture and damage mechanics; Numeric and experimental simulation of crack propagation and damage processes; Exemplary damage cases; Fracture mechanics in product development; Failure characteristics of lightweight constructional materials and joints [de

  14. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  15. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xin; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Li, Qian; Ali, Shahjahan; Lezmi, Stephane; Chen, Hong; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Laegreid, William W; Saif, Taher A; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition.Methods: Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher's exact test.Results: Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells.Conclusions: Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular

  16. A mechanically-induced colon cancer cell population shows increased metastatic potential

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xin

    2014-05-29

    Background: Metastasis accounts for the majority of deaths from cancer. Although tumor microenvironment has been shown to have a significant impact on the initiation and/or promotion of metastasis, the mechanism remains elusive. We previously reported that HCT-8 colon cancer cells underwent a phenotypic transition from an adhesive epithelial type (E-cell) to a rounded dissociated type (R-cell) via soft substrate culture, which resembled the initiation of metastasis. The objective of current study was to investigate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms of the E-R transition.Methods: Global gene expressions of HCT-8 E and R cells were measured by RNA Sequencing (RNA-seq); and the results were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), anoikis resistance, enzyme activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3 family, member A1 (ALDH3A1), and in vitro invasion assay were tested on both E and R cells. The deformability of HCT-8 E and R cells was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To study the in vivo invasiveness of two cell types, athymic nude mice were intra-splenically injected with HCT-8 E or R cells and sacrificed after 9 weeks. Incidences of tumor development and metastasis were histologically evaluated and analyzed with Fisher\\'s exact test.Results: Besides HCT-8, E-R transition on soft substrates was also seen in three other cancer cell lines (HCT116, SW480 colon and DU145 prostate cancer). The expression of some genes, such as ALDH3A1, TNS4, CLDN2, and AKR1B10, which are known to play important roles in cancer cell migration, invasion, proliferation and apoptosis, were increased in HCT-8 R cells. R cells also showed higher ALDH3A1 enzyme activity, higher ROS, higher anoikis resistance, and higher softness than E cells. More importantly, in vitro assay and in vivo animal models revealed that HCT-8 R cells were more invasive than E cells.Conclusions: Our comprehensive comparison of HCT-8 E and R cells revealed differences of molecular

  17. Nutraceuticals for prostate cancer chemoprevention: from molecular mechanisms to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Fan, Jeffery; Liu, Mandy; Yeung, Steven; Chang, Andy; Chow, Moses S S; Pon, Doreen; Huang, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Nutraceutical is a food, or part of a food, used for the prevention and/or treatment of diseases. A number of nutraceuticals serve as candidates for development of prostate cancer chemopreventive agents because of promising epidemiological, preclinical and pilot clinical findings. Their mechanisms of action may involve an ability to target multiple molecular pathways in carcinogenesis without eliciting toxic side effects. This review provides an overview of several nutraceuticals, including green tea polyphenol, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, lycopene, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol and sulforaphane, for the clinical relevance to chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Their mechanisms of action on regulating key processes of carcinogenesis are also discussed. For each of these agents, a brief summary of completed or currently ongoing clinical trials related to the chemopreventive efficacy on prostate cancer is given. Even though a few clinical trials have been conducted, review of these results indicate that further studies are required to confirm the clinical efficacy and safety, and to provide a guidance on how to use nutraceuticals for optimal effect. Future cancer prevention clinical trials for the nutraceuticals should recruit men with an increased risk of prostate cancer.

  18. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim eGurpinar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  19. CA-125–indicated asymptomatic relapse confers survival benefit to ovarian cancer patients who underwent secondary cytoreduction surgery

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    Wang Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus regarding the management of ovarian cancer patients, who have shown complete clinical response (CCR to primary therapy and have rising cancer antigen CA-125 levels but have no symptoms of recurrent disease. The present study aims to determine whether follow-up CA-125 levels can be used to identify the need for imaging studies and secondary cytoreductive surgery (CRS. Methods We identified 410 ovarian cancer patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1984 and 2011. These patients had shown CCR to primary therapy. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of the MD Anderson Cancer Center. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test to assess the associations between the follow-up CA-125 levels and secondary CRS and survival duration. Results The CA-125 level of 1.68 × nadir was defined as the indicator of recurrent disease (p  1.68 × nadir at relapse (55.7 and 10.4 months; p = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively. The overall and progression free survival duration of patients with asymptomatic relapse and underwent a secondary CRS was longer than that of patients with symptomatic relapse (p = 0.02 and 0.04 respectively. Conclusions The increase of serum CA-125 levels is an early warning of clinical relapse in ovarian cancer. Using CA-125 levels in guiding the treatment of patients with asymptomatic recurrent ovarian cancer, who have shown CCR to primary therapy, can facilitate optimal secondary CRS and extend the survival duration of the patients.

  20. Insulin Resistance and Cancer Risk: An Overview of the Pathogenetic Mechanisms

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    Biagio Arcidiacono

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is common in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes (T2D, in which circulating insulin levels are frequently increased. Recent epidemiological and clinical evidence points to a link between insulin resistance and cancer. The mechanisms for this association are unknown, but hyperinsulinaemia (a hallmark of insulin resistance and the increase in bioavailable insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I appear to have a role in tumor initiation and progression in insulin-resistant patients. Insulin and IGF-I inhibit the hepatic synthesis of sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG, whereas both hormones stimulate the ovarian synthesis of sex steroids, whose effects, in breast epithelium and endometrium, can promote cellular proliferation and inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, an increased risk of cancer among insulin-resistant patients can be due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS that can damage DNA contributing to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, it is possible that the abundance of inflammatory cells in adipose tissue of obese and diabetic patients may promote systemic inflammation which can result in a protumorigenic environment. Here, we summarize recent progress on insulin resistance and cancer, focusing on various implicated mechanisms that have been described recently, and discuss how these mechanisms may contribute to cancer initiation and progression.

  1. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Uncover the Multiple Mechanisms of Hedyotis diffusa Willd. on Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinkui Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer diseases globally, colorectal cancer (CRC remains an important cause of cancer-related death. Although the traditional Chinese herb Hedyotis diffusa Willd. (HDW has been proven to be effective for treating CRC in clinical practice, its definite mechanisms have not been completely deciphered. Objective. The aim of our research is to systematically explore the multiple mechanisms of HDW on CRC. Methods. This study adopted the network pharmacology approach, which was mainly composed of active component gathering, target prediction, CRC gene collection, network analysis, and gene enrichment analysis. Results. The network analysis showed that 10 targets might be the therapeutic targets of HDW on CRC, namely, HRAS, PIK3CA, KRAS, TP53, APC, BRAF, GSK3B, CDK2, AKT1, and RAF1. The gene enrichment analysis implied that HDW probably benefits patients with CRC by modulating pathways related to cancers, infectious diseases, endocrine system, immune system, nervous system, signal transduction, cellular community, and cell motility. Conclusions. This study partially verified and predicted the pharmacological and molecular mechanism of HDW against CRC from a holistic perspective, which will also lay a foundation for the further experimental research and clinical rational application of HDW.

  2. Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling Confers Cardiac Protection Against Ischemic Injury via Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase- and Soluble Guanylate Cyclase-dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Zou, Lin; Li, Yan; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Huang, Peigen; Brouckaert, Peter; Chao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior administration of a small dose of lipopolysaccharide confers a cardiac protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the signaling mechanisms that control the protection are incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that TLR4 mediates the ability of lipopolysaccharide to protect against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury through distinct intracellular pathways involving myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-β–mediated transcription-factor (Trif), inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Methods Wild-type mice and the genetically modified mice, i.e., TLR4-deficient (TLR4-def), TLR2 knockout (TLR2−/−), MyD88−/−, Trif−/−, iNOS−/−, and sGCα1−/−, were treated with normal saline or 0.1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide, intraperitoneally. Twenty-four hours later, isolated hearts were perfused in a Langendorff apparatus and subsequently subjected to 30 min of global ischemia and reperfusion for up to 60 min. Left ventricular function and myocardial infarction sizes were examined. Results Compared to saline-treated mice, lipopolysaccharide-treated mice had markedly improved left ventricular developed pressure and dP/dtmax (P < 0.01) and reduced MI sizes (37.2 ± 3.4% vs. 19.8 ± 4.9%, P < 0.01) after ischemia-reperfusion. The cardiac protective effect of lipopolysaccharide was abolished in the TLR4-def and MyD88−/− mice, but remained intact in TLR2−/− or Trif−/− mice. iNOS−/− mice or wild-type mice treated with the iNOS inhibitor 1400W failed to respond to the TLR4-induced nitric oxide production and were not protected by the lipopolysaccharide preconditioning. While sGC 1−/− mice had robust nitric oxide production in response to lipopolysaccharide, they were not protected by the TLR4-elicited cardiac protection. Conclusions TLR4 activation confers a potent cardiac protection against ischemia

  3. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  4. Biophysical Approach to Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention and Treatment with Green Tea Catechins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Masami; Takahashi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Iida, Keisuke; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Fujiki, Hirota

    2016-11-18

    Green tea catechin and green tea extract are now recognized as non-toxic cancer preventives for humans. We first review our brief historical development of green tea cancer prevention. Based on exciting evidence that green tea catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in drinking water inhibited lung metastasis of B16 melanoma cells, we and other researchers have studied the inhibitory mechanisms of metastasis with green tea catechins using biomechanical tools, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microfluidic optical stretcher. Specifically, determination of biophysical properties of cancer cells, low cell stiffness, and high deformability in relation to migration, along with biophysical effects, were studied by treatment with green tea catechins. The study with AFM revealed that low average values of Young's moduli, indicating low cell stiffness, are closely associated with strong potential of cell migration and metastasis for various cancer cells. It is important to note that treatments with EGCG and green tea extract elevated the average values of Young's moduli resulting in increased stiffness (large elasticity) of melanomas and various cancer cells. We discuss here the biophysical basis of multifunctions of green tea catechins and green tea extract leading to beneficial effects for cancer prevention and treatment.

  5. Biophysical Approach to Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention and Treatment with Green Tea Catechins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Suganuma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Green tea catechin and green tea extract are now recognized as non-toxic cancer preventives for humans. We first review our brief historical development of green tea cancer prevention. Based on exciting evidence that green tea catechin, (−-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG in drinking water inhibited lung metastasis of B16 melanoma cells, we and other researchers have studied the inhibitory mechanisms of metastasis with green tea catechins using biomechanical tools, atomic force microscopy (AFM and microfluidic optical stretcher. Specifically, determination of biophysical properties of cancer cells, low cell stiffness, and high deformability in relation to migration, along with biophysical effects, were studied by treatment with green tea catechins. The study with AFM revealed that low average values of Young’s moduli, indicating low cell stiffness, are closely associated with strong potential of cell migration and metastasis for various cancer cells. It is important to note that treatments with EGCG and green tea extract elevated the average values of Young’s moduli resulting in increased stiffness (large elasticity of melanomas and various cancer cells. We discuss here the biophysical basis of multifunctions of green tea catechins and green tea extract leading to beneficial effects for cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. Withaferin A and sulforaphane regulate breast cancer cell cycle progression through epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Kendra J; Paul, Bidisha; Nozell, Susan; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2018-07-01

    Little is known about the effects of combinatorial dietary compounds on the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms involved in breast cancer prevention. The human diet consists of a multitude of components, and there is a need to elucidate how certain compounds interact in collaboration. Withaferin A (WA), found in the Indian winter cherry and documented as a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, and sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor found in cruciferous vegetables, are two epigenetic modifying compounds that have only recently been studied in conjunction. The use of DNMT and HDAC inhibitors to reverse the malignant expression of certain genes in breast cancer has shown considerable promise. Previously, we found that SFN + WA synergistically promote breast cancer cell death. Herein, we determined that these compounds inhibit cell cycle progression from S to G2 phase in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this unique combination of epigenetic modifying compounds down-regulates the levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4, and pRB; conversely, the levels of E2F mRNA and tumor suppressor p21 are increased independently of p53. We find these events coincide with an increase in unrestricted histone methylation. We propose SFN + WA-induced breast cancer cell death is attributed, in part, to epigenetic modifications that result in the modulated expression of key genes responsible for the regulation of cancer cell senescence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Obesity-related colon cancer: dietary factors and their mechanisms of anticancer action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L

    2012-02-01

    Overweight/obesity is an epidemic in the US as well as in other developed countries, affecting two-thirds of Americans and an estimated 2.3 billion people worldwide. Obesity increases the risk for Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. For example, epidemiological studies have established a strong association between obesity and colon cancer. It is generally accepted that metabolic changes associated with overweight/obesity, particularly abdominal obesity and changes in adipocyte function, contribute to the increased risk of colon cancer. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this association is important for the development of preventive strategies for colon cancer. Part of these preventive strategies may be based on dietary factors, such as vitamins, minerals (e.g. selenium), fibre, phytochemicals and phenolic compounds. These anticancer nutrients may counteract the molecular changes associated with obesity. The present article reviews the evidence that inflammation and insulin resistance induced by obesity are the molecular mediators of the association between obesity and colon cancer. We also evaluate the evidence for the ability of dietary factors to target the obesity-induced changes and, thus, protect against colon cancer. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Reduced expression of p27 is a novel mechanism of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Iain; Shalli, Kawan; McDonald, Sarah L; Moir, Susan E; Hutcheon, Andrew W; Heys, Steven D; Schofield, Andrew C

    2004-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of breast cancer. Breast cancers can have an inherent or acquired resistance to docetaxel but the causes of this resistance remain unclear. However, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation are key mechanisms by which most chemotherapeutic agents exert their cytotoxic effects. We created two docetaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and performed cDNA microarray analysis to identify candidate genes associated with docetaxel resistance. Gene expression changes were validated at the RNA and protein levels by reverse transcription PCR and western analysis, respectively. Gene expression cDNA microarray analysis demonstrated reduced p27 expression in docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells. Although p27 mRNA expression was found to be reduced only in MCF-7 docetaxel-resistant sublines (2.47-fold), reduced expression of p27 protein was noted in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells (2.83-fold and 3.80-fold, respectively). This study demonstrates that reduced expression of p27 is associated with acquired resistance to docetaxel in breast cancer cells. An understanding of the genes that are involved in resistance to chemotherapy may allow further development in modulating drug resistance, and may permit selection of those patients who are most likely to benefit from such therapies

  9. Molecular programs induced by heat acclimation confer neuroprotection against TBI and hypoxic insults via cross-tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eHorowitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection following prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures (heat acclimation HA develops via altered molecular programs such as cross-tolerance (Heat Acclimation -Neuroprotection Cross-Tolerance -HANCT. The mechanisms underlying cross-tolerance depend on enhanced on-demand protective pathways evolving during acclimation. The protection achieved is long lasting and limits the need for de novo recruitment of cytoprotective pathways upon exposure to novel stressors. Using mouse and rat acclimated phenotypes, we will focus on the impact of heat acclimation on Angiotensin II-AT2 receptors in neurogenesis and on HIF-1 as key mediators in spontaneous recovery and HANCT after traumatic brain injury (TBI. The neuroprotective consequences of heat acclimation on NMDA and AMPA receptors will be discussed using the global hypoxia model. A behavioral-molecular link will be crystallized. The differences between HANCT and consensus preconditioning will be reviewed.

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Outreach Program Cancer Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press ...

  11. Mechanisms Regulating Acid-Base Transporter Expression in Breast- and Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbatenko, Andrej

    , characteristics of which are a shift towards glycolytic metabolism and increased acid production. HER2 receptor overexpression in breast cancer leads to further increased glycolysis, invasion and metastasis, drug resistance and poor prognosis. Increased tumor glycolysis requires acquisition of mechanisms...... for dealing with excess acid production. In this light, evidence accumulates on the importance of pH regulatory proteins to cancer cell survival and motility. Our group previously demonstrated upregulation of the Na+/HCO3 - co-transporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) by a constitutively active form of HER2 receptor (p95HER...

  12. EMT blockage strategies: Targeting Akt dependent mechanisms for breast cancer metastatic behaviour modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, D; Doktorovová, S; Florindo, H F; Gener, P; Abasolo, I; Schwartz, S; Videira, M A

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is an event where epithelial cells acquire mesenchymal-like phenotype. EMT can occur as a physiological phenomenon during tissue development and wound healing, but most importantly, EMT can confer highly invasive properties to epithelial carcinoma cells. The impairment of E-cadherin expression, an essential cell-cell adhesion protein, together with an increase in the expression of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin, characterize the EMT process and are usually correlated with tumor migration, and metastization. A wide range of micro-environmental and intracellular factors regulate tumor development and progression. The dynamic cross-talk between the adhesion-related proteins such as E-cadherin and the EMT-related transcription factors, with special focus on TWIST, will be discussed here, with the aim of finding a suitable biological pathway to be used as potential target for cancer therapy. Emerging concepts such as the role of the PI3K/AKT/TWIST pathway in the regulation of the E-cadherin expression will be highlighted, since it seems to be consistently involved in cells EMT. The well-known efficacy of the RNA interference as a tool to silence the expression of specific proteins has come into focus as a strategy to control different tumor sub-populations. Despite the oligonucleotides enormous sensitivity and low in vivo stability, new (nano)technological solutions are expected to enable RNAi clinical application in cancer therapy.

  13. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  14. Lactate/pyruvate transporter MCT-1 is a direct Wnt target that confers sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowl-Tanio, Stephanie; Habowski, Amber N; Pate, Kira T; McQuade, Miriam M; Wang, Kehui; Edwards, Robert A; Grun, Felix; Lyou, Yung; Waterman, Marian L

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oncogenic Wnt signaling directs metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells to favor aerobic glycolysis or Warburg metabolism. In colon cancer, this reprogramming is due to direct regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 ( PDK1 ) gene transcription. Additional metabolism genes are sensitive to Wnt signaling and exhibit correlative expression with PDK1. Whether these genes are also regulated at the transcriptional level, and therefore a part of a core metabolic gene program targeted by oncogenic WNT signaling, is not known. Here, we identify monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT-1; encoded by SLC16A1 ) as a direct target gene supporting Wnt-driven Warburg metabolism. We identify and validate Wnt response elements (WREs) in the proximal SLC16A1 promoter and show that they mediate sensitivity to Wnt inhibition via dominant-negative LEF-1 (dnLEF-1) expression and the small molecule Wnt inhibitor XAV939. We also show that WREs function in an independent and additive manner with c-Myc, the only other known oncogenic regulator of SLC16A1 transcription. MCT-1 can export lactate, the byproduct of Warburg metabolism, and it is the essential transporter of pyruvate as well as a glycolysis-targeting cancer drug, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). Using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assays to follow cell proliferation, we tested a panel of colon cancer cell lines for sensitivity to 3-BP. We observe that all cell lines are highly sensitive and that reduction of Wnt signaling by XAV939 treatment does not synergize with 3-BP, but instead is protective and promotes rapid recovery. We conclude that MCT-1 is part of a core Wnt signaling gene program for glycolysis in colon cancer and that modulation of this program could play an important role in shaping sensitivity to drugs that target cancer metabolism.

  15. Transcription Factor KLF5 Binds a Cyclin E1 Polymorphic Intronic Enhancer to Confer Increased Bladder Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that environmental toxins, such as exposure to arsenic, are risk factors in the development of urinary bladder cancer, yet recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide compelling evidence that there is a strong genetic component associated with disease predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs8102137, was identified on chromosome 19q12, residing 6 kb upstream of the important cell cycle regulator and proto-oncogene, Cyclin E1 (CCNE1). However, the functional role of this variant in bladder cancer predisposition has been unclear since it lies within a non-coding region of the genome. Here, it is demonstrated that bladder cancer cells heterozygous for this SNP exhibit biased allelic expression of CCNE1 with 1.5-fold more transcription occurring from the risk allele. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, a novel enhancer element was identified within the first intron of CCNE1 that binds Kruppel-like Factor 5 (KLF5), a known transcriptional activator in bladder cancer. Moreover, the data reveal that the presence of rs200996365, a SNP in high linkage disequilibrium with rs8102137 residing in the center of a KLF5 motif, alters KLF5 binding to this genomic region. Through luciferase assays and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, a novel polymorphic intronic regulatory element controlling CCNE1 transcription is characterized. These studies uncover how a cancer-associated polymorphism mechanistically contributes to an increased predisposition for bladder cancer development. Implications A polymorphic KLF5 binding site near the CCNE1 gene explains genetic risk identified through genome wide association studies. PMID:27514407

  16. Clinical trial involving sufferers and non-sufferers of cervicogenic headache (CGH): potential mechanisms of action of photobiomodulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Ann D.; Bicknell, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) is an effective tool for the management of spinal pain including inflammation of facet joints. Apart from cervical and lumbar joint pain the upper cervical spine facet joint inflammation can result in the CGH (traumatic or atraumatic in origin). This condition affects children, adults and elders and is responsible for 19% of chronic headache and up to 33% of patients in pain clinics. The condition responds well to physiotherapy, facet joint injection, radiofrequency neurotomy and surgery at a rate of 75%. The other 25% being unresponsive to treatment with no identified features of unresponsiveness. In other conditions of chronic unresponsive cervical pain have responded to photobiomodulation at a level of 80% in the short and medium term. A clinical trial was therefore conducted on a cohort of atraumatic patients from the ages of 5-93 (predominantly Neurologist referred / familial sufferers 2/3 generations vertically and laterally) who had responded to a course of PBM and physiotherapy. The CGH sufferers and their non CGH suffering relatives over these generations were then compared for features that distinguish the two groups. Fifty parameters were tested (anthropmetric, movement and neural tension tests included) and there was a noted difference in tandem stance between the groups (.04 significance with repeated measures). As this impairment is common to benign ataxia and migrainous vertigo and in these conditions there is an ion channelopathy (especially potassium channelopathy). A postulated mechanism of action of PBM would involve modulation of ion channels and this is discussed in this presentation.

  17. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  18. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  19. Therapeutic rationale to target highly expressed CDK7 conferring poor outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Bo; Chonghaile, Triona Ni; Fan, Yue; Madden, Stephen F.; Klinger, Rut; O'Connor, Aisling E.; Walsh, Louise; O'Hurley, Gillian; Udupi, Girish Mallya; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Tarrant, Finbarr; Conroy, Emer; Gaber, Alexander; Chin, Suet-Feung; Bardwell, Helen A; Provenzano, Elena; Crown, John; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine; Jirstrom, Karin; Caldas, Carlos; O'Connor, Darran P; Gallagher, William M

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients commonly exhibit poor prognosis and high relapse after treatment, but there remains a lack of biomarkers and effective targeted therapies for this disease. Here, we report evidence highlighting the cell-cycle–related kinase CDK7 as a driver and candidate

  20. Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palesh O

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxana Palesh,1 Luke Peppone,2 Pasquale F Innominato,3–5 Michelle Janelsins,2 Monica Jeong,1 Lisa Sprod,7 Josee Savard,6 Max Rotatori,1 Shelli Kesler,1 Melinda Telli,1 Karen Mustian21Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 3INSERM, UMRS 776, Biological Rhythms and Cancers, Villejuif, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Universite Paris Sud, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 5APHP, Chronotherapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; 6Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 7University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients

  1. International Conference on Risk Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Teresa; Rigas, Alexandros; Gulati, Sneh

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest results in the field of risk analysis. Presented topics include probabilistic models in cancer research, models and methods in longevity, epidemiology of cancer risk, engineering reliability and economical risk problems. The contributions of this volume originate from the 5th International Conference on Risk Analysis (ICRA 5). The conference brought together researchers and practitioners working in the field of risk analysis in order to present new theoretical and computational methods with applications in biology, environmental sciences, public health, economics and finance.

  2. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  3. Optimizing structural and mechanical properties of cryogel scaffolds for use in prostate cancer cell culturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecilia, A.; Baecker, A.; Hamann, E.; Rack, A.; Kamp, T. van de; Gruhl, F.J.; Hofmann, R.; Moosmann, J.; Hahn, S.; Kashef, J.; Bauer, S.; Farago, T.; Helfen, L.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) currently is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and the second most cause of cancer death after lung cancer in Western societies. This sets the necessity of modelling prostatic disorders to optimize a therapy against them. The conventional approach to investigating prostatic diseases is based on two-dimensional (2D) cell culturing. This method, however, does not provide a three-dimensional (3D) environment, therefore impeding a satisfying simulation of the prostate gland in which the PCa cells proliferate. Cryogel scaffolds represent a valid alternative to 2D culturing systems for studying the normal and pathological behavior of the prostate cells thanks to their 3D pore architecture that reflects more closely the physiological environment in which PCa cells develop. In this work the 3D morphology of three potential scaffolds for PCa cell culturing was investigated by means of synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography (SXCμT) fitting the according requirements of high spatial resolution, 3D imaging capability and low dose requirements very well. In combination with mechanical tests, the results allowed identifying an optimal cryogel architecture, meeting the needs for a well-suited scaffold to be used for 3D PCa cell culture applications. The selected cryogel was then used for culturing prostatic lymph node metastasis (LNCaP) cells and subsequently, the presence of multi-cellular tumor spheroids inside the matrix was demonstrated again by using SXCμT. - Highlights: • Synthesis of cryogel scaffolds for prostate cancer cell culturing. • Study of cryogel morphology by synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography. • Analysis of cryogel mechanical properties with laboratory techniques. • Culturing of prostate cancer cell in the optimal cryogel composition for 21 days. • 3D visualization of the cells by synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography.

  4. Optimizing structural and mechanical properties of cryogel scaffolds for use in prostate cancer cell culturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecilia, A. [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Baecker, A. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 Bldg 329, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe D-76344 (Germany); Hamann, E. [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rack, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Kamp, T. van de [Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 6980, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gruhl, F.J. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1 Bldg 329, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe D-76344 (Germany); Hofmann, R. [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Moosmann, J. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hahn, S.; Kashef, J.; Bauer, S.; Farago, T. [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Helfen, L. [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); and others

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) currently is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and the second most cause of cancer death after lung cancer in Western societies. This sets the necessity of modelling prostatic disorders to optimize a therapy against them. The conventional approach to investigating prostatic diseases is based on two-dimensional (2D) cell culturing. This method, however, does not provide a three-dimensional (3D) environment, therefore impeding a satisfying simulation of the prostate gland in which the PCa cells proliferate. Cryogel scaffolds represent a valid alternative to 2D culturing systems for studying the normal and pathological behavior of the prostate cells thanks to their 3D pore architecture that reflects more closely the physiological environment in which PCa cells develop. In this work the 3D morphology of three potential scaffolds for PCa cell culturing was investigated by means of synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography (SXCμT) fitting the according requirements of high spatial resolution, 3D imaging capability and low dose requirements very well. In combination with mechanical tests, the results allowed identifying an optimal cryogel architecture, meeting the needs for a well-suited scaffold to be used for 3D PCa cell culture applications. The selected cryogel was then used for culturing prostatic lymph node metastasis (LNCaP) cells and subsequently, the presence of multi-cellular tumor spheroids inside the matrix was demonstrated again by using SXCμT. - Highlights: • Synthesis of cryogel scaffolds for prostate cancer cell culturing. • Study of cryogel morphology by synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography. • Analysis of cryogel mechanical properties with laboratory techniques. • Culturing of prostate cancer cell in the optimal cryogel composition for 21 days. • 3D visualization of the cells by synchrotron X-ray computed micro tomography.

  5. Effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of human cancer cells investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, LianQing; Xi, Ning; Wang, YueChao; Xiao, XiuBin; Zhang, WeiJing

    2015-09-01

    Cell mechanics plays an important role in cellular physiological activities. Recent studies have shown that cellular mechanical properties are novel biomarkers for indicating the cell states. In this article, temperature-controllable atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to quantitatively investigate the effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of human cancer cells. First, AFM indenting experiments were performed on six types of human cells to investigate the changes of cellular Young's modulus at different temperatures and the results showed that the mechanical responses to the changes of temperature were variable for different types of cancer cells. Second, AFM imaging experiments were performed to observe the morphological changes in living cells at different temperatures and the results showed the significant changes of cell morphology caused by the alterations of temperature. Finally, by co-culturing human cancer cells with human immune cells, the mechanical and morphological changes in cancer cells were investigated. The results showed that the co-culture of cancer cells and immune cells could cause the distinct mechanical changes in cancer cells, but no significant morphological differences were observed. The experimental results improved our understanding of the effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of cancer cells.

  6. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo Isaac

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  7. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose E.; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  8. Mechanisms of DNA damage repair in adult stem cells and implications for cancer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2018-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity in tissue-specific stem cells is critical for tissue homeostasis and the prevention of deleterious diseases such as cancer. Stem cells are subject to DNA damage induced by endogenous replication mishaps or exposure to exogenous agents. The type of DNA lesion and the cell cycle stage will invoke different DNA repair mechanisms depending on the intrinsic DNA repair machinery of a cell. Inappropriate DNA repair in stem cells can lead to cell death, or to the formation and accumulation of genetic alterations that can be transmitted to daughter cells and so is linked to cancer formation. DNA mutational signatures that are associated with DNA repair deficiencies or exposure to carcinogenic agents have been described in cancer. Here we review the most recent findings on DNA repair pathways activated in epithelial tissue stem and progenitor cells and their implications for cancer mutational signatures. We discuss how deep knowledge of early molecular events leading to carcinogenesis provides insights into DNA repair mechanisms operating in tumours and how these could be exploited therapeutically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct Mechanisms of Nuclease-Directed DNA-Structure-Induced Genetic Instability in Cancer Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Del Mundo, Imee M; McKinney, Jennifer A; Lu, Xiuli; Bacolla, Albino; Boulware, Stephen B; Zhang, Changsheng; Zhang, Haihua; Ren, Pengyu; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Vasquez, Karen M

    2018-01-30

    Sequences with the capacity to adopt alternative DNA structures have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, the mechanisms are unclear. For example, H-DNA-forming sequences within oncogenes have been shown to stimulate genetic instability in mammals. Here, we report that H-DNA-forming sequences are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer genomes, further implicating them in cancer etiology. H-DNA-induced mutations were suppressed in human cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair nucleases, ERCC1-XPF and XPG, but were stimulated in cells deficient in FEN1, a replication-related endonuclease. Further, we found that these nucleases cleaved H-DNA conformations, and the interactions of modeled H-DNA with ERCC1-XPF, XPG, and FEN1 proteins were explored at the sub-molecular level. The results suggest mechanisms of genetic instability triggered by H-DNA through distinct structure-specific, cleavage-based replication-independent and replication-dependent pathways, providing critical evidence for a role of the DNA structure itself in the etiology of cancer and other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  11. A polymorphism in miR-1262 regulatory region confers the risk of lung cancer in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Chen, Mengxi; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Liang, Cheng; Song, Ci; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Lin, Dongxin; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2017-09-01

    It has been proposed that the majority of disease-associated loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are enriched in non-coding regions, such as the promoter, enhancer or non-coding RNA genes. Thus, we performed a two-stage case-control study to systematically evaluate the association of genetic variants in miRNA regulatory regions (promoter and enhancer) with lung cancer risk in 7,763 subjects (discovery stage: 2,331 cases and 3,077 controls; validation stage: 1,065 cases and 1,290 controls). As a result, we identified that rs12740674 (C > T) in miR-1262 enhancer was significantly associated with the increased risk of lung cancer (additive model in discovery stage: adjusted OR = 1.31, 95%CI = 1.13-1.53, p = 3.846 × 10 -4 in Nanjing GWAS; adjusted OR = 1.20, 95%CI = 1.00-1.44, p = 0.041 in Beijing GWAS; validation stage: adjusted OR = 1.20, 95%CI = 1.03-1.41, p = 0.024). In meta-analysis, the p value for the association between rs12740674 and lung cancer risk reached 6.204 × 10 -6 (adjusted OR = 1.24, 95%CI = 1.13-1.36). Using 3DSNP database, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and functional assays, we observed that the risk T allele of rs12740674 reduced the expression level of miR-1262 in lung tissue through chromosomal looping, and overexpression of miR-1262 inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation probably through targeting the expression levels of ULK1 and RAB3D. Our findings confirmed the important role that genetic variants of noncoding sequence play in lung cancer susceptibility and indicated that rs12740674 in miR-1262 may be biologically relevant to lung carcinogenesis. © 2017 UICC.

  12. Neuroendorine differentiation in prostate cancer: A mechanism of radioresistance and treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Deng eHu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED in prostate cancer is a well recognized phenotypic change by which prostate cancer cells transdifferentiate into neuroendocrine-like (NE-like cells. NE-like cells lack the expression of androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen, and are resistant to treatments. In addition, NE-like cells secrete peptide hormones and growth factors to support the growth of surrounding tumor cells in a paracrine manner. Accumulated evidence has suggested that NED is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. The importance of NED in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic response is further supported by the fact that therapeutic agents, including androgen deprivation therapy, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy, also induce NED. We will review the work supporting the overall hypothesis that therapy-induced NED is a mechanism of resistance to treatments, as well as discuss the relationship between therapy-induced NED and therapy-induced senescence, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells. Furthermore, we will use radiation-induced NED as a model to explore several NED-based targeting strategies for development of novel therapeutics. Finally, we propose future studies that will specifically address therapy-induced NED in the hope that a better treatment regimen for prostate cancer can be developed.

  13. PI3K/Akt/mTOR Intracellular Pathway and Breast Cancer: Factors, Mechanism and Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Var Ruchi; Gupta, Girish Kumar; Sharma, A K; Batra, Navneet; Sharma, Daljit K; Joshi, Amit; Sharma, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    The most recurrent and considered second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide in women is the breast cancer. The key to diagnosis is early prediction and a curable stage but still treatment remains a great clinical challenge. Origin of the Problem: A number of studies have been carried out for the treatment of breast cancer which includes the targeted therapies and increased survival rates in women. Essential PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway activation has been observed in most breast cancers. The cell growth and tumor development in such cases involve phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex intracellular pathway. Through preclinical and clinical trials, it has been observed that there are a number of other inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, which either alone or in combination with cytotoxic agents can be used for endocrine therapies. Structure and regulation/deregulation of mTOR provides a greater insight into the action mechanism. Also, through this review, one could easily scan first and second generation inhibitors for PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway besides targeted therapies for breast cancer and the precise role of mTOR. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  15. Elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Joshi

    2017-10-01

    Results: The whole exome data was analyzed using an in-house developed pipeline. Of all the known resistance mutations, we identified EGFR T790M mutation in five out of fifteen patients. Other than T790M we expect to identify novel resistance causing mutations from the analysis of ten patients with unknown resistance mechanisms. Functional validation of these resistance specific alterations would be performed in vitro using drug sensitive lung cancer cell lines.

  16. Bitter melon juice targets molecular mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    SOMASAGARA, RANGANATHA R.; DEEP, GAGAN; SHROTRIYA, SANGEETA; PATEL, MANISHA; AGARWAL, CHAPLA; AGARWAL, RAJESH

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, and resistance towards gemcitabine, the front-line chemotherapy, is the main cause for dismal rate of survival in PanC patients; overcoming this resistance remains a major challenge to treat this deadly malignancy. Whereas several molecular mechanisms are known for gemcitabine resistance in PanC cells, altered metabolism and bioenergetics are not yet studied. Here, we compared metabolic and bioenergetic functions between gemcita...

  17. Loss of PEDF: A Novel Mechanism of Antihormone Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    transcriptionally silent , and that DNA methylation gradually accumulates upon long-term gene silencing and are associated with human malignancies. 5-Aza-2...in various neoplasms of the thyroid , where specific mutations lead to defined tumor types [60-62]. The RET protein spans the cell membrane, so that one...BM: Mechanisms of disease: cancer targeting and the impact of oncogenic RET for medullary thyroid carcinoma therapy. Nat Clin Pract Oncol 2006, 3:564

  18. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Fang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a variety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can function as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identifying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides.

  19. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  20. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  1. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Adaptive Responses to Targeted Kinase Inhibitors in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven P; Zawistowski, Jon S; Johnson, Gary L

    2018-01-06

    Although targeted inhibition of oncogenic kinase drivers has achieved remarkable patient responses in many cancers, the development of resistance has remained a significant challenge. Numerous mechanisms have been identified, including the acquisition of gatekeeper mutations, activating pathway mutations, and copy number loss or gain of the driver or alternate nodes. These changes have prompted the development of kinase inhibitors with increased selectivity, use of second-line therapeutics to overcome primary resistance, and combination treatment to forestall resistance. In addition to genomic resistance mechanisms, adaptive transcriptional and signaling responses seen in tumors are gaining appreciation as alterations that lead to a phenotypic state change-often observed as an epithelial-to-mesenchymal shift or reversion to a cancer stem cell-like phenotype underpinned by remodeling of the epigenetic landscape. This epigenomic modulation driving cell state change is multifaceted and includes modulation of repressive and activating histone modifications, DNA methylation, enhancer remodeling, and noncoding RNA species. Consequently, the combination of kinase inhibitors with drugs targeting components of the transcriptional machinery and histone-modifying enzymes has shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we review mechanisms of resistance to kinase inhibition in cancer, with special emphasis on the rewired kinome and transcriptional signaling networks and the potential vulnerabilities that may be exploited to overcome these adaptive signaling changes.

  2. Endogenous molecular network reveals two mechanisms of heterogeneity within gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Site; Zhu, Xiaomei; Liu, Bingya; Wang, Gaowei; Ao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity is a common phenomenon and impedes cancer therapy and research. Gastric cancer (GC) cells have generally been classified into two heterogeneous cellular phenotypes, the gastric and intestinal types, yet the mechanisms of maintaining two phenotypes and controlling phenotypic transition are largely unknown. A qualitative systematic framework, the endogenous molecular network hypothesis, has recently been proposed to understand cancer genesis and progression. Here, a minimal network corresponding to such framework was found for GC and was quantified via a stochastic nonlinear dynamical system. We then further extended the framework to address the important question of intratumor heterogeneity quantitatively. The working network characterized main known features of normal gastric epithelial and GC cell phenotypes. Our results demonstrated that four positive feedback loops in the network are critical for GC cell phenotypes. Moreover, two mechanisms that contribute to GC cell heterogeneity were identified: particular positive feedback loops are responsible for the maintenance of intestinal and gastric phenotypes; GC cell progression routes that were revealed by the dynamical behaviors of individual key components are heterogeneous. In this work, we constructed an endogenous molecular network of GC that can be expanded in the future and would broaden the known mechanisms of intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:25962957

  3. Integrative Genomics Reveals Mechanisms of Copy Number Alterations Responsible for Transcriptional Deregulation in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jordi; Nguyen, Quang Tri; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Knutsen, Turid; McNeil, Nicole E.; Wangsa, Danny; Hummon, Amanda B.; Grade, Marian; Ried, Thomas; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms and consequences of chromosomal aberrations in colorectal cancer (CRC), we used a combination of spectral karyotyping, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), and array-based global gene expression profiling on 31 primary carcinomas and 15 established cell lines. Importantly, aCGH showed that the genomic profiles of primary tumors are recapitulated in the cell lines. We revealed a preponderance of chromosome breakpoints at sites of copy number variants (CNVs) in the CRC cell lines, a novel mechanism of DNA breakage in cancer. The integration of gene expression and aCGH led to the identification of 157 genes localized within high-level copy number changes whose transcriptional deregulation was significantly affected across all of the samples, thereby suggesting that these genes play a functional role in CRC. Genomic amplification at 8q24 was the most recurrent event and led to the overexpression of MYC and FAM84B. Copy number dependent gene expression resulted in deregulation of known cancer genes such as APC, FGFR2, and ERBB2. The identification of only 36 genes whose localization near a breakpoint could account for their observed deregulated expression demonstrates that the major mechanism for transcriptional deregulation in CRC is genomic copy number changes resulting from chromosomal aberrations. PMID:19691111

  4. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Crosstalk between Apoptosis and Autophagy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahid El-Khattouti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both apoptosis and autophagy are highly conserved processes that besides their role in the maintenance of the organismal and cellular homeostasis serve as a main target of tumor therapeutics. Although their important roles in the modulation of tumor therapeutic strategies have been widely reported, the molecular actions of both apoptosis and autophagy are counteracted by cancer protective mechanisms. While apoptosis is a tightly regulated process that is implicated in the removal of damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy is a cellular catabolic pathway that is involved in lysosomal degradation and recycling of proteins and organelles, and thereby is considered an important survival/protective mechanism for cancer cells in response to metabolic stress or chemotherapy. Although the relationship between autophagy and cell death is very complicated and has not been characterized in detail, the molecular mechanisms that control this relationship are considered to be a relevant target for the development of a therapeutic strategy for tumor treatment. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, autophagy, and those of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in order to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that may be essential for the balance between cell survival and death as well as their role as targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  6. Taxane resistance in breast cancer: mechanisms, predictive biomarkers and circumvention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S; Briasoulis, E; Linardou, H; Bafaloukos, D; Papadimitriou, C

    2012-11-01

    Taxanes are established in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and early breast cancer (EBC) as potent chemotherapy agents. However, their therapeutic usefulness is limited by de-novo refractoriness or acquired resistance, which are common drawbacks to most anti-cancer cytotoxics. Considering that the taxanes will remain principle chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer, we reviewed known mechanisms of resistance in with an outlook of optimizing their clinical use. We searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles (from inception through to 9th January 2012; last search 10/01/2012) and journals known to publish information relevant to taxane chemotherapy. We imposed no language restrictions. Search terms included: cancer, breast cancer, response, resistance, taxane, paclitaxel, docetaxel, taxol. Due to the possibility of alternative mechanisms of resistance all combination chemotherapy treated data sets were removed from our overview. Over-expression of the MDR-1 gene product Pgp was extensively studied in vitro in association with taxane resistance, but data are conflicting. Similarly, the target components microtubules, which are thought to mediate refractoriness through alterations of the expression pattern of tubulins or microtubule associated proteins and the expression of alternative tubulin isoforms, failed to confirm such associations. Little consensus has been generated for reported associations between taxane-sensitivity and mutated p53, or taxane-resistance and overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or NFkB. In contrary sufficient in vitro data support an association of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) defects with resistance. Clinical data have been limited and inconsistent, which relate to the variety of methods used, lack of standardization of cut-offs for quantitation, differences in clinical endpoints measured and in methods of tissue collection preparation and storage, and study/patient heterogeneity. The most

  7. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... In addition, there are persistent problems with leadership and planning, vaccine stock management, supply chain capacity and quality, provider-parent communication, and financial sustainability. The conference delegates agreed to move from talking to taking concrete actions around children's health, and ...

  8. Glasgow conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-10-15

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge.

  9. Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A brief review is given of the main results presented at the International Conference on Heavy Ion Sources, October 27--30, 1975. The sections are as follows: highlights, general observations, fundamental processes in sources, positive ion sources, negative ion sources, beam formation and emittance measurements, stripping, accelerators and experiments, and future prospects

  10. Lisbon Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Although no major physics discoveries were announced, the European Physical Society's International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Lisbon from 9-15 July, was significant in that it showed the emerging pattern of physics for the 1980s

  11. Conference report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    Bloomberg Philanthropies. The conference theme “from research to implementation” emphasised the importance of connecting knowledge around violence with injury prevention, while stressing the need to address the multitude of transnational public health challenges. In speaking to this theme, the. Tampere Declaration ...

  12. Conference Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of the management planning technique known as Break Even Analysis and outlines its use as a tool in financial planning for organizations intending to conduct or sponsor a conference, seminar, or workshop. Three figures illustrating Break Even Analysis concepts and a Break Even Analysis worksheet are included. (JL)

  13. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice .... while the implementation of family planning in African HIV programs will favor safe contraception ... equipment. The WHO-stepwise approach for the global strategy for the prevention ...

  14. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  15. Wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy improves skin cancer diagnostic specificity at high sensitivity levels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan; Kalia, Sunil; Lui, Harvey

    2017-02-01

    Background: Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical technique which can measure molecular vibrational modes within tissue. A large-scale clinical study (n = 518) has demonstrated that real-time Raman spectroscopy could distinguish malignant from benign skin lesions with good diagnostic accuracy; this was validated by a follow-up independent study (n = 127). Objective: Most of the previous diagnostic algorithms have typically been based on analyzing the full band of the Raman spectra, either in the fingerprint or high wavenumber regions. Our objective in this presentation is to explore wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy for skin cancer diagnosis. Methods: A wavenumber selection algorithm was implemented using variably-sized wavenumber windows, which were determined by the correlation coefficient between wavenumbers. Wavenumber windows were chosen based on accumulated frequency from leave-one-out cross-validated stepwise regression or least and shrinkage selection operator (LASSO). The diagnostic algorithms were then generated from the selected wavenumber windows using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component and general discriminant analysis (PC-GDA) and partial least squares (PLS). A total cohort of 645 confirmed lesions from 573 patients encompassing skin cancers, precancers and benign skin lesions were included. Lesion measurements were divided into training cohort (n = 518) and testing cohort (n = 127) according to the measurement time. Result: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) improved from 0.861-0.891 to 0.891-0.911 and the diagnostic specificity for sensitivity levels of 0.99-0.90 increased respectively from 0.17-0.65 to 0.20-0.75 by selecting specific wavenumber windows for analysis. Conclusion: Wavenumber selection based analysis in Raman spectroscopy improves skin cancer diagnostic specificity at high sensitivity levels.

  16. The Mechanism by Which MYCN Amplification Confers an Enhanced Sensitivity to a PCNA-Derived Cell Permeable Peptide in Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Gu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated expression of MYC family genes is a hallmark of many malignancies. Unfortunately, these proteins are not amenable to blockade by small molecules or protein-based therapeutic agents. Therefore, we must find alternative approaches to target MYC-driven cancers. Amplification of MYCN, a MYC family member, predicts high-risk neuroblastoma (NB disease. We have shown that R9-caPep blocks the interaction of PCNA with its binding partners and selectively kills human NB cells, especially those with MYCN amplification, and we now show the mechanism. We found elevated levels of DNA replication stress in MYCN-amplified NB cells. R9-caPep exacerbated DNA replication stress in MYCN-amplified NB cells and NB cells with an augmented level of MYC by interfering with DNA replication fork extension, leading to Chk1 dependence and susceptibility to Chk1 inhibition. We describe how these effects may be exploited for treating NB.

  17. 4th European Turbulence Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The European Turbulence Conferences have been organized under the auspices of the European Mechanics Committee (Euromech) to provide a forum for discussion and exchange of recent and new results in the field of turbulence. The first conference was organized in Lyon in 1986 with 152 participants. The second and third conferences were held in Berlin (1988) and Stockholm (1990) with 165 and 172 participants respectively. The fourth was organized in Delft from 30 June to 3 July 1992 by the J.M. Burgers Centre. There were 214 participants from 22 countries. This steadily growing number of participants demonstrates both the success and need for this type of conference. The main topics of the Fourth European Turbulence Conference were: Dynamical Systems and Transition; Statistical Physics and Turbulence; Experiments and Novel Experimental Techniques; Particles and Bubbles in Turbulence; Simulation Methods; Coherent Structures; Turbulence Modelling and Compressibility Effects. In addition a special session was held o...

  18. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  19. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  20. Mechanisms of Anorexia Cancer Cachexia Syndrome and Potential Benefits of Traditional Medicine and Natural Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Hua, Cong; Bao-Hua, Zou; Lei, Yu

    Anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome is prevalent in advanced cancer patients, which is featured by anorexia, decreased dietary intake, body weight loss (skeletal muscle mass loss), and is unable to be reversed by routine nutritional support therapy. Up to now, the main mechanisms involved in cancer cachexia include excessive systemic inflammation, which is represented by increased plasma levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, tumor-induced factors, such as PIF and LMF. These factors eventually act on orexigenic and anorexigenicneurons located in the hypothalamus or protein and lipid metabolism of peripheral tissues, which lead to anorexia, decreased dietary intake, enhanced basic metabolism rate and hypercatabolism. The treatment modality includes early nutritional intervention, physical activity and drug treatment. However, studies about drugs used to treat cachexia are always controversial or merely effective in stimulating appetite and increasing body weight, though not lean body mass. The main target of pharmaceutical treatment is to improve appetite, decrease systemic inflammation and promote anabolic metabolism. Nevertheless, the treatment effectiveness of chemical drugs are not reaching consensus by existing cachexia guidelines. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is recently known as a promising treatment to improve cachaxia status and quality of life of cancer patients. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural herbal medicines have been used in the treatment of cancer for thousands of years worldwide, particularly in China. More and more research show that traditional Hanfang (Chinese medicines) and some natural herbs with less side reactions, have the effects of antagonizing pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancing immune system, inhibiting protein catabolism, boosting the appetite and body weight, which maybe a promising treatment strategy and development tendency for anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome.

  1. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  2. [Effect of PMU hepatic arterial chemotherapy for liver metastases of gastric cancer. Hokuriku Cisplatin Round-table Conference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, H; Matsuki, N; Katayama, K; Hirosawa, H; Tomita, F; Takano, N; Tanaka, T; Sawa, T; Ueno, K; Uogishi, M

    1989-08-01

    We performed PMU hepatic arterial chemotherapy (a combination therapy consisting of intra-hepatic arterial infusion of CDDP and MMC, oral administration of UFT) in 20 patients with gastric cancer and liver metastases. In this method, 1-6 courses of one infusion of CDDP at 70-100 mg/body and MMC of 10 mg/body into the proper hepatic artery were administered at intervals of 3-4 weeks. UFT of 300-400 mg/day was orally administered with the infusion. The primary response for hepatic metastatic lesions was observed in one case of CR, 14 cases of PR, 4 cases of NC, and one case of PD. The efficacy for CR and PR was high at 75%. The median disease-free interval was 56 weeks in responders. The 50% survival period was 11.1 months; one-year survival rate, 42.1%; two-year survival rate, 12.3%; the longest survival period was 108 weeks. Mild and transient side effects were recognized in 17 cases (85%): gastrointestinal symptoms, sense of general malaise, fever, leukocytopenia, and elevated BUN. Thus, the results indicated that this combination chemotherapy was effective for liver metastases of gastric cancer.

  3. Complete cytoreduction after five or more cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy confers a survival benefit in advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew; Sundar, Sudha; Singh, Kavita; Nevin, James; Elattar, Ahmed; Kehoe, Sean; Balega, Janos

    2018-06-01

    To assess the impact of 5 or more cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and cytoreductive outcomes on overall survival (OS) in patients undergoing interval debulking surgery (IDS) for advanced ovarian cancer. A retrospective review of patients receiving NACT followed by IDS between 2007 and 2017. Patients were analysed according to number of NACT cycles received: group 1 consisted of patients receiving ≤4 cycles and group 2 consisted of those receiving ≥5 cycles. Outcomes were stratified by cytoreductive outcome, surgical complexity, stage and chemotherapy exposure. 231 patients in group 1 and 167 in group 2 were identified. In group 1, the OS for those achieving Complete (R0), Optimalcycles to 24.3 (95%CI 14.4-34.2)months with ≥6 cycles. Surgery with utilisation of cytoreductive procedures to achieve complete clearance should be offered to all patients even after ≥5 cycles if R0 can be achieved. R1 cytoreduction has questionable value in those receiving ≤4 cycles and no value in those receiving ≥5 cycles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomics Characterization of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutant P53 Reactivation with PRIMA-1 in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daoud, Sayed S

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to identify novel protein-protein interactions in various locations of cells to establish the molecular mechanisms of mutant p53 reactivation with PRIMA-1 in breast cancer cells...

  5. Tumor-Protective Mechanism Identified from Premature Aging Disease | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extraordinarily rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which encodes architectural proteins of the human cell nucleus. The mutation causes the production of a mutant protein called progerin. Patients with HGPS display signs of premature aging, such as hair loss, slowed growth, weakening of bone and joint integrity, and cardiovascular disease. Most die in their mid-teens of heart disease or stroke. Intriguingly, these patients do not develop another aging-related disease, cancer, despite having dramatically elevated levels of DNA damage. Tom Misteli, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues hypothesized that, rather than patients not living long enough to develop cancer, a resistance mechanism was operating in HGPS cells to prevent cancer formation. To begin testing this idea, the researchers transformed fibroblasts from HGPS patients or age-matched, healthy controls with telomerase, constitutively-activated HRAS, and SV40 large and small T antigens. Transformed HGPS cells displayed morphological changes and increased proliferation similar to transformed controls but formed fewer colonies in soft agar and fewer tumors when injected into mice. When the investigators examined global gene expression in the two populations of cells, they found that transformed HGPS cells failed to activate many of the genes that are induced in response to transformation in controls, including oncogenic and proliferation pathways. In addition the transformed HGPS cells were unable to undergo oncogenic de-differentiation. Importantly, the tumor resistance in HGPS cells was due to the presence of the progerin protein, which was both necessary and sufficient to protect cells from oncogenic transformation. Together these results suggested that HGPS cells resist cancer-inducing stimuli by not undergoing the genetic reprogramming necessary for tumor initiation. The scientists

  6. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2015-01-01

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer

  7. Adipocytes enhance murine pancreatic cancer growth via a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Considine, Robert V; True, Eben; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Obesity accelerates the development and progression of pancreatic cancer, though the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Adipocytes are biologically active, producing factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that may influence tumor progression. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that adipocyte-secreted factors including HGF accelerate pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Murine pancreatic cancer cells (Pan02 and TGP-47) were grown in a) conditioned medium (CM) from murine F442A preadipocytes, b) HGF-knockdown preadipocyte CM, c) recombinant murine HGF at increasing doses, and d) CM plus HGF-receptor (c-met) inhibitor. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay. ANOVA and t-test were applied; p TGP-47 cell proliferation relative to control (59 ± 12% and 34 ± 12%, p TGP-47 cells remained unchanged. Recombinant HGF dose-dependently increased Pan02, but not TGP-47, proliferation (p TGP-47 cells. These experiments demonstrate that adipocyte-derived factors accelerate murine pancreatic cancer proliferation. In the case of Pan02 cells, HGF is responsible, in part, for this proliferation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A., E-mail: lsamant@uab.edu [Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, WTI320D, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Psychological and behavioral mechanisms influencing the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, K; Komura, K; Tokoro, A; Kuromaru, T; Ohshima, A; Ito, T; Sumiyoshi, Y; Hyodo, I

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the psychological and behavioral mechanisms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Japanese cancer patients using two applied behavioral models, the transtheoretical model (TTM), and theory of planned behavior (TPB). Questionnaires were distributed to 1100 patients at three cancer treatment facilities in Japan and data on 521 cancer patients were used in the final analysis. The questionnaire included items based on TTM and TPB variables, as well as three psychological batteries. According to the TTM, 88 patients (17%) were in precontemplation, 226 (43%) in contemplation, 33 (6%) in preparation, 71 (14%) in action, and 103 (20%) in maintenance. The model derived from structural equation modeling revealed that the stage of CAM use was significantly affected by the pros, cons, expectation from family, norms of medical staff, use of chemotherapy, period from diagnosis, and place of treatment. The primary factor for the stage of CAM use was the expectation from family. The findings revealed the existence of a number of psychologically induced potential CAM users, and psychological variables including positive attitude for CAM use and perceived family expectation greatly influence CAM use in cancer patients.

  10. The Bioelectric Code: Reprogramming Cancer and Aging From the Interface of Mechanical and Chemical Microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B. Silver

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex, heterogeneous group of diseases that can develop through many routes. Broad treatments such as chemotherapy destroy healthy cells in addition to cancerous ones, but more refined strategies that target specific pathways are usually only effective for a limited number of cancer types. This is largely due to the multitude of physiological variables that differ between cells and their surroundings. It is therefore important to understand how nature coordinates these variables into concerted regulation of growth at the tissue scale. The cellular microenvironment might then be manipulated to drive cells toward a desired outcome at the tissue level. One unexpected parameter, cellular membrane voltage (Vm, has been documented to exert control over cellular behavior both in culture and in vivo. Manipulating this fundamental cellular property influences a remarkable array of organism-wide patterning events, producing striking outcomes in both tumorigenesis as well as regeneration. These studies suggest that Vm is not only a key intrinsic cellular property, but also an integral part of the microenvironment that acts in both space and time to guide cellular behavior. As a result, there is considerable interest in manipulating Vm both to treat cancer as well as to regenerate organs damaged or deteriorated during aging. However, such manipulations have produced conflicting outcomes experimentally, which poses a substantial barrier to understanding the fundamentals of bioelectrical reprogramming. Here, we summarize these inconsistencies and discuss how the mechanical microenvironment may impact bioelectric regulation.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Curcumin-Mediated Therapeutic Effects in Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Wojcik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing prevalence of age-related diseases, especially type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cancer, has become global health and economic problems. Due to multifactorial nature of both diseases, their pathophysiology is not completely understood so far. Compelling evidence indicates that increased oxidative stress, resulting from an imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and their clearance by antioxidant defense mechanisms, as well as the proinflammatory state contributes to the development and progression of the diseases. Curcumin (CUR; diferuloylmethane, a well-known polyphenol derived from the rhizomes of turmeric Curcuma longa, has attracted a great deal of attention as a natural compound with beneficial antidiabetic and anticancer properties, partly due to its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory actions. Although this polyphenolic compound is increasingly being recognized for its growing number of protective health effects, the precise molecular mechanisms through which it reduces diabetes- and cancer-related pathological events have not been fully unraveled. Hence, CUR is the subject of intensive research in the fields Diabetology and Oncology as a potential candidate in the treatment of both T2DM and cancer, particularly since current therapeutic options for their treatment are not satisfactory in clinics. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made on the molecular targets and pathways involved in antidiabetic and anticancer activities of CUR that are responsible for its beneficial health effects.

  12. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores.

  13. Mechanical properties of metastatic breast cancer cells invading into collagen I matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical to the metastasis of cancer cells. To investigate the mechanical interplay between the cells and ECM during invasion, we created thin bovine collagen I hydrogels ranging from 0.1-5 kPa in Young's modulus that were seeded with highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant population fractions invaded the matrices either partially or fully within 24 h. We then combined confocal fluorescence microscopy and indentation with an atomic force microscope to determine the Young's moduli of individual embedded cells and the pericellular matrix using novel analysis methods for heterogeneous samples. In partially embedded cells, we observe a statistically significant correlation between the degree of invasion and the Young's modulus, which was up to an order of magnitude greater than that of the same cells measured in 2D. ROCK inhibition returned the cells' Young's moduli to values similar to 2D and diminished but did not abrogate invasion. This provides evidence that Rho/ROCK-dependent acto-myosin contractility is employed for matrix reorganization during initial invasion, and suggests the observed cell stiffening is due to an attendant increase in actin stress fibers. This work was supported by the National Cancer Institute under the grant U54 CA143862.

  14. Asymmetry in family history implicates nonstandard genetic mechanisms: application to the genetics of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice R Weinberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies typically target inherited autosomal variants, but less studied genetic mechanisms can play a role in complex disease. Sex-linked variants aside, three genetic phenomena can induce differential risk in maternal versus paternal lineages of affected individuals: 1. maternal effects, reflecting the maternal genome's influence on prenatal development; 2. mitochondrial variants, which are inherited maternally; 3. autosomal genes, whose effects depend on parent of origin. We algebraically show that small asymmetries in family histories of affected individuals may reflect much larger genetic risks acting via those mechanisms. We apply these ideas to a study of sisters of women with breast cancer. Among 5,091 distinct families of women reporting that exactly one grandmother had breast cancer, risk was skewed toward maternal grandmothers (p<0.0001, especially if the granddaughter was diagnosed between age 45 and 54. Maternal genetic effects, mitochondrial variants, or variant genes with parent-of-origin effects may influence risk of perimenopausal breast cancer.

  15. Cannabinoids Modulate Neuronal Activity and Cancer by CB1 and CB2 Receptor-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Soderstrom

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids include the active constituents of Cannabis or are molecules that mimic the structure and/or function of these Cannabis-derived molecules. Cannabinoids produce many of their cellular and organ system effects by interacting with the well-characterized CB1 and CB2 receptors. However, it has become clear that not all effects of cannabinoid drugs are attributable to their interaction with CB1 and CB2 receptors. Evidence now demonstrates that cannabinoid agents produce effects by modulating activity of the entire array of cellular macromolecules targeted by other drug classes, including: other receptor types; ion channels; transporters; enzymes, and protein- and non-protein cellular structures. This review summarizes evidence for these interactions in the CNS and in cancer, and is organized according to the cellular targets involved. The CNS represents a well-studied area and cancer is emerging in terms of understanding mechanisms by which cannabinoids modulate their activity. Considering the CNS and cancer together allow identification of non-cannabinoid receptor targets that are shared and divergent in both systems. This comparative approach allows the identified targets to be compared and contrasted, suggesting potential new areas of investigation. It also provides insight into the diverse sources of efficacy employed by this interesting class of drugs. Obtaining a comprehensive understanding of the diverse mechanisms of cannabinoid action may lead to the design and development of therapeutic agents with greater efficacy and specificity for their cellular targets.

  16. Cancer resistance of SR/CR mice in the genetic knockout backgrounds of leukocyte effector mechanisms: determinations for functional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anne M; Stehle, John R; Blanks, Michael J; Riedlinger, Gregory; Kim-Shapiro, Jung W; Monjazeb, Arta M; Adams, Jonathan M; Willingham, Mark C; Cui, Zheng

    2010-03-31

    Spontaneous Regression/Complete Resistant (SR/CR) mice are a colony of cancer-resistant mice that can detect and rapidly destroy malignant cells with innate cellular immunity, predominately mediated by granulocytes. Our previous studies suggest that several effector mechanisms, such as perforin, granzymes, or complements, may be involved in the killing of cancer cells. However, none of these effector mechanisms is known as critical for granulocytes. Additionally, it is unclear which effector mechanisms are required for the cancer killing activity of specific leukocyte populations and the survival of SR/CR mice against the challenges of lethal cancer cells. We hypothesized that if any of these effector mechanisms was required for the resistance to cancer cells, its functional knockout in SR/CR mice should render them sensitive to cancer challenges. This was tested by cross breeding SR/CR mice into the individual genetic knockout backgrounds of perforin (Prf-/-), superoxide (Cybb-/), or inducible nitric oxide (Nos2-/). SR/CR mice were bred into individual Prf-/-, Cybb-/-, or Nos2-/- genetic backgrounds and then challenged with sarcoma 180 (S180). Their overall survival was compared to controls. The cancer killing efficiency of purified populations of macrophages and neutrophils from these immunodeficient mice was also examined. When these genetically engineered mice were challenged with cancer cells, the knockout backgrounds of Prf-/-, Cybb-/-, or Nos2-/- did not completely abolish the SR/CR cancer resistant phenotype. However, the Nos2-/- background did appear to weaken the resistance. Incidentally, it was also observed that the male mice in these immunocompromised backgrounds tended to be less cancer-resistant than SR/CR controls. Despite the previously known roles of perforin, superoxide or nitric oxide in the effector mechanisms of innate immune responses, these effector mechanisms were not required for cancer-resistance in SR/CR mice. The resistance was

  17. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: Tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1......%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm 2) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order...

  18. Wavelength dependent SHG imaging and scattering probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campbell, Kirby R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate. To improve upon this situation, we utilized collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe structural differences in the extracellular matrix of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous (LGS and HGS) tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found strong wavelength dependent dependencies of these metrics that were different between the different tumors that are related to respective structural attributes in the collagen organization. These sub-resolution determinations are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. However, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. Moreover, our analyses are further consistent with LGS and benign tumors having similar etiology. We identified optimal wavelengths for the SHG metrics as well as optical scattering measurements. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were then used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy ( 90%) between the tissue types. This delineation is superior to current clinical performance and has potential applicability in supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool.

  19. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair

  20. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  1. Mechanisms and Barriers in Cancer Nanomedicine: Addressing Challenges, Looking for Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Boraschi, Diana; Chorny, Michael; Decuzzi, Paolo; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Farhangrazi, Z Shadi; Farrell, Dorothy; Gabizon, Alberto; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Godin, Biana; La-Beck, Ninh M; Ljubimova, Julia; Moghimi, S Moein; Pagliaro, Len; Park, Ji-Ho; Peer, Dan; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Serkova, Natalie J; Simberg, Dmitri

    2017-01-24

    Remarkable progress has recently been made in the synthesis and characterization of engineered nanoparticles for imaging and treatment of cancers, resulting in several promising candidates in clinical trials. Despite these advances, clinical applications of nanoparticle-based therapeutic/imaging agents remain limited by biological, immunological, and translational barriers. In order to overcome the existing status quo in drug delivery, there is a need for open and frank discussion in the nanomedicine community on what is needed to make qualitative leaps toward translation. In this Nano Focus, we present the main discussion topics and conclusions from a recent workshop: "Mechanisms and Barriers in Nanomedicine". The focus of this informal meeting was on biological, toxicological, immunological, and translational aspects of nanomedicine and approaches to move the field forward productively. We believe that these topics reflect the most important issues in cancer nanomedicine.

  2. Probiotics in colorectal cancer (CRC) with emphasis on mechanisms of action and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouli, Imen; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2013-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer. Diverse therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radiation have shown beneficial effects, but are limited because of their safety and toxicity. Probiotic formulations have shown great promise in CRC as preventive and early stage therapeutics. This review highlights the importance of a balanced intestinal microbiota and summarizes the recent developments in probiotics for treating CRC. Specifically, this report describes evidence of the role of probiotics in modulating the microbiota, in improving the physico-chemical conditions of the gut and in reducing oxidative stress. It also discusses the mechanisms of probiotics in inhibiting tumour progression, in producing anticancer compounds and in modulating the host immune response. Even though some of these effects were observed in several clinical trials, when probiotic formulations were used as a supplement to CRC therapies, the application of probiotics as biotherapeutics against CRC still needs further investigation.

  3. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  4. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  5. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  6. Glasgow conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-01-01

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge

  7. Target-oriented mechanisms of novel herbal therapeutics in the chemotherapy of gastrointestinal cancer and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Joshua K; Auyeung, Kathy K

    2013-01-01

    A prominent group of effective cancer chemopreventive drugs has been derived from natural products having low toxicity while possessing apparent benefit in the disease process. It is plausible that there are multiple target molecules critical to cancer cell survival. Herbal terpenoids have demonstrated excellent target-specific anti-neoplastic functions by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Transcriptional molecules in the NF-κB, MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways are important molecular targets of chemotherapy that play distinctive roles in modulating the apoptosis cascades. It is recently suggested that NSAID-activated gene (NAG-1), a novel proapoptotic protein, is the upstream anti-carcinogenic target of NSAIDs, PPAR ligands and herbal chemotherapeutic agents that triggers some of the events mentioned above. Besides, angiogenesis, oxidative stress as well as inflammation are important factors that contribute to the development and metastasis of cancer, which could be actively modulated by novel agents of plant origin. The aim of the present review is to discuss and summarize the contemporary use of herbal therapeutics and phytochemicals in the treatment of human cancers, in particular that of the colon. The major events and signaling pathways in the carcinogenesis process being potentially modulated by natural products and novel herbal compounds will be evaluated, with emphasis on some terpenoids. Advances in eliciting the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms during the anti-tumorigenic process of novel herbal therapeutics will be of imperative clinical significance to increase the efficacy and reduce prominent adverse drug effects in cancer patients through target-specific therapy.

  8. Washington Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 Particle Accelerator Conference was held in Washington from 11-13 March. It was the ninth in the series of meetings organized in the USA which differ from the 'International' meetings in their coverage of the full range of accelerator engineering and technology, including applications outside e field of high energy physics. The Conference took place under the cloud of further budget cuts for Fiscal Year 1982 in the USA which the Department of Energy has applied in line with the financial policy of the new administration. Coming on top of many years of budget trimming which have reduced the number of high energy physics Laboratories funded by the DOE to three (Brookhaven, Fermilab, Stanford - Cornell is funded by the National Science Foundation) and reduced the exploitation of these Laboratories to less than half of their potential, the new cuts did not exactly help to boost morale. Nevertheless, the huge amount of tailed work in accelerator physics and technology which was presented at the Conference showed how alive the field is

  9. DNA double-strand breaks induced by cavitational mechanical effects of ultrasound in cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Furusawa

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic technologies pervade the medical field: as a long established imaging modality in clinical diagnostics; and, with the emergence of targeted high intensity focused ultrasound, as a means of thermally ablating tumours. In parallel, the potential of [non-thermal] intermediate intensity ultrasound as a minimally invasive therapy is also being rigorously assessed. Here, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells has been observed, although definitive identification of the underlying mechanism has thus far remained elusive. A likely candidate process has been suggested to involve sonochemical activity, where reactive oxygen species (ROS mediate the generation of DNA single-strand breaks. Here however, we provide compelling new evidence that strongly supports a purely mechanical mechanism. Moreover, by a combination of specific assays (neutral comet tail and staining for γH2AX foci formation we demonstrate for the first time that US exposure at even moderate intensities exhibits genotoxic potential, through its facility to generate DNA damage across multiple cancer lines. Notably, colocalization assays highlight that ionizing radiation and ultrasound have distinctly different signatures to their respective γH2AX foci formation patterns, likely reflecting the different stress distributions that initiated damage formation. Furthermore, parallel immuno-blotting suggests that DNA-PKcs have a preferential role in the repair of ultrasound-induced damage.

  10. Deciphering the Code of the Cancer Genome: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Rass, Emilie; Scully, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement plays a causal role in tumorigenesis by contributing to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, the dysregulated expression or amplification of oncogenes and the generation of novel gene fusions. Chromosome breaks are important intermediates in this process. How, when and where these breaks arise and the specific mechanisms engaged in their repair strongly influence the resulting patterns of chromosome rearrangement. Here, we review recent progress in understanding how certain distinctive features of the cancer genome, including clustered mutagenesis, tandem segmental duplications, complex breakpoints, chromothripsis, chromoplexy and chromoanasynthesis may arise. PMID:26726318

  11. Change from lung adenocarcinoma to small cell lung cancer as a mechanism of resistance to afatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Paolo; Russano, Marco; Pantano, Francesco; Tonini, Giuseppe; Santini, Daniele

    2017-08-29

    We report the case of a patient affected by advanced EGFR mutation-positive lung who experienced resistance to therapy during treatment with Afatinib through the occurrence of a switch of tumor histotype to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with features of a G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma. Unexpectedly, the switch to SCLC histotype occurred in the only site not responsive to afatinib and subsequently the most responsive to chemotherapy. Our case shows that occurrence of switch to SCLC is a possible mechanism of resistance during treatment with Afatinib.

  12. Memories of paternal relations are associated with coping and defense mechanisms in breast cancer patients: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Renzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer diagnosis and treatment represent stressful events that demand emotional adjustment, thus recruiting coping strategies and defense mechanisms. As parental relations were shown to influence emotion regulation patterns and adaptive processes in adulthood, the present study investigated whether they are specifically associated to coping and defense mechanisms in patients with breast cancer. Methods One hundred and ten women hospitalized for breast cancer surgery were administered questionnaires assessing coping with cancer, defense mechanisms, and memories of parental bonding in childhood. Results High levels of paternal overprotection were associated with less mature defenses, withdrawal and fantasy and less adaptive coping mechanisms, such as hopelessness/helplessness. Low levels of paternal care were associated with a greater use of repression. No association was found between maternal care, overprotection, coping and defense mechanisms. Immature defenses correlated positively with less adaptive coping styles, while mature defenses were positively associated to a fighting spirit and to fatalism, and inversely related to less adaptive coping styles. Conclusions These data suggest that paternal relations in childhood are associated with emotional, cognitive, and behavioral regulation in adjusting to cancer immediately after surgery. Early experiences of bonding may constitute a relevant index for adaptation to cancer, indicating which patients are at risk and should be considered for psychological interventions.

  13. Study on Effects and Mechanisms of Phytochemicals in Vegetables and Fruits 
in Preventing and Treating Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian GUO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether in the world or China, lung cancer is a malignant tumor which is harmful to human health. There were studies showed that lung cancer is tightly related to the environment factors and life style. The epidemiology study found that eating more fruits and vegetables can prevent lung cancer. Vegetables and fruits are rich in phytochemicals such as isothiocyanates, indoles, flavonoids and so on. These phytochemicals reduce the risk of lung cancer by modulating antitumor-related pathways such as inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and the like. The aim of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits in the pathogenesis and progression of lung cancer, so as to provide theoretical basis and direction for the prevention and treatment of lung cancer.

  14. EGFR-targeted anti-cancer drugs in radiotherapy: Preclinical evaluation of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Dittmann, Klaus; Doerr, Wolfgang; Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical results indicate that the EGFR can mediate radioresistance in different solid human tumours. Combination of radiotherapy and EGFR inhibitors can improve local tumour control compared to irradiation alone and has been introduced into clinical radiotherapy practice. So far several mechanisms have been identified in preclinical studies to contribute to improved local tumour control after radiation combined with EGFR inhibitors. These include direct kill of cancer stem cells by EGFR inhibitors, cellular radiosensitization through modified signal transduction, inhibition of repair of DNA damage, reduced repopulation and improved reoxygenation during fractionated radiotherapy. Effects and mechanisms may differ for different classes of EGFR inhibitors, for different tumours and for normal tissues. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity are currently poorly understood, and predictive assays are not available yet. Importantly, mechanisms and predictors for the combined effects of radiation with EGFR inhibitors appear to be considerably different to those for application of EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Therefore to further evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of EGFR-inhibition in combined treatments, radiotherapy-specific preclinical research strategies, which include in vivo experiments using local tumour control as an endpoint, as well as animal studies on normal tissue toxicity are needed

  15. Amphiregulin triggered epidermal growth factor receptor activation confers in vivo crizotinib-resistance of EML4-ALK lung cancer and circumvention by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Shinji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Arai, Sachiko; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yano, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Crizotinib, a first-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, is known to be effective against echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancers. Nonetheless, the tumors subsequently become resistant to crizotinib and recur in almost every case. The mechanism of the acquired resistance needs to be deciphered. In this study, we established crizotinib-resistant cells (A925LPE3-CR) via long-term administration of crizotinib to a mouse model of pleural carcinomatous effusions; this model involved implantation of the A925LPE3 cell line, which harbors the EML4-ALK gene rearrangement. The resistant cells did not have the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells, and these cells were cross-resistant to alectinib and ceritinib as well. In cell clone #2, which is one of the clones of A925LPE3-CR, crizotinib sensitivity was restored via the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by means of an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (erlotinib) or an anti-EGFR antibody (cetuximab) in vitro and in the murine xenograft model. Cell clone #2 did not have an EGFR mutation, but the expression of amphiregulin (AREG), one of EGFR ligands, was significantly increased. A knockdown of AREG with small interfering RNAs restored the sensitivity to crizotinib. These data suggest that overexpression of EGFR ligands such as AREG can cause resistance to crizotinib, and that inhibition of EGFR signaling may be a promising strategy to overcome crizotinib resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Potential Mechanisms Controlling the Catalase Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Glorieux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer cell resistance against prooxidant drugs limits its potential clinical use. MCF-7 breast cancer cells chronically exposed to ascorbate/menadione became resistant (Resox cells by increasing mainly catalase activity. Since catalase appears as an anticancer target, the elucidation of mechanisms regulating its expression is an important issue. In MCF-7 and Resox cells, karyotype analysis showed that chromosome 11 is not altered compared to healthy mammary epithelial cells. The genomic gain of catalase locus observed in MCF-7 and Resox cells cannot explain the differential catalase expression. Since ROS cause DNA lesions, the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways may influence catalase expression. However, none of the related proteins (i.e., p53, ChK was activated in Resox cells compared to MCF-7. The c-abl kinase may lead to catalase protein degradation via posttranslational modifications, but neither ubiquitination nor phosphorylation of catalase was detected after catalase immunoprecipitation. Catalase mRNA levels did not decrease after actinomycin D treatment in both cell lines. DNMT inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased catalase protein level in MCF-7 and its resistance to prooxidant drugs. In line with our previous report, chromatin remodeling appears as the main regulator of catalase expression in breast cancer after chronic exposure to an oxidative stress.

  18. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  19. Antiproliferative and Molecular Mechanism of Eugenol-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Supriyanto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic phytochemicals are a broad class of nutraceuticals found in plants which have been extensively researched by scientists for their health-promoting potential. One such a compound which has been comprehensively used is eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol, which is the active component of Syzigium aromaticum (cloves. Aromatic plants like nutmeg, basil, cinnamon and bay leaves also contain eugenol. Eugenol has a wide range of applications like perfumeries, flavorings, essential oils and in medicine as a local antiseptic and anesthetic. Increasing volumes of literature showed eugenol possesses antioxidant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Molecular mechanism of eugenol-induced apoptosis in melanoma, skin tumors, osteosarcoma, leukemia, gastric and mast cells has been well documented. This review article will highlight the antiproliferative activity and molecular mechanism of the eugenol induced apoptosis against the cancer cells and animal models.

  20. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Association, Brazil, 17Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Departamento de Medicina Social Pelotas, RS, Brazil .... line with statements of the Minister of Public Health, Andre Mama ... The high cancer burden in Africa. (breast ...

  1. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  2. Effects of curcumin on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixue LIU

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study investigated the effects of curcumin (Cur on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism. The nude mice modeled with human cervical cancer HeLa cell xenograft were treated with normal saline (control, 3 mg/kg Cisplatin, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur, respectively. The animal body weight and growth of tumor were measured. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, p21, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue were determined. Results showed that, after treatment for 20 days, the tumor mass and tumor volume in 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. The expressions of Bax, p53 and p21 protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly higher than control group (P < 0.05, and the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. Cur can inhibit the growth of HeLa cell xenograft in nude mice. The possible mechanism may be related to its up-regulation of Bax, p53 and p21 protein expression in tumor tissue, and down-regulation of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein expression.

  3. TIM-3 as a Target for Cancer Immunotherapy and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Du

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has produced impressive clinical results in recent years. Despite the success of the checkpoint blockade strategies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1, a large portion of cancer patients have not yet benefited from this novel therapy. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3 has been shown to mediate immune tolerance in mouse models of infectious diseases, alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and tumor Immunity. Thus, targeting TIM-3 emerges as a promising approach for further improvement of current immunotherapy. Despite a large amount of experimental data showing an immune suppressive function of TIM-3 in vivo, the exact mechanisms are not well understood. To enable effective targeting of TIM-3 for tumor immunotherapy, further in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted. These studies will also provide much-needed insight for the rational design of novel combination therapy with other checkpoint blockers. In this review, we summarize key evidence supporting an immune regulatory role of TIM-3 and discuss possible mechanisms of action.

  4. Inhibitory effects and molecular mechanisms of tetrahydrocurcumin against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC, an active metabolite of curcumin, has been reported to have similar biological effects to curcumin, but the mechanism of the antitumor activity of THC is still unclear. Methods: The present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and mechanism of THC in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using the methods of MTT assay, LDH assay, flow cytometry analysis, and western blot assay. Results: THC was found to have markedly cytotoxic effect and antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 for 24 h of 107.8 μM. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that THC mediated the cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and 32.8% of MCF-7 cells entered the early phase of apoptosis at 100 μM for 24 h. THC also dose-dependently led to apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathway, as evidenced by the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, the elevation of intracellular ROS, a decrease in Bcl-2 and PARP expression, and an increase in Bax expression. Meanwhile, cytochrome C was released to cytosol and the loss of mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm was observed after THC treatment. Conclusion: THC is an excellent source of chemopreventive agents in the treatment of breast cancer and has excellent potential to be explored as antitumor precursor compound.

  5. Mechanisms of action of nonpeptide hormones on resveratrol-induced antiproliferation of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Cheng, Guei-Yun; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Chin, Yu-Tang; Shih, Ya-Jung; Nana, André Wendindondé; Lin, Shin-Ying; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Chiang, I-Jen; Wang, Kuan

    2017-09-01

    Nonpeptide hormones, such as thyroid hormone, dihydrotestosterone, and estrogen, have been shown to stimulate cancer proliferation via different mechanisms. Aside from their cytosolic or membrane-bound receptors, there are receptors on integrin α v β 3 for nonpeptide hormones. Interaction between hormones and integrin α v β 3 can induce signal transduction and eventually stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Resveratrol induces inducible COX-2-dependent antiproliferation via integrin α v β 3 . Resveratrol and hormone-induced signals are both transduced by activated extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2); however, hormones promote cell proliferation, while resveratrol induces antiproliferation in cancer cells. Hormones inhibit resveratrol-stimulated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15, resveratrol-induced nuclear COX-2 accumulation, and formation of p53-COX-2 nuclear complexes. Subsequently, hormones impair resveratrol-induced COX-2-/p53-dependent gene expression. The inhibitory effects of hormones on resveratrol action can be blocked by different antagonists of specific nonpeptide hormone receptors but not integrin α v β 3 blockers. Results suggest that nonpeptide hormones inhibit resveratrol-induced antiproliferation in cancer cells downstream of the interaction between ligand and receptor and ERK1/2 activation to interfere with nuclear COX-2 accumulation. Thus, the surface receptor sites for resveratrol and nonpeptide hormones are distinct and can induce discrete ERK1/2-dependent downstream antiproliferation biological activities. It also indicates the complex pathways by which antiproliferation is induced by resveratrol in various physiological hormonal environments. . © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Vitamins in Pancreatic Cancer: A Review of Underlying Mechanisms and Future Applications12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Yadley, Ashley H; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2015-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence that vitamins influence pancreatic adenocarcinoma biology and carcinogenesis, a comprehensive review is lacking. In this study, we performed a PubMed literature search to review the anticancer mechanisms and the preclinical and clinical studies that support the development of the bioactive vitamins A, C, D, E, and K in pancreatic cancer intervention. Preclinical studies have shown promising results for vitamin A in pancreatic cancer prevention, with clinical trials showing intriguing responses in combination with immunotherapy. For vitamin C, preclinical studies have shown slower tumor growth rates and/or increased survival when used alone or in combination with gemcitabine, with clinical trials with this combination revealing decreased primary tumor sizes and improved performance status. Preclinical studies with vitamin D analogues have shown potent antiproliferative effects and repression of migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, with a clinical trial showing increased time to progression when calciferol was added to docetaxel. For vitamin E, preclinical studies have shown that δ-tocotrienol and γ-tocotrienol inhibited tumor cell growth and survival and augmented gemcitabine activity. Early-phase clinical trials with δ-tocotrienol are ongoing. Vitamin K demonstrates activation of apoptosis and inhibition of cellular growth in pancreatic tumor cells; however, there are no clinical studies available for further evaluation. Although preclinical and clinical studies are encouraging, randomized controlled trials with endpoints based on insights gained from mechanistic and preclinical studies and early-phase clinical trials are required to determine the efficacy of bioactive vitamin interventions in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26567201

  7. Mechanisms driving local breast cancer recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify mechanisms driving local recurrence in a model of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer recurrence after BCS remains a clinically significant, but poorly understood problem. We have previously reported that recurrent colorectal tumours demonstrate altered growth dynamics, increased metastatic burden and resistance to apoptosis, mediated by upregulation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase\\/Akt (PI3K\\/Akt). We investigated whether similar characteristics were evident in a model of locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: Tumours were generated by orthotopic inoculation of 4T1 cells in two groups of female Balb\\/c mice and cytoreductive surgery performed when mean tumour size was above 150 mm(3). Local recurrence was observed and gene expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChips in primary and recurrent tumours. Differential expression was confirmed with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Phosphorylation of Akt was assessed using Western immunoblotting. An ex vivo heat shock protein (HSP)-loaded dendritic cell vaccine was administered in the perioperative period. RESULTS: We observed a significant difference in the recurrent 4T1 tumour volume and growth rate (p < 0.05). Gene expression studies suggested roles for the PI3K\\/Akt system and local immunosuppression driving the altered growth kinetics. We demonstrated that perioperative vaccination with an ex vivo HSP-loaded dendritic cell vaccine abrogated recurrent tumour growth in vivo (p = 0.003 at day 15). CONCLUSION: Investigating therapies which target tumour survival pathways such as PI3K\\/Akt and boost immune surveillance in the perioperative period may be useful adjuncts to contemporary breast cancer treatment.

  8. Mechanisms of RhoGDI2 Mediated Lung Cancer Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Niu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of RhoGDI2 in lung cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process and to illustrate the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improvement of lung cancer treatment. Methods: The RhoGDI2 knock-down and overexpressing A549 cell lines were first constructed. The influence of RhoGDI2 on cytoskeleton in A549 cells was studied using two approaches: G-LISA-based Rac1 activity measurement and immunostaining-based F-actin distribution. The expression levels of key EMT genes were analyzed using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, western blot and immunostaining in untreated and RhoGDI2 knock-down or overexpressing A549 cells in both in vivo and in vitro experimental settings. Results: Our study showed that the activity of Rac1, a key gene that is crucial for the initiation and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma, causing the redistribution of F-actin with partial loss of cell-cell adhesions and stress fibers, was significantly suppressed by RhoGDI2. RhoGDI2 promoted the expression of EMT marker gene E-cadherin and repressed EMT promoting genes Slug, Snail, α-SMA in both A549 cells and lung and liver organs derived from the mouse models. Knocking-down RhoGDI2 induced abnormal morphology for lung organs. Conclusion: These findings indicate that RhoGDI2 repressed the activity of Rac1 and may be involved in the rearrangement of cytoskeleton in lung cancer cells. RhoGDI2 suppresses the metastasis of lung cancer mediated through EMT by regulating the expression of key genes such as E-cadherin, Slug, Snail and α-SMA in both in vivo and in vitro models.

  9. Molecular mechanism of bystander effects and related abscopal/cohort effects in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zuo, Li

    2018-01-01

    Cancer cells subjected to ionizing radiation may release signals which can influence nearby non-irradiated cells, termed bystander effects. The transmission of bystander effects among cancer cells involves the activation of inflammatory cytokines, death ligands, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. In addition to bystander effects, two other forms of non-target effects (NTEs) have been identified in radiotherapy, as one is called cohort effects and the other is called abscopal effects. Cohort effects represent the phenomenon where irradiated cells can produce signals that reduce the survival of neighboring cells within an irradiated volume. The effects suggest the importance of cellular communication under irradiation with non-uniform dose distribution. In contrast, abscopal effects describe the NTEs that typically occur in non-irradiated cells distant from an irradiated target. These effects can be mediated primarily by immune cells such as T cells. Clinical trials have shown that application of radiation along with immunotherapy may enhance abscopal effects and improve therapeutic efficacy on non-target lesions outside an irradiated field. According to NTEs, cell viability is reduced not only by direct irradiation effects, but also due to signals emitted from nearby irradiated cells. A clinical consideration of NTEs could have a revolutionary impact on current radiotherapy via the establishment of more efficient and less toxic radiobiological models for treatment planning compared to conventional models. Thus, we will review the most updated findings about these effects and outline their mechanisms and potential applications in cancer treatment with a special focus on the brain, lung, and breast cancers. PMID:29719632

  10. Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L; Neugut, Alfred I; Ergas, Isaac J; Wright, Jaime D; Caan, Bette J; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2013-06-01

    We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006 to 2011 and provided data on social networks (the presence of a spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible support, emotional/informational support, affection, positive social interaction), and QOL, measured by the FACT-B, approximately 2 months post diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower versus higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR = 2.18, 95 % CI: 1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR = 1.61, 95 % CI: 1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI: 1.65-2.63), social WB (OR = 3.46, 95 % CI: 2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR = 1.67, 95 % CI: 1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR = 1.48, 95 % CI: 1.18-1.87) compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was "positive social interaction." However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status.

  11. Molecular mechanism of bystander effects and related abscopal/cohort effects in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhou, Tingyang; Liu, Wei; Zuo, Li

    2018-04-06

    Cancer cells subjected to ionizing radiation may release signals which can influence nearby non-irradiated cells, termed bystander effects. The transmission of bystander effects among cancer cells involves the activation of inflammatory cytokines, death ligands, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. In addition to bystander effects, two other forms of non-target effects (NTEs) have been identified in radiotherapy, as one is called cohort effects and the other is called abscopal effects. Cohort effects represent the phenomenon where irradiated cells can produce signals that reduce the survival of neighboring cells within an irradiated volume. The effects suggest the importance of cellular communication under irradiation with non-uniform dose distribution. In contrast, abscopal effects describe the NTEs that typically occur in non-irradiated cells distant from an irradiated target. These effects can be mediated primarily by immune cells such as T cells. Clinical trials have shown that application of radiation along with immunotherapy may enhance abscopal effects and improve therapeutic efficacy on non-target lesions outside an irradiated field. According to NTEs, cell viability is reduced not only by direct irradiation effects, but also due to signals emitted from nearby irradiated cells. A clinical consideration of NTEs could have a revolutionary impact on current radiotherapy via the establishment of more efficient and less toxic radiobiological models for treatment planning compared to conventional models. Thus, we will review the most updated findings about these effects and outline their mechanisms and potential applications in cancer treatment with a special focus on the brain, lung, and breast cancers.

  12. Anticancer activity and potential mechanisms of 1C, a ginseng saponin derivative, on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu De Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: AD-2 (20(R-dammarane-3b, 12b, 20, 25-tetrol; 25-OH-PPD is a ginsenoside and isolated from Panax ginseng, showing anticancer activity against extensive human cancer cell lines. In this study, effects and mechanisms of 1C ((20R-3b-O-(L-alanyl-dammarane-12b, 20, 25-triol, a modified version of AD-2, were evaluated for its development as a novel anticancer drug. Methods: MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell cytotoxic activity. Cell cycle and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS were determined using flow cytometry analysis. Western blotting was employed to analyze signaling pathways. Results: 1C concentration-dependently reduces prostate cancer cell viability without affecting normal human gastric epithelial cell line-1 viability. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, 1C triggered apoptosis via Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondria pathway, downregulated expression of mouse double minute 2, upregulated expression of p53 and stimulated ROS production. ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine, can attenuate 1C-induced apoptosis. 1C also inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP cells through inhibition on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Conclusion: 1C shows obvious anticancer activity based on inducing cell apoptosis by Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondria pathway and ROS production, inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate that 1C may provide leads as a potential agent for cancer therapy. Keywords: 1C, AD-2, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, Wnt/β-catenin pathway

  13. Steroid sulfatase inhibition success and limitation in breast cancer clinical assays: an underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiaoye; Han, Hui; Poirier, Donald; Lin, Sheng Xiang

    2018-05-24

    Steroid sulfatase is detectable in most hormone-dependent breast cancers. STX64, an STS inhibitor, induced tumor reduction in animal assay. Despite success in phase І clinical trial, the results of phase II trial were not that significant. Breast Cancer epithelial cells (MCF-7 and T47D) were treated with two STS inhibitors (STX64 and EM1913). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, and the concentrations of estradiol and 5α-dihydrotestosterone were measured to determine the endocrinological mechanism of sulfatase inhibition. Comparisons were made with inhibitions of reductive 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs). Proliferation studies showed that DNA synthesis in cancer cells was modestly decreased (approximately 20%), accompanied by an up to 6.5% in cells in the G0/G1 phase and cyclin D1 expression reduction. The concentrations of estradiol and 5α-dihydrotestosterone were decreased by 26% and 3% respectively. However, supplementation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone produced a significant increase (approximately 35.6%) in the anti-proliferative effect of sulfatase inhibition. This study has clarified sex-hormone control by sulfatase in BC, suggesting that the different roles of estradiol and 5α-dihydrotestosterone can lead to a reduction in the effect of sulfatase inhibition when compared with 17β-HSD7 inhibition. This suggests that combined treatment of sulfatase inhibitors with 17β-HSD inhibitors such as the type7 inhibitor could hold promise for hormone-dependent breast cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Wright, Jaime D.; Caan, Bette J.; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Methods This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006-2011 and provided data on social networks (presence of spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible, emotional/informational, affection, positive social interaction), and quality of life (QOL), measured by the FACT-B, approximately two months post-diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower vs. higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. Results In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR=2.18, 95%CI:1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR=1.61, 95%CI:1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR=2.08, 95%CI:1.65-2.63), social WB (OR=3.46, 95%CI:2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR=1.67, 95%CI:1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR=1.48, 95%CI:1.18-1.87), compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was “positive social interaction”. However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Conclusions Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status. PMID:23657404

  15. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and prognostic significance of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hairu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM is implicated in the prognosis of multiple cancers with low level expression associated with metastasis and early death in breast cancer. Despite this significance, mechanisms that regulate ALCAM gene expression and ALCAM's role in adhesion of pre-metastatic circulating tumor cells have not been defined. We studied ALCAM expression in 20 tumor cell lines by real-time PCR, western blot and immunochemistry. Epigenetic alterations of the ALCAM promoter were assessed using methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. ALCAM's role in adhesion of tumor cells to the vascular wall was studied in isolated perfused lungs. Results A common site for transcription initiation of the ALCAM gene was identified and the ALCAM promoter sequenced. The promoter contains multiple cis-active elements including a functional p65 NF-κB motif, and it harbors an extensive array of CpG residues highly methylated exclusively in ALCAM-negative tumor cells. These CpG residues were modestly demethylated after 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment. Restoration of high-level ALCAM expression using an ALCAM cDNA increased clustering of MDA-MB-435 tumor cells perfused through the pulmonary vasculature of ventilated rat lungs. Anti-ALCAM antibodies reduced the number of intravascular tumor cell clusters. Conclusion Our data suggests that loss of ALCAM expression, due in part to DNA methylation of extensive segments of the promoter, significantly impairs the ability of circulating tumor cells to adhere to each other, and may therefore promote metastasis. These findings offer insight into the mechanisms for down-regulation of ALCAM gene expression in tumor cells, and for the positive prognostic value of high-level ALCAM in breast cancer.

  16. Impaired swallowing mechanics of post radiation therapy head and neck cancer patients: A retrospective videofluoroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William G; Davidoff, Alisa A; Smith, Zachary M; Adams, Dorothy E; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-02-28

    To determine swallowing outcomes and hyolaryngeal mechanics associated with post radiation therapy head and neck cancer (rtHNC) patients using videofluoroscopic swallow studies. In this retrospective cohort study, videofluoroscopic images of rtHNC patients (n = 21) were compared with age and gender matched controls (n = 21). Penetration-aspiration of the bolus and bolus residue were measured as swallowing outcome variables. Timing and displacement measurements of the anterior and posterior muscular slings elevating the hyolaryngeal complex were acquired. Coordinate data of anatomical landmarks mapping the action of the anterior muscles (suprahyoid muscles) and posterior muscles (long pharyngeal muscles) were used to calculate the distance measurements, and slice numbers were used to calculate time intervals. Canonical variate analysis with post-hoc discriminant function analysis was performed on coordinate data to determine multivariate mechanics of swallowing associated with treatment. Pharyngeal constriction ratio (PCR) was also measured to determine if weak pharyngeal constriction is associated with post radiation therapy. The rtHNC group was characterized by poor swallowing outcomes compared to the control group in regards to: Penetration-aspiration scale (P time of displacement was abbreviated (P = 0.002) and distance of excursion was reduced (P = 0.02) in the rtHNC group. A canonical variate analysis shows a significant reduction in pharyngeal mechanics in the rtHNC group (P clearance. Using videofluoroscopy, this study shows rtHNC patients have worse swallowing outcomes associated with reduced hyolaryngeal mechanics and pharyngeal constriction compared with controls.

  17. Pain in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: Prevalence, Mechanisms, Management and Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouris, Andreas I; Banim, Paul; Hart, Andrew R

    2017-04-01

    Pain affects approximately 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer, with half requiring strong opioid analgesia, namely: morphine-based drugs on step three of the WHO analgesic ladder (as opposed to the weak opioids: codeine and tramadol). The presence of pain is associated with reduced survival. This article reviews the literature regarding pain: prevalence, mechanisms, pharmacological, and endoscopic treatments and identifies areas for research to develop individualized patient pain management pathways. The online literature review was conducted through: PubMed, Clinical Key, Uptodate, and NICE Evidence. There are two principal mechanisms for pain: pancreatic duct obstruction and pancreatic neuropathy which, respectively, activate mechanical and chemical nociceptors. In pancreatic neuropathy, several histological, molecular, and immunological changes occur which correlate with pain including: transient receptor potential cation channel activation and mast cell infiltration. Current pain management is empirical rather etiology-based and is informed by the WHO analgesic ladder for first-line therapies, and then endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) in patients with resistant pain. For EUS-CPN, there is only one clinical trial reporting a benefit, which has limited generalizability. Case series report pancreatic duct stenting gives effective analgesia, but there are no clinical trials. Progress in understanding the mechanisms for pain and when this occurs in the natural history, together with assessing new therapies both pharmacological and endoscopic, will enable individualized care and may improve patients' quality of life and survival.

  18. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  19. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  20. Munich conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-10-15

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility.

  1. Munich conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility

  2. Proceedings of the international conference on environmental mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and health and fortieth annual meeting of Environmental Mutagen Society of India: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This conference addresses topics like: antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis; biodiversity, bioprospection and health; cancer chemoprevention; environmental pollution and health; free radicals and antioxidant mechanisms; genetic susceptibility, biomarkers and risk assessment; genetic toxicology; nanotoxicology and radiation induced toxicology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. The Reversal Effect and Its Mechanisms of Tetramethylpyrazine on Multidrug Resistance in Human Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is an important strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer. However, the main problem limiting the success of chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR. To improve the management of bladder cancer, it is an urgent matter to search for strategies to reverse MDR. We chose three kinds of herbal medicines including ginsenoside Rh2, (--Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP to detect their effects on bladder cancer. Reversal effects of these three herbal medicines for drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM-resistant Pumc-91 cells (Pumc-91/ADM were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 cell proliferation assay system. The mechanisms of reversal effect for TMP were explored in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells. After Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells were treated with TMP, cell cycle distribution analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The expression of MRP1, GST, BCL-2, LRP and TOPO-II was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunefluorescence assay and western blot. It was observed that TMP was capable of enhancing the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on Pumc-91/ADM cells in response to ADM, however Rh2 and EGCG were unable to. The reversal effect of TMP was also demonstrated in T24/DDP cells. Moreover, the treatment with TMP in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells led to an increased of G1 phase accompanied with a concomitant decrease of cell numbers in S phase. Compared to the control group, an obvious decrease of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and an increase of TOPO-II were shown in TMP groups with a dose-dependency in mRNA and protein levels. However, there was no difference on LRP expression between TMP groups and the control group. TMP could effectively reverse MDR of Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells and its mechanisms might be correlated with the alteration of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and TOPO-II. TMP might be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer

  4. Mechanisms of breast cancer risk in shift workers: association of telomere shortening with the duration and intensity of night work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Notø, Heidi Ødegaard; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Jenny-Anne S; Petersen-Øverleir, Marte; Reszka, Edyta; Pepłońska, Beata; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-08-01

    Occupational factors such as shiftwork and especially night work that involves disruption of the circadian rhythm may contribute to increased breast cancer risk. Circadian disruption may also affect telomere length (TL). While short TL generally is associated with increased cancer risk, its association with breast cancer risk is inconclusive. We suggest that working schedules might be an important factor in assessment of effects of TL on breast cancer risk. Moreover, telomere shortening might be a potential mechanism for night work-related breast cancer. In this study, effects of shift work on TL and its association with breast cancer risk were investigated in a nested breast cancer case-control study of Norwegian nurses. TL was assessed by qPCR in DNA from 563 breast cancer patients and 619 controls. Here, we demonstrate that TL is affected by intensive night work schedules, as work with six consecutive night for a period of more than 5 years was associated with decreased telomere lengths (-3.18, 95% CI: -6.46 to -0.58, P = 0.016). Furthermore, telomere shortening is associated with increased breast cancer risk in workers with long periods of consecutive night shifts. Thus, nurses with longer telomere lengths had a lower risk for breast cancer if they had worked more than four (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.79, P = 0.014) or five (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.83, P = 0.029) consecutive night shifts for a period of 5 years or more. These data suggest that telomere shortening is associated with the duration and intensity of night work and may be a contributing factor for breast cancer risk among female shift workers. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Title - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited)

    OpenAIRE

    Lohrey, MC; Lawrence, AS

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) "Notes" - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) In preparation (Publication status) Yes, full paperYes, abstract onlyNo (Peer reviewed?) "Add a comment" - EFARS - Conference - Uninvited

  6. Prevention of chinese green tea on 3,4-benzopyrene-induced lung cancer and its mechanism in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihua GU

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Chinese green tea is one of the daily consumption beverages in the world and is considered a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. In the present study, we investigate the role of lung cancer prevention by green tea and its mechanism. Methods Three groups of female SD rats were kept with the same feed. Rats in group A were administrated with 1% green tea drinking, while in group B and group C with water only. Animals in group A and group B were given 3,4-benzopyrene-corn oil mixture pulmonary injection fortnightly for 4 times, while in group C corn oil only. Rats were sacrificed 1 year after the first injection under narcotism. Lung tumors and lung tissues were performed H&E staining for cancer identification. Each case of lung cancer was examined for expression of p53 and Bcl-2 with in situ hybridization analysis and immunohistochemistry staining. Results No cancer was found in rats in group C. However, in group B, 15 out of 20 rats were found generating lung cancer, and in group A, 6 out of 20 rats inducing lung cancer were recorded. The rate of lung carcinogenesis in rats was decreased from 75% to 30% by 1% chinese green tea oral administration (χ2=8.12, P0.05. However, significantly lower level of Bcl-2 expression was found in lung cancer tissues of group A than that of group B (P<0.05. Conclusion The results indicate that chinese green tea inhibits lung carcinogenesis. Chinese green tea can slightly upregulate expression of p53, but significantly downregulate expression of Bcl-2 in lung cancer, and this may be related to the mechanism of lung cancer prevention.

  7. The variant rs1867277 in FOXE1 gene confers thyroid cancer susceptibility through the recruitment of USF1/USF2 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñigo Landa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify genetic factors related to thyroid cancer susceptibility, we adopted a candidate gene approach. We studied tag- and putative functional SNPs in genes involved in thyroid cell differentiation and proliferation, and in genes found to be differentially expressed in thyroid carcinoma. A total of 768 SNPs in 97 genes were genotyped in a Spanish series of 615 cases and 525 controls, the former comprising the largest collection of patients with this pathology from a single population studied to date. SNPs in an LD block spanning the entire FOXE1 gene showed the strongest evidence of association with papillary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility. This association was validated in a second stage of the study that included an independent Italian series of 482 patients and 532 controls. The strongest association results were observed for rs1867277 (OR[per-allele] = 1.49; 95%CI = 1.30-1.70; P = 5.9x10(-9. Functional assays of rs1867277 (NM_004473.3:c.-283G>A within the FOXE1 5' UTR suggested that this variant affects FOXE1 transcription. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that, exclusively, the sequence containing the A allele recruited the USF1/USF2 transcription factors, while both alleles formed a complex in which DREAM/CREB/alphaCREM participated. Transfection studies showed an allele-dependent transcriptional regulation of FOXE1. We propose a FOXE1 regulation model dependent on the rs1867277 genotype, indicating that this SNP is a causal variant in thyroid cancer susceptibility. Our results constitute the first functional explanation for an association identified by a GWAS and thereby elucidate a mechanism of thyroid cancer susceptibility. They also attest to the efficacy of candidate gene approaches in the GWAS era.

  8. The Variant rs1867277 in FOXE1 Gene Confers Thyroid Cancer Susceptibility through the Recruitment of USF1/USF2 Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Conde, Cristina; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Schiavi, Francesca; Leskelä, Susanna; Pita, Guillermo; Milne, Roger; Maravall, Javier; Ramos, Ignacio; Andía, Víctor; Rodríguez-Poyo, Paloma; Jara-Albarrán, Antonino; Meoro, Amparo; del Peso, Cristina; Arribas, Luis; Iglesias, Pedro; Caballero, Javier; Serrano, Joaquín; Picó, Antonio; Pomares, Francisco; Giménez, Gabriel; López-Mondéjar, Pedro; Castello, Roberto; Merante-Boschin, Isabella; Pelizzo, Maria-Rosa; Mauricio, Didac; Opocher, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; González-Neira, Anna; Matías-Guiu, Xavier; Santisteban, Pilar; Robledo, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify genetic factors related to thyroid cancer susceptibility, we adopted a candidate gene approach. We studied tag- and putative functional SNPs in genes involved in thyroid cell differentiation and proliferation, and in genes found to be differentially expressed in thyroid carcinoma. A total of 768 SNPs in 97 genes were genotyped in a Spanish series of 615 cases and 525 controls, the former comprising the largest collection of patients with this pathology from a single population studied to date. SNPs in an LD block spanning the entire FOXE1 gene showed the strongest evidence of association with papillary thyroid carcinoma susceptibility. This association was validated in a second stage of the study that included an independent Italian series of 482 patients and 532 controls. The strongest association results were observed for rs1867277 (OR[per-allele] = 1.49; 95%CI = 1.30–1.70; P = 5.9×10−9). Functional assays of rs1867277 (NM_004473.3:c.−283G>A) within the FOXE1 5′ UTR suggested that this variant affects FOXE1 transcription. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that, exclusively, the sequence containing the A allele recruited the USF1/USF2 transcription factors, while both alleles formed a complex in which DREAM/CREB/αCREM participated. Transfection studies showed an allele-dependent transcriptional regulation of FOXE1. We propose a FOXE1 regulation model dependent on the rs1867277 genotype, indicating that this SNP is a causal variant in thyroid cancer susceptibility. Our results constitute the first functional explanation for an association identified by a GWAS and thereby elucidate a mechanism of thyroid cancer susceptibility. They also attest to the efficacy of candidate gene approaches in the GWAS era. PMID:19730683

  9. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER......'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk....

  10. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the unedited proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Managing Electricity Price Volatility. There were a total of eleven papers presented, dealing with a variety of issues affecting price volatility. Subjects treated included: new power generation development in Alberta; an analysis of electricity supply and demand to predict future price volatility; the effect of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market; risk management in volatile energy markets; an analysis of Alberta's capacity to supply its own internal electric power needs; the impact of increased electricity import and export capacity on price fluctuation in Alberta; improving market liquidity in Alberta; using weather derivatives to offset price risk; the impact of natural gas prices on electricity price volatility; capitalizing on advancements in online trading; and strategies for businesses to keep operating through times of price volatility. In most cases only overhead viewgraphs are available

  11. Cairo conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-03

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern about population growth and models of economic development.

  12. Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Reu, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This collection represents a single volume of technical papers presented at the Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference organized by the Society for Experimental Mechanics and Sandia National Laboratories and held in Philadelphia, PA, November 7-10, 2016. The volume presents early findings from experimental, standards development and various other investigations concerning digital image correlation - an important area within Experimental Mechanics. The area of Digital Image Correlation has been an integral track within the SEM Annual Conference spearheaded by Professor Michael Sutton from the University of South Carolina. In 2016, the SEM and Sandia joined their collaborative strengths to launch a standing fall meeting focusing specifically on developments in the area of Digital Image Correlation. The contributed papers within this volume span numerous technical aspects of DIC including standards development for the industry. .

  13. Regulation of the ITGA2 gene by epigenetic mechanisms in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Suyin Paulynn; Marthick, James R; West, Alison C; Short, Annabel K; Chuckowree, Jyoti; Polanowski, Andrea M; Thomson, Russell J; Holloway, Adele F; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2015-05-01

    Integrin alpha2 beta1 (α2 β1 ) plays an integral role in tumour cell invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, and altered expression of the receptor has been linked to tumour prognosis in several solid tumours. However, the relationship is complex, with both increased and decreased expression associated with different stages of tumour metastases in several tumour types. The ITGA2 gene, which codes for the α2 subunit, was examined to investigate whether a large CpG island associated with its promoter region is involved in the differential expression of ITGA2 observed in prostate cancer. Bisulphite sequencing of the ITGA2 promoter was used to assess methylation in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tumour specimens and prostate cancer cell lines, PC3, 22Rv1 and LNCaP. Changes in ITGA2 mRNA expression were measured using quantitative PCR. ITGA2 functionality was interrogated using cell migration scratch assays and siRNA knockdown experiments. Bisulphite sequencing revealed strikingly decreased methylation at key CpG sites within the promoter of tumour samples, when compared with normal prostate tissue. Altered methylation of this CpG island is also associated with differences in expression in the non-invasive LNCaP, and the highly metastatic PC3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell lines. Further bisulphite sequencing confirmed that selected CpGs were highly methylated in LNCaP cells, whilst only low levels of methylation were observed in PC3 and 22Rv1 cells, correlating with ITGA2 transcript levels. Examination of the increased expression of ITGA2 was shown to influence migratory potential via scratch assay in PC3, 22Rv1 and LNCaP cells, and was confirmed by siRNA knockdown experiments. Taken together, our data supports the assertion that epigenetic modification of the ITGA2 promoter is a mechanism by which ITGA2 expression is regulated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Potentiation of radiosensitivity by tetrandrine in human breast cancer cells and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xinchen; Zhen Yongsu; Shao Rongguang; Wang Junjie

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potentiation of radiosensitivity and mechanism by tetrandrine (Tet) in human breast cancer p53-mutant MCF-7/ADR and p53-wt MCF-7 cells. Methods: Clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, Western blotting were preformed in this experiment. Results: The data of clonogenic assay showed that Tet markedly sensitized MCF-7/ADR cell to X-rays, and the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) of Tet was 1.51. Flow cytometry assay showed that exposure of MCF-7/ADR cells to X-rays caused cells to arrest in G 2 phase, whereas Tet was able to lower the number of cells arrested in G 2 phase. However, in MCF-7 cells, the potentiation effect of Tet was lower, and its SER was 1.10. MCF-7 cells were induced to arrest in G 1 and G 2 phases by X-rays, and the number of cells arrested in G 2 phase abrogated by Tet was less than that in MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, the results showed that the levels of Cyclin B1 and Cdc2 expression decreased after X-irradiation, and the mitotic index was lower too. Tet could reverse this decrease and induce X-ray-irradiated cells to enter mitosis. Conclusion: Tet is a potent G 2 checkpoint abrogator and markedly enhances the cytotoxicity of X irradiation in the p53-mutant cancer cells

  15. Caveolin-1 sensitizes cisplatin-induced lung cancer cell apoptosis via superoxide anion-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongjit, Kanittha; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2011-12-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression frequently found in lung cancer was linked with disease prognosis and progression. This study reveals for the first time that Cav-1 sensitizes cisplatin-induced lung carcinoma cell death by the mechanism involving oxidative stress modulation. We established stable Cav-1 overexpressed (H460/Cav-1) cells and investigated their cisplatin susceptibility in comparison with control-transfected cells and found that Cav-1 expression significantly enhanced cisplatin-mediated cell death. Results indicated that the different response to cisplatin between these cells was resulted from different level of superoxide anion induced by cisplatin. Inhibitory study revealed that superoxide anion inhibitor MnTBAP could inhibit cisplatin-mediated toxicity only in H460/Cav-1 cells while had no effect on H460 cells. Further, superoxide anion detected by DHE probe indicated that H460/Cav-1 cells generated significantly higher superoxide anion level in response to cisplatin than that of control cells. The role of Cav-1 in regulating cisplatin sensitivity was confirmed in shRNA-mediated Cav-1 down-regulated (H460/shCav-1) cells and the cells exhibited decreased cisplatin susceptibility and superoxide generation. In summary, these findings reveal novel aspects regarding role of Cav-1 in modulating oxidative stress induced by cisplatin, possibly providing new insights for cancer biology and cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  16. Androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Zurita, Amado J; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V; Prieto, Victor G; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K; Logothetis, Christopher J; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M

    2008-08-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer-induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor-null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells.

  17. [Mechanism research on the lupeol treatment on MCF-7 breast cancer cells based on cell metabonomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongdong; Kuang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guiming; Peng, Zhangxiao; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chao

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the suppressive effects of lupeol on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and explore its mechanism on inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 cells based on cell metabonomics and cell cycle. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used in the cell metabonomics assay to identify metabolites of MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 cells treated with lupeol. Then, orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to process the metabolic data and model parameters of OPLS-DA were as follows: R2Ycum = 0.988, Q2Ycum = 0.964, which indicated that these two groups could be distinguished clearly. The metabolites (VIP (variable importance in the projection) > 1) were analyzed by t-test, and finally, metabolites (t metabonomics.

  18. Furanyl Fatty Acid Inhibition of FABP5 as a Mechanism for Treatment and Prevention of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SPONSOR...Tochtrop and Stewart attended the 2017 Lipids Gordon Conference. Stewart attended a professional development workshop at this conference. How were the

  19. Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapies Targeting BRCA-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    limiting for mutagenic NHEJ but not for physiological CSR. An implication of our results is that deregulation of the RNF168/53BP1 pathway could alter the...resistance in BRCA-deficient tumors. We have also observed that deregulation of the RNF168/53BP1 pathway can alter the chemosensitivity of BRCA1 deficient...FASEB Summer Research Conference. Big Sky, Montana, 2015 g. Invited Speaker, Conference "Chromatin and Cell Fate", Essen, Germany , 2015 h. Invited

  20. Direct binding of microRNA-21 pre-element with Regorafenib: An alternative mechanism for anti-colorectal cancer chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobing; Xie, Bojian; Cao, Liang; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Beibei; Lv, Huifang; Fan, Xingxing; Han, Lili; Bie, Liangyu; Cao, Xinguang; Shen, Xiaokun; Cao, Feilin

    2017-05-01

    The Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor that has been approved to treat colorectal cancer (CRC). However, evidences have shown that the agent is also implicated in drug interaction with microRNA-21 (miR-21), an oncogenic miRNA which plays a key role in resisting programmed cell death in CRC cells. Here, we supposed that, instead of kinase inhibition, Regorafenib can directly bind to and then stabilize miR-21 pre-element, thus preventing RNase Dicer-meditated cleavage of the pre-element to mature miR-21. In order to verify the notion, an in silico-in vitro integrated investigation of the direct intermolecular interaction between Regorafenib and miR-21 pre-element was performed by using active pocket identification, RNA-ligand docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, binding energetic analysis, and fluorescence-based assay. It was revealed that the Regorafenib can bind at the major groove-like stem region of miR-21 pre-element through three geometrically satisfactory hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) as well as a number of hydrophobic forces and π-π stacking, conferring strong specificity and high stability to the RNA-ligand complex system (K d =0.73μM). Separate inversion mutation of two base pairs (G6C, C12G) and (A13U, U4A) that are involved in the H-bonding can considerably impair the affinity of Regorafenib to miR-21 pre-element, with K d increase to 27 and 96μM, respectively. All these supported that Regorafenib can directly bind to miR-21 pre-element at molecular level and the binding mode can be properly modeled by using the proposed integrated strategy. This study would provide a potential, alternative mechanism for anti-colorectal cancer chemotherapy with Regorafenib. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of the Mechanisms Underlying Antiestrogen Resistance: Breast Cancer Research Partnership between FIU-UM Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Deodutta

    2008-01-01

    This research proposal has two primary objectives which are to (1) increase FIU investigators' research expertise and competitive ability to succeed as independent breast cancer researchers; and (2...

  2. Conference summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Tim [Inta Communication Limited for European Service Network/ DG Research, Trillium House, 32 New Street, St. Neots, Cambridge PE19 1AJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of

  3. Effects and mechanism of GA-13315 on the proliferation and apoptosis of KB cells in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shan; Tang, Jingxia

    2017-08-01

    The present study describes the effects and mechanism of GA-13315 on the proliferation and apoptosis of KB cells in oral cancer. Oral cancer is twice as common in men than women. More than 90% of oral cancers in men and 85% in women are linked to lifestyle and environmental factors. PPP2R2B methylation may be associated with survival and prognosis in patients with gliomas. In tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, the mechanism of PPP2R2B remains unclear. In the present study, we found that PPP2R2B expression of H1299 cells is significantly decreased after being treated by GA-13315. KB cells were isolated from patients with oral cancer and treated with GA-13315 (5 µM). Cells without GA-13315 treatment served as the control group. An MTT experiment was performed to detect the post-treatment cell growth between the groups. A flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods were used for detecting the expression of PPP2R2B. Compared with the control group, the cell proliferation of the treatment group slowed after being treated with GA-13315. The difference was statistically significant (Poral cancer were weakened after being treated by GA-13315. GA-13315 can accelerate the apoptosis of oral cancer cells and presents a dose correlation. The biological effect is exerted through the decrease of PPP2R2B.

  4. 4th International Conference on Advanced Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The Fourth International Conference on Advanced Robotics was held in Columbus, Ohio, U. S. A. on June 13th to 15th, 1989. The first two conferences in this series were held in Tokyo. The third was held in Versailles, France in October 1987. The International Conference on Advanced Robotics is affiliated with the International Federation of Robotics. This conference was sponsored by The Ohio State University. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers was a cooperating co-sponsor. The objective of the International Conference on Advanced Robotics is to provide an international exchange of information on the topic of advanced robotics. This was adopted as one of the themes for international research cooperation at a meeting of representatives of seven industrialized countries held in Williamsburg, U. S. A. in May 1983. The present conference is truly international in character with contributions from authors of twelve countries. (Bulgaria, Canada, France, Great Britain, India, Italy, Japan, Peoples Republic o...

  5. International Conference on Computational Engineering Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yagawa, G

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this Conference was to become a forum for discussion of both academic and industrial research in those areas of computational engineering science and mechanics which involve and enrich the rational application of computers, numerical methods, and mechanics, in modern technology. The papers presented at this Conference cover the following topics: Solid and Structural Mechanics, Constitutive Modelling, Inelastic and Finite Deformation Response, Transient Analysis, Structural Control and Optimization, Fracture Mechanics and Structural Integrity, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Compressible and Incompressible Flow, Aerodynamics, Transport Phenomena, Heat Transfer and Solidification, Electromagnetic Field, Related Soil Mechanics and MHD, Modern Variational Methods, Biomechanics, and Off-Shore-Structural Mechanics.

  6. Proceedings of transducer 84 conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    In the broad and varied field of sensors this conference reviews thermal sensors for temperature measurements, gas sensors for gas analysis (for example analysis of exhaust gases from vehicles), optical fiber sensors, applications for optics, mechanics, robotics and signal processing. In particular one of the applications concerns acoustical transducers operating in liquid sodium for LMFBR reactors.

  7. Mechanisms of MRP over-expression in four human lung-cancer cell lines and analysis of the MRP amplicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijdems, E. W.; de Haas, M.; Coco-Martin, J. M.; Ottenheim, C. P.; Zaman, G. J.; Dauwerse, H. G.; Breuning, M. H.; Twentyman, P. R.; Borst, P.; Baas, F.

    1995-01-01

    Some multidrug resistant cell lines over-express the gene encoding the multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP). In all cell lines reported thus far, over-expression is associated with gene amplification. We have studied the predominant mechanisms of MRP over-expression in 4 human lung-cancer

  8. Mechanisms underlying the dualistic mode of action of major soy isoflavones in relation to cell proliferation and cancer risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Sotoca, A.M.; Vervoort, J.; Louisse, J.

    2013-01-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens that have been linked to both beneficial as well as adverse effects in relation to cell proliferation and cancer risks. The present article presents an overview of these seemingly contradicting health effects and of mechanisms that could be involved in this dualistic

  9. Glucuronidation as a mechanism of intrinsic drug resistance in colon cancer cells: contribution of drug transport proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Zelcer, Noam; Allen, John D.; Yao, Denggao; Boyd, Gary; Maliepaard, Mark; Friedberg, Thomas H.; Smyth, John F.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently shown that drug conjugation catalysed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) functions as an intrinsic mechanism of resistance to the topoisomerase I inhibitors 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and NU/ICRF 505 in human colon cancer cells and now report on the role of drug transport in

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents ... Organization Advisory Boards and Review Groups Budget & Appropriations About ...

  11. Conference Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A total of 18 papers were presented at the 2003 Annual Executive Conference of the Canadian Gas Association held at St. Andrews, NB, from June 25th to June 28th. Titles of the presentations were as follows: (1) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Pierre Marcel Desjardins; (2) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Jean-Paul Theoret; (3) 'Perceptions of natural gas' by Noel Sampson; (4) 'Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry' by Peter Love; (5) 'Natural gas R and D - NRCan perspective' by Graham R. Campbell; (6) 'Impact of earned media on corporate perceptions in the gas industry' by Michael Coates; (7) 'Moving forward with an initiative for natural gas technology innovation' by Emmanuel Morin; (8) 'Natural gas R and D - No more dodging the issue' by Chuck Szmurlo; (9) 'Meeting the technology needs of the gas industry and the gas consumer' by Stanley S. Borys; (10) 'Market signals' by John Wellard; (11) 'Future sources of Canadian natural gas' by Rick Hyndman; (12) 'The state of supply: Northeast U.S. perspective' by Tom Kiley; (13) 'AGA's priorities and perspectives' by Dick Reiten; (14) 'Global energy issues: Recent development in policy and business' by Gerald Doucet; (15) 'Keeping the distribution cart behind the horse: Why finding more offshore gas is much more important than completing the natural gas grid, including for New Brunswick' by Brian Lee Crowley; (16) 'Environmental opportunities and challenges for the gas industry' by Manfred Klein; (17) 'The potential for natural gas demand destruction' by Timothy Partridge; and (18) 'Pushing the envelope on gas supply' by Roland R. George. In most instances only speaking notes and view graphs are available

  12. Cancer and orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, M; Salvemini, D

    2016-11-01

    Cancer pain is a devastating condition. Pain in the orofacial region, may be present as the single symptom of cancer or as a symptom of cancer in its later stages. This manuscript revises in a comprehensive manner the content of the conference entitled "Orofacial Pain and Cancer" (Dolor Orofacial y Cancer) given at the VI Simposio International "Advances in Oral Cancer" on the 22 July, 2016 in San Sebastioan-Donostia, Spain. We have reviewed (pubmed-medline) from the most relevant literature including reviews, systematic reviews and clinical cases, the significant and evidence-based mechanisms and mediators of cancer-associated facial pain, the diverse types of cancers that can be present in the craniofacial region locally or from distant sites that can refer to the orofacial region, cancer therapy that may induce pain in the orofacial region as well as discussed some of the new advancements in cancer pain therapy. There is still a lack of understanding of cancer pain pathophysiology since depends of the intrinsic heterogeneity, type and anatomic location that the cancer may present, making more challenging the creation of better therapeutic options. Orofacial pain can arise from regional or distant tumor effects or as a consequence of cancer therapy. The clinician needs to be aware that the pain may present the characteristics of any other orofacial pain disorder so a careful differential diagnosis needs to be given. Cancer pain diagnosis is made by exclusion and only can be reached after a thorough medical history, and all the common etiologies have been carefully investigated and ruled out. The current management tools are not optimal but there is hope for new, safer and effective therapies coming in the next years.

  13. Induction of apoptosis by pinostrobin in human cervical cancer cells: Possible mechanism of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Jaudan

    Full Text Available Pinostrobin (PN is a naturally occurring dietary bioflavonoid, found in various medicinal herbs/plants. Though anti-cancer potential of many such similar constituents has been demonstrated, critical biochemical targets and exact mechanism for their apoptosis-inducing actions have not been fully elucidated. The present study was aimed to investigate if PN induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells (HeLa of human origin. It is demonstrated that PN at increasing dose effectivity reduced the cell viability as well as GSH and NO2- levels. Condensed nuclei with fragmented chromatin and changes in mitochondrial matrix morphology clearly indicated the role of mitochondria in PN induced apoptosis. A marked reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production after PN treatment showed involvement of free radicals, which in turn further augment ROS levels. PN treatment resulted in DNA damage, which could have been triggered by an increase in ROS levels. Decrease in apoptotic cells in the presence of caspase 3 inhibitor in PN-treated cells suggested that PN induced apoptosis via caspase dependent pathways. Additionally, a significant increase in the expression of proteins of extrinsic (TRAIL R1/DR4, TRAIL R2/DR5, TNF RI/TNFRSF1A, FADD, Fas/TNFRSF6 and intrinsic pathway (Bad, Bax, HTRA2/Omi, SMAC/Diablo, cytochrome C, Pro-Caspase-3, Cleaved Caspase-3 was observed in the cells exposed to PN. Taken together, these observations suggest that PN efficiently induces apoptosis through ROS mediated extrinsic and intrinsic dependent signaling pathways, as well as ROS mediated mitochondrial damage in HeLa cells.

  14. Novel mechanisms for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the skin and in skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-Ling; Jiang, Yan

    2015-04-01

    The VDR acting with or without its principal ligand 1,25(OH)2D regulates two central processes in the skin, interfollicular epidermal (IFE) differentiation and hair follicle cycling (HFC). Calcium is an important co-regulator with 1,25(OH)2D at least of epidermal differentiation. Knockout of the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in addition to VDR accelerates the development of skin cancer in mice on a low calcium diet. Coactivators such as mediator 1 (aka DRIP205) and steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC3) regulate VDR function at different stages of the differentiation process, with Med 1 essential for hair follicle differentiation and early stages of epidermal differentiation and proliferation and SRC3 essential for the latter stages of differentiation including formation of the permeability barrier and innate immunity. The corepressor of VDR, hairless (HR), is essential for hair follicle cycling, although its effect on epidermal differentiation in vivo is minimal. In its regulation of HFC and IFE VDR controls two pathways-wnt/β-catenin and sonic hedgehog (SHH). In the absence of VDR these pathways are overexpressed leading to tumor formation. Whereas, VDR binding to β-catenin may block its activation of TCF/LEF1 sites, β-catenin binding to VDR may enhance its activation of VDREs. 1,25(OH)2D promotes but may not be required for these interactions. Suppression of SHH expression by VDR, on the other hand, requires 1,25(OH)2D. The major point of emphasis is that the role of VDR in the skin involves a number of novel mechanisms, both 1,25(OH)2D dependent and independent, that when disrupted interfere with IFE differentiation and HFC, predisposing to cancer formation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Lymph Node Metastasis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Datta, Kaustubh

    2007-01-01

    .... Again, the cancer will often progress to an androgen refractory (independent), metastatic stage. Recent reports have suggested that the expression of VEGF-C is directly correlated with lymph node dissemination in prostate cancer...

  16. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, R.J.; Miller, J.H.; Sasser, L.B.; Schultz, I.R.; Thrall, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop critical data for changing risk-based clean-up standards for trichloroethylene (TCE). The project is organized around two interrelated tasks: Task 1 addresses the tumorigenic and dosimetry issues for the metabolites of TCE that produce liver cancer in mice, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA). Early work had suggested that TCA was primarily responsible for TCE-induced liver tumors, but several, more mechanistic observations suggest that DCA may play a prominent role. This task is aimed at determining the basis for the selection hypothesis and seeks to prove that this mode of action is responsible for TCE-induced tumors. This project will supply the basic dose-response data from which low-dose extrapolations would be made. Task 2 seeks specific evidence that TCA and DCA are capable of promoting the growth of spontaneously initiated cells from mouse liver, in vitro. The data provide the clearest evidence that both metabolites act by a mechanism of selection rather than mutation. These data are necessary to select between a linear (i.e. no threshold) and non-linear low-dose extrapolation model. As of May of 1998, this research has identified two plausible modes of action by which TCE produces liver tumors in mice. These modes of action do not require the compounds to be mutagenic. The bulk of the experimental evidence suggests that neither TCE nor the two hepatocarcinogenic metabolites of TCE are mutagenic. The results from the colony formation assay clearly establish that both of these metabolites cause colony growth from initiated cells that occur spontaneously in the liver of B 6 C 3 F 1 mice, although the phenotypes of the colonies differ in the same manner as tumors differ, in vivo. In the case of DCA, a second mechanism may occur at a lower dose involving the release of insulin. This observation is timely as it was recently reported that occupational exposures to trichloroethylene results in 2 to 4-fold

  17. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  18. Investigating Genomic Mechanisms of Treatment Resistance in Castration ResistantProstate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    bladder cancer which has been a time intensive but fruitful process. Additionally I have taken on a number of extramural responsibilities including...advancement. Led ASCO 2017 Annual Meeting Prostate Program Committee, served on ASCO 2017 Educational Committee, NCCN panel member ( bladder cancer ...pancreatic cancer . Cancer Lett. 2016 Sep 28; 380(1):144-52. PMID: 27343980 4. Anantharaman A, Friedlander TW. Targeting the androgen receptor in metastatic

  19. Dietary calcium and phosphate in the prevention of colorectal cancer. Mechanism and nutrition implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, Maria Johanna Adriana Petronella

    1993-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (cancerof the large intestine) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental factors, and in particular dietary habits, play an important role in the etiology of colorectal cancer. A positive association

  20. Green vegetables and colon cancer: the mechanism of a protective effect by chlorophyll

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important environmental determinants of the risk of colon cancer is the composition of the diet. Regular consumption of high amounts of red meat increases colon cancer risk. In contrast, consumption of green vegetables decreases the risk of colon cancer. This thesis provides a molecular

  1. Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of persons with cancer pain: A prospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mechanism-based classification (MBC was established with current evidence and physical therapy (PT management methods for both cancer and for noncancer pain. Aims: This study aims to describe the efficacy of MBC-based PT in persons with primary complaints of cancer pain. Settings and Design: A prospective case series of patients who attended the physiotherapy department of a multispecialty university-affiliated teaching hospital. Material and Methods: A total of 24 adults (18 female, 6 male aged 47.5 ± 10.6 years, with primary diagnosis of heterogeneous group of cancer, chief complaints of chronic disabling pain were included in the study on their consent for participation The patients were evaluated and classified on the basis of five predominant mechanisms for pain. Physical therapy interventions were recommended based on mechanisms identified and home program was prescribed with a patient log to ensure compliance. Treatments were given in five consecutive weekly sessions for five weeks each of 30 min duration. Statistical Analysis Used: Pre-post comparisons for pain severity (PS and pain interference (PI subscales of Brief pain inventory-Cancer pain (BPI-CP and, European organization for research and treatment in cancer-quality of life questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30 were done using Wilcoxon signed-rank test at 95% confidence interval using SPSS for Windows version 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL. Results: There were statistically significant ( P < 0.05 reduction in pain severity, pain interference and total BPI-CP scores, and the EORTC-QLQ-C30. Conclusion: MBC-PT was effective for improving BPI-CP and EORTC-QLQ-C30 scores in people with cancer pain.

  2. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1β was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1β. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1β expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  3. Mechanisms that contribute to the tendency to continue chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. Qualitative observations in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Linda; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Pasman, H Roeline W

    2016-03-01

    The study aims to describe mechanisms that contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer. The study conducted qualitative observations of outpatient clinic visits of 28 patients with advanced cancer (glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer). We uncovered four mechanisms in daily oncology practice that can contribute to the tendency towards continuing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: (1) "presenting the full therapy sets the standard"--patients seemed to base their justification for continuing chemotherapy on the "standard" therapy with the maximum number of cycles as presented by the physician at the start of the treatment; (2) "focus on standard evaluation moments hampers evaluation of care goals"--whether or not to continue the treatment was mostly only considered at standard evaluation moments; (3) "opening question guides towards focus on symptoms"--most patients gave an update of their physical symptoms in answer to the opening question of "How are you doing?" Physicians consequently discussed how to deal with this at length, which often took up most of the visit; (4) "treatment is perceived as the only option"--patients mostly wanted to continue with chemotherapy because they felt that they had to try every available option the physician offered. Physicians also often seemed to focus on treatment as the only option. Discussing care goals more regularly with the patient, facilitated for instance by implementing early palliative care, might help counter the mechanisms and enable a more well-considered decision. This could be either stopping or continuing chemotherapy.

  4. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  5. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui, E-mail: baohuihan1@163.com

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of β-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

  6. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and s