WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer combination therapies

  1. Curcumin in combined cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troselj, Koraljka Gall; Kujundzic, Renata Novak

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of beneficial preventive and therapeutic effects achieved by traditional and complementary medicine are currently being deciphered in molecular medicine. Curcumin, a yellow-colored polyphenol derived from the rhizome of turmeric (Curcuma longa), influences a wide variety of cellular processes through the reshaping of many molecular targets. One of them, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), represents a strong mediator of inflammation and, in a majority of systems, supports the pro-proliferative features of cancer cells. The application of various anticancer drugs, cytostatics, triggers signals which lead to an increase in cellular NF-κB activity. As a consequence, cancer cells often reshape their survival signaling pathways and, over time, become resistant to applied therapy. Curcumin was shown to be a strong inhibitor of NF-κB activity and its inhibitory effect on NF-κB related pathways often leads to cellular apoptotic response. All these facts, tested and confirmed in many different biological systems, have paved the way for research aimed to elucidate the potential beneficial effects of combining curcumin and various anti-cancer drugs in order to establish more efficient and less toxic cancer treatment modalities. This review addresses certain aspects of NF-κB-related inflammatory response, its role in carcinogenesis and therapy benefits that may be gained through silencing NF-κB by selectively combining curcumin and various anticancer drugs.

  2. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the newest research about the effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on cancer risk. RECENT FINDINGS: HIV+ persons are at increased risk of cancer. As this risk is higher for malignancies driven by viral and bacterial coinfections, classifying malignancies...... initiation in reducing cancer risk, understand the relationship between long-term cART exposure and cancer incidence and assess whether adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies can reduce cancer risk during treated HIV infection....... into infection-related and infection-unrelated has been an emerging trend. Cohorts have detected major reductions in the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) following cART initiation among immunosuppressed HIV+ persons. However, recent randomized data indicate that cART reduces risk...

  3. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in combination with conventional therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, Niels; Ellebaek, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination...

  4. Predicting the Toxicity of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Drug Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Combination With Trastuzumab in Patients With HER2-Positive, Metastatic Breast Cancer Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Herceptin ...Trastuzumab ( Herceptin ) -Refractory, Metastatic Breast Cancer Active, not recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Capecitabine|Drug: Lapatinib Lapatinib...Lapatinib Plus Herceptin With or Without Endocrine Therapy Recruiting No Results Available NO Drug: Herceptin |Drug: Lapatinib|Drug: Letrozole

  5. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds K

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Reynolds, Sasmit Sarangi, Aditya Bardia, Don S Dizon Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2, is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. Keywords: pertuzumab, HER2 breast cancer, personalized therapy

  6. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mads Hald Andersen; Niels Junker; Eva Ellebaek; Inge Marie Svane; Per thor Straten

    2010-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation o...

  7. Cancer treatment: the combination of vaccination with other therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.H.; Sorensen, R.B.; Schrama, D.

    2008-01-01

    approach to fight cancer, the combination with additional therapy could create a number of synergistic effects. Herein we discuss the possibilities and prospects of vaccination when combined with other treatments. In this regard, cell death upon drug exposure may be immunogenic or non-immunogenic depending...... and endothelial cells. The efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against cancer will over the next few years be studied in settings taking advantage of strategies in which vaccination is combined with other treatment modalities. These combinations should be based on current knowledge not only regarding the biology...... of the cancer cell per se, but also considering how treatment may influence the malignant cell population as well as the immune system Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  8. Combining HDAC inhibitors with oncolytic virotherapy for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Nakashima, Tran Nguyen, Ennio Antonio ChioccaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes play a critical role in the epigenetic regulation of cellular functions and signaling pathways in many cancers. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi have been validated for single use or in combination with other drugs in oncologic therapeutics. An even more novel combination therapy with HDACi is to use them with an oncolytic virus. HDACi may lead to an amplification of tumor-specific lytic effects by facilitating increased cycles of viral replication, but there may also be direct anticancer effects of the drug by itself. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of the combination of oncolytic viruses with HDACi.Keywords: epigenetics, glioma, oncolytic virus, HDAC inhibitor, HSV-1, cancer

  9. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pancreatic cancer: systemic combination therapies for a heterogeneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melisi, Davide; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Frizziero, Melissa; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the only human malignancy for which patients' survival has not improved substantially during the past 30 years. Despite advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic carcinogenesis, current systemic treatments offer only a modest benefit in tumor-related symptoms and survival. Over the past decades, gemcitabine and its combination with other standard cytotoxic agents have been the reference treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. The recent introduction of the three-drug combination regimen FOLFIRINOX or the new taxane nab-paclitaxel represent key advances for a better control of the disease. Novel agents targeting molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development and maintenance are currently under clinical investigation. This review describes the most important findings in the field of systemic combination therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We discuss the emerging evidences for the clinical activity of combination treatments with standard chemotherapy plus novel agents targeting tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment signaling pathways. We present some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer and the emerging therapeutic targets to overcome this resistance.

  11. Better Together: Targeted Combination Therapies in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Elisa; Bregni, Giacomo; de Braud, Filippo; Di Cosimo, Serena

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries both in cell proliferation and survival mechanisms and new antineoplastic agents have led to deep change in the breast cancer treatment paradigm. Nonetheless, all of the progress in knowledge and strategy has not been enough to overcome mechanisms of escape and resistance put in place by the tumor cells. New targeted agents mean new possibilities for combinations, a viable option to try to stop compensatory pathways of tumor growth activated in response to therapeutics. The main challenges in designing a combined therapy come from the variety of subtypes of breast cancer (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like) and from the multitude of pathways each subtype can exploit. Recent research has focused on dual blockade of HER2 (trastuzumab-lapatinib; trastuzumab-pertuzumab) and concomitant blockade of the endocrine driver and other pathways such as the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (everolimus-exemestane), HER2 (trastuzumab/lapatinib-endocrine therapy) and the cell cycle through cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition (letrozole-palbociclib). This combined and personalized approach to treatment needs a profound knowledge of the mechanisms leading to proliferation in each tumor subtype. Deepening our understanding of tumor growth is mandatory to keep improving the efficacy of combination therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Hald Andersen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of most therapeutic vaccines against cancer has not yet met its promise. Data are emerging that strongly support the notion that combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies, for example, radiation and chemotherapy may improve efficacy. In particular combination with chemotherapy may lead to improved clinical efficacy by clearing suppressor cells, reboot of the immune system, by rendering tumor cells more susceptible to immune mediated killing, or by activation of cells of the immune system. In addition, a range of tumor antigens have been characterized to allow targeting of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma.

  13. Natural compounds and combination therapy in colorectal cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejhová, A; Opattová, A; Čumová, A; Slíva, D; Vodička, P

    2018-01-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy using conventional chemotherapeutics represents a considerable burden for the patient's organism because of high toxicity while the response is relatively low. Our review summarizes the findings about natural compounds as chemoprotective agents for decreasing risk of CRC. It also identifies natural compounds which possess anti-tumor effects of various characteristics, mainly in vitro on colorectal cell lines or in vivo studies on experimental models, but also in a few clinical trials. Many of natural compounds suppress proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest or induce apoptosis of CRC cells resulting in the inhibition of tumor growth. A novel employment of natural substances is a so-called combination therapy - administration of two or more substances - conventional chemotherapeutics and a natural compound or more natural compounds at a time. Some natural compounds may sensitize to conventional cytotoxic therapy, reinforce the drug effective concentration, intensify the combined effect of both administered therapeutics or exert cytotoxic effects specifically on tumor cells. Moreover, combined therapy by targeting multiple signaling pathways, uses various mechanisms to reduce the development of resistance to antitumor drugs. The desired effect could be to diminish burden on the patient's organism by replacing part of the dose of a conventional chemotherapeutic with a natural substance with a defined effect. Many natural compounds are well tolerated by the patients and do not cause toxic effects even at high doses. Interaction of conventional chemotherapeutics with natural compounds introduces a new aspect in the research and therapy of cancer. It could be a promising approach to potentially achieve improvements, while minimizing of adverse effects associated with conventional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of Combination Therapy with Anti-Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes early clinical trials with anti-cancer drugs in combination with commonly applied and registered chemotherapy and single agent studies with compounds that are intended for use in combination with registered or other targeted anti-cancer drugs. Gemcitabine is a prodrug that

  15. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines in Combination with Conventional Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Junker, N.; Ellebaek, E.

    2010-01-01

    of proteins coupled to intrinsic properties of cancer cells. For example, proteins associated with drug resistance can be targeted, and form ideal target structures for use in combination with chemotherapy for killing of surviving drug resistant cancer cells. Proteins associated with the malignant phenotype...... can be targeted to specifically target cancer cells, but proteins targeted by immunotherapy may also simultaneously target cancer cells as well as suppressive cells in the tumor stroma....

  16. NMR with Combined Antiangiogenic and Radiation Therapies - Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The original goal of the present study was to determine optimal strategies for combining radiation and antiangiogenic therapies in spontaneous murine tumors and to evaluate the potential of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR...

  17. Improvement of cancer immunotherapy by combining molecular targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka eKawakami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In human cancer cells, a constitutive activation of MAPK, STAT3, β-catenin, and various other signaling pathways triggers multiple immunosuppressive cascades. These cascades result in the production of immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. TGF-β, IL-10, IL-6, VEGF, and CCL2 and induction of immunosuppressive immune cells (e.g. regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells. Consequently, immunosuppressive conditions are formed in tumor-associated microenvironments, including the tumor and sentinel lymph nodes. Some of these cancer-derived cytokines and chemokines impair immune cells and render them immunosuppressive via the activation of signaling molecules, such as STAT3, in the immune cells. Thus, administration of signal inhibitors may inhibit the multiple immunosuppressive cascades by acting simultaneously on both cancer and immune cells at the key regulatory points in the cancer-immune network. Since common signaling pathways are involved in manifestation of several hallmarks of cancer, including cancer cell proliferation/survival, invasion/metastasis, and immunosuppression, targeting these shared signaling pathways in combination with immunotherapy may be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  18. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    intensity focused ultrasound ( HIFU ) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...feasibility of synergistic combination of HIFU thermal ablation and HIFU -induced gene therapy is interpreted both in vitro and in vivo using cancer...distribution. This work opens up a new paradigm for synergistic combination of HIFU thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy to improve the overall

  19. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  20. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer: Rationales, delivery technologies and dosage regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy...... using different pharmaceuticals has been proven highly effective due to the ability to affect multiple cellular pathways involved in the disease progression. However, the currently used drug combination designs are primarily based on empirical clinical studies, and little attention has been given...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  1. Recent Advances in Upconversion Nanoparticles-Based Multifunctional Nanocomposites for Combined Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-12-16

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have the ability to generate ultraviolet or visible emissions under continuous-wave near-infrared (NIR) excitation. Utilizing this special luminescence property, UCNPs are approved as a new generation of contrast agents in optical imaging with deep tissue-penetration ability and high signal-to-noise ratio. The integration of UCNPs with other functional moieties can endow them with highly enriched functionalities for imaging-guided cancer therapy, which makes composites based on UCNPs emerge as a new class of theranostic agents in biomedicine. Here, recent progress in combined cancer therapy using functional nanocomposites based on UCNPs is reviewed. Combined therapy referring to the co-delivery of two or more therapeutic agents or a combination of different treatments is becoming more popular in clinical treatment of cancer because it generates synergistic anti-cancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. Here, the recent advances of combined therapy contributed by UCNPs-based nanocomposites on two main branches are reviewed: i) photodynamic therapy and ii) chemotherapy, which are the two most widely adopted therapies of UCNPs-based composites. The future prospects and challenges in this emerging field will be also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Cancer prevention and treatment using combination therapy with plant- and animal-derived compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoigwe, Jacinta; Sauter, Edward R

    2012-11-01

    Compounds naturally occurring in plants and animals play an essential role in the prevention and treatment of various cancers. There are more than 100 plant- and animal-based natural compounds currently in clinical use. Similar to synthetic compounds, these natural compounds are associated with dose-related toxicity that limits efficacy. Scientists have investigated combination therapy with compounds that have different toxicities in order to optimize efficacy. These combination therapies may work additively or synergistically, there may be no effect or they may promote tumor formation. Combination therapy with agents that have similar mechanisms of action may increase toxicity. In this article, combination therapies that have been investigated, their rationale, mechanism of action and findings are reviewed. When the data warrant it, combined (pharmacologic and natural; two or more natural) interventions that appear to increase efficacy (compared with monotherapy) while minimizing toxicity have been highlighted.

  3. Explorations of combinational therapy in cancer : targeting the tumor and its microenvironment by combining chemotherapy with chemopreventive approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Johannes Willem van

    2011-01-01

    One of the most effective anticancer therapy still remains chemotherapy, however, both used as single agent as in combinational regimens, chemotherapy still encounters the problem of therapeutic resistance. Limitations of chemotherapy have led to the exploration of alternative anti-cancer approaches

  4. Targeting the NF-κB Pathway as a Combination Therapy for Advanced Thyroid Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Pozdeyev

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling plays an important role in tumor cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and drug/radiation resistance. Combination therapy involving NF-κB pathway inhibition is an attractive strategy for the treatment of advanced forms of thyroid cancer. This study was designed to test the efficacy of NF-κB pathway inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, using docetaxel and ionizing radiation in in vitro models of thyroid cancer. We found that while both docetaxel and ionizing radiation activated NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cells, there was no synergistic effect on cell proliferation and/or programmed cell death with either genetic (transduction of a dominant negative mutant form of IκBα or pharmacologic (proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and IKKβ inhibitor GO-Y030 inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines BCPAP, 8505C, THJ16T and SW1736. Docetaxel plus bortezomib synergistically decreased in vitro invasion of 8505C cells, but not in the other cell lines. Screening of a panel of clinically relevant targeted therapies for synergy with genetic NF-κB inhibition in a proliferation/cytotoxicity assay identified the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA as a potential candidate. However, the synergistic effect was confirmed only in the BCPAP cells. These results indicate that NF-κB inhibitors are unlikely to be beneficial as combination therapy with taxane cytotoxic chemotherapy, external radiation therapy or radioiodine therapy. There may be unique circumstances where NF-κB inhibitors may be considered in combination with docetaxel to reduce tumor invasion or in combination with HDAC inhibitors to reduce tumor growth, but this does not appear to be a combination therapy that could be broadly applied to patients with advanced thyroid cancer. Further research may identify which subsets of patients/tumors may respond to this therapeutic

  5. Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    stimulate the body’s immune system to target and attack cancer cells. Another part of our research includes coating these gold nanoparticles with...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0427 TITLE: Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal... Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0427 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Branden Moriarity, Tim

  6. HSP90 Inhibitor Encapsulated Photo-Theranostic Nanoparticles for Synergistic Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Guo, Wenchang; Long, Qilai; Ma, Aihong; Liu, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Hongyong; Huang, Yee; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Pan, Chongxian; Lam, Kit S; Li, Yuanpei

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising non-invasive therapeutic modality that has been proposed for treating prostate cancer, but the procedure is associated with limited efficacy, tumor recurrence and photo-toxicity. In the present study, we proposed to develop a novel multifunctional nano-platform for targeted delivery of heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor simultaneously for combination therapy against prostate cancer. This new nano-platform combines two newly developed entities: 1) a unique organic and biocompatible nanoporphyrin-based drug delivery system that can generate efficient heat and ROS simultaneously with light activation at the tumor sites for dual-modal photothermal- and photodynamic- therapy (PTT/PDT), and 2) new nano-formulations of Hsp90 inhibitors that can decrease the levels of pro-survival and angiogenic signaling molecules induced by phototherapy, therefore, further sensitizing cancer cells to phototherapy. Furthermore, the nanoparticles have activatable near infrared (NIR) fluorescence for optical imaging to conveniently monitor the real-time drug delivery in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models bearing prostate cancer xenograft. This novel multifunctional nano-platform has great potential to improve the care of prostate cancer patients through targeted combination therapy.

  7. Manipulating Protein Acetylation in Breast Cancer: A Promising Approach in Combination with Hormonal Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Linares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens play an essential role in the normal physiology of the breast as well as in mammary tumorigenesis. Their effects are mediated by two nuclear estrogen receptors, ERα and β, which regulate transcription of specific genes by interacting with multiprotein complexes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. During the past few years, HDACs have raised great interest as therapeutic targets in the field of cancer therapy. In breast cancer, several experimental arguments suggest that HDACs are involved at multiple levels in mammary tumorigenesis: their expression is deregulated in breast tumors; they interfere with ER signaling in intricate ways, restoring hormone sensitivity in models of estrogen resistance, and they clinically represent new potential targets for HDACs inhibitors (HDIs in combination with hormonal therapies. In this paper, we will describe these different aspects and underline the clinical interest of HDIs in the context of breast cancer resistance to hormone therapies (HTs.

  8. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  9. Gold Nanostructures as a Platform for Combinational Therapy in Future Cancer Therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelveh, Salomeh [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chithrani, Devika B., E-mail: devika.chithrani@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); STTARR Innovation Centre, Toronto Medical Discovery Tower, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-03-04

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshells (GNSs) and gold nanocages (GNCs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options and recent developments in cancer research show that the incorporation of gold nanostructures into these protocols has enhanced tumor cell killing. These nanostructures further provide strategies for better loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. In addition, the heat generation capability of gold nanostructures upon exposure to UV or near infrared light is being used to damage tumor cells locally in photothermal therapy. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. In this review article, the recent progress in the development of gold-based NPs towards improved therapeutics will be discussed. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents, holds an array of promising directions for cancer research.

  10. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  11. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn(2+) ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics.

  12. Quality of Life Patients with Breast Cancer Therapy Combination Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, and Cyclofosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi D. Agustini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer with combination chemotherapy Florouracil, doxorubicin, and Cyclofosfamide (FAC lead to differences in the quality of life of patients is important to know because it can support the effectiveness of patient treatment. The aim of the study was to measure the difference and know the dimensions that affect the quality of life of breast cancer patients from each cycle of chemotherapy in Hasan Sadikin Hospital. This research is an observational analytic cross sectional approach. A sample of 200 breast cancer patients who were selected purposively and separated based on cycles of therapy. Assessment of quality of life of patients is done using a multidimensional instrument EORTC QLQ (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and BR23. Data analysis was calculated using independent t test and linear regression. The results showed that there are differences in quality of life is very significant between QLQ-C30 functioning scale baseline with treatment 5, the QLQ-C30 symptom scale baseline therapy 5th, QLQ-BR23 function scale baseline with therapy 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th, QLQ-BR23 symptoms scale baseline with therapy 4th, then a significant difference between scale symptoms of QLQ-BR23 baseline therapy with the 1st, 3rd, and 5th. Dimensions have a significant effect on quality of life is a social function, nausea and vomiting, dyspnea, sleep disorders and financial difficulties.

  13. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combination therapy targeting Raf-1 and MEK causes apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Romesh R; Yamakawa, Akio

    2012-11-01

    Members of the Ras protooncogene family are mutated in approximately 75% of colon cancers. The Raf kinases (Raf-1, b-Raf and a-Raf) directly interact with Ras and serve as mediators of mitogenic signals. Expression of the constitutively active alleles of Raf or Ras gene families results in oncogenesis in a number of model systems. Previous studies emphasized the importance of Raf-1 and b-Raf in preventing apoptosis in addition to their roles in cell growth. In the present study, we examined whether inhibition of the Raf-1 or b-Raf kinase decreases cell growth and increases apoptosis in colon cancer cells. c-Raf and b-Raf were depleted in colon cancer cell lines, such as HCT116, HT29 and Colo205, containing Ras or b-Raf mutations by RNA interference (RNAi). The results showed that colon cancer cells with activating Ras mutations undergo apoptosis following Raf-1 inhibition, as determined by cell cycle analysis and the release of cytochrome c. Moreover, in b-Raf mutant colon cancers, the inhibition of b-Raf as compared to Raf-1 is crucial for cancer cell death. There is increasing evidence for both MEK-independent Raf signaling and Raf-independent MEK signaling. Thus, we investigated whether targeting multiple points of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway with a MEK inhibitor and Raf RNAi increases cancer cell death. The results showed that combination therapy, inhibiting Raf and MEK kinases simultaneously, increased apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that combination therapy targeting the MAPK pathway at two distinct points, Raf kinase and MEK, has greater efficacy in increasing cancer cell death and is likely to improve therapeutic outcomes for patients.

  15. Core-Satellite Polydopamine-Gadolinium-Metallofullerene Nanotheranostics for Multimodal Imaging Guided Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Lin, Jing; Wang, Zhantong; Zhou, Zijian; Bai, Ruiliang; Lu, Nan; Liu, Yijing; Fu, Xiao; Jacobson, Orit; Fan, Wenpei; Qu, Junle; Chen, Siping; Wang, Tianfu; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-09-01

    Integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other imaging modalities is promising to furnish complementary information for accurate cancer diagnosis and imaging-guided therapy. However, most gadolinium (Gd)-chelator MR contrast agents are limited by their relatively low relaxivity and high risk of released-Gd-ions-associated toxicity. Herein, a radionuclide-64 Cu-labeled doxorubicin-loaded polydopamine (PDA)-gadolinium-metallofullerene core-satellite nanotheranostic agent (denoted as CDPGM) is developed for MR/photoacoustic (PA)/positron emission tomography (PET) multimodal imaging-guided combination cancer therapy. In this system, the near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing PDA acts as a platform for the assembly of different moieties; Gd3 N@C80 , a kind of gadolinium metallofullerene with three Gd ions in one carbon cage, acts as a satellite anchoring on the surface of PDA. The as-prepared CDPGM NPs show good biocompatibility, strong NIR absorption, high relaxivity (r 1 = 14.06 mM-1 s-1 ), low risk of release of Gd ions, and NIR-triggered drug release. In vivo MR/PA/PET multimodal imaging confirms effective tumor accumulation of the CDPGM NPs. Moreover, upon NIR laser irradiation, the tumor is completely eliminated with combined chemo-photothermal therapy. These results suggest that the CDPGM NPs hold great promise for cancer theranostics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [A case of metastatic pancreatic cancer which trastuzumab+capecitabine combination therapy was effective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Katsuhiko; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tokugawa, Tomoki; Inaba, Seiichirou

    2012-08-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with carcinoma of the left breast(T2N1M0, stage II B), which enforced left Bt+R1. In May 2008, the patient underwent preoperative chemotherapy consisting of 4 courses of FEC 75(fluororracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide). Pathological examination revealed that the lesion was a papillotubular carcinoma,(ER-, PgR-, HER2 3+). In September, 2009, CT scans revealed metastases of the cervical lymph nodes and pancreas. Examination of biopsy specimens from the left cervical lymph nodes revealed that the metastases were from breast cancer(ER-, PgR-, HER2 3+). To treat the recurrences, combination therapy with trastuzumab+capecitabine was introduced in October, 2009. CT scans obtained in May 2010 revealed complete response of the metastases of the lymph nodes and pancreas. It is difficult to distinguish a metastases from a primary pancreatic cancer, but the present case was considered to be one of metastic pancreatic cancer because the findings were in agreement with the expression time of lymph node metastasis. Follow-up CT scans revealed that CR was maintained by the combination therapy of trastuzumab+capecitabine.

  17. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases.

  18. Combination photodynamic therapy of human breast cancer using salicylic acid and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh; Jahanshiri, Maryam

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combination therapy with methylene blue (MB) assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) and salicylic acid (SA) as chemo-therapy anticancer agent. The binding of salicylic acid to methylene blue was studied using spectrophotometric method. The results show the 1:2 complex formation between SA and MB. The binding constants and related Gibbs free energies o are obtained (Kb1 = 183.74, Kb2 = 38.13 and ∆ Gb1° = 12.92 kJ·mol- 1, ∆ Gb2° =9.02 kJ·mol- 1). The spectrophotometric results show the improvement in solubilization and reduction prevention for SA and MB in the complex form. These results are in agreements with cellular experiments. The dark toxicity measurements represent the improve efficacy of chemotherapy using combination of SA and MB. The photodynamic therapy results (using red LED as light source (630 nm; power density: 30 mW cm- 2)) show that the cancer cell killing efficiency of MB increases in the combination with SA due to reduction prevention and stabilization of monomeric form of MB.

  19. Molecular landscape of acquired resistance to targeted therapy combinations in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Daniele; Sennott, Erin M.; Barault, Ludovic; Valtorta, Emanuele; Arena, Sabrina; Cassingena, Andrea; Filiciotto, Genny; Marzolla, Giulia; Elez, Elena; van Geel, Robin M.J.M.; Bartolini, Alice; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Boscaro, Valentina; Godfrey, Jason T.; Buscarino, Michela; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Linnebacher, Michael; Corti, Giorgio; Truini, Mauro; Siravegna, Giulia; Grasselli, Julieta; Gallicchio, Margherita; Bernards, René; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Tabernero, Josep; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Siena, Salvatore; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although recent clinical trials of BRAF inhibitor combinations have demonstrated improved efficacy in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer, emergence of acquired resistance limits clinical benefit. Here, we undertook a comprehensive effort to define mechanisms underlying drug resistance with the goal of guiding development of therapeutic strategies to overcome this limitation. We generated a broad panel of BRAF mutant resistant cell line models across seven different clinically-relevant drug combinations. Combinatorial drug treatments were able to abrogate ERK1/2 phosphorylation in parental sensitive cells, but not in their resistant counterparts, indicating that resistant cells escaped drug treatments through one or more mechanisms leading to biochemical reactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway. Genotyping of resistant cells identified gene amplification of EGFR, KRAS and mutant BRAF, as well as acquired mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MAP2K1. These mechanisms were clinically relevant, as we identified emergence of a KRAS G12C mutation and increase of mutant BRAF V600E allele frequency in the circulating tumor DNA of a patient at relapse from combined treatment with BRAF and MEK inhibitors. In order to identify therapeutic combinations capable of overcoming drug resistance, we performed a systematic assessment of candidate therapies across the panel of resistant cell lines. Independent of the molecular alteration acquired upon drug pressure, most resistant cells retained sensitivity to vertical MAPK pathway suppression when combinations of ERK, BRAF, and EGFR inhibitors were applied. These therapeutic combinations represent promising strategies for future clinical trials in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer. PMID:27312529

  20. Molecular Landscape of Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapy Combinations in BRAF-Mutant Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Daniele; Sennott, Erin M; Barault, Ludovic; Valtorta, Emanuele; Arena, Sabrina; Cassingena, Andrea; Filiciotto, Genny; Marzolla, Giulia; Elez, Elena; van Geel, Robin M J M; Bartolini, Alice; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Boscaro, Valentina; Godfrey, Jason T; Buscarino, Michela; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Linnebacher, Michael; Corti, Giorgio; Truini, Mauro; Siravegna, Giulia; Grasselli, Julieta; Gallicchio, Margherita; Bernards, René; Schellens, Jan H M; Tabernero, Josep; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Siena, Salvatore; Corcoran, Ryan B; Di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Although recent clinical trials of BRAF inhibitor combinations have demonstrated improved efficacy in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, emergence of acquired resistance limits clinical benefit. Here, we undertook a comprehensive effort to define mechanisms underlying drug resistance with the goal of guiding development of therapeutic strategies to overcome this limitation. We generated a broad panel of BRAF-mutant resistant cell line models across seven different clinically relevant drug combinations. Combinatorial drug treatments were able to abrogate ERK1/2 phosphorylation in parental-sensitive cells, but not in their resistant counterparts, indicating that resistant cells escaped drug treatments through one or more mechanisms leading to biochemical reactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway. Genotyping of resistant cells identified gene amplification of EGFR, KRAS, and mutant BRAF, as well as acquired mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MAP2K1 These mechanisms were clinically relevant, as we identified emergence of a KRAS G12C mutation and increase of mutant BRAF V600E allele frequency in the circulating tumor DNA of a patient at relapse from combined treatment with BRAF and MEK inhibitors. To identify therapeutic combinations capable of overcoming drug resistance, we performed a systematic assessment of candidate therapies across the panel of resistant cell lines. Independent of the molecular alteration acquired upon drug pressure, most resistant cells retained sensitivity to vertical MAPK pathway suppression when combinations of ERK, BRAF, and EGFR inhibitors were applied. These therapeutic combinations represent promising strategies for future clinical trials in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4504-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Immunotherapy regimens for combination with photodynamic therapy aimed at eradication of solid cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen

    2000-06-01

    Due to inflammatory/immune responses elicited by photodynamic therapy (PDT), this modality is particularly suitable in combination with various forms of immunotherapy for an improved therapeutic gain. A wide variety of approaches that may be applicable in this context include those focusing on amplifying the activity of particular immune cell types (neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, helper or cytotoxic T lymphocytes). Another type of approach is to focus on a specific phase of immune response development, which comprises the activation of non-specific inflammatory immune effectors, immune recognition, immune memory, immune rejection, or blocking of immune suppression. These different strategies call for a variety of immunotherapeutic protocols to be employed in combination with PDT. These include treatments such as: (1) non-specific immunoactivators (e.g. bacterial vaccines), (2) specific immune agents (cytokines, or other activating factors), (3) adoptive immunotherapy treatments (transfer of dendritic cells, tumor-sensitized T lymphocytes or natural killer cells), or (4) their combinations. Techniques of gene therapy employed in some of these protocols offer novel opportunities for securing a potent and persistent immune activity. Using PDT and immunotherapy represents an attractive combination for cancer therapy that is capable of eradicating both localized and disseminated malignant lesions.

  2. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  3. Long-term outcomes of combined androgen blockade therapy in stage IV prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Taeko; Kawai, Koji; Kimura, Tomokazu; Kojima, Takahiro; Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Hinotsu, Shiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-04-01

    To clarify which subset of stage IV prostate cancer patients benefit from combined androgen blockade (CAB) using Japanese nationwide database. A total of 3,752 patients with stage IV disease from the prospective nationwide cohort database of the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer (J-CaP) were enrolled. All patients started primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) between 2001 and 2003, and the present study was performed using the data set from December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups according to initial treatments: CAB with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRH) plus anti-androgen (AA) and non-CAB treatments such as LHRH monotherapy. The overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for each group were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 2,967 patients (79.1%) received CAB. Overall, no significant difference was observed in OS and CSS between the CAB group and the non-CAB group. However, CAB resulted in significantly better OS and CSS compared to non-CAB in patients with very high Japan Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (J-CAPRA) scores of ten or greater (P = 0.007 and 0.013, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that CAB was an independent predictive factor for better OS (P = 0.013, hazard ratio = 0.83). Based on large-scale nationwide database, as PADT for prostate cancer patients with very high-risk disease, CAB resulted in better OS than other endocrine treatments.

  4. Recombinant human erythropoietin therapy for anemic cancer patients on combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, D C; Bukowski, R M; Carey, R W; Fishkin, E H; Henry, D H; Jacobson, R J; Jones, S E; Keller, A M; Kugler, J W; Nichols, C R

    1993-05-19

    Patients with advanced cancer frequently experience clinically significant anemia, which is often exacerbated by myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Consistent with the anemia of chronic disease, studies have documented serum erythropoietin levels that are inappropriately low for the degree of anemia in cancer patients. Myelosuppressive chemotherapy impairs erythropoiesis, which may not fully recover between treatment cycles. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has been used safely and effectively to treat anemia in AIDS patients receiving zidovudine (AZT) and in patients with chronic renal failure. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical role of rHuEPO in reducing symptomatic anemia in patients with advanced cancer who were receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy (excluding cisplatin). We studied 153 anemic cancer patients receiving cyclic combination chemotherapy in a prospective multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either rHuEPO (150 U/kg) or placebo subcutaneously three times a week for a maximum of 12 weeks or until the hematocrit level increased to 38%-40%. If the hematocrit reached this target level before 12 weeks, the rHuEPO dose could be reduced to maintain the hematocrit at that level for the duration of the study. Response to rHuEPO therapy was assessed by measuring changes in hematocrit level, transfusion requirements, and quality of life. Quality-of-life assessment was based on patients' responses to questionnaires before and after the courses of therapy. The increase in hematocrit in the rHuEPO-treated group compared with hematocrit in the placebo-treated group was statistically significant (P = .0001) as measured by percentage point of change from baseline to final evaluation, by an increase in hematocrit level of six percentage points or more unrelated to transfusion, and by a rise in hematocrit level to 38% or more unrelated to transfusion. There was a trend toward the

  5. Targeted Therapy of Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy in Combination with Multi-faceted Anti-Tumor Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Olivo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has emerged as one of the important therapeutic options in the management of cancer and other diseases. PDT involves a tumor-localized photosensitizer (PS, which when appropriately illuminated by visible light converts oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, that attack key structural entities within the targeted cells, ultimately resulting in necrosis or apoptosis. Though PDT is a selective modality, it can be further enhanced by combining other targeted therapeutic strategies that include the use of synthetic peptides and nanoparticles for selective delivery of photosensitizers. Another potentially promising strategy is the application of targeted therapeutics that exploit a myriad of critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Vascular disrupting agents that eradicate tumor vasculature during PDT and anti-angiogenic agents that targets specific molecular pathways and prevent the formation of new blood vessels are novel therapeutic approaches that have been shown to improve treatment outcome. In addition to the well-documented mechanisms of direct cell killing and damage to the tumor vasculature, PDT can also activate the body’s immune response against tumors. Numerous pre-clinical studies and clinical observations have demonstrated the immuno-stimulatory capability of PDT. Herein, we aim to integrate the most important findings with regard to the combination of PDT and other novel targeted therapy approaches, detailing its potential in cancer photomedicine.

  6. Combined Treatments with Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rocío Lucena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common form of cancer in the Caucasian population. Among NMSC types, basal cell carcinoma (BCC has the highest incidence and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is less common although it can metastasize, accounting for the majority of NMSC-related deaths. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and non-surgical modalities. Even though surgical approaches are most commonly used to treat these lesions, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT has the advantage of being a non-invasive option, and capable of field treatment, providing optimum cosmetic outcomes. Numerous clinical research studies have shown the efficacy of PDT for treating pre-malignant and malignant NMSC. However, resistant or recurrent tumors appear and sometimes become more aggressive. In this sense, the enhancement of PDT effectiveness by combining it with other therapeutic modalities has become an interesting field in NMSC research. Depending on the characteristics and the type of tumor, PDT can be applied in combination with immunomodulatory (Imiquimod and chemotherapeutic (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, diclofenac, or ingenol mebutate agents, inhibitors of some molecules implicated in the carcinogenic process (COX2 or MAPK, surgical techniques, or even radiotherapy. These new strategies open the way to a wider improvement of the prevention and eradication of skin cancer.

  7. Combined Treatments with Photodynamic Therapy for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Silvia Rocío; Salazar, Nerea; Gracia-Cazaña, Tamara; Zamarrón, Alicia; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Ángeles; Gilaberte, Yolanda

    2015-10-28

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common form of cancer in the Caucasian population. Among NMSC types, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has the highest incidence and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is less common although it can metastasize, accounting for the majority of NMSC-related deaths. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and non-surgical modalities. Even though surgical approaches are most commonly used to treat these lesions, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has the advantage of being a non-invasive option, and capable of field treatment, providing optimum cosmetic outcomes. Numerous clinical research studies have shown the efficacy of PDT for treating pre-malignant and malignant NMSC. However, resistant or recurrent tumors appear and sometimes become more aggressive. In this sense, the enhancement of PDT effectiveness by combining it with other therapeutic modalities has become an interesting field in NMSC research. Depending on the characteristics and the type of tumor, PDT can be applied in combination with immunomodulatory (Imiquimod) and chemotherapeutic (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, diclofenac, or ingenol mebutate) agents, inhibitors of some molecules implicated in the carcinogenic process (COX2 or MAPK), surgical techniques, or even radiotherapy. These new strategies open the way to a wider improvement of the prevention and eradication of skin cancer.

  8. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  9. Combination therapy of prostate cancer with HPMA copolymer conjugates containing PI3K/mTOR inhibitor and docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Yang, Jiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapies have been investigated to address the current challenges of anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, a novel paradigm of combination therapy targeting both cancer stem/progenitor cells and bulk tumor cells is promising to improve the long-term therapeutic benefit against prostate cancer. Among the therapeutic agents with anti-CSC activities, the PI3K/mTOR inhibitors exhibit preferential inhibitory effect on prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells and potent cytotoxicity against bulk tumor cells. The combination of PI3K/mTOR inhibitor and traditional chemotherapy docetaxel may show superior therapeutic effect over single drug treatment. Aiming to further improve the combinational anti-tumor and anti-CSC effect, we developed the combination therapy containing two HPMA copolymer-drug conjugates, incorporated with PI3K/mTOR inhibitor GDC-0980 (P-(GDC-0980)) and docetaxel (P-DTX), respectively. The anti-tumor and anti-CSC effects of the single and combination therapy were investigated in vitro and on PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice. Our evaluations showed that P-(GDC-0980) suppressed CD133+ prostate stem/progenitor cell growth even at the low dose which does not cause significant growth inhibition in bulk tumor cells. The combination therapy exhibited effective anti-CSC effect as well as enhanced anti-bulk tumor effect in vitro. Among all the single and combination dosing regimens of free drugs and conjugates, the macromolecular combination therapy showed significantly prolonged mice survival in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Beta-lactam versus beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination therapy in cancer patients with neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mical; Dickstein, Yaakov; Schlesinger, Agata; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Leibovici, Leonard

    2013-06-29

    Continued controversy surrounds the optimal empirical treatment for febrile neutropenia. New broad-spectrum beta-lactams have been introduced as single treatment, and classically, a combination of a beta-lactam with an aminoglycoside has been used. To compare beta-lactam monotherapy versus beta-lactam-aminoglycoside combination therapy for cancer patients with fever and neutropenia. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 7, 2012), LILACS (August 2012), MEDLINE and EMBASE (August 2012) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (Issue 3, 2012). We scanned references of all included studies and pertinent reviews and contacted the first author of each included trial, as well as the pharmaceutical companies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any beta-lactam antibiotic monotherapy with any combination of a beta-lactam and an aminoglycoside antibiotic, for the initial empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic cancer patients. All cause mortality was the primary outcome assessed. Data concerning all cause mortality, infection related mortality, treatment failure (including treatment modifications), super-infections, adverse effects and study quality measures were extracted independently by two review authors. Risk ratios (RRs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Outcomes were extracted by intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis whenever possible. Individual domains of risk of bias were examined through sensitivity analyses. Published data were complemented by correspondence with authors. Seventy-one trials published between 1983 and 2012 were included. All cause mortality was lower with monotherapy (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02, without statistical significance). Results were similar for trials comparing the same beta-lactam in both trial arms (11 trials, 1718 episodes; RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.06) and for trials comparing different beta-lactams-usually a broad-spectrum beta

  11. Combination Therapy with Capecitabine and Cisplatin as Second-Line Chemotherapy for Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jang Han; Lee, Hee Seung; Jo, Jung Hyun; Cho, In Rae; Chung, Moon Jae; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Park, Jeong Youp

    2017-08-26

    Palliative chemotherapy is the main treatment for advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). However, there is a lack of established second-line chemotherapy to treat disease progression after first-line chemotherapy. We examined combination therapy with capecitabine and cisplatin for advanced BTC as a second-line regimen. We analyzed the medical records of 40 patients diagnosed with BTC who received palliative second-line chemotherapy with capecitabine and cisplatin. The median overall survival from the start of second-line chemotherapy was 6.3 months. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 17.9 months. The median progression-free survival during second-line chemotherapy was 2.3 months. Nine (30%) patients experienced adverse events of grade ≥3. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score was an independent predictor of adverse events. Combination therapy with capecitabine and cisplatin may be an option for second-line chemotherapy in some of patients with advanced BTC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Local triple-combination therapy results in tumour regression and prevents recurrence in a colon cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Zhang, Yi; Artzi, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cancer therapies involve the systemic delivery of anticancer agents that neither discriminate between cancer and normal cells nor eliminate the risk of cancer recurrence. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of gene, drug and phototherapy delivered through a prophylactic hydrogel patch leads, in a colon cancer mouse model, to complete tumour remission when applied to non-resected tumours and to the absence of tumour recurrence when applied following tumour resection. The adhesive hydrogel patch enhanced the stability and provided local delivery of embedded nanoparticles. Spherical gold nanoparticles were used as a first wave of treatment to deliver siRNAs against Kras, a key oncogene driver, and rod-shaped gold nanoparticles mediated the conversion of near-infrared radiation into heat, causing the release of a chemotherapeutic as well as thermally induced cell damage. This local, triple-combination therapy can be adapted to other cancer cell types and to molecular targets associated with disease progression.

  13. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy in combination with panitumumab for patients with resectable esophageal cancer: the PACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, Sil; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; van der Vliet, Hans J.; Kapiteijn, Ellen; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT

  14. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy in combination with panitumumab for patients with resectable esophageal cancer: the PACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordes, S.; Berge Henegouwen, M.I. van; Hulshof, M.C.C.; Bergman, J.J.; Vliet, H.J. van der; Kapiteijn, E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Richel, D.J.; Klinkenbijl, J.H.G.; Meijer, S.L.; Wilmink, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a

  15. [A patient with axillary node metastasis from breast cancer who responded to trastuzumab/capecitabine combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Aya; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Imai, Shunsuke; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    We report an 83-year-old female with axillary node metastasis from breast cancer who responded to trastuzumab/ capecitabine combination therapy. In April 2007, she underwent surgery and at the same time axillary node metastasis was detected. As there was no hormone sensitivity, chemotherapy was selected, and administration of capecitabine at 1,800 mg/day(2 divided doses)and trastuzumab was initiated. Thoracic CT at the end of the six courses revealed the disappearance of the axillary node metastasis. No major side effects were produced. It was concluded from these findings that trastuzumab/capecitabine combination therapy could be safely and effectively administered to elderly advanced breast cancer patients.

  16. Progress of clinical research on targeted therapy combined with thoracic radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang HQ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongqing Zhuang,1,* Xianzhi Zhao,1,* Lujun Zhao,1 Joe Y Chang,2 Ping Wang1 1Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, and Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this paper Abstract: The combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy is an important approach in the application of targeted therapy in clinical practice, and represents an important opportunity for the development of radiotherapy itself. Numerous agents, including epidermal growth factor receptor, monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antiangiogenic therapies, have been used for targeted therapy. A number of studies of radiotherapy combined with targeted therapy in non-small-cell lung carcinoma have been completed or are ongoing. This paper briefly summarizes the drugs involved and the important related clinical research, and indicates that considerable progress has been made with the joint efforts of the two disciplines. Many issues, including drug selection, identification of populations most likely to benefit, timing of administration of medication, and side effects of treatment require further investigation. However, further fundamental research and accumulation of clinical data will provide a more comprehensive understanding of these therapies. Targeted therapy in combination with radiotherapy has a bright future. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, radiotherapy, epidermal growth factor receptor, monoclonal antibody, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic therapies

  17. Combination of MPPa-PDT and HSV1-TK/GCV gene therapy on prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Chen, Weiwen; Lin, Yani; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2018-02-01

    We combined pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester, photodynamic therapy (MPPa-PDT), 670 ± 10 nm, 4 mW/cm 2 , with herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV1-TK/GCV) to improve the therapeutic effect. We built HSV1-TK expression vector GV230-TK and we observed a bright green fluorescence under fluorescence microscope. It indicated the recombinant plasmid was transfected into PC-3M prostate cancer cells successfully. As the abundant glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) promoter in PC-3M cells can cause active expression of HSV1-TK, cell protein was collected for western blot to determine the expression of HSV1-TK. In CCK-8 assay (n = 6), the cell survival rate of combined treatment group was about 10%, less than that of pure MPPa-PDT group (23%) and pure HSV1-TK/GCV group (35%) (t test, P PDT group (about 22%) and pure HSV1-TK/GCV group (about 19%). The results showed that the combination of the two treatments can effectively improve the cytocidal effect in PC-3M cells.

  18. Thermoradiation therapy in combined modality treatment for locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choynzonov, E. L.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Spivakova, I. O.

    2017-09-01

    The article presents the results of combined modality treatment for stage III-IV (T3N0-2M0) laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. All patients (55) were divided into 2 groups. Group I patients (n = 25) received pre-operative thermoradiation therapy and Group II patients (n = 30) received pre-operative radiation therapy alone. The follow-up period was 6-24 months. In Group I patients, partial tumor regression was achieved in 21 (84%) patients and stable disease was observed in 4 (16%) patients. In group II patients, partial tumor regression and stable disease were diagnosed in 18 (60%) and 12 (49%) patients, respectively. Local and regional recurrences occurred in 1 patient (4%) of Group I within the first year of follow-up and in 11 patients of Group II (7 within the first year and 4 within two years of follow-up). The 2-year overall survival rate was 100% in Group I patients and 76.7% ± 10.1% in Group II patients. Disease-free survival rates were 96.6 ± 3.5% and 63.3 ± 13.9%, respectively.

  19. Progress of Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined with Surgery in Non-small Cell
Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi WANG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading form of cancer in terms of both incidence and cancer-related deaths. For patients with resectable IIIa/N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, guidelines in and abroad recommend multidisciplinary team treatment, including surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy or other comprehensive treatment. Newly published evidences prove that neoadjuvant therapy can improve outcomes of NSCLC patients significantly, with advangtages in tolerability and compliance medication. Neoadjuvant therapy has been adopted mainly in locally advanced NSCLC, especially in stages IIIa/N2 patients, and chemotherapy of 2-4 cycles has become the basic pattern. Neoadjuvant therapy does not increase the concomitant complications of chemotherapy and surgery. However, challenges still exist in determining subsequent surgical timing, approach and extent of resection.

  20. Combination therapy approaches to target insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Baxter, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling as a therapeutic target has been widely studied and clinically tested. Despite the vast amount of literature supporting the biological role of IGF1R in breast cancer, effective clinical translation in targeting its activity as a cancer therapy has not been successful. The intrinsic complexity of cancer cell signaling mediated by many tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors that work together to modulate each other and intracellular downstream mediators in the cell highlights that studying IGF1R expression and activity as a prognostic factor and therapeutic target in isolation is certainly associated with problems. This review discusses the current literature and clinical trials associated with IGF-1 signaling and attempts to look at new ways of designing novel IGF1R-directed breast cancer therapy approaches to target its activity 
and/or intracellular downstream signaling pathways in IGF1R-expressing breast cancers. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. [New Combination Therapy to Improve the Functional Preservation Rate of the Larynx in Laryngeal, Oropharyngeal, and Hypopharyngeal Cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaka, Tohru

    2015-10-01

    A new combination therapy has been developed to achieve high overall survival and functional laryngeal preservation rates in head and neck cancers, which require laryngectomy. In order to treat the primary site without resection, superselective intra-arterial infusions with DCF anterogradely and 60 mg/m2 of DOC and 60 mg/m2 of CDDP via the femoral artery on day 1 were administered, followed by continuous intravenous instillation of 750 mg/m2/day of 5-FU for 5 days from day 2. The 5- year survival rate was 70.4% in laryngeal cancer, 72.8% in oropharyngeal cancer, and 68.5% in hypopharyngeal cancer. The 5-year functional laryngeal preservation rate was 71.0% in laryngeal cancer, 63.4% in oropharyngeal cancer, and 65.2% in hypopharyngeal cancer. In addition to regional lymph node control, a thorough neck dissection was performed. Good overall survival and functional laryngeal preservation rates were achieved.

  2. Effects of combination therapy with vesnarinone, 5-FU and radiation on growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Michio; Nio, Yoshinori; Minari, Yoshimitsu; Iguchi, Chikage; Sasaki, Susumu; Hirahara, Noriyuki; Tamura, Katsuhiro [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    We examined the combination effect of Vesnarinone (AZ, 5 mg/day), 5-FU (40 mg/kg) and radiation (RT, 8 Gy/body) for human pancreatic cancer lines which were subcutaneously xenografted in nude mice. AZ alone did not inhibit their growth, but a combination of AZ, 5-FU and RT showed a significant inhibition. Pathological study demonstrated that the ductal structure became more prominent in the poorly differentiated tumors after Vesnarinone treatment. In conclusion, vesnarinone may be a beneficial agent for the differentiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, especially in combination with 5-FU and/or RT. (author)

  3. Tumor cryoablation in combination with natural killer cells therapy and Herceptin in patients with HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuzhen; Niu, Lizhi; Xu, Kecheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yingqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Lin, Mao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the clinical benefits of a combination of tumor cryoablation with natural killer (NK) cells therapy and Herceptin for human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. From May 2015 to May 2016, 48 patients who met the enrollment criteria were assigned to three groups (n=16): cryoablation group (group I), cryoablation-NK cells therapy group (group II) and cryoablation-NK cells therapy-Herceptin group (group III). Safety and short-term effects were evaluated. All the adverse effects were manageable and acceptable. The three-therapy combination treatment not only yielded good clinical efficacy, it also improved the quality of life; reduced levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs); reduced carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) expression; enhanced immune function significantly. Furthermore, it can resulte in significant prolongation of progression free survival (PFS). This is the first clinical study to demonstrate the benefit of the three-therapy combination of tumor cryoablation, NK cells therapy, and Herceptin for HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A nanomedicine based combination therapy based on QLPVM peptide functionalized liposomal tamoxifen and doxorubicin against Luminal A breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyou; Chen, Xianhui; Yang, Xiucong; Gao, Wei; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Zhifei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Though combination chemotherapy or antitumor nanomedicine is extensively investigated, their combining remains in infancy. Additionally, enhanced delivery of estrogen or its analogs to tumor with highly-expressed estrogen-receptor (ER) is seldom considered, despite its necessity for ER-positive breast cancer treatment. Here, nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM conjugated liposomal tamoxifen (TAM) and doxorubicin (DOX) was designed and testified, where the penta-peptide was derived from Ku70 Bax-binding domain. Quantitative, semi-quantitative and qualitative approaches demonstrated the enhanced endocytosis and cytotoxicity of QLPVM conjugated sterically stabilized liposomes (QLPVM-SSLs) in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism studies of QLPVM excluded the possible electrostatic, hydrophobic or receptor-ligand interactions. However, as a weak cell-penetrating peptide, QLPVM significantly induced drug release from QLPVM-SSLs during their interaction with cells, which was favorable for drug internalization. These findings suggested that the nanomedicine based combination therapy using QLPVM-SSL-TAM and QLPVM-SSL-DOX might provide a rational strategy for Luminal A breast cancer. Breast cancer remains a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Although combined therapy using hormonal antagonist and chemotherapy is the norm nowadays, the use of these agents together in a single delivery system has not been tested. Here, the authors investigated this approach using QLPVM conjugated liposomes in in-vitro and in-vivo models. The positive findings may provide a novel direction for breast cancer treatment in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PSMA-specific theranostic nanoplex for combination of TRAIL gene and 5-FC prodrug therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihang; Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Banerjee, Sangeeta R; Pomper, Martin G; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality and there is a critical unmet need for effective treatments. We have developed a theranostic nanoplex platform for combined imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Our prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted nanoplex is designed to deliver plasmid DNA encoding tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), together with bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) as a prodrug enzyme. Nanoplex specificity was tested using two variants of human PC3 prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumor xenografts, one with high PSMA expression and the other with negligible expression levels. The expression of EGFP-TRAIL was demonstrated by fluorescence optical imaging and real-time PCR. Noninvasive (19)F MR spectroscopy detected the conversion of the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by bCD. The combination strategy of TRAIL gene and 5-FC/bCD therapy showed significant inhibition of the growth of prostate cancer cells and tumors. These data demonstrate that the PSMA-specific theranostic nanoplex can deliver gene therapy and prodrug enzyme therapy concurrently for precision medicine in metastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 {mu}Ci. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  7. Theranostic Nanoparticles Loaded with Imaging Probes and Rubrocurcumin for Combined Cancer Therapy by Folate Receptor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Diego; Protti, Nicoletta; Franck, Morgane; Stefania, Rachele; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Deagostino, Annamaria; Aime, Silvio; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta

    2017-04-06

    The combination of different therapeutic modalities is a promising option to combat the recurrence of tumors. In this study, polylactic and polyglycolic acid nanoparticles were used for the simultaneous delivery of a boron-curcumin complex (RbCur) and an amphiphilic gadolinium complex into tumor cells with the aim of performing boron and gadolinium neutron capture therapy (NCT) in conjunction with the additional antiproliferative effects of curcumin. Furthermore, the use of Gd complexes allows magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of the amount of B and Gd internalized by tumor cells. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were targeted to ovarian cancer (IGROV-1) cells through folate receptors, by including in the formulation a PEGylated phospholipid functionalized with the folate moiety. NCT was performed on IGROV-1 cells internalizing 6.4 and 78.6 μg g-1 of 10 B and 157 Gd, respectively. The synergic action of neutron treatment and curcumin cytotoxicity was shown to result in a significant therapeutic improvement. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Systems Analysis of Drug-Induced Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Reprogramming Following Targeted Mono- and Combination Anti-Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Goltsov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are key drivers of cancer progression and targets for drug therapy. A major challenge in anti-RTK treatment is the dependence of drug effectiveness on co-expression of multiple RTKs which defines resistance to single drug therapy. Reprogramming of the RTK network leading to alteration in RTK co-expression in response to drug intervention is a dynamic mechanism of acquired resistance to single drug therapy in many cancers. One route to overcome this resistance is combination therapy. We describe the results of a joint in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations on the efficacy of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and their combination to target the HER2 receptors. Computational modelling revealed that these two drugs alone and in combination differentially suppressed RTK network activation depending on RTK co-expression. Analyses of mRNA expression in SKOV3 ovarian tumour xenograft showed up-regulation of HER3 following treatment. Considering this in a computational model revealed that HER3 up-regulation reprograms RTK kinetics from HER2 homodimerisation to HER3/HER2 heterodimerisation. The results showed synergy of the trastuzumab and pertuzumab combination treatment of the HER2 overexpressing tumour can be due to an independence of the combination effect on HER3/HER2 composition when it changes due to drug-induced RTK reprogramming.

  9. Re-irradiation using proton beam therapy combined with weekly intra-arterial chemotherapy for recurrent oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Mitsudo, Kenji; Kimura, Kanako; Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Ono, Takashi; Azami, Yusuke; Takayama, Kanako; Hirose, Katsumi; Yabuuchi, Tomonori; Suzuki, Motohisa; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Hitoshi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hareyama, Masato; Tohnai, Iwai

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy and toxicities of re-irradiation using proton beam therapy combined with weekly intra-arterial chemotherapy for recurrent oral cancer. Between October 2009 and July 2014, 34 patients who had recurrent oral cancer were treated by proton beam therapy combined with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center, Japan. For all patients, the median follow-up was 25 months (range, 3-77 months). After treatment, 22 patients (65%) achieved a complete response, and 12 patients (35%) achieved a partial response at the primary tumor site. One-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 62% and 42%, respectively. One-year and 2-year LC rates were 77% and 60%, respectively. No treatment-related deaths were observed during the treatment and follow-up periods. Re-irradiation using proton beam therapy combined with weekly intra-arterial chemotherapy improved OS and local control rates compared with other treatment modalities and could become a new treatment modality for patients with recurrent oral cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Multinucleation and Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition Alleviate Resistance to Combined Cabazitaxel and Antiandrogen Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah K; Pu, Hong; Penticuff, Justin C; Cao, Zheng; Horbinski, Craig; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2016-02-15

    Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently develop therapeutic resistance to taxane chemotherapy and antiandrogens. Cabazitaxel is a second-line taxane chemotherapeutic agent that provides additional survival benefits to patients with advanced disease. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanism of action of combined cabazitaxel and androgen receptor (AR) targeting in preclinical models of advanced prostate cancer. We found that cabazitaxel induced mitotic spindle collapse and multinucleation by targeting the microtubule depolymerizing kinesins and inhibiting AR. In androgen-responsive tumors, treatment with the AR inhibitor, enzalutamide, overcame resistance to cabazitaxel. Combination treatment of human CRPC xenografts with cabazitaxel and enzalutamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) and led to multinucleation, while retaining nuclear AR. In a transgenic mouse model of androgen-responsive prostate cancer, cabazitaxel treatment induced MET, glandular redifferentiation, and AR nuclear localization that was inhibited by androgen deprivation. Collectively, our preclinical studies demonstrate that prostate tumor resistance to cabazitaxel can be overcome by antiandrogen-mediated EMT-MET cycling in androgen-sensitive tumors but not in CRPC. Moreover, AR splice variants may preclude patients with advanced disease from responding to cabazitaxel chemotherapy and antiandrogen combination therapy. This evidence enables a significant insight into therapeutic cross-resistance to taxane chemotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy in advanced prostate cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Cediranib, a pan-VEGFR inhibitor, and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, in combination therapy for high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, S Percy; Liu, Joyce F; Lee, Jung-Min; Matulonis, Ursula A; Kohn, Elise C

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 22,000 women are diagnosed annually with ovarian cancer in the United States. Initially chemo-sensitive, recurrent disease ultimately becomes chemoresistant and may kill ~14,000 women annually. Molecularly targeted therapy with cediranib (AZD2171), a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, 2, and 3 signaling blocker, and olaparib (AZD2281), a poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, administered orally in combination has shown anti-tumor activity in the treatment of high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). This combination has the potential to change the treatment of HGSOC. Preclinical and clinical studies of single agent cediranib and olaparib or their combination are reviewed. Data are presented from peer-reviewed published manuscripts, completed and ongoing early phase clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and related recent abstracts. Advances in the treatment of HGSOC that improve progression-free and overall survival have proven elusive despite examination of molecularly targeted therapy. HGSOC patients with deleterious germline or somatic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCAm) are most responsive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). PARPi combined with angiogenesis inhibition improved anti-cancer response and duration in both BRCAm and BRCA wild type HGSOC patients, compared to olaparib single agent treatment, demonstrating therapeutic chemical and contextual synthetic lethality.

  12. Combined therapy with disintegrin and melphalan as a new strategy in inhibition of endometrial cancer cell line (Ishikawa growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołczyński Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer in females with prevalence of 22 in 100,000 women. The etiology of the cancer remains unclear. Despite significant progress towards understanding the patho-mechanism of the disease, effective treatment is still lacking. The results of the study suggest that combined treatment of Ishikawa cells for 24 h with disintegrin and then for 24 h with melphalan severely inhibits important biological functions of the cells. We showed that such strategy have a potent cytotoxic effect. The mechanism of process undergoes probably through inhibition of integrin - dependent signaling. In this study we shown down regulation of Shc and FAK proteins in cells treated with echistatin and melphalan. It suggests that signaling pathways that involve Shc and FAK participation may represent target for antineoplastic strategy. The functional significance of the combined treatment of Ishikwa cells with echistatin and melphalan was found at the level of collagen biosynthesis. Decreased biosynthesis of collagen in extracellular matrix may suppress cell growth and induce apoptosis. The treatment with echistatin and melphalan also showed decreased expression of IGF receptor in comparison to the cells treated with both compounds separately. The data presented suggest that combined therapy with disintegrin - echistatin and alkyalting drug - mephalan may represent a new approach to more effective and safe cancer therapy.

  13. Multinucleation and Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial-Transition Alleviate Resistance to Combined Cabazitaxel and Antiandrogen Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah K.; Pu, Hong; Penticuff, Justin C.; Cao, Zheng; Horbinski, Craig; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) frequently develop therapeutic resistance to taxane chemotherapy and antiandrogens. Cabazitaxel (CBZ) is a second-line taxane chemotherapeutic agent that provides additional survival benefits to patients with advanced disease. In this study we sought to identify the mechanism of action of combined CBZ and androgen receptor (AR) targeting, in pre-clinical models of advanced prostate cancer. We found tha CBZ induced mitotic spindle collapse and multi-nucleation by targeting the microtubule de-polymerizing kinesins and inhibiting AR. In androgen responsive tumors, treatment with the AR inhibitor, Enzalutamide, overcame resistance to CBZ. Combination treatment of human CRPC xenografts with CBZ and Enzalutamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to mesenchymal-epithelial-transition (MET) and led to multi-nucleation, while retaining nuclear AR. In a transgenic mouse model of androgen-responsive prostate cancer, CBZ treatment induced MET, glandular re-differentiation and AR nuclear localization that was inhibited by androgen deprivation. Collectively, our pre-clinical studies demonstrate that prostate tumor resistance to Cabazitaxel can be overcome by antiandrogen-mediated EMT-MET cycling in androgen-sensitive tumors, but not in CRPC. Moreover, AR splice variants may preclude patients with advanced disease from responding to Cabazitaxel chemotherapy and antiandrogen combination therapy. This evidence enables a significant insight into therapeutic cross-resistance to taxane chemotherapy and androgen-deprivation therapy in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26645563

  14. [Breast Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine Monotherapy after Failure of Combination Therapy Comprising Bevacizumab and Paclitaxel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Asako; Suganuma, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of breast cancer with multiple liver metastases successfully treated with capecitabine monotherapy after failure of combination therapy comprising bevacizumab (Bev) and paclitaxel (PTX). In March 2012, a 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer with massive pleural effusion. Histological examination showed invasive ductal carcinoma (scirrhous carcinoma) that was positive for hormonal receptor but negative for HER2 expression, and the nuclear grade was 1. She first received chemotherapy to decrease the tumor volume followed by hormonal therapy. After progression, imaging studies showed increased multiple lung and liver metastases and pleural effusion. Subsequently, treatment with combination of Bev and PTX was started from July 2014. After 4 courses of the combination therapy, multiple liver metastases were unchanged, but her liver function was impaired. Hence, she received capecitabine monotherapy (1,800 mg bis in die [BID]; 2-week administration followed by a week of rest). Her liver function improved early, and a partial response (PR) in the multiple liver metastases was achieved 3 months after initiation of therapy. Furthermore, the metastatic lesions were well controlled 4 months later. These findings suggest that the sensitivity to an anticancer agent greatly varies among patients.

  15. Rapid tumor necrosis and massive hemorrhage induced by bevacizumab and paclitaxel combination therapy in a case of advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mayu Ono, Tokiko Ito, Toshiharu Kanai, Koichi Murayama, Hiroshi Koyama, Kazuma Maeno, Yasuhiro Mochizuki, Asumi Iesato, Toru Hanamura, Toshihiro Okada, Takayuki Watanabe, Ken-ichi ItoDivision of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery (II, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, JapanAbstract: Bevacizumab when combined with chemotherapy exerts significant activity against many solid tumors through tumor angiogenesis inhibition; however, it can induce severe side effects. We report the rare case of a 27-year-old premenopausal woman with locally advanced breast cancer that was marked by rapid tumor necrosis followed by massive hemorrhage shortly after bevacizumab and paclitaxel administration. On the basis of histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen and computed tomography findings, she was diagnosed with stage IV estrogen and progesterone receptor-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-positive breast cancer with multiple organ metastases when she had entered gestational week 24. Cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin®, fluorouracil therapy was initiated, but multiple liver metastases continued to progress. A healthy fetus was delivered by induced delivery and trastuzumab-based treatment was initiated. Although the multiple liver metastases were controlled successfully by trastuzumab combined with paclitaxel, the primary tumor continued to expand even after subsequent administration of three other treatment regimens including anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 agents and cytotoxic drugs. To inhibit primary tumor growth, a combination therapy with paclitaxel and bevacizumab was subsequently initiated. Following therapy initiation, however, the large tumor occupying the patient's entire left breast became necrotic and ulcerated rapidly. Furthermore, massive hemorrhage from the tumor occurred 5 weeks after bevacizumab-based therapy initiation. Although hemostasis was achieved by manual

  16. Novel Cancer Therapeutics with Allosteric Modulation of the Mitochondrial C-Raf-DAPK Complex by Raf Inhibitor Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Ta; Chuang, Mei-Jen; Tang, Shou-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Chen, Yu-Chi; Sun, Guang-Huan; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Ho, Jar-Yi; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Rong; Lin, Chung-Chih; Chang, Sun-Yran; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Cha, Tai-Lung

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of cells. Mitochondrial C-Raf is a potential cancer therapeutic target, as it regulates mitochondrial function and is localized to the mitochondria by its N-terminal domain. However, Raf inhibitor monotherapy can induce S338 phosphorylation of C-Raf (pC-Raf(S338)) and impede therapy. This study identified the interaction of C-Raf with S308 phosphorylated DAPK (pDAPK(S308)), which together became colocalized in the mitochondria to facilitate mitochondrial remodeling. Combined use of the Raf inhibitors sorafenib and GW5074 had synergistic anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo, but targeted mitochondrial function, rather than the canonical Raf signaling pathway. C-Raf depletion in knockout MEF(C-Raf-/-) or siRNA knockdown ACHN renal cancer cells abrogated the cytotoxicity of combination therapy. Crystal structure simulation showed that GW5074 bound to C-Raf and induced a C-Raf conformational change that enhanced sorafenib-binding affinity. In the presence of pDAPK(S308), this drug-target interaction compromised the mitochondrial targeting effect of the N-terminal domain of C-Raf, which induced two-hit damages to cancer cells. First, combination therapy facilitated pC-Raf(S338) and pDAPK(S308) translocation from mitochondria to cytoplasm, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Second, ROS facilitated PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of pDAPK(S308) to DAPK. PP2A then dissociated from the C-Raf-DAPK complex and induced profound cancer cell death. Increased pDAPK(S308) modification was also observed in renal cancer tissues, which correlated with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival in renal cancer patients. Besides mediating the anticancer effect, pDAPK(S308) may serve as a predictive biomarker for Raf inhibitors combination therapy, suggesting an ideal preclinical model that is worthy of clinical translation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. A multicenter phase II trial of gemcitabine and candesartan combination therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: GECA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Ijichi, Hideaki; Sasaki, Takashi; Takahara, Naminatsu; Ito, Yukiko; Matsubara, Saburo; Uchino, Rie; Yagioka, Hiroshi; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Miyabayashi, Koji; Mizuno, Suguru; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Sasahira, Naoki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-10-01

    Our retrospective study and phase I trial of gemcitabine and candesartan combination therapy suggested the inhibition of renin-angiotensin system potentially has a role in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. The aim of this multicenter phase II trial was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine and candesartan combination therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically proven advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Gemcitabine was administered at a dose of 1,000 mg/m(2) over 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15 and oral candesartan at a dose of 16 mg in normotensive patients, and 8 mg initially in hypertensive patients, with dose escalation to 16 mg allowed, from days 1 to 28, repeated every 4 weeks. A total of 35 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Overall response rate and disease control rate were 11.4 % and 62.9 %. The median PFS and OS were 4.3 and 9.1 months with 1-year survival rate of 34.2 %. The median PFS was significantly longer in patients receiving 16 mg compared with 8 mg of candesartan (4.6 vs. 3.5 months, p=0.031). Major severe toxicities were neutropenia (23 %), leukopenia (17 %) and thrombocytopenia (11 %). Grade 2 hypotension was observed in 3 patients (9 %) and candesartan was discontinued in 2 patients due to hypotension. Conclusions In this multicenter phase 2 trial, gemcitabine and candesartan combination therapy was tolerable but failed to demonstrate activity against advanced pancreatic cancer. (UMIN CTR: UMIN000005580).

  18. In vitro combined effect of Doxorubicin and sulfonated zinc Phthalocyanine-mediated photodynamic therapy on MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniogo, Eric Chekwube; George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2017-10-01

    Doxorubicin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and anticancer drug used to treat a variety of human malignancies like breast cancer and leukaemia. Unfortunately, a dose-dependent side effect of this drug is common, representing a major obstacle to its use despite its therapeutic efficacy. Photodynamic therapy is an emerging non-invasive potential adjuvant for conventional cancer treatment. In an attempt to circumvent the dose-limiting effect of doxorubicin, this study aimed to investigate cellular anticancer activity of doxorubicin and sulfonated zinc phthalocyanine-mediated photodynamic therapy on MCF-7 cells alone and in combination. Furthermore, we investigated the cell death pathway resulting from the combination treatment. MCF-7 cells were incubated with 0.5 µM concentration of doxorubicin for 20 h, afterwards, various concentrations of sulfonated zinc phthalocyanine were added and incubated for 4 h. Cells were irradiated using a 681.5 nm diode laser at 4.53 mW/cm(2) for 18 min 24 s (5 J/cm(2)). Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue assay and homogeneous adenosine triphosphate quantitation assay, respectively, while qualitative changes in cellular morphology were observed under inverted light microscopy. Cellular DNA damage was assessed under fluorescent microscopy and Annexin V/propidium iodide stain was used to investigate the cell death pathway. Findings from this study shown that combined treatment with doxorubicin and photodynamic therapy was more effective in inhibiting the proliferation and growth of MCF-7 cells. Overall, the results indicate that combination of smaller dose of doxorubicin with photodynamic therapy is a promising combined treatment strategy for breast carcinoma. However, this combination warrants further investigation.

  19. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential for Enhanced Therapeutic Activity of Biological Cancer Therapies with Doxycycline Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Sampath, Padma; Yan, Xinmin; Thorne, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant strides made in the clinical translation of adoptive immune cell therapies, it is apparent that many tumors incorporate strategies to avoid recognition by receptors expressed on the immune cells, such as NKG2D. Strategies that stabilize the expression of ligands for these receptors may enhance the therapeutic potential of these and related therapies. Doxycycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that act to cleave the extracellular domain of MICA/B, ligands for the NKG2D receptor. Doxycycline treatment blocked shedding of MICA/B from a panel of human tumor cells, but also acted to increase their expression and cell surface translocation, possibly through its action on ATM. This meant that many tumor cells displayed increased MICA/B expression and enhanced susceptibility to CIK cells. Interestingly, doxycycline also selectively enhanced the replication of oncolytic vaccinia in many tumor cell lines, leading to increased sensitivity to these therapies. Combination (CIK-oncolytic vaccinia) therapies used in conjunction with doxycyline led to increased anti-tumor effects. The unexpected and pleiotropic beneficial anti-tumor effects of doxycycline on both immune cell and oncolytic viral therapies make it an excellent candidate for rapid clinical testing. PMID:23282955

  1. Clinical safety of combined therapy of immune checkpoint inhibitors and Viscum album L. therapy in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronicke, Anja; Steele, Megan L; Grah, Christian; Matthes, Burkhard; Schad, Friedemann

    2017-12-13

    Despite improvement of tumour response rates in patients with progressive and metastatic cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICM) induce toxicities in cancer patients. Viscum album L. (VA, mistletoe) extracts are applied as add-on cancer therapy especially in German speaking countries and within integrative and anthroposophical concepts with the goal to improve quality of life. The primary objective of this pilot observational cohort study was to determine the rate of adverse events (AE) related to ICM therapy with and without VA in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer in a certified Cancer Center. ICM or combined ICM/VA therapies were applied in patients with progressive or metastatic cancer. AE rates of both therapy groups were compared. A total of sixteen cancer patients were treated with ICM: nivolumab (75%), ipilimumab (19%) or pembrolizumab (6%). The median age of the study population was 64 years (IQR 57.8; 69.3); 44% were male. Of the sixteen patients receiving ICM, nine patients received additional VA (56%; ICM/VA group) and seven did not (44%; ICM group). No statistically significant differences were seen between groups with respect to AE-rates (67% ICM/VA versus 71% ICM). Adjusted multivariate regression analysis revealed that concomitant application of VA did not alter the AE rate in ICM treated patients. 85% of AEs were expected ICM reactions. No AEs of grade 3 or greater were documented for the total study cohort. This is the first study evaluating the clinical safety profile of ICM in combination with VA in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer. The overall AE rate of the study cohort is comparable to AE rates of ICM treatment in the literature. Our data indicate a first impression that concomitant VA application may not alter ICM-induced AE rates. However, the nature of this study does not allow excluding possible immunological interactions between ICM and VA. Further prospective trials in larger study cohorts should focus on the

  2. Functional oncogene signatures guide rationally designed combination therapies to synergistically induce breast cancer cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Stephen T.; Kratche, Zachary R.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Wilson, Robert C.; Haddad, Ramsi; Gray, Joe W.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    A critical first step in the personalized approach to cancer treatment is the identification of activated oncogenes that drive each tumor. The Identification of driver oncogenes on a patient-by-patient basis is complicated by the complexity of the cancer genome and the fact that a particular genetic alteration may serve as a driver event only in a subset of tumors that harbor it. In this study, we set out to identify the complete set of functional oncogenes in a small panel of breast cancer cell lines. The cell lines in this panel were chosen because they each contain a known receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) oncogene. To identify additional drivers, we integrated functional genetic screens with copy number and mutation analysis, and cancer genome knowledge databases. The resulting functional oncogene signatures were able to predict responsiveness of cell lines to targeted inhibitors. However, as single agents, these drugs had little effect on clonogenic potential. By contrast, treatment with drug combinations that targeted multiple oncogenes in the signatures, even at very low doses, resulted in the induction of apoptosis and striking synergistic effects on clonogenicity. In particular, targeting a driver oncogene that mediates AKT phosphorylation in combination with targeting the anti-apoptotic BCL2L1 protein had profound effects on cell viability. Importantly, because the synergistic induction of cell death was achieved using low levels of each individual drug, it suggests that a therapeutic strategy based on this approach could avoid the toxicities that have been associated with the combined use of multiple-targeted agents. PMID:27153554

  3. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative...... highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation...... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  4. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  5. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, Sil, E-mail: s.kordes@amc.uva.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vliet, Hans J. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapiteijn, Ellen [Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G. [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Sybren L. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilmink, Johanna W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  6. Smart tetrazole-based antibacterial nanoparticles as multifunctional drug carriers for cancer combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakerzadeh, Elham; Salehi, Roya; Mahkam, Mehrdad

    2017-12-01

    Due to multidrug resistance of cancer tissues and immune-suppression of cancerous patients during chemotherapy in one hand and the use of tetrazole derivatives in medicine because of its anticancer, antifungal, and antiviral properties, on the other, we were encouraged to design novel smart antibacterial nanocomposites-based polymer of tetrazole as dual anticancer drug delivery systems. The structures of nanocomposites characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR, FESEM-EDX, and TGA analyzes and antibacterial activity of smart carriers were evaluated by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against some bacteria and fungi. Then, the pH-responsive manner of both nanocomposites was proved by checking their release profiles at pH of the physiological environment (pH 7.4) and pH of tumor tissues (mildly acidic). Finally, the potential antitumoral activity of these nanocomposite systems against MCF7 cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay and cell cycle studies. The results demonstrated that the novel developed nanocomposites not only meet our expectations about simultaneous release of two anticancer drugs according to the predicted profile but also showed antibacterial and anticancer properties in vitro experimental. Moreover, it was proved that these carriers have tremendous potential in multifunctional drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  7. Thermoresponsive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for combined modalities of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, S; Chang, P E J; Rumpel, H; Kee, I H C; Ng, R T H; Chow, P K H; Tan, C K; Ramanujan, R V

    2009-07-29

    Thermoresponsive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles loaded with anti-cancer drugs are of considerable interest for novel multi-modal cancer therapies. Such nanoparticles can be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release. Gamma-Fe(2)O(3) iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) with average sizes of 14, 19 and 43 nm were synthesized by high temperature decomposition. Composite magnetic nanoparticles (CNP) of 43 nm MNP coated with the thermoresponsive polymer poly-n-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) were prepared by dispersion polymerization of n-isopropylacrylamide monomer in the presence of the MNP. In vitro drug release of doxorubicin-(dox) loaded dehydrated CNP at temperatures below and above the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM (34 degrees C) revealed a weak dependence of drug release on swelling behavior. The particles displayed Fickian diffusion release kinetics; the maximum dox release at 42 degrees C after 101 h was 41%. In vitro simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release of therapeutically relevant quantities of dox was achieved, 14.7% of loaded dox was released in 47 min at hyperthermia temperatures. In vivo magnetic targeting of dox-loaded CNP to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a buffalo rat model was studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. In summary, the good in vitro and in vivo performance of the doxorubicin-loaded thermoresponsive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles suggests considerable promise for applications in multi-modal treatment of cancer.

  8. Thermoresponsive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for combined modalities of cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purushotham, S; Ramanujan, R V [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Chang, P E J; Tan, C K [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608 (Singapore); Rumpel, H [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608 (Singapore); Kee, I H C; Ng, R T H [Department of Experimental Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608 (Singapore); Chow, P K H [Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608 (Singapore)

    2009-07-29

    Thermoresponsive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles loaded with anti-cancer drugs are of considerable interest for novel multi-modal cancer therapies. Such nanoparticles can be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release. {gamma}- Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) with average sizes of 14, 19 and 43 nm were synthesized by high temperature decomposition. Composite magnetic nanoparticles (CNP) of 43 nm MNP coated with the thermoresponsive polymer poly-n-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) were prepared by dispersion polymerization of n-isopropylacrylamide monomer in the presence of the MNP. In vitro drug release of doxorubicin-(dox) loaded dehydrated CNP at temperatures below and above the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM (34 {sup 0}C) revealed a weak dependence of drug release on swelling behavior. The particles displayed Fickian diffusion release kinetics; the maximum dox release at 42 {sup 0}C after 101 h was 41%. In vitro simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release of therapeutically relevant quantities of dox was achieved, 14.7% of loaded dox was released in 47 min at hyperthermia temperatures. In vivo magnetic targeting of dox-loaded CNP to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a buffalo rat model was studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. In summary, the good in vitro and in vivo performance of the doxorubicin-loaded thermoresponsive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles suggests considerable promise for applications in multi-modal treatment of cancer.

  9. Combination Therapy of PPAR Ligands and Inhibitors of Arachidonic Acid in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Tauler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and five-year survival remains low. Numerous studies have shown that chronic inflammation may lead to progression of carcinogenesis. As a result of inflammatory stimulation, arachidonic acid (AA metabolism produces proliferation mediators through complex and dynamic interactions of the products of the LOX/COX enzymes. One important mediator in the activation of the AA pathways is the nuclear protein PPAR. Targeting LOX/COX enzymes and inducing activation of PPAR have resulted in significant reduction of cell growth in lung cancer cell lines. However, specific COX-inhibitors have been correlated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Clinical applications are still being explored with a novel generation of dual LOX/COX inhibitors. PPAR activation through synthetic ligands (TZDs has revealed a great mechanistic complexity since effects are produced through PPAR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Furthermore, PPAR could also be involved in regulation of COX-2. Overexpression of PPAR has reported to play a role in control of invasion and differentiation. Exploring the function of PPAR, in this new context, may provide a better mechanistic model of its role in cancer and give an opportunity to design a more efficient therapeutic approach in combination with LOX/COX inhibitors.

  10. Paclitaxel-Paclitaxel Prodrug Nanoassembly as a Versatile Nanoplatform for Combinational Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangfei; Chen, Jinling; Jiang, Mengjuan; Zhang, Na; Na, Kexin; Luo, Cong; Zhang, Ruoshi; Sun, Mengchi; Lin, Guimei; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Yan; Liu, Dan; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-12-14

    Recently, nanomedicine without drug carriers has attracted many pharmacists' attention. A novel paclitaxel-s-s-paclitaxel (PTX-s-s-PTX) conjugate with high drug loading (∼78%, w/w) was synthesized by conjugating paclitaxel to paclitaxel by using disulfide linkage. The conjugate could self-assemble into uniform nanoparticles (NPs) with 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (DiR) encapsulated within the core of PTX-s-s-PTX NPs for photothermal therapy (PTT). The DiR-loaded self-assembled nanoparticles (DSNs) had a mean diameter of about 150 nm and high stability in biological condition. A disulfide bond is utilized as a redox-responsive linkage to facilitate a rapid release of paclitaxel in tumor cells. DSNs indicated significant cytotoxicity as a result of the synergetic chemo-thermal therapy. DSNs were featured with excellent advantages, including high drug loading, redox-responsive releasing behavior of paclitaxel, capability of loading with photothermal agents, and combinational therapy with PTT. In such a potent nanosystem, prodrug and photothermal strategy are integrated into one system to facilitate the therapy efficiency.

  11. Combination of androgen deprivation therapy and radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer in the contemporary era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelillo, Rolando M; Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Bari, Berardino; Fiorentino, Alba; Arcangeli, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo

    2015-02-01

    Currently, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has a well-defined role when administered together with radiotherapy (RT): neo-adjuvant and concurrent combination for intermediate risk-disease and adjuvant therapy for high risk disease. Evidence of this association was generated by randomized trials designed and led approximately 30 years ago; thus the question which arises is how relevant and portable are these data in our current clinical practice? In the present review, we examine the pitfalls of these published randomized controlled trials, their relevance to present daily clinics, where high-dose external beam RT or brachytherapy is applied, as well as the adoption of ADT in patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Combination of Immune Checkpoint Inhibition with Metronomic Chemotherapy as a Way of Targeting Therapy-Resistant Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic resistance remains a major obstacle in treating many cancers, particularly in advanced stages. It is likely that cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs have the potential to eliminate therapy-resistant cancer cells. However, their effectiveness may be limited either by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, or by immune cell death induced by cytotoxic treatments. High-frequency low-dose (also known as metronomic chemotherapy can help improve the activity of CTLs by providing sufficient stimulation for cytotoxic immune cells without excessive depletion. Additionally, therapy-induced removal of tumor cells that compete for shared nutrients may also facilitate tumor infiltration by CTLs, further improving prognosis. Metronomic chemotherapy can also decrease the number of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment, including regulatory T cells (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Immune checkpoint inhibition can further augment anti-tumor immune responses by maintaining T cells in an activated state. Combining immune checkpoint inhibition with metronomic administration of chemotherapeutic drugs may create a synergistic effect that augments anti-tumor immune responses and clears metabolic competition. This would allow immune-mediated elimination of therapy-resistant cancer cells, an effect that may be unattainable by using either therapeutic modality alone.

  13. A Combination of Immune Checkpoint Inhibition with Metronomic Chemotherapy as a Way of Targeting Therapy-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina

    2017-10-13

    Therapeutic resistance remains a major obstacle in treating many cancers, particularly in advanced stages. It is likely that cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) have the potential to eliminate therapy-resistant cancer cells. However, their effectiveness may be limited either by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, or by immune cell death induced by cytotoxic treatments. High-frequency low-dose (also known as metronomic) chemotherapy can help improve the activity of CTLs by providing sufficient stimulation for cytotoxic immune cells without excessive depletion. Additionally, therapy-induced removal of tumor cells that compete for shared nutrients may also facilitate tumor infiltration by CTLs, further improving prognosis. Metronomic chemotherapy can also decrease the number of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Immune checkpoint inhibition can further augment anti-tumor immune responses by maintaining T cells in an activated state. Combining immune checkpoint inhibition with metronomic administration of chemotherapeutic drugs may create a synergistic effect that augments anti-tumor immune responses and clears metabolic competition. This would allow immune-mediated elimination of therapy-resistant cancer cells, an effect that may be unattainable by using either therapeutic modality alone.

  14. Enhancing Endocrine Therapy Combination Strategies for the Treatment of Postmenopausal HR+/HER2– Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Stephen K.; Simmons, Christine; McLeod, Deanna; Paterson, Alexander; Provencher, Louise; Rayson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy in women worldwide, with approximately two‐thirds having hormone receptor‐positive (HR+) tumors. New endocrine therapy (ET) strategies include combining ET agents as well as adding inhibitors targeting growth factors, angiogenesis, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3‐kinase (PI3K), or cyclin‐dependent kinase 4/6 to ET. Level 1 evidence supports use of fulvestrant plus anastrozole or palbociclib plus letrozole as first‐line therapy for HR+/HER− advanced BC with special consideration for the former in ET‐naïve patients, as well as everolimus plus exemestane or palbociclib plus fulvestrant as second‐line therapy with special consideration in select first‐line patients. Although the safety profiles of these combinations are generally predictable and manageable, both everolimus and palbociclib are associated with an increased risk of potentially serious or early‐onset toxicities requiring individualized a priori adverse event risk stratification, earlier and more rigorous agent‐specific monitoring, and patient education. Although each of these combinations improves progression‐free survival, none with the exception of anastrazole plus fulvestrant have demonstrated improved overall survival. PI3K catalytic‐α mutations assessed from circulating tumor DNA represent the first potentially viable serum biomarker for the selection of ET combinations, and new data demonstrate the feasibility of this minimally invasive technique as an alternative to traditional tissue analysis. Therapeutic ratios of select ET combinations support their use in first‐ and second‐line settings, but optimal sequencing has yet to be determined. Implications for Practice. Emerging data show that new endocrine therapy (ET) combinations can improve progression‐free and overall survival outcomes in patients with hormone receptor‐positive, HER2‐negative (HR+/HER−) advanced breast cancer

  15. Dual Protective and Cytotoxic Benefits of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Combination with Chemotherapy/Radiotherapy for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendijani, Fatemeh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in the world, and scientists seek innovative treatment strategies with higher efficacy and lower toxicity than the existing therapeutic agents. In this way, stem cell researchers try to reveal new pathways that will eventually benefit patients. Stem cell research has proven that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anticancer activities, and their protein-rich secretome showed similar effects. MSCs also secrete cytokines that play an active role in healing and regeneration processes. Because of their known plasticity, MSCs display a variety of characteristics and functions in different environments, depending on their interactions with various cell types and tissues. Therefore, we hypothesize that MSC therapy in combination with anticancer medicines can potentiate cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. In addition, because of their regenerative capacity, MSCs can protect normal tissues from adverse cytotoxic drug reactions. They may also help rescue injured tissues from these toxic damages or systemic pathological events that occur during cancer treatment. MSC therapy may double the beneficial effects on cancer and normal cells. As our knowledge of systems biology and biotechnological methodology is progressing, this idea can move forward as a treatment option.

  16. Potential Combinational Anti-Cancer Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Traditional Chinese Medicine Sun-Bai-Pi Extract and Cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chin-Hung; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chung, Meng-Chi; Chang, Jing-Fen; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional lung cancer treatments involve chemical or radiation therapies after surgical tumor removal; however, these procedures often kill normal cells as well. Recent studies indicate that chemotherapies, when combined with Traditional Chinese Medicines, may offer a new way to treat cancer. In vitro tests measuring the induction of autophagy and/or apoptosis were used to examine the cytotoxicity of SBPE, commonly used for lung inflammation on A549 cell line. The results indicated that intercellular levels of p62 and Atg12 were increased, LC3-I was cleaved into LC3-II, and autophagy was induced with SBPE only. After 24 hours, the apoptotic mechanism was induced. If the Cisplatin was added after cells reached the autophagy state, we observed synergistic effects of the two could achieve sufficient death of lung cancer cells. Therefore, the Cisplatin dosage used to induce apoptosis could be reduced by half, and the amount of time needed to achieve the inhibitory concentration of 50% was also half that of the original. In addition to inducing autophagy within a shortened period of time, the SBPE and chemotherapy drug combination therapy was able to achieve the objective of rapid low-dosage cancer cell elimination. Besides, SBPE was applied with Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel, and found that the combination treatment indeed achieve improved lung cancer cell killing effects. However, SBPE may also be less toxic to normal cells.

  17. Potential Combinational Anti-Cancer Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Traditional Chinese Medicine Sun-Bai-Pi Extract and Cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Tseng

    Full Text Available Traditional lung cancer treatments involve chemical or radiation therapies after surgical tumor removal; however, these procedures often kill normal cells as well. Recent studies indicate that chemotherapies, when combined with Traditional Chinese Medicines, may offer a new way to treat cancer. In vitro tests measuring the induction of autophagy and/or apoptosis were used to examine the cytotoxicity of SBPE, commonly used for lung inflammation on A549 cell line. The results indicated that intercellular levels of p62 and Atg12 were increased, LC3-I was cleaved into LC3-II, and autophagy was induced with SBPE only. After 24 hours, the apoptotic mechanism was induced. If the Cisplatin was added after cells reached the autophagy state, we observed synergistic effects of the two could achieve sufficient death of lung cancer cells. Therefore, the Cisplatin dosage used to induce apoptosis could be reduced by half, and the amount of time needed to achieve the inhibitory concentration of 50% was also half that of the original. In addition to inducing autophagy within a shortened period of time, the SBPE and chemotherapy drug combination therapy was able to achieve the objective of rapid low-dosage cancer cell elimination. Besides, SBPE was applied with Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel, and found that the combination treatment indeed achieve improved lung cancer cell killing effects. However, SBPE may also be less toxic to normal cells.

  18. Combining vasculature disrupting agent and toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anushree; Lee, Hyunseung; Cho, Mi Young; Park, Cheongsoo; Korm, Sovannarith; Lee, Joo-Yong; Choi, Inpyo; Lim, Yong Taik; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of combination of two different treatment regimens for solid tumor therapy: vasculature targeting agent and immune-stimulation. Poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles were synthesized for intracellular delivery of toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonist—gardiquimod. Spherical and mono-disperse gardiquimod encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles (Gardi-PLGA), approximately 194 nm in size were formulated. Gardi-PLGA induced immune-stimulation, and vasculature disrupting agent (VDA)—5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) was used in combination to assessing the influence on bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and B16-F10 melanoma cells. The combination treatment significantly increased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, indicating their activation in BMDCs, while melanoma cells remained viable. Further, mice melanoma model was established, and DMXAA was administered intraperitoneally and Gardi-PLGA was administered via an intra-tumoral injection. The combination treatments strategy significantly inhibited tumor growth as shown by tumor volume analysis, and the survival rate of the mice was found to be 63.6% (n = 11), after 54 days of tumor inoculation. Immunohistochemical findings of tumor sections treated with DMXAA confirmed the in vivo vasculature disruption. Thus, the inhibition of tumor growth can be attributed to the synergistic effect of immune stimulation caused by DC activation and vasculature disruption. PMID:28036266

  19. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  20. WS2 nanosheet as a new photosensitizer carrier for combined photodynamic and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yuan; Zhou, Liangjun; Gu, Zhanjun; Yan, Liang; Tian, Gan; Zheng, Xiaopeng; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiao; Shi, Junxin; Cong, Wenshu; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a simple and efficient strategy to fabricate WS2 nanosheets with low toxicity and good water solubility via a liquid exfoliation method by using H2SO4 intercalation and ultrasonication. The as-prepared WS2 nanosheets were employed not only as an NIR absorbing agent for photothermal therapy (PTT) but also as a photosensitizer (PS) carrier for photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to their sheet like structure that offers large surface area to load PS molecules. Moreover, singlet-oxygen generation of the PSs-WS2 complex could be finely controlled by NIR irradiation that could manipulate the PSs release behavior from WS2 nanosheets. The synergistic anti-tumor effect of WS2 nanosheets mediated PDT-PTT was also evaluated carefully and the results clearly showed that the efficacy of combined PDT-PTT treatment of cancer cells is significantly higher than those of PDT-only and PTT-only treatment, indicating enhanced efficiency of the combined therapeutic system. In addition, the WS2 could be used as a computed tomography (CT) contrast agent for bio-imaging since W atoms have strong X-ray attenuation ability, making them a multifunctional theranostic platform for simultaneous imaging-guided diagnosis and therapy.We have developed a simple and efficient strategy to fabricate WS2 nanosheets with low toxicity and good water solubility via a liquid exfoliation method by using H2SO4 intercalation and ultrasonication. The as-prepared WS2 nanosheets were employed not only as an NIR absorbing agent for photothermal therapy (PTT) but also as a photosensitizer (PS) carrier for photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to their sheet like structure that offers large surface area to load PS molecules. Moreover, singlet-oxygen generation of the PSs-WS2 complex could be finely controlled by NIR irradiation that could manipulate the PSs release behavior from WS2 nanosheets. The synergistic anti-tumor effect of WS2 nanosheets mediated PDT-PTT was also evaluated carefully and the results

  1. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with adoptive cell immunotherapy exerts better antitumor effects in non-small cell lung cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Shi

    therapy against lung carcinomas and unmask the mechanisms of the synergistic antitumor efficacy, providing a new rationale for combining antiangiogenesis therapy with immunotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer.

  2. Meta-analysis of transarterial chemoembolization combined with microwave coagulation therapy in treatment of advanced liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Zhendong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the clinical efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE combined with microwave coagulation therapy (MCT in the treatment of advanced liver cancer and to provide a more convincing basis for the clinical application of this therapy. MethodsA search was performed using Cochrane Library, PubMed, Em-base, CBM, CNKI, VIP WanFang Data as well as other sources to collect randomised controlled trials (RCTs of TACE combined with MCT in the treatment of advanced primary liver cancer. The literature was selected according to inclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed according to Cochrane review criteria. A Meta-analysis was performed on homogeneous studies using RevMan 5.0. The patients receiving TACE combined with MCT were compared with those receiving TACE alone in terms of 0.5-year, 1-year, and 2-year survival rates and negative conversion rate of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. ResultsA total of 12 RCTs involving 872 cases were included in the analysis. Compared with those receiving TACE alone, the patients receiving TACE combined with MCT had a significantly higher 0.5-year survival rate (OR=7.21, 95% CI: 1.92-2708, P=0.003, a significantly higher 1-year survival rate (OR=4.47, 95% CI:3.14-6.36, P<0.000 01, a significantly higher 2-year survival rate (OR=3.66, 95% CI:2.45-4.84, P<0.000 01, and a significantly higher negative conversion rate of AFP (OR=2.65, 95% CI:1.73-4.07, P<0.000 1. ConclusionCompared with TACE alone, TACE combined with MCT can produce better short-term and long-term treatment outcomes and significantly improve the survival rate in patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer, according to the meta-analysis. This combination therapy might be clinically effective, but which needs to be confirmed by a large number of high-quality controlled clinical trials.

  3. Bromelain and N-acetylcysteine inhibit proliferation and survival of gastrointestinal cancer cells in vitro: significance of combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Afshin; Masoumi-Moghaddam, Samar; Ehteda, Anahid; Morris, David Lawson

    2014-11-12

    Bromelain and N-acetylcysteine are two natural, sulfhydryl-containing compounds with good safety profiles which have been investigated for their benefits and application in health and disease for more than fifty years. As such, the potential values of these agents in cancer therapy have been variably reported in the literature. In the present study, the efficacy of bromelain and N-acetylcysteine in single agent and combination treatment of human gastrointestinal carcinoma cells was evaluated in vitro and the underlying mechanisms of effect were explored. The growth-inhibitory effects of bromelain and N-acetylcysteine, on their own and in combination, on a panel of human gastrointestinal carcinoma cell lines, including MKN45, KATO-III, HT29-5F12, HT29-5M21 and LS174T, were assessed by sulforhodamine B assay. Moreover, the influence of the treatment on the expression of a range of proteins involved in the regulation of cell cycle and survival was investigated by Western blot. The presence of apoptosis was also examined by TUNEL assay. Bromelain and N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited cell proliferation, more potently in combination therapy. Drug-drug interaction in combination therapy was found to be predominantly synergistic or additive. Mechanistically, apoptotic bodies were detected in treated cells by TUNEL assay. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed diminution of cyclins A, B and D, the emergence of immunoreactive subunits of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-8 and cleaved PARP, withering or cleavage of procaspase-9, overexpression of cytochrome c, reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-survival phospho-Akt, the emergence of the autophagosomal marker LC3-II and deregulation of other autophagy-related proteins, including Atg3, Atg5, Atg7, Atg12 and Beclin 1. These results were more prominent in combination therapy. We report for the first time to our knowledge the growth-inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of bromelain and N-acetylcysteine, in

  4. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Plasma pharmacokinetics after combined therapy of gemcitabine and oral S-1 for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okita Yoshihiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of gemcitabine (GEM and S-1, an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU derivative, has been shown to be a promising regimen for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods Six patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this pharmacokinetics (PK study. These patients were treated by oral administration of S-1 30 mg/m2 twice daily for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period and intravenous administration of GEM 800 mg/m2 on days 1, 15 and 29 of each course. The PK parameters of GEM and/or 5-FU after GEM single-administration, S-1 single-administration, and co-administration of GEM with pre-administration of S-1 at 2-h intervals were analyzed. Results The maximum concentration (Cmax, the area under the curve from the drug administration to the infinite time (AUCinf, and the elimination half-life (T1/2 of GEM were not significantly different between GEM administration with and without S-1. The Cmax, AUCinf, T1/2, and the time required to reach Cmax (Tmax were not significantly different between S-1 administration with and without GEM. Conclusion There were no interactions between GEM and S-1 regarding plasma PK of GEM and 5-FU.

  6. An innovative MWCNTs/DOX/TC nanosystem for chemo-photothermal combination therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Sun, Zhiting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Leng, Xigang

    2017-10-01

    Chemotherapy and photothermal therapy can be efficiently integrated to achieve enhanced antitumor efficacy by using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which are super in delivering drug and converting near infrared radiation (NIR) into heat. We previously developed an innovative TAT-chitosan functionalized MWCNTs (MWCNTs/TC) based drug delivery system for doxorubicin (DOX) and preliminarily investigated its release profile and antitumor effect. In the present study, the application potential of MWCNTs/DOX/TC in chemo-photothermal combination therapy was further explored. The in vitro drug release, photothermal effect, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity were assessed. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of MWCNTs/DOX/TC was further evaluated by noninvasive bioluminescence imaging. It was demonstrated that this innovative drug delivery system not only realized a conspicuously sustained release of DOX, but also retained the optical properties of MWCNTs for a high photothermal effect upon NIR irradiation, and exhibited remarkably enhanced anti-tumor efficacy through the synergistic function of chemotherapy and photothermal ablation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Photothermal and biodegradable polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites as drug carriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Wang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Zhenyu; Li, Jiachen

    2017-03-15

    To develop photothermal and biodegradable nanocarriers for combined chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer, polyaniline/porous silicon hybrid nanocomposites had been successfully fabricated via surface initiated polymerization of aniline onto porous silicon nanoparticles in our experiments. As-prepared polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites could be well dispersed in aqueous solution without any extra hydrophilic surface coatings, and showed a robust photothermal effect under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Especially, after an intravenous injection into mice, these biodegradable porous silicon-based nanocomposites as non-toxic agents could be completely cleared in body. Moreover, these polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites as drug carriers also exhibited an efficient loading and dual pH/NIR light-triggered release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a model anticancer drug). Most importantly, assisted with NIR laser irradiation, polyaniline/PSiNPs nanocomposites with loading DOX showed a remarkable synergistic anticancer effect combining chemotherapy with photothermal therapy, whether in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, based on biodegradable PSiNPs-based nanocomposites, this combination approach of chemo-photothermal therapy would have enormous potential on clinical cancer treatments in the future. Considering the non-biodegradable nature and potential long-term toxicity concerns of photothermal nanoagents, it is of great interest and importance to develop biodegradable and photothermal nanoparticles with an excellent biocompatibility for their future clinical applications. In our experiments, we fabricated porous silicon-based hybrid nanocomposites via surface initiated polymerization of aniline, which showed an excellent photothermal effect, aqueous dispersibility, biodegradability and biocompatibility. Furthermore, after an efficient loading of DOX molecules, polyaniline/porous silicon nanocomposites exhibited the remarkable synergistic anticancer

  8. Effects of combined therapy of Phosphatidylinositol 3p-Kinase and Paclitaxel in human lung cancer nude mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan REN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increasing evidence suggests that aberrant activation of PI3K/Akt is involved in many human cancers, and that inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway might be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. The aims of this study is to evaluate the effects of combined therapy of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase inhibitor(LY294002 and Paclitaxel in athymic mice xenogeneic transplant model of lung cancer and to reveal the possible mechanisms involved.Methods Eighteen athymic mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (control, paclitaxel alone and paclitaxel plus LY294002, and were treated respectively. Athymic mice xenogeneic transplant model was establishedby inoculation (sc with A549 lung cancer cells. Body mass (BM and diameter of tumor mass were measured. Furthermore,the protein expressions of CyclinD1,bcl-2 and bax in tumor tissues were analyzed with immunohistochemistry. Results The tumor-inhibiting rate of paclitaxel plus LY294002 (92.47% was significantly higher than the paclitaxel alone (65.59%(P<0.05.The protein expression of bcl-2 in paclitaxel plus LY294002 group were significantly higher, while bax wassignificantly lower than that in the other two groups (P <0.05. The protein expression of CyclinD1 was significantly lower than the control group (P <0.05. Conclusion LY294002 can enhance the effects of paclitaxel in the treatment of lung cancer and CyclinD1, bcl-2 and bax may be involved in its inhibitory effects.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eDal Pra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa. The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: I. androgen signaling pathway; II. hypoxic tumor cells and regions; III. DNA damage response (DDR pathway; and IV. abnormal extra/intra-cell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa.

  10. Risk of Breast Cancer in Relation to Combined Effects of Hormone Therapy, Body Mass Index, and Alcohol Use, by Hormone-receptor Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Tjonneland, Anne; Keiding, Niels

    2015-01-01

    -risk" users is important for therapeutic reasons. We investigated interactions between hormone therapy use and alcohol-use/high BMI status in relation to invasive breast cancer risk, both overall and according to estrogen receptor (ER) status. METHODS: Two Danish prospective cohorts were pooled, including 30......BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, increased body mass index (BMI), and hormone therapy are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, but their combined effects are not well understood. Because hormone therapy is effective for the relief of menopausal symptoms, the identification of "high......,938 person-years of follow-up, 1579 women developed invasive breast cancer. Among nonusers of hormone therapy, the risk of breast cancer was slightly increased with overweight/obesity and increasing alcohol consumption. Compared with normal-weight nonusers, the risk of breast cancer was higher in hormone...

  11. A MEK/PI3K/HDAC inhibitor combination therapy for KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, Irene; Petrenko, Oleksi; Hayman, Michael J

    2015-06-30

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive, metastatic disease with limited treatment options. Factors contributing to the metastatic predisposition and therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer are not well understood. Here, we used a mouse model of KRAS-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis to define distinct subtypes of PDAC metastasis: epithelial, mesenchymal and quasi-mesenchymal. We examined pro-survival signals in these cells and the therapeutic response differences between them. Our data indicate that the initiation and maintenance of the transformed state are separable, and that KRAS dependency is not a fundamental constant of KRAS-initiated tumors. Moreover, some cancer cells can shuttle between the KRAS dependent (drug-sensitive) and independent (drug-tolerant) states and thus escape extinction. We further demonstrate that inhibition of KRAS signaling alone via co-targeting the MAPK and PI3K pathways fails to induce extensive tumor cell death and, therefore, has limited efficacy against PDAC. However, the addition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors greatly improves outcomes, reduces the self-renewal of cancer cells, and blocks cancer metastasis in vivo. Our results suggest that targeting HDACs in combination with KRAS or its effector pathways provides an effective strategy for the treatment of PDAC.

  12. Combined therapy using bevacizumab and turmeric ethanolic extract (with absorbable curcumin) exhibited beneficial efficacy in colon cancer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Kwok, Hin-Fai; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Jiang, Lei; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Gao, Si; Wong, Hing-Lok; Li, Lin; Chan, Kar-Man; Leung, Ping-Chung; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Zuo, Zhong; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2016-09-01

    Turmeric is commonly used as a medicinal herb and dietary supplement. Its active ingredient, curcumin, has been shown to possess antitumor effects in colorectal cancer patients. However, poor absorption of curcumin in intestine impedes its wide clinical application. Our previous findings showed that the presence of turmerones increased the accumulation of curcumin inside colonic cells. Hence, we hypothesized that curcumin with turmerones or present in turmeric ethanolic extract would augment its anti-tumor activities in tumor-bearing mice. The pharmacokinetics of curcumin in different preparations (containing same amount of curcumin) were studied in mice. The anti-tumor efficacies of curcumin or turmeric extract (with absorbable curcumin) in combination with bevacizumab were further investigated in HT29 colon tumor-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic results showed that the plasma curcumin level of turmeric extract-fed mice was the highest, suggesting turmeric extract had the best bioavailability of curcumin. Besides, combined turmeric extract plus bevacizumab treatment significantly inhibited the tumor growth. Such inhibitory effects were stronger than those of curcumin plus bevacizumab or bevacizumab alone and were comparable with those of 5-fluorouracil+leucovorin+oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab. Notably, there was no observable side effect induced by turmeric extract treatment while significant side effects were found in FOLFOX-treated mice. In conclusion, combination of turmeric extract with bevacizumab possessed potent anti-tumor effects without observable side effects, strongly suggesting the adjuvant use of turmeric extract in colorectal cancer therapy. Our current findings warrant the confirmation regarding the benefits arising from the combined use of bevacizumab and turmeric in colorectal cancer patients in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An in vitro model for preclinical testing of endocrine therapy combinations for prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even though patients with prostate cancer commonly respond to endocrine treatment, in most cases the disease progresses to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our objective was to generate a novel cell line model representing the endocrine treatment naive prostate cancer for

  14. Nanoparticle delivery of HIF1α siRNA combined with photodynamic therapy as a potential treatment strategy for head-and-neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Lecaros, Rumwald Leo G.; Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy has become a major strategy in cancer treatment. We used anisamide-targeted lipid–calcium–phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles to efficiently deliver HIF1α siRNA to the cytoplasm of sigma receptor-expressing SCC4 and SAS cells that were also subjected to photodynamic therapy (PDT). HIF1α siRNA nanoparticles effectively reduced HIF1α expression, increased cell death, and significantly inhibited cell growth following photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy in cultured cells. Intrave...

  15. HIV Maintains an Evolving and Dispersed Population in Multiple Tissues during Suppressive Combined Antiretroviral Therapy in Individuals with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Rebecca; Lamers, Susanna L; Nolan, David J; Maidji, Ekaterina; Faria, N R; Pybus, Oliver G; Dollar, James J; Maruniak, Samuel A; McAvoy, Andrew C; Salemi, Marco; Stoddart, Cheryl A; Singer, Elyse J; McGrath, Michael S

    2016-10-15

    While combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in undetectable plasma viral loads, it does not eradicate HIV infection. Furthermore, HIV-infected individuals while on cART remain at an increased risk of developing serious comorbidities, such as cancer, neurological disease, and atherosclerosis, suggesting that during cART, tissue-based HIV may contribute to such pathologies. We obtained DNA and RNA env, nef, and pol sequences using single-genome sequencing from postmortem tissues of three HIV(+) cART-treated (cART(+)) individuals with undetectable viral load and metastatic cancer at death and performed time-scaled Bayesian evolutionary analyses. We used a sensitive in situ hybridization technique to visualize HIV gag-pol mRNA transcripts in cerebellum and lymph node tissues from one patient. Tissue-associated virus evolved at similar rates in cART(+) and cART-naive (cART(-)) patients. Phylogenetic trees were characterized by two distinct features: (i) branching patterns consistent with constant viral evolution and dispersal among tissues and (ii) very recently derived clades containing both DNA and RNA sequences from multiple tissues. Rapid expansion of virus near death corresponded to wide-spread metastasis. HIV RNA(+) cells clustered in cerebellum tissue but were dispersed in lymph node tissue, mirroring the evolutionary patterns observed for that patient. Activated, infiltrating macrophages were associated with HIV RNA. Our data provide evidence that tissues serve as a sanctuary for wild-type HIV during cART and suggest the importance of macrophages as an alternative reservoir and mechanism of virus spread. Combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) reduces plasma HIV to undetectable levels; however, removal of cART results in plasma HIV rebound, thus highlighting its inability to entirely rid the body of infection. Additionally, HIV-infected individuals on cART remain at high risk of serious diseases, which suggests a contribution from residual HIV. In

  16. Non-Toxic Metabolic Management of Metastatic Cancer in VM Mice: Novel Combination of Ketogenic Diet, Ketone Supplementation, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, A M; Ward, N; Seyfried, T N; Arnold, P; D'Agostino, D P

    2015-01-01

    The Warburg effect and tumor hypoxia underlie a unique cancer metabolic phenotype characterized by glucose dependency and aerobic fermentation. We previously showed that two non-toxic metabolic therapies - the ketogenic diet with concurrent hyperbaric oxygen (KD+HBOT) and dietary ketone supplementation - could increase survival time in the VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that combining these therapies could provide an even greater therapeutic benefit in this model. Mice receiving the combination therapy demonstrated a marked reduction in tumor growth rate and metastatic spread, and lived twice as long as control animals. To further understand the effects of these metabolic therapies, we characterized the effects of high glucose (control), low glucose (LG), ketone supplementation (βHB), hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT), or combination therapy (LG+βHB+HBOT) on VM-M3 cells. Individually and combined, these metabolic therapies significantly decreased VM-M3 cell proliferation and viability. HBOT, alone or in combination with LG and βHB, increased ROS production in VM-M3 cells. This study strongly supports further investigation into this metabolic therapy as a potential non-toxic treatment for late-stage metastatic cancers.

  17. Non-Toxic Metabolic Management of Metastatic Cancer in VM Mice: Novel Combination of Ketogenic Diet, Ketone Supplementation, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Poff

    Full Text Available The Warburg effect and tumor hypoxia underlie a unique cancer metabolic phenotype characterized by glucose dependency and aerobic fermentation. We previously showed that two non-toxic metabolic therapies - the ketogenic diet with concurrent hyperbaric oxygen (KD+HBOT and dietary ketone supplementation - could increase survival time in the VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that combining these therapies could provide an even greater therapeutic benefit in this model. Mice receiving the combination therapy demonstrated a marked reduction in tumor growth rate and metastatic spread, and lived twice as long as control animals. To further understand the effects of these metabolic therapies, we characterized the effects of high glucose (control, low glucose (LG, ketone supplementation (βHB, hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT, or combination therapy (LG+βHB+HBOT on VM-M3 cells. Individually and combined, these metabolic therapies significantly decreased VM-M3 cell proliferation and viability. HBOT, alone or in combination with LG and βHB, increased ROS production in VM-M3 cells. This study strongly supports further investigation into this metabolic therapy as a potential non-toxic treatment for late-stage metastatic cancers.

  18. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyand, Mathias; Ryom, Lene; Shepherd, Leah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. METHODS: Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry...... or January 1, 2004, until the earliest of a first cancer diagnosis, February 1, 2012, death, or 6 months after the last visit. Multivariable Poisson regression models assessed associations between cumulative (per year) use of either any cART or PI/NNRTI, and the incidence of any cancer, non...... diagnosed [incidence rate: 0.76/100 PY (95% confidence interval: 0.72 to 0.79)], 718 ADC [0.30/100 PY (0.28-0.32)], and 1114 NADC [0.46/100 PY (0.43-0.49)]. Longer exposure to cART was associated with a lower ADC risk [adjusted rate ratio: 0.88/year (0.85-0.92)] but a higher NADC risk [1.02/year (1...

  19. Future directions in combined modality therapy for rectal cancer: reevaluating the role of total mesorectal excision after chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solanki AA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abhishek A Solanki,1 Daniel T Chang,2 Stanley L Liauw11Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Most patients who develop rectal cancer present with locoregionally advanced (T3 or node-positive disease. The standard management of locoregionally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (nCRT, followed by radical resection (low-anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection with total mesorectal excision. Approximately 15% of patients can have a pathologic complete response (pCR at the time of surgery, indicating that some patients can have no detectable residual disease after nCRT. The actual benefit of surgery in this group of patients is unclear. It is possible that omission of surgery in these patients, termed selective nonoperative management, can limit the toxicities associated with standard, multimodal combined modality therapy without compromising disease control. In this review, we discuss the clinical experiences to date using selective nonoperative management and various attempts at escalation of nCRT to improve the number of patients who have a pCR. We also explore several clinical, laboratory, imaging, histopathologic, and genetic biomarkers that have been tested as tools to predict which patients are most likely to have a pCR after nCRT.Keywords: rectal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, nonoperative management, organ preservation

  20. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features on ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used to: ...

  1. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and curcumin by pH-sensitive prodrug nanoparticle for combination therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jinjian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Fan; Chu, Liping; Gao, Honglin; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Liu, Qian; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-02-01

    Ample attention has focused on cancer drug delivery via prodrug nanoparticles due to their high drug loading property and comparatively lower side effects. In this study, we designed a PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle for simultaneous delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) and curcumin (Cur) as a combination therapy to treat cancer. DOX was conjugated to PEG by Schiff’s base reaction. The obtained prodrug conjugate could self-assemble in water at pH 7.4 into nanoparticles (PEG-DOX NPs) and encapsulate Cur into the core through hydrophobic interaction (PEG-DOX-Cur NPs). When the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs are internalized by tumor cells, the Schiff’s base linker between PEG and DOX would break in the acidic environment that is often observed in tumors, causing disassembling of the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs and releasing both DOX and Cur into the nuclei and cytoplasma of the tumor cells, respectively. Compared with free DOX, free Cur, free DOX-Cur combination, or PEG-DOX NPs, PEG-DOX-Cur NPs exhibited higher anti-tumor activity in vitro. In addition, the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs also showed prolonged blood circulation time, elevated local drug accumulation and increased tumor penetration. Enhanced anti-tumor activity was also observed from the PEG-DOX-Cur-treated animals, demonstrating better tumor inhibitory property of the NPs. Thus, the PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle system provides a simple yet efficient approach of drug delivery for chemotherapy.

  2. Enhancing photodynamic therapy of refractory solid cancers: Combining second-generation photosensitizers with multi-targeted liposomal delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, Ruud; Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; van Vught, Remko; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Breukink, Eefjan; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Storm, Gert; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the last-line treatment of refractory cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinomas, superficial recurrent urothelial carcinomas, and non-resectable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas yields poor clinical outcomes and may be associated with adverse events. This

  3. Intrahepatic and systemic therapy with oxaliplatin combined with capecitabine in patients with hepatic metastases from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D L; Nørgaard, H; Weber Vestermark, Lene

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate activity and toxicity of hepatic arterial infusion of oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer with liver metastases and limited extrahepatic disease.......The aim was to evaluate activity and toxicity of hepatic arterial infusion of oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer with liver metastases and limited extrahepatic disease....

  4. Palbociclib Combined with Fulvestrant in Premenopausal Women with Advanced Breast Cancer and Prior Progression on Endocrine Therapy: PALOMA-3 Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Turner, Nicholas C; Ro, Jungsil; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Iwata, Hiroji; Im, Seock-Ah; Masuda, Norikazu; Loi, Sherene; André, Fabrice; Harbeck, Nadia; Verma, Sunil; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Puyana Theall, Kathy; Hoffman, Justin; Zhang, Ke; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Dowsett, Mitchell

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, combined with fulvestrant and goserelin was assessed in premenopausal women with advanced breast cancer (ABC) who had progressed on prior endocrine therapy (ET). One hundred eight premenopausal endocrine-refractory women ≥18 years with hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) ABC were among 521 women randomized 2:1 (347:174) to fulvestrant (500 mg) ± goserelin with either palbociclib (125 mg/day orally, 3 weeks on, 1 week off) or placebo. This analysis assessed whether the overall tolerable safety profile and significant progression-free survival (PFS) improvement extended to premenopausal women. Potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and ovarian suppression with goserelin were assessed via plasma pharmacokinetics and biochemical analyses, respectively. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01942135) RESULTS: Median PFS for premenopausal women in the palbociclib (n = 72) versus placebo arm (n = 36) was 9.5 versus 5.6 months, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.87), and consistent with the significant PFS improvement in the same arms for postmenopausal women. Any-grade and grade ≤3 neutropenia, leukopenia, and infections were among the most frequent adverse events reported in the palbociclib arm with concurrent goserelin administration. Hormone concentrations were similar between treatment arms and confirmed sustained ovarian suppression. Clinically relevant DDIs were not observed. Palbociclib combined with fulvestrant and goserelin was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for premenopausal women with prior endocrine-resistant HR+/HER2- ABC. Inclusion of both premenopausal and postmenopausal women in pivotal combination ET trials facilitates access to novel drugs for young women and should be considered as a new standard for clinical trial design. PALOMA-3, the first registrational study

  5. New Combination Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer Based on the Radiosensitizing Potential of 5-Azacytidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    growth of xenografted prostate cancer tumors’ by Alfred Gallegos , Pamela Dino, Suzanne Regan, Bernard Futscher, Giuseppe Pizzorno and Eric Weterings...Jan 2012.  Steven Brotman, Senior Research Specialist, University of Arizona, Feb 2012 – Feb 2013.  Alfred Gallegos , Senior Research Specialist

  6. Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: new therapies, novel combination strategies and implications for immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drake, C.G.; Sharma, P.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, docetaxel has remained the global standard of care for frontline treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Until recently, there were limited options for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel failure or resistance, but now the approved treatment

  7. An experimental study on cervix cancer with combination of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Qiusha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the killing effect of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system combined with 60Co radiotherapy on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. Methods HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy were used separately or in combination on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo to compare their effects. Colony formation test and the rate of radiosensitization effect (E/O were employed to observed the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. Results HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system had strong therapeutic effects on Hela cells in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rates were 45.8% and 39.5%, respectively, moreover, the combined administration of gene therapy and radiotherapy had stronger therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rate was 87.5% in vitro, and the inhibition rate was 87.9% in vivo (P in vitro and 35.8% in vivo. The sensitivity of combined therapy to radiotherapy increased more than that of therapy alone, the ability of colony formation decreased (P 1.4, indicating HSV-TK/GCV system could exert a sensitizing effect on 60Co radiotherapy of the transplanted human cervical cancer cell in nude mice. Conclusion HSV-TK/GCV system had radiosensitization. Gene therapy combined with radiotherapy may be a good supplementary method for cervix cancer synthetic treatment.

  8. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), e-mail: vogelius@gmail.com; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Bentzen, Soeren M. (Dept. of Human Oncology, Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States)); Korreman, Stine S. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark); Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde Univ., Roskilde (Denmark)); Mehta, Minesh P. (Northwestern Univ., Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago (United States))

    2011-08-15

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration of the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy is modeled as an independent cell killing process using a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose (CERD) added to the entire organ at risk. We estimate the risk of grade 3 or higher RP (G3RP) using the critical volume model. Results. The mean risk of clinical G3RP at zero CERD is 5% for tomotherapy (range: 1-18 %) and 14% for 3D-CRT (range 2-49%). When the CERD exceeds 9 Gy, however, the risk of RP with the tomotherapy plans become higher than the 3D-CRT plans. The IMPT plans are less toxic both at zero CERD (mean 2%, range 1-5%) and at CERD = 10 Gy (mean 7%, range 1-28%). Tomotherapy yields a lower risk of RP than 3D-CRT for 17/18 patients at zero CERD, but only for 7/18 patients at CERD = 10 Gy. IMPT gives the lowest risk of all plans for 17/18 patients at zero CERD and for all patients with CERD = 10 Gy. Conclusions. The low dose bath from highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during

  9. Long-term effects on cancer survivors' quality of life of physical training versus physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy : results from a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; Korstjens, Irene; van Weert, Ellen; van den Borne, Bart; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Mesters, Ilse; Passchier, Jan; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Ros, Wynand J. G.

    We compared the effect of a 12-week group-based multidisciplinary self-management rehabilitation program, combining physical training (twice weekly) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (once weekly) with the effect of 12-week group-based physical training (twice weekly) on cancer survivors' quality of

  10. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy: the D: A: D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyand, Mathias; Ryom, Lene; Shepherd, Leah; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; Grulich, Andrew; Reiss, Peter; de Wit, Stéphane; D Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Furrer, Hansjakob; Pradier, Christian; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Caroline; Powderly, B.; Shortman, N.; Moecklinghoff, C.; Reilly, G.; Franquet, X.; Ryom, L.; Sabin, C. A.; Kamara, D.; Smith, C.; Phillips, A.; Mocroft, A.; Tverland, J.; Mansfeld, M.; Nielsen, J.; Raben, D.; Lundgren, J. D.; Salbøl Brandt, R.; Rickenbach, M.; Fanti, I.; Krum, E.; Hillebregt, M.; Geffard, S.; Sundström, A.; Delforge, M.; Fontas, E.; Torres, F.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Kjær, J.; Sjøl, A.; Meidahl, P.; Helweg-Larsen, J.; Schmidt Iversen, J.; Kirk, O.; Ross, M.; Fux, C. A.; Morlat, P.; Moranne, O.; Kesselring, A. M.; Kamara, D. A.; Weber, R.; Pradier, C.; Friis-Møller, N.; Kowalska, J.; Sabin, C.; Law, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Dabis, F.; Bruyand, M.; Bower, M.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Donald, A.; Grulich, A.; Zaheri, S.; Gras, L.; Prins, J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M. L.; Wiersinga, W. J.; Goorhuis, A.; Hovius, J. W. R.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Driessen, G. J. A.; van Rossum, A. M. C.; Branger, J.; Schippers, E. F.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; van Elzakker, E. P.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; Soetekouw, R.; ten Kate, R. W.; Kroon, F. P.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Jolink, H.; ter Vollaard, H. J. M.; Bauer, M. P.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; Diederen, B. M. W.; Leyten, E. M. S.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Kootstra, G. J.; Delsing, C. E.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Mulder, J. W.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Lauw, F. N.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; Warris, A.; van Crevel, R.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Barth, R. E.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Perenboom, R. M.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Bont, L. J.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Weijer, S.; el Moussaoui, R.; Winkel, C.; Muskiet, F.; Durand, N. N.; Voigt, R.; Bonnet, F.; Breilh, D.; Dupon, M.; Chêne, G.; Fleury, H.; Malvy, D.; Mercié, P.; Pellegrin, I.; Neau, D.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Thiébaut, R.; Bouchet, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Lacoste, D.; Tchamgoué, S.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Wittkop, L.; Bernard, N.; Hessamfar, M.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Dauchy, F. A.; Dutronc, H.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Duffau, P.; Schmeltz, J. Roger; Pistone, T.; Receveur, M. C.; Cazanave, C.; Ochoa, A.; Vareil, M. O.; Viallard, J. F.; Greib, C.; Lazaro, E.; Lafon, M. E.; Reigadas, S.; Trimoulet, P.; Molimard, M.; Titier, K.; Moreau, J. F.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé, G.; Dupont, A.; Gerard, Y.; Caunègre, L.; André, K.; Bonnal, F.; Farbos, S.; Gemain, M. C.; Ceccaldi, J.; de Witte, S.; Courtault, C.; Monlun, E.; Lataste, P.; Meraud, J. P.; Chossat, I.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Conte, V.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; Diarra, F.; D'Ivernois, C.; Frosch, A.; Hanappier, C.; Lenaud, E.; Leleux, U.; Le Marec, F.; Leray, J.; Louis, I.; Palmer, G.; Pougetoux, A.; Sicard, X.; Touchard, D.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, B.; Petoumenos, K.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.; Hoy, J.; Watson, K.; Roth, N.; Nicholson, J.; Bloch, M.; Franic, T.; Baker, D.; Vale, R.; Carr, A.; Cooper, D.; Chuah, J.; Ngieng, A.; Nolan, D.; Skett, J.; Calvo, G.; Mateu, S.; Domingo, P.; Sambeat, M. A.; Gatell, J.; del Cacho, E.; Cadafalch, J.; Fuster, M.; Codina, C.; Sirera, G.; Vaqué, A.; de Wit, S.; Clumeck, N.; Necsoi, C.; Gennotte, A. F.; Gerard, M.; Kabeya, K.; Konopnicki, D.; Libois, A.; Martin, C.; Payen, M. C.; Semaille, P.; van Laethem, Y.; Neaton, J.; Bartsch, G.; El-Sadr, W. M.; Thompson, G.; Wentworth, D.; Luskin-Hawk, R.; Telzak, E.; Abrams, D. I.; Cohn, D.; Markowitz, N.; Arduino, R.; Mushatt, D.; Friedland, G.; Perez, G.; Tedaldi, E.; Fisher, E.; Gordin, F.; Crane, L. R.; Sampson, J.; Baxter, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Podlekareva, D.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Fischer, A. H.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Sedlacek, D.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Bickel, Markus; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Testa, A.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Castagna, A.; Gianotti, N.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; Rozentale, B.; Zeltina, I.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Parczewski, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Zakharova, N.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokráš, M.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Medrano, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Karlsson, A.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Morfeldt, L.; Thulin, G.; Åkerlund, B.; Koppel, K.; Håkangård, C.; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, R.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; de Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Cicconi, P.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Santoro, C.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Puzzolante, C.; Abrescia, N.; Guida, M. G.; Onofrio, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; d'Avino, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Caissotti, C.; Dellamonica, P.; Bernard, E.; Cua, E.; de Salvador-Guillouet, F.; Durant, J.; Ferrando, S.; Mondain-Miton, V.; Naqvi, A.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B.; Pillet, S.; Pugliese, P.; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, P. M.; Dollet, K.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Egger, M.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, A.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Yerly, S.

    2015-01-01

    The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry or January 1, 2004,

  11. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy : the D: A: D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyand, Mathias; Ryom, Lene; Shepherd, Leah; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; Grulich, Andrew; Reiss, Peter; de Wit, Stéphane; D Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Furrer, Hansjakob; Pradier, Christian; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Caroline; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. METHODS: Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry or

  12. Cancer risk and use of protease inhibitor or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based combination antiretroviral therapy: the D: A: D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyand, M.; Ryom, L.; Shepherd, L.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Grulich, A.; Reiss, P.; Wit, S. de; Monforte, A.M.; Furrer, H.; Pradier, C.; Lundgren, J.; Sabin, C.; Warris, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and cancer risk, especially regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), is unclear. METHODS: Participants were followed from the latest of D:A:D study entry or

  13. Albumin Nanocarriers, γ- Irradiated Crosslinked, Combined with Therapeutic Drugs for Cancer Therapy>.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Macarena; Achilli, Estefania; Grasselli, Mariano; Del V Alonso, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Albumin polymeric Nanoparticles (NPs) have opened a great expectancy as for controlled drug delivery due to their therapeutic potency. Concomitantly biodegradable NPs technologies with target linked structures to pave the way of personalised medicine are becoming increasingly important in sight of a therapeutically effective research technology. This is particularly attractive for nanoparticle-based cancer delivery systems, based on the known limitations and efforts to overcome. This new group of gamma irradiated-NPs inherited both the protein delivery properties and robustness of polymer forming structures, and gamma irradiation techniques that leave clean, innocuous and biodegradable NPs. These protein NPs made of serum albumin are referred to SA NPs that possesses several characteristics making them especially attractive to be considered as a drug delivery system. This review focused on methodologies actually being used in the synthesis and characterisation of albumin NPs and different author's opinions on strategic ways to treat cancerous cell-lines with NPs. Utterly, challenges being overthrown by researchers are brought up to anneal an effective, all in one targeted albumin NPs to passed through in vitro and preclinical trials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Combined Gene Therapy Using AdsVEGFR2 and AdsTie2 With Chemotherapy Reduces the Growth of Human Ovarian Cancer and Formation of Ascites in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppurainen, Laura; Sallinen, Hanna; Karvonen, Anni; Valkonen, Elina; Laakso, Hanne; Liimatainen, Timo; Hytönen, Elisa; Hämäläinen, Kirsi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Anttila, Maarit; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is highly dependent on tumor microvessels and angiogenesis regulated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and their receptors (VEGFRs) and angiopoietins (Ang) and their Tie receptors. We studied the efficacy of adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy with soluble VEGFR2 and Tie2 combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of ovarian cancer. An intraperitoneal human ovarian cancer xenograft model in nude mice (n = 44) was used in this study. Gene therapy was given intravenously when the presence of sizable tumors was confirmed in magnetic resonance imaging. The study groups were as follows: AdCMV as a control (group I), AdCMV with chemotherapy (group II), AdsVEGFR2 and AdsTie2 (group III), and AdsVEGFR2 and AdsTie2 with chemotherapy (group IV). Antitumor effectiveness was assessed by overall tumor growth, ascites, immunohistochemistry, microvessel density, and sequential magnetic resonance imaging analyses. AdsVEGFR2 and AdsTie2 gene therapy (group III) significantly reduced tumor weights as compared with group II (P = 0.007). Accumulation of ascites was significantly reduced when the mice were treated with AdsVEGFR2 and AdsTie2 gene therapy or with combined gene therapy and chemotherapy as compared with controls (P = 0.029 and P = 0.010, respectively). Vascular endothelial growth factor and Ang2 levels in ascites fluid were elevated after the gene therapy. Combined inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 and Ang/Tie2 pathways provided efficient therapy for ovarian cancer in mice. In addition, antiangiogenic gene therapy has potential as a treatment for the accumulation of ascites.

  15. Trimodal Therapy: Combining Hyperthermia with Repurposed Bexarotene and Ultrasound for Treating Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K; Ghoshal, Goutam; Gartia, Manas R; Wu, Zhe; De, Arun K; Ye, Mao; Bromfield, Corinne R; Williams, Emery M; Singh, Kuldeep; Tangella, Krishnarao V; Rund, Laurie; Schulten, Klaus; Schook, Lawrence B; Ray, Partha S; Burdette, Everette C; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-11-24

    Repurposing of existing cancer drugs to overcome their physical limitations, such as insolubility, represents an attractive strategy to achieve enhanced therapeutic efficacy and broaden the range of clinical applications. Such an approach also promises to offer substantial cost savings in drug development efforts. Here we repurposed FDA-approved topical agent bexarotene (Targretin), currently in limited use for cutaneous manifestations of T-cell lymphomas, and re-engineer it for use in solid tumor applications by forming self-assembling nanobubbles. Physico-chemical characterization studies of the novel prodrug nanobubbles demonstrated their stability, enhanced target cell internalization capability, and highly controlled release profile in response to application of focused ultrasound energy. Using an in vitro model of hepatocellular carcinoma and an in vivo large animal model of liver ablation, we demonstrate the effectiveness of bexarotene prodrug nanobubbles when used in conjunction with catheter-based ultrasound, thereby highlighting the therapeutic promise of this trimodal approach.

  16. A Combination Therapy of JO-1 and Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    foot syndrome and stomatitis/mucositis being the most common. Doses have to be reduced to as low as 30 mg/m2 in combination regimens which may be...Healthcare, Pittsburgh, PA) supplemented with 2 mM CaCl2 was used as running buffer at a flow rate of 15 l/min. Immobilization on CM5 sensorchip...D239 and K275 are shown in dashes. d) Affinity of JO-4 to DSG2 measured by Surface Plasmon Resonance. JO-4 was immobilized on sensorchips, and

  17. Use of Combination Thermal Therapy & Radiation in Breast-Conserving Treatment of Extensive Intraductal Breast Cancer (Breast Cancer)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svensson, Goran

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for a research project supporting the development of a technique for breast cancer treatment using ultrasound hyperthermia as an adjuvant to standard treatment using radiation...

  18. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  19. The enhanced tumor inhibitory effects of gefitinib and L-ascorbic acid combination therapy in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Eun; Hahm, Eunsil; Bae, Seyeon; Kang, Jae Seung; Lee, Wang Jae

    2017-07-01

    Despite documentation of successful therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with lung cancer, the response rate of patients treated with this therapy remains low. The present study investigated whether L-ascorbic acid serves an adjuvant role in vitro when combined with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib (Iressa(®)) in lung cancer cell lines. A total of three human lung cancer cell lines were used. The antiproliferative effects and changes in the cell cycle and expression of intracellular signaling molecules, including extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and protein kinase B (Akt), were measured in cells treated with gefitinib and/or L-ascorbic acid at various concentrations. When combined with gefitinib, L-ascorbic acid exhibited an additive effect on cell proliferation in all gefitinib-sensitive and gefitinib-resistant cell lines. A decrement of ~40% was observed with a low dose 0.5 mM L-ascorbic acid and gefitinib in the relatively gefitinib-resistant A549 cell line (85.6±5.4% with gefitinib alone vs. 52.7±7.3% with combination therapy; P=0.046). The downregulation of intracellular signaling cascades, including EGFR, Akt, Erk and Stat3, was also observed. L-Ascorbic acid serves an adjuvant role when administered in combination with gefitinib; however, the degree of inhibition of cell proliferation differs between lung cancer cell lines.

  20. Receptor-Mediated Surface Charge Inversion Platform Based on Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Cell Recognition and Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Correia, Alexandra; Mäkilä, Ermei; Li, Wei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni J; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-03-22

    Negatively charged surface-modified drug delivery systems are promising for in vivo applications as they have more tendency to accumulate in tumor tissues. However, the inefficient cell uptake of these systems restricts their final therapeutic performance. Here, we have fabricated a receptor-mediated surface charge inversion nanoparticle made of undecylenic acid modified, thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles core and sequentially modified with polyethylenimine (PEI), methotrexate (MTX), and DNA aptamer AS1411 (herein termed as UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411) for enhancing the cell uptake of nucleolin-positive cells. The efficient interaction of AS1411 and the relevant receptor nucleolin caused the disintegration of the negative-charged AS1411 surface. The subsequent surface charge inversion and exposure of the active targeting ligand, MTX, enhanced the cell uptake of the nanoparticles. On the basis of this synergistic effect, the UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411 (hydrodynamic diameter is 242 nm) were efficiently internalized by nucleolin-positive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, with an efficiency around 5.8 times higher than that of nucleolin-negative cells (NIH 3T3 fibroblasts). The receptor competition assay demonstrated that the major mechanism (more than one-half) of the internalized nanoparticles in MDA-MB-231 cells was due to the receptor-mediated surface charge inversion process. Finally, after loading of sorafenib, the nanosystem showed efficient performance for combination therapy with an inhibition ratio of 35.6%.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of TRA-8 anti-death receptor 5 (DR5) monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, J Michael; Oliver, Patsy G; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Alvarez, Ronald D; Grizzle, William E; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2006-04-01

    There is substantial evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) causes apoptosis via activation of death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). We sought to determine the therapeutic potential of TRA-8 (anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody) in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model. DR5 expression in 7 human cervical cancer cell lines was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using murine TRA-8 in combination with flow cytometry. Cell lines were treated with TRA-8 alone or in combination with cisplatin, topotecan, or radiation, and cytotoxicity assays were performed. Mice were inoculated with ME-180 cancer cells and treated with different combinations of therapy. Animals receiving antibody were injected intraperitoneally with 200 microg of TRA-8. Animals received 9 Gy 60Co radiation divided into 3 fractions and 3 intraperitoneal doses of cisplatin (6 mg/kg) 1 h before radiation. A similar experiment was performed using topotecan (2 mg/kg) as the chemotherapeutic agent. DR5 was expressed to a varying degree on the cervical cancer cell lines. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and chemotherapy or radiation resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8, cisplatin, and radiation produced tumor growth inhibition that was significantly greater than the other groups. Similar results were seen in combination studies with topotecan. These data suggest that DR5 is a good target for activation of the apoptotic pathway. Monoclonal antibodies such as TRA-8 may play an important role in the development of an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced cervical cancer.

  2. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  3. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang Xu,1,2,* Xiaobo Wu,3,* Chun Hu,1,2 Zhiying Zhang,4 Le Zhang,1,2 Shujing Liang,1,2 Yingchun Xu,5 Fengchun Zhang1,2 1Department of Oncology, Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Suzhou, 2Department of Oncology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Prevention and Cure Center of Breast Disease, Third Hospital of Nanchang, Nanchang, 4Graduate School, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, 5Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015 comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR and pooled risk ratio (RR were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002, PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001, and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001. Notably, subgroup analysis

  4. Combination therapy Eve and Pac to induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells by targeting PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pingping; Hao, Fengmei; Dai, Shufeng; Tian, Lin

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the anti-cervical cancer effects of everolimus (Eve) and paclitaxel (Pac) when used alone or in combination. Human cervical cancer cells HeLa and SiHa were divided into four group: Blank control group (control), everolimus group (Eve), paclitaxel group (Pac) and combined therapy group (Eve + Pac). The cell viability was detected by CCK-8 assay and the cell cloning ability was detected by clonegenic assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (AKT), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and their phosphorylated proteins were studied by western blot. The HeLa and SiHa cells proliferation and cloning ability were significantly inhibited in drug treatment groups compared with control group (p Pac combinatorial therapy showed the better results than single treatment with Eve or Pac. Combination of Eve and Pac has synergistic effect on the induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. In addition, the protein ratios in HeLa and SiHa cell treated with the Eve + Pac combination were significantly lower than that of cervical cancer cells treated with either Eve or Pac cell alone. Our study suggested that Eve + Pac provide a novel therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer.

  5. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianliang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT combined with high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods: For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV, intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D 90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D 2cc < 75 Gy and D 2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2 for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT only. Results: The mean D 90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82. For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D 100% , and IRCTV D 90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The D 2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions : B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow

  6. Systemic Cancer Therapy:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ostario Palumbo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the century, advances in the systemic therapy of cancer, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy and immunotherapy have been responsible for improvements in cancer related mortality in developed countries even as the population continues to age. Although such advancements have yet to benefit all cancer types, systemic therapies have led to an improvement in overall survival in both the adjuvant and metastatic setting for many cancers. With the pressure to make therapies available as soon as possible, the side-effects of systemic therapies, in particular long-term side-effects are not very well characterized and understood. Increasingly, a number of cancer types are requiring long-term and even lifelong systemic therapy. This is true for both younger and older patients with cancer and has important implications for each subset. Younger patients have an overall greater expected life-span, and as a result may suffer a greater variety of treatment related complications in the long-term, whereas older patients may develop earlier side-effects as a result of their frailty. Because the incidence of cancer in the world will increase over the next several decades and there will be more people living with cancer, it is important to have an understanding of the potential side effects of new systemic therapies. As an introductory article, in this review series, we begin by describing some of the major advances made in systemic cancer therapy along with some of their known side-effects and we also make an attempt to describe the future of systemic cancer therapy.

  7. Doxorubicin in combination with a small TGFbeta inhibitor: a potential novel therapy for metastatic breast cancer in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhik Bandyopadhyay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggested that induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT might confer both metastatic and self-renewal properties to breast tumor cells resulting in drug resistance and tumor recurrence. TGFbeta is a potent inducer of EMT and has been shown to promote tumor progression in various breast cancer cell and animal models.We report that chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin activates TGFbeta signaling in human and murine breast cancer cells. Doxorubicin induced EMT, promoted invasion and enhanced generation of cells with stem cell phenotype in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro, which were significantly inhibited by a TGFbeta type I receptor kinase inhibitor (TbetaRI-KI. We investigated the potential synergistic anti-tumor activity of TbetaR1-KI in combination with doxorubicin in animal models of metastatic breast cancer. Combination of Doxorubicin and TbetaRI-KI enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin in reducing tumor growth and lung metastasis in the 4T1 orthotopic xenograft model in comparison to single treatments. Doxorubicin treatment alone enhanced metastasis to lung in the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 orthotopic xenograft model and metastasis to bone in the 4T1 orthotopic xenograft model, which was significantly blocked when TbetaR1-KI was administered in combination with doxorubicin.These observations suggest that the adverse activation of TGFbeta pathway by chemotherapeutics in the cancer cells together with elevated TGFbeta levels in tumor microenvironment may lead to EMT and generation of cancer stem cells resulting in the resistance to the chemotherapy. Our results indicate that the combination treatment of doxorubicin with a TGFbeta inhibitor has the potential to reduce the dose and consequently the toxic side-effects of doxorubicin, and improve its efficacy in the inhibition of breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  8. HPMA copolymer-based combination therapy toxic to both prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells and differentiated cells induces durable anti-tumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Yang, Jiyuan; Rhim, Johng S; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-12-28

    Current treatments for prostate cancer are still not satisfactory, often resulting in tumor regrowth and metastasis. One of the main reasons for the ineffective anti-prostate cancer treatments is the failure to deplete cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) - a subset of cancer cells with enhanced tumorigenic capacity. Thus, combination of agents against both CSCs and bulk tumor cells may offer better therapeutic benefits. Several molecules with anti-cancer stem/progenitor cell activities have been under preclinical evaluations. However, their low solubility and nonspecific toxicity limit their clinical translation. Herein, we designed a combination macromolecular therapy containing two drug conjugates: HPMA copolymer-cyclopamine conjugate (P-CYP) preferentially toxic to cancer stem/progenitor cells, and HPMA copolymer-docetaxel conjugate (P-DTX) effective in debulking the tumor mass. Both conjugates were synthesized using RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymerization resulting in narrow molecular weight distribution. The killing effects of the two conjugates against bulk tumor cells and CSCs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In PC-3 or RC-92a/hTERT prostate cancer cells, P-CYP preferentially kills and impairs the function of CD133+ prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells; P-DTX was able to kill bulk tumor cells instead of CSCs. In a PC-3 xenograft mice model, combination of P-DTX and P-CYP showed the most effective and persistent tumor growth inhibitory effect. In addition, residual tumors contained less CD133+ cancer cells following combination or P-CYP treatments, indicating selective killing of cancer cells with stem/progenitor cell properties. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Graphene oxide covalently grafted upconversion nanoparticles for combined NIR mediated imaging and photothermal/photodynamic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinghui; Wang, Hengguo; Liu, Dapeng; Song, Shuyan; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-10-01

    Theranostics, the integration of diagnostics and therapies, has become a new concept in the battles with various major diseases such as cancer. Here, we report a multifunctional nanoplatform, which is developed by covalently grafting core-shell structured upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with nanographene oxide (NGO) via bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG), and then loading phthalocyanine (ZnPc) on the surface of NGO. The obtained UCNPs-NGO/ZnPc nanocomposites are not only be used as upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging probes of cells and whole-body animals with high contrast for diagnosis, but also can generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen under light excitation for photodynamic therapy (PDT), as well as rapidly and efficiently convert the 808 nm laser energy into thermal energy for photothermal therapy (PTT). A remarkably improved and synergistic therapeutic effect compared to PTT or PDT alone is obtained, providing high therapeutic efficiency for cancer treatment. Therefore, benefiting from the unique multifunctional hybrid nanostructure, UCNPs-NGO/ZnPc nanocomposites developed herein are promising as an integrated theranostic probe for potential UCL image-guided combinatorial PDT/PTT of cancer. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Combining Clozapine and Talk Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Kevin

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. This paper reviews articles concerning clozapine therapy. It considers its benefits and dangers in various situations, and how it can be successfully combined with talk therapies. Studies are reviewed concerning patients in outpatient clinics, partial hospitalization…

  11. Taxanes alone or in combination with anthracyclines as first-line therapy of patients with metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Buyse, Marc; Sledge, George; Carmichael, James; Lueck, Hans-Joachim; Mackey, John R.; Nabholtz, Jean-Marc; Paridaens, Robert; Biganzoli, Laura; Jassem, Jacek; Bontenbal, Marijke; Bonneterre, Jacques; Chan, Stephen; Basaran, Gul Atalay; Therasse, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Taxanes (paclitaxel or docetaxel) have been sequenced or combined with anthracyclines (doxorubicin or epirubicin) for the first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer. This meta-analysis uses data from all relevant trials to detect any advantages of taxanes in terms of tumor response,

  12. PALBOCICLIB IN COMBINATION WITH HORMONE THERAPY FOR LUMINAL HER2-NEGATIVE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER: NEW HIGHLY EFFECTIVE STRATEGY OF DRUG TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Artamonova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers a new oral targeted drug palbociclib and its place in treatment of luminal (estrogen receptor-positive HER2– metastatic breast cancer. The results of randomized clinical trials have shown that inclusion of palbociclib in various hormone therapy regimens for treatment of HER2– metastatic breast cancer with expression of estrogen receptors allows to significantly improve clinical outcomes and increase survival, objective response rate and its duration, as well as clinical benefit rate (CBR. Addition of palbociclib to letrozole in the 1st line hormone therapy or to fulvestrant in patients with progression at/after previous endocrine therapy increased progression-free survival in all groups irrespective of clinical characteristics, tumor progression, or expression of molecular markers mediating development of hormone resistance. The main adverse events associated with palbociclib were neutropenia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, but overall hematological toxicity was manageable, and the therapy itself was safe. This strategy received a “breakthrough therapy designation” from the experts and combines proven effectiveness and satisfactory tolerability, allows to maintain high quality of life, and should be prescribed to patients with luminal HER2– metastatic breast cancer.

  13. Combined therapy with {sup 131}I and retinoic acid in Korean patients with radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seung-hwan; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Do Joon; Cho, Bo Youn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University WCU Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of redifferentiation therapy using retinoic acid (RA) in combination with {sup 131}I therapy, and to identify biological parameters that predict therapeutic response in Korean patients with radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 47 patients (13 men, 34 women; age 54.2 {+-} 13.6 years) with radioiodine-refractory PTC underwent therapy consisting of consecutive treatment with {sup 131}I and RA. Each {sup 131}I/RA treatment cycle involved the administration of oral isotretinoin for 6 weeks at 1-1.5 mg/kg daily followed by a single oral dose of {sup 131}I (range 5.5-16.7 GBq). Therapeutic responses were determined using serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and the change in tumour size 6 months after completing the {sup 131}I/RA therapy. Biological parameters and pathological parameters before and after combined therapy were compared. After completing {sup 131}I/RA therapy, 1 patient showed a complete response, 9 partial response, 9 stable disease, and 28 progressive disease, representing an overall response rate of 21.3%. Univariate analysis revealed that an age of <45 years and a persistently high serum Tg level were related to a good response. No clinical response was achieved when metastases showing no iodine uptake were present. Multivariate regression analysis showed that an age of <45 years was significantly associated with a good response. Of the 24 patients with well-differentiated carcinoma, 5 (20.8%) responded to {sup 131}I/RA therapy, whereas all 6 patients with poorly differentiated carcinoma failed to respond. {sup 131}I/RA therapy was found to elicit a response rate of 21.3% among patients with radioiodine-refractory PTC, and an age of <45 years was found to be significantly associated with a good response. (orig.)

  14. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000 members who specialize in treating cancer with radiation therapies. ASTRO is dedicated to improving patient care through ... rtanswers.org © ASTRO 2016 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Gynecologic cancers include malignancies of ...

  15. Unmet Medical Needs in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment: How to Design Pre-Emptive Combination Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Karachaliou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding catalogue of human oncogenic mutations, coupled with difficulties in identifying the cellular targets of active compounds in phenotypic screens, has refocused drug discovery efforts on inhibitors of specific cellular proteins. This new ‘target-based’ approach has enjoyed some spectacular successes in several types of tumours, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations occur in 17% of NSCLC patients, with notable response to single agent therapy. Unfortunately, all patients eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, while complete remission rate to EGFR TKIs monotherapy is low. Priming BIM, a proapoptotic signalling BH3-only protein, induces sensitivity to erlotinib [Tarceva®] in EGFR-mutant cell lines. Synthetic lethal approaches and pre-emptive therapies based on the initial expression of BIM may significantly improve treatment outcomes. EGFR mutations result in transient pro-death imbalance of survival and apoptotic signalling in response to EGFR inhibition. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 is essential to the balance between extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide- 3-kinase/protein kinase B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity. Furthermore, stromal hepatocyte growth factor confers EGFR TKI resistance and induces inter-receptor crosstalk with Ephrin Type-A receptor 2, CDCP1, AXL, and JAK1. A better understanding of the complex cancer molecular biology of EGFR mutant lung cancer is crucial for development of effective treatment and design of successful future clinical studies.

  16. Preoperative combined modality therapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, prolonged infusion 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy in localized esophageal cancer: preliminary results of a Minnie Pearl Cancer Research Network phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meluch, A A; Hainsworth, J D; Gray, J R; Thomas, M; Whitworth, P L; Davis, J L; Greco, F A

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, toxicity, and therapeutic efficacy of 1-hour paclitaxel, carboplatin, continuous low-dose infusional 5-fluorouracil, and concurrent radiation therapy administered preoperatively in patients with localized esophageal cancer. Forty-nine patients with localized esophageal cancer, of either squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma histology, were enrolled into this phase II trial. All patients were candidates for surgical resection and received the following neoadjuvant therapy: paclitaxel, 200 mg/m2, 1 hour IV on days 1 and 22; carboplatin, AUC 6.0, IV on days 1 and 22; 5-fluorouracil, 225 mg/m2/day, continuous IV infusion on days 1 to 42; and radiation therapy, 45 Gy, administered by 1.8-Gy daily fractions beginning on day 1 of chemotherapy. Upon completion of this neoadjuvant regimen, patients were reevaluated, and all responding patients were resected within 6 weeks of completing neoadjuvant treatment. Administration of this combined modality regimen was associated with moderate toxicity and was tolerated by most patients. Leukopenia (65%) and esophagitis (31%) were the most common toxicities. Most patients did not require nutritional support. There were no treatment-related deaths during neoadjuvant therapy; however, three patients (9%) experienced postoperative death. Preliminary assessment of treatment efficacy is encouraging, with 17 of 37 evaluable patients (46%) achieving pathologic complete remission and an additional 11 patients (30%) having only microscopic residual disease. This novel, combined-modality neoadjuvant approach for the treatment of localized esophageal carcinoma is feasible and can be administered with toxicity that compares favorably to previously reported neoadjuvant regimens containing high-dose cisplatin. Preliminary assessment of efficacy is also encouraging, with 46% of patients having pathologic complete response. Further follow-up and larger numbers of patients are required to assess efficacy more

  17. Liposome based radiosensitizer cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourhassan, Houman

    Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapeutics have been used in the treatment of a variety of cancers and are feasible for use as mono-therapeutics as well as for combination therapy in conjunction with other modalities. Despite widespread use of liposomal drugs in cancer patient care, insufficient drug...... in tumor-bearing mice.The safety and efficacy of sPLA2-sensitive liposomal L-OHP was assessed in sPLA2-deficient FaDu hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and sPLA2-expressing Colo205 colorectal adenocarcinoma. Also, the feasibility of multimodal cancer therapy employing L-OHP encapsulated in MMP....... And may thereby improve therapeutic outcome. Two types of enzymes commonly overexpressed in solid cancers and exploited for liposomal drug delivery purposes, are secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).Furthermore, as platinum-based chemotherapeutic compounds are renowned...

  18. Fighting liver cancer with combination immunotherapies | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial testing the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatment combinations against liver cancer is enrolling patients at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Individually, immunotherapy drugs harness the power of the human immune system to better identify and kill cancer cells. Now, researchers at the NIH’s Center for Cancer Research have begun to find evidence that the drugs may work far more effectively when taken in combination with other therapies and with each other than when taken alone.

  19. [A Case of HER2-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Effectively Treated with Trastuzumab, Capecitabine, and Cisplatin Combination Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Yoshio; Kitamura, Shosuke; Okanobu, Hideharu; Sakimoto, Hideto; Nishida, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    We reported a case of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases that responded well to a combination of trastuzumab, capecitabine, and cisplatin(T-XP therapy)as first-line chemotherapy. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in December 2012 for liver dysfunction. Based on computed tomography(CT)and gastroendoscopy findings, he was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases. Because HER2 protein overexpression was observed in the primary tumor, he was treated with T-XP therapy. After 5 courses of treatment, the sizes of the primary tumor and multiple liver metastases were reduced on CT scans. In March 2013, a Billroth I distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection was performed. Liver metastasis was not detected. No residual cancer cells were found in the stomach or lymph nodes. The patient subsequently received oral administration of S-1 alone for 2 weeks followed by a 2-week rest period as 1 course. This was repeated for 19 courses. The postoperative course was uneventful, and there was no detectable liver metastasis 36 months after the original diagnosis. Therefore, T-XP therapy is an option for the management of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis.

  20. Use of Combination Thermal Therapy and Radiation in Breast-Conserving Treatment of Extensive Intraductal Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    radiation therapy (RT) to the left breast (Abstr.) IntJ Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 36 (suppl. 1): 181, 1996 75. Wong JS, Nixon AJ, Recht A, Beard CJ, Busse...cancer (Abstr.) IntJ Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 36 (suppl. 1): 275, 1996 32& Abram Recht - Bibliography -* 78. Harrigan PM, Recht A, Payne S, Come SE, Hayes DF...Vicini F, Wazer D, Recht A, Strawderman M, Lichter A , The use of radiotherapy in the conservative management of Paget’s disease (Abstr.) IntJ Radiat

  1. Doxorubicin/gold-loaded core/shell nanoparticles for combination therapy to treat cancer through the enhanced tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungim; Oh, Keun Sang; Park, Dal Yong; Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Beom Suk; Kim, In San; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Sang, Yoon Kim; Yuk, Soon Hong

    2016-04-28

    A combination therapy consisting of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is performed using the core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) containing gold NPs and doxorubicin (DOX). Gold NPs in the core/shell NPs were utilized as a radiosensitizer. To examine the morphology and size distribution of the core/shell NPs, transmittance electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used. The in vitro release behavior, cellular uptake and toxicity were also observed to verify the functionality of the core/shell NPs as a nanocarrier. To demonstrate the advantage of the core/shell NPs over traditional gold NPs reported in the combination therapy, we evaluated the accumulation behavior of the core/shell NPs at the tumor site using the biodistribution. Antitumor efficacy was observed with and without radiation to evaluate the role of gold NPs as a radiosensitizer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Options for investigative postsurgical therapy for gastric cancer, and case report of using the option for combined immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, P

    2001-02-01

    The investigative therapy for a senior patient after radical subtotal gastroesophagectomy for regional lymph node and proximal esophagus metastasized adenocarcinoma (stage IIIA, T3, N 1 M0) of the cardioesophageal junction is reported. The case has several unusual features: (1) the patient is the author and is not a physician; (2) in the absence of codified postsurgical treatment, he used his academic biomedical background, commercial associations, and international contacts to find and prioritize six clinically tested options for investigative postsurgical therapy; (3) after unsuccessful efforts to append ongoing clinical trials of new immunotherapies for breast adenocarcinoma (the first two therapy options), an innovative protocol was designed and gained allowance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for his use of combined nonspecific immunotherapy and chemotherapy based on extensive trials in South Korea that showed the synergistic effect of the two postsurgical therapies used together. A potent, new, nonspecific immunostimulant (DetoxPC) was injected subcutaneously in 10 diminishing doses during 105 weeks. Two standard chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C) were injected intravenously in six equal doses during three weeks. Five years after the surgery, the patient enjoys good health without signs or symptoms of recurrence or metastasis. He discusses his perspectives on future clinical trials and on a patient actively pursuing investigative postsurgical therapy for a malignancy when otherwise poor survival is indicated.

  3. Panitumumab in combination with infusional oxaliplatin and oral capecitabine for conversion therapy in patients with colon cancer and advanced liver metastases. The MetaPan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Francesco; Artale, Salvatore; Marino, Donatella; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Cascinu, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Tampellini, Marco; Di Fabio, Francesca; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; De Carlis, Luciano; Pugliese, Raffaele; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Gioeni, Luisa; Siena, Salvatore; Aglietta, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Preoperative chemotherapy improves the outcome in patients with colorectal cancer with liver metastases. In the current study, the authors evaluated the activity of a conversion treatment with the combination of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) used in association with panitumumab in patients with unresectable, liver-only, metastatic colon cancer. Chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable liver metastases from colon cancer with no other metastatic disease sites were enrolled. All patients received upfront therapy with XELOX plus panitumumab (P-XELOX) and were reevaluated for resectability every 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, the percentage of patients whose disease became radically resectable, and the safety of the P-XELOX combination. A total of 49 patients were recruited, 35 of whom had wild-type KRAS (wtKRAS) and 14 of whom (who were enrolled before study amendment) had unknown (9 patients) or mutated (5 patients) KRAS mutational status. Forty-six patients were evaluable for response. After conversion P-XELOX therapy, the ORR in the general population was 54%, with 2 complete responses, 23 partial responses, and 14 cases of stable disease. In patients with wtKRAS, the ORR of the patients reached 65% (2 CRs and 19 PRs), which allowed 15 patients with initial unresectable liver metastasis to be reclassified as having resectable disease. Survival analysis demonstrated a median progression-free survival of 8.5 months and a median OS of 21.9 months. Patients who underwent surgery were found to have a significantly better OS when compared with those who did not undergo surgery (P Conversion P-XELOX therapy yields high response and resectability rates for patients with metastatic colon cancer with extensive liver involvement. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  4. The Clinical Applications of Combined HBV Approach to Chemotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer while Adoption of Antivirus Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincan DUAN

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer has become the most serious malignant tumor threating the human beings’ health and life, and chemotherapy postponing or suspending contributes to one of the prognostic causes. In this research, we try to explore the importance of combined HBV approach to chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer while adoption of antivirus therapy. Methods Select 60 cases of patients suffering from combined HBV ⅢA non-small cell lung cancer, who were divided into two groups, the experimental group and control group. For the experimental group, a NP-approach chemotherapy was adopted along with addition of Lamivudine (NP+Lam group, while for the control group, only NP-approach was applied (NP group, in order to compare whether there would be any statistical difference between the two groups in terms of damage to the functions of liver and immune system as well as reactivation of HBV. Results The blood serum of the patients from both of the two groups rises, with the NP group being prominently higher than the NP+Lam group on an average (P<0.05. Upon completion of the chemotherapy, the percentage of CD3+/CD4+ and CD4+/ CD8+ decreases. As the percentage of CD8+ increases, the differences in these items turn out to be marked(P<0.05. The reactivation of HBV and postponing or suspending of the chemotherapy are also find prominently different (P<0.05. Conclusion It is necessary to use antiviral therapy while the patents with combined non-small cell lung cancer receive therapy.

  5. Gold nanoshelled liquid perfluorocarbon nanocapsules for combined dual modal ultrasound/CT imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hengte; Yue, Xiuli; Wang, Jinrui; Xing, Sen; Zhang, Qian; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie; Wang, Shumin; Jin, Yushen

    2014-03-26

    The integration of multimodal contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging and therapeutic capabilities could utilize imaging guided therapy to plan the treatment strategy based on the diagnostic results and to guide/monitor the therapeutic procedures. Herein, gold nanoshelled perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) nanocapsules with PEGylation (PGsP NCs) are constructed by oil-in-water emulsion method to form polymeric PFOB nanocapsules, followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. PGsP NCs could not only provide excellent contrast enhancement for dual modal ultrasound and CT imaging in vitro and in vivo, but also serve as efficient photoabsorbers for photothermal ablation of tumors on xenografted nude mouse model. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of gold nanoshell serving as both CT contrast agents and photoabsorbers for photothermal therapy. The novel multifunctional nanomedicine would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information to guide more accurate and effective cancer therapy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparison of palbociclib in combination with letrozole or fulvestrant with endocrine therapies for advanced/metastatic breast cancer: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirila, Costel; Mitra, Debanjali; Colosia, Ann; Ling, Caroline; Odom, Dawn; Iyer, Shrividya; Kaye, James A

    2017-08-01

    Palbociclib is the first cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor approved in the United States for HR+/HER2- advanced/metastatic breast cancer, in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy in postmenopausal women or with fulvestrant in women with disease progression following endocrine therapy. We compared progression-free survival (PFS) and discontinuations due to adverse events for palbociclib combinations against other endocrine therapies using a mixed-treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. A systematic literature review identified relevant trials. Separate analyses were conducted for each palbociclib combination using a Bayesian approach. Treatment rankings were established using the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA). Sixty-five unique studies met inclusion criteria. Palbociclib plus letrozole had the highest SUCRA value (99.9%) and was associated with significantly longer PFS than all comparators in treatment-naïve patients (hazard ratios [HRs] ranged from 0.41 to 0.58). Palbociclib plus fulvestrant had the second highest SUCRA value (93.9%) and, in previously treated patients, yielded significantly longer PFS than most comparators (HRs ranged from 0.26 to 0.46); the exception was everolimus plus exemestane, with similar PFS (HR, 1.04; 95% credible interval [CrI], 0.58-1.76). Palbociclib plus fulvestrant was associated with significantly lower odds of discontinuation due to adverse events than everolimus plus exemestane (odds ratio, 0.14; 95% CrI, 0.05-0.39). The results suggest that the two palbociclib combinations yielded significantly greater PFS than endocrine therapy in treatment-naïve and previously treated patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer. Palbociclib plus fulvestrant was associated with significantly less toxicity than everolimus plus exemestane.

  7. Bioinformatics-driven discovery of rational combination for overcoming EGFR-mutant lung cancer resistance to EGFR therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Vasu, Vihas T.; Mishra, Rangnath; Singleton, Katherine R.; Yoo, Minjae; Leach, Sonia M.; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; Mason, Robert J.; Kang, Jaewoo; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Kern, Jeffrey A.; Heasley, Lynn E.; Finigan, James H.; Tan, Aik Choon

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been widely and successfully used in treating NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations. Unfortunately, the duration of response is short-lived, and all patients eventually relapse by acquiring resistance mechanisms. Result: We performed an integrative systems biology approach to determine essential kinases that drive EGFR-TKI resistance in cancer cell lines. We used a series of bioinformatics methods to analyze and integrate the functional genetics screen and RNA-seq data to identify a set of kinases that are critical in survival and proliferation in these TKI-resistant lines. By connecting the essential kinases to compounds using a novel kinase connectivity map (K-Map), we identified and validated bosutinib as an effective compound that could inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in TKI-resistant lines. A rational combination of bosutinib and gefitinib showed additive and synergistic effects in cancer cell lines resistant to EGFR TKI alone. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a bioinformatics-driven discovery roadmap for drug repurposing and development in overcoming resistance in EGFR-mutant NSCLC, which could be generalized to other cancer types in the era of personalized medicine. Availability and implementation: K-Map can be accessible at: http://tanlab.ucdenver.edu/kMap. Contact: aikchoon.tan@ucdenver.edu or finiganj@njhealth.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24812339

  8. Dasatinib synergizes with both cytotoxic and signal transduction inhibitors in heterogeneous breast cancer cell lines--lessons for design of combination targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian J; Whichard, Zakary L; Corey, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies have emerged as the leading theme in cancer therapeutics. Multi-cytotoxic drug regimens have been highly successful, yet many studies in targeted therapeutics have centered on a single agent. We investigated whether the Src/Abl kinase inhibitor dasatinib displays synergy with other agents in molecularly heterogeneous breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7, SKBR-3, and MDA-MB-231 display different signaling and gene signatures profiles due to expression of the estrogen receptor, ErbB2, or neither. Cell proliferation was measured following treatment with dasatinib±cytotoxic (paclitaxel, ixabepilone) or molecularly targeted agents (tamoxifen, rapamycin, sorafenib, pan PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126). Dose-responses for single or combination drugs were calculated and analyzed by the Chou-Talalay method. The drugs with the greatest level of synergy with dasatinib were rapamycin, ixabepilone, and sorafenib, for the MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and SK-BR-3 cell lines respectively. However, dasatinib synergized with both cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents in all three molecularly heterogeneous breast cancer cell lines. These results suggest that effectiveness of rationally designed therapies may not entirely rest on precise identification of gene signatures or molecular profiling. Since a systems analysis that reveals emergent properties cannot be easily performed for each cancer case, multi-drug regimens in the near future will still involve empirical design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining the single-walled carbon nanotubes with low voltage electrical stimulation to improve accumulation of nanomedicines in tumor for effective cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chi; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2016-03-10

    Effective delivery of biomolecules or functional nanoparticles into target sites has always been the primary objective for cancer therapy. We demonstrated that by combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with low-voltage (LV) electrical stimulation, biomolecule delivery can be effectively enhanced through reversible electroporation (EP). Clear pore formation in the cell membrane is observed due to LV (50V) pulse electrical stimulation amplified by SWNTs. The cell morphology remains intact and high cell viability is retained. This modality of SWNT + LV pulses can effectively transfer both small molecules and macromolecules into cells through reversible EP. The results of animal studies also suggest that treatment with LV pulses alone cannot increase vascular permeability in tumors unless after the injection of SWNTs. The nanoparticles can cross the permeable vasculature, which enhances their accumulation in the tumor tissue. Therefore, in cancer treatment, both SWNT + LV pulse treatment followed by the injection of LIPO-DOX® and SWNT/DOX + LV pulse treatment can increase tumor inhibition and delay tumor growth. This novel treatment modality applied in a human cancer xenograft model can provide a safe and effective therapy using various nanomedicines in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  11. Artificial intelligence in drug combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F

    2018-02-09

    Currently, the development of medicines for complex diseases requires the development of combination drug therapies. It is necessary because in many cases, one drug cannot target all necessary points of intervention. For example, in cancer therapy, a physician often meets a patient having a genomic profile including more than five molecular aberrations. Drug combination therapy has been an area of interest for a while, for example the classical work of Loewe devoted to the synergism of drugs was published in 1928-and it is still used in calculations for optimal drug combinations. More recently, over the past several years, there has been an explosion in the available information related to the properties of drugs and the biomedical parameters of patients. For the drugs, hundreds of 2D and 3D molecular descriptors for medicines are now available, while for patients, large data sets related to genetic/proteomic and metabolomics profiles of the patients are now available, as well as the more traditional data relating to the histology, history of treatments, pretreatment state of the organism, etc. Moreover, during disease progression, the genetic profile can change. Thus, the ability to optimize drug combinations for each patient is rapidly moving beyond the comprehension and capabilities of an individual physician. This is the reason, that biomedical informatics methods have been developed and one of the more promising directions in this field is the application of artificial intelligence (AI). In this review, we discuss several AI methods that have been successfully implemented in several instances of combination drug therapy from HIV, hypertension, infectious diseases to cancer. The data clearly show that the combination of rule-based expert systems with machine learning algorithms may be promising direction in this field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer after unsuccesfull radical radiotherapy and combined therapy; Leczenie pooperacyjne niepowodzen radykalnej radioterapii oraz wznow po skojarzonym leczeniu raka krtani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szuber, K.; Wewiorska, T.; Rymarz, A.; Pogorzelski, A. [Szpital Wojskowy Nr 1, Rzeszow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In the years 1974-1992 a group of 471 patients was operated for the laryngeal cancer in ENT Department in Rzeszow. In this group, 66 patients were operated on as the result of unsuccessful primary radiotherapy. The c, r, p TNM classification of these group and 3, 5 and 10 years survival which was 48, 36 and 23 percent respectively are presented. The other group is 10 patients operated for the reason of unsuccesfull combined therapy (surgery + radiotherapy). In this group two patients during 3 years, and next one during 5 months are without evidence of disease from the last operation. (author) 5 refs, 1 fig

  13. [Outcomes and predictors of T3a prostate cancer treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhipeng; Yan, Weigang; Li, Hanzhong; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Zhien; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of T3a prostate cancer treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy, and analyse the influence of preoperative factors on prognosis. From January 2003 to December 2008, 38 pactients with T3a prostate cancer aged from 48 to 81 years (mean: 71 years) were enrolled, with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels ranged from 10.000 to 99.800 µg/L (mean: 56.300 µg/L), Gleason score from 5 to 9 (mean: 7.6) and percentage of positive biopsy cores from 10.0% to 100% (mean: 65.3%). All patients were treated by permanent interstitial brachytherapy combined with external radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The predictive factors including patient's age, prostate volume, serum pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score and percentage of positive biopsy cores were used for univariate analysis on biochemical failure-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival. The mean follow-up was 69 months (range: 9-109 months).Nineteen patients experienced biochemical failure. The average biochemical failure time was 13.4 months (range: 1-40 months). There were 13 patients developed as distant metastatic prostate cancer since average 19.7 months (range: 1-70 months) after brachytherapy. Of all patients, 9 died of prostate cancer recurrence, while 6 passed away because of other reasons, with an average of 52.2 months (range: 9.0- 98.5 months). The 5-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) rate were 44.1%, 68.6%, 82.4 and 75.8%, respectively. Twenty-nine patients experienced grade 1-2 gastrointestinal toxicity and 18 patients experienced grade 1-2 genitourinary toxicity. In univariate analysis, the percentage of positive biopsy cores was significantly correlated with BFFS (χ(2) = 17.240, P = 0.000), DMFS (χ(2) = 18.641, P = 0.000) and OS (χ(2

  14. Oncolytic gene therapy combined with double suicide genes for human bile duct cancer in nude mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoh; Honda, Kazuo; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Nobuaki

    2009-11-01

    The prognosis of bile duct cancer is quite poor because of the low resection rate and the tolerance of the cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the feasibility of an oncolytic adenovector with two suicide genes for the treatment of bile duct cancer. We developed a new conditionally replicating adenovirus (AxE1CAUT) with the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene, and compared its antitumor effects with a replication defective adenovector (AxCAUT) that has both the UPRT and HSV-tk genes. We evaluated the effects of these adenoviruses with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and/or ganciclovir (GCV) on human cholangiocarcinoma cells (HuCCT1, with mutant p53) in vitro and in vivo. The drug sensitivity of HuCCT1 cells to 5-FU and/or GCV was increased with an increase in the multiplicity of infection (MOI). The antitumor effect increased when 5-FU and GCV were given at the same time. Subcutaneous tumors of nude mice directly injected with AxCAUT showed a higher response to 5-FU/GCV than 5-FU or GCV alone, but there was no difference between AxCAUT and AxE1CAUT. However, AxE1CAUT with 5-FU/GCV produced a decrease in tumor weight and better survival than AxCAUT in a peritoneal dissemination model infected by intraperitoneal administration of the adenovectors. Oncolytic double suicide gene therapy is effective against human cholangiocarcinoma cells in nude mouse models.

  15. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  16. Combined effect of topical arsenic trioxide and radiation therapy on skin-infiltrating lesions of breast cancer-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yuen-Liang; Chang, Hen-Hong; Huang, Ming-Jer; Chang, Kou-Hwa; Su, Wen-Hao; Chen, Hong-Wen; Chung, Chang-Hung; Wang, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Hua; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2003-11-01

    It has been reported that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an apoptosis inducer and radiation sensitizer for various cancer cell lines. In this study of breast cancer patients, we examined the combined effect of topical As2O3 and radiation therapy on fungating and/or skin-infiltrating lesions of breast cancer. The dermatological, gastrointestinal, hematological, renal and hepatic toxicities of the treatment were also monitored. As2O3 gel (0.05%) was applied to tumor lesions 1 h prior to delivery of each fraction, with the gel removed about 5 min before the irradiation. Superficial radiation was delivered using an electron beam from a linear accelerator. Every week, the tumor lesions were photographed to evaluate effectiveness, and blood was sampled to monitor changes in hemogram and biochemical profile. Seven breast cancer patients with cutaneous metastasis were enrolled in this study. In terms of tumor, the rates for complete, partial response and stable disease were 42.9 (three of seven), 42.9 (three of seven) and 14.3% (one of seven), respectively. The skin pain, assessed by a visual analog scale, and secretion from all of the seven superficial and fungating wounds decreased markedly after treatment. Significant bone marrow suppression or granulocytosis was not noted. Further, changes in renal and hepatic function were also not significant. It seems reasonable to conclude that As2O3 may be an effective and safe radiosensitizer for palliative radiotherapy for skin-infiltrating lesions of breast cancer.

  17. Safety and tolerability of combination therapy vs. standard treatment alone for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. James Gulley is leading a team to test the safety and tolerability of the combination of nivolumab and CV301 to see if it can improve the survival for patientis with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.  Learn more...

  18. Chemo-photodynamic combined gene therapy and dual-modal cancer imaging achieved by pH-responsive alginate/chitosan multilayer-modified magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Chen, Yin; Chen, Zhongyuan; Geng, Yue; Xie, Xiaoxue; Shen, Xue; Li, Tingting; Li, Shun; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2017-05-02

    Multifunctional theranostics have offered some interesting new opportunities for cancer therapy and diagnosis in the last decade. Herein, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs) were designed and synthesized, then the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) and antitumor drug doxorubicin (Dox) were adsorbed onto the M-MSNs. Biocompatible alginate/chitosan polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) were assembled on the M-MSNs to achieve a pH-responsive drug delivery system and adsorb P-gp shRNA for reversing the multidrug resistance. The obtained M-MSN(Dox/Ce6)/PEM/P-gp shRNA nanocomposites were characterized using TEM, SEM, X-ray diffraction, BET, FTIR and electrophoresis. The nanocomposites with average diameter of 280 nm exhibited a pH-responsive drug release profile, and more singlet oxygen generation in cancer cells after laser illumination. CCK-8 assay and calcein-AM/PI co-staining showed that the multifunctional nanocomplexes significantly increased cell apoptosis in vitro. With tumor-bearing Balb/c mice employed as the animal model, combined photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy was carried out, also achieving synergistic anti-tumor effects in vivo. The cores of bifunctional Fe3O4-Au nanoparticles in the multifunctional nanocomposites enabled dual-modal MR and CT imaging, which illustrated strong tumor uptake of these nanocomposites after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. This work highlights the great potential of magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites as a multifunctional delivery platform, which is promising for imaging-guided cancer combination therapy with high efficacy.

  19. Fertility preservation by photodynamic therapy combined with conization in young patients with early stage cervical cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min Chul; Jung, Sang Geun; Park, Hyun; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Chan; Hwang, Yeun Young; Kim, Seung Jo

    2014-09-01

    Vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT) is the standard fertility preserving procedure for early stage cervical cancer patients. There have been reports in the literature, however, that VRT to be too radical procedure for early stage cervical cancer, as its post-operative obstetric morbidity was high. In this study, PDT with Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) or conization was investigated as a less radical fertility preserving treatment alternative to VRT for early stage cervical cancer patients. We analyzed data of 21 patients with early stage cervical cancer (stages IA-IIA) who underwent PDT with LEEP/conization from 2003 to 2012. LEEP or conization was performed before PDT in every case. For patients in stage IB1 or above, only those who were confirmed to be free of malignancy in frozen section by pelvic lymph node dissection received PDT. Surface photoillumination with red laser light at a wavelength of 630nm was applied to the cervix and the endocervical canal 48h after intravenous injection of 2mg/kg of photosensitizer. Median age of the 21 patients was 31 years old (range: 22-43), 19 patients (90.5%) of whom were nulliparous. Majority of the lesions were at stage IA1 (47.6%) or IB1 (42.9%). Histologically, 80.9% were squamous cell carcinoma. 5 patients (23.8%) had a lesion of 2cm or larger in diameter. There was one recurrence (4.7%) and no death during 52.6 months (6-114 months). Of the 13 women who attempted to get pregnant, 10 (76.9%) women conceived a total of 11 pregnancies. The first and second trimester miscarriages were 2 and 1 respectively, and 7 (70%) of the pregnancies reached the third trimester, of which 5 delivered at term. No tumor-related deaths or PDT-related severe adverse effects were noted. PDT combined with LEEP/conization could be an effective fertility sparing conservative treatment for young patients with early stage cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. HER-3 peptide vaccines/mimics: Combined therapy with IGF-1R, HER-2, and HER-1 peptides induces synergistic antitumor effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Megan Jo; Foy, Kevin C; Overholser, Jay P; Nahta, Rita; Kaumaya, Pravin Tp

    2014-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER-3/ErbB3) is a unique member of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors, because it lacks intrinsic kinase activity and ability to heterodimerize with other members. HER-3 is frequently upregulated in cancers with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER-1/ErbB1) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/ErBB2) overexpression, and targeting HER-3 may provide a route for overcoming resistance to agents that target EGFR or HER-2. We have previously developed vaccines and peptide mimics for HER-1, HER-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, we extend our studies by identifying and evaluating novel HER-3 peptide epitopes encompassing residues 99-122, 140-162, 237-269 and 461-479 of the HER-3 extracellular domain as putative B-cell epitopes for active immunotherapy against HER-3 positive cancers. We show that the HER-3 vaccine antibodies and HER-3 peptide mimics induced antitumor responses: inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, inhibition of receptor phosphorylation, induction of apoptosis and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Two of the HER-3 epitopes 237-269 (domain II) and 461-479 (domain III) significantly inhibited growth of xenografts originating from both pancreatic (BxPC3) and breast (JIMT-1) cancers. Combined therapy of HER-3 (461-471) epitope with HER-2 (266-296), HER-2 (597-626), HER-1 (418-435) and insulin-like growth factor receptor type I (IGF-1R) (56-81) vaccine antibodies and peptide mimics show enhanced antitumor effects in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study establishes the hypothesis that combination immunotherapy targeting different signal transduction pathways can provide effective antitumor immunity and long-term control of HER-1 and HER-2 overexpressing cancers.

  1. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. Testosterone is one ...

  2. Fertility and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-05-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life.

  3. Superior survival with capecitabine plus docetaxel combination therapy in anthracycline-pretreated patients with advanced breast cancer: phase III trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Miles, David; Vukelja, Svetislava; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Ayoub, Jean-Pierre; Cervantes, Guadalupe; Fumoleau, Pierre; Jones, Stephen; Lui, Wing-Yiu; Mauriac, Louis; Twelves, Chris; Van Hazel, Guy; Verma, Shailendra; Leonard, Robert

    2002-06-15

    Docetaxel and capecitabine, a tumor-activated oral fluoropyrimidine, show high single-agent efficacy in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and synergy in preclinical studies. This international phase III trial compared efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine/docetaxel therapy with single-agent docetaxel in anthracycline-pretreated patients with MBC. Patients were randomized to 21-day cycles of oral capecitabine 1,250 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1 to 14 plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) on day 1 (n = 255) or to docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 (n = 256). Capecitabine/docetaxel resulted in significantly superior efficacy in time to disease progression (TTP) (hazard ratio, 0.652; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.545 to 0.780; P =.0001; median, 6.1 v 4.2 months), overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.775; 95% CI, 0.634 to 0.947; P =.0126; median, 14.5 v 11.5 months), and objective tumor response rate (42% v 30%, P =.006) compared with docetaxel. Gastrointestinal side effects and hand-foot syndrome were more common with combination therapy, whereas myalgia, arthralgia, and neutropenic fever/sepsis were more common with single-agent docetaxel. More grade 3 adverse events occurred with combination therapy (71% v 49%, respectively), whereas grade 4 events were slightly more common with docetaxel (31% v 25% with combination). The significantly superior TTP and survival achieved with the addition of capecitabine to docetaxel 75 mg/m(2), with the manageable toxicity profile, indicate that this combination provides clear benefits over single-agent docetaxel 100 mg/m(2). Docetaxel/capecitabine therapy is an important treatment option for women with anthracycline-pretreated MBC.

  4. Combination chemotherapy versus single-agent therapy as first- and second-line treatment in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensuu, H; Holli, K; Heikkinen, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report results of a randomized prospective study that compared single agents of low toxicity given both as the first-line and second-line chemotherapy with combination chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer with distant metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients in the single-agent arm...... three times per week (CEF) followed by M 8 mg/m2 plus vinblastine (V) 6 mg/m2 every 4 weeks. Exclusion criteria included age greater than 70 years, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status greater than 2, prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and presence of liver metastases in patients...... younger than 50. RESULTS: An objective response (complete [CR] or partial [PR]) was obtained in 55%, 48%, 16%, and 7% of patients treated with CEF, E, M, and MV, respectively. A response to CEF tended to last longer than a response to E (median, 12 v 10.5 months; P = .07). Treatment-related toxicity...

  5. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  6. Re: Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined AndrogenDeprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D. Mason

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No certain treatment recommendations were given for locally advanced or high-risk prostate cancer in the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines (1. In the guidelines, studies supporting surgery or radiotherapy (RT were listed, and the readers were left alone to make their own decisions. In the present study, Mason et al. reported the impact of adding RT to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. One thousand two hundred and five patients with T3- 4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either PSA more than 40 μg/L or PSA 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomized to ADT alone (n=602 or to ADT+RT (n=603. A lower dose radiation 64 to 69 Gy was used for RT. Overall survival (OS risk reduction was 30% for ADT+RT group (P<0.001 at a median follow-up of 8 years. Cancer-specific survival (CSS was significantly improved by the addition of RT to ADT (HR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.61; p<0.001. Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity. However, reported frequency of ADT-related toxicities (impotence, hot flushes, urinary frequency, ischemia, and hypertension were similar for both arms. The present study provided results of high-risk patients in a longer median follow-up time than SPCG-7 study (2. Because the study took place between 1995 and 2005, less than 70 Gy was used for RT. Even at lower radiation doses, the authors confirmed that adding RT to ADT improved both OS and cancer-specific survival (CSS with minimal general toxicity. In the modern era, improved RT techniques may help achieve better outcomes with much higher radiation doses without increased morbidity in this group of patients

  7. β-Lapachone and Paclitaxel Combination Micelles with Improved Drug Encapsulation and Therapeutic Synergy as Novel Nanotherapeutics for NQO1-Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Kuan; Liu, Chun; Gao, Jinming; Qian, Feng

    2015-11-02

    β-Lapachone (LPC) is a novel cytotoxic agent that is bioactivated by NADP(H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), an enzyme elevated in a variety of tumors, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer. Despite its unique mechanism of action, its clinical evaluation has been largely hindered by low water solubility, short blood half-life, and narrow therapeutic window. Although encapsulation into poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) micelles could modestly improve its solubility and prolong its half-life, the extremely fast intrinsic crystallization tendency of LPC prevents drug loading higher than ∼2 wt %. The physical stability of the LPC-loaded micelles is also far from satisfactory for further development. In this study, we demonstrate that paclitaxel (PTX), a front-line drug for many cancers, can provide two functions when coencapsulated together with LPC in the PEG-PLA micelles; first, as a strong crystallization inhibitor for LPC, thus to significantly increase the LPC encapsulation efficiency in the micelle from 11.7 ± 2.4% to 100.7 ± 2.2%. The total drug loading efficiency of both PTX and LPC in the combination polymeric micelle reached 100.3 ± 3.0%, and the drug loading density reached 33.2 ± 1.0%. Second, the combination of LPC/PTX demonstrates strong synergistic cytotoxicity effect against the NQO1 overexpressing cancer cells, including A549 NSCLC cells, and several pancreatic cancer cells (combination index drug release study showed that LPC was released faster than PTX either in phosphate-buffered saline (PH = 7.4) or in 1 M sodium salicylate, which agrees with the desired dosing sequence of the two drugs to exert synergistic pharmacologic effect at different cell checkpoints. The PEG-PLA micelles coloaded with LPC and PTX offer a novel nanotherapeutic, with high drug loading, sufficient physical stability, and biological synergy to increase drug delivery efficiency and optimize

  8. Photodynamic therapy of human biliary cancer cell line using combination of phosphorus porphyrins and light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Suzuki, Kou; Yasuda, Masahide; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Imamura, Naoya; Nanashima, Atsushi

    2017-12-15

    A series of phosphorus porphyrin complexes ([(RO)2P(tpp)]Cl, tpp = tetraphenylporphyrinato group, R = -(CH2CH2O)m(CH2)nH; 1a: m = 2, n = 2; 1b: m = 2, n = 4; 1c: m = 2, n = 6; 1d: m = 3, n = 6) were used for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of human biliary cancer cell line (NOZ) when exposed to the irradiation of light emitting diodes (LEDs). A Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing NOZ cells (2000 cell well-1) and 1 (0-100 nM) was introduced into a 96-well microplate and incubated for 24 h to accumulate 1 into the NOZ cells and to multiply the NOZ cells until the cell number reached 104 cells well-1. After replacing the DMEM medium containing 1 with a fresh DMEM medium without 1, the plates were irradiated for 30 min at 610 nm. After incubation was performed for 24 h in dark conditions, the cell viability of the NOZ cells was determined using the MTT assay. The half maximum inhibitory concentrations 50 (IC50) of 1a-1d were found to be in the range of 33.7-58.7 nM for NOZ. These IC50 values for the NOZ were one hundredth the IC50 value (7.57 μM) for mono-l-aspartyl chlorin e6 (laserphyrin®). Thus, it was found that the PDT activity of 1a-1d was much higher than the mono-l-aspartyl chlorin e6. Similarly, IC50 vales of 1a-1d for HeLa cells were found to be 27.8-52.5 nM. This showed that 1a-1d had high photodynamic activity in cancer cells. At the same time, it was speculated that an LED is a useful light source for deactivating the cancer cells because it can excite the sensitizers with peak width in their absorption spectra using the light of the specified wave length with band width of 10-20 nm; LEDs provide a homogeneous light distribution for the target cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  10. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Mirzaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  13. Potential Therapeutic Modalities in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithvi Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of huge concerted efforts, the treatment of cancer, a disease frequently associated with genetic alterations caused due to hereditary or environmental factors, remains a challenge. The last few years have witnessed emergence of several innovative and effective modalities for the treatment of solid tumours and hematological malignancies. Gene therapy has shown enormous potential for cancer treatment, especially for metastatic cancers which unlike localized solid tumours, may not be amenable to surgery or other treatment options. Gene therapy aims to introduce a correct copy of the malfunctioning gene in the tumour environment by using viral or non-viral methods to impede or inhibit its growth. This review provides an overview of three main approaches for cancer gene therapy namely immunotherapy, oncolytic therapy and gene transfer therapy. Immunotherapy augments the host immune system in order to destroy cancer cells while oncolytic therapy uses genetically engineered viruses such as to effectively kill cancer cells. Clinical studies so far have shown that cells can be engineered to express gene products that can specifically target cancer cells and prevents their growth and metastasis. Though gene therapy for cancer is yet to see extensive clinical use, it is likely that in combination with other treatment modalities, it will help in controlling and possibly curing cancer in the near future.

  14. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  15. Combined Ventilation and Perfusion Imaging Correlates With the Dosimetric Parameters of Radiation Pneumonitis in Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Doi, Yoshiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Kawabata, Hideo; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Okabe, Tomoyuki; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate clinical correlations between dosimetric parameters associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) and functional lung imaging. Methods and Materials: Functional lung imaging was performed using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for ventilation imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for perfusion imaging, or both (V/Q-matched region). Using 4D-CT, ventilation imaging was derived from a low attenuation area according to CT numbers below different thresholds (vent-860 and -910). Perfusion imaging at the 10th, 30th, 50th, and 70th percentile perfusion levels (F10-F70) were defined as the top 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% hyperperfused normal lung, respectively. All imaging data were incorporated into a 3D planning system to evaluate correlations between RP dosimetric parameters (where fV20 is the percentage of functional lung volume irradiated with >20 Gy, or fMLD, the mean dose administered to functional lung) and the percentage of functional lung volume. Radiation pneumonitis was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Statistical significance was defined as a P value of <.05. Results: Sixty patients who underwent curative radiation therapy were enrolled (48 patients for non-small cell lung cancer, and 12 patients for small cell lung cancer). Grades 1, 2, and ≥3 RP were observed in 16, 44, and 6 patients, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the percentage of functional lung volume and fV20 (r=0.4475 in vent-860 and 0.3508 in F30) or fMLD (r=0.4701 in vent-860 and 0.3128 in F30) in patients with grade ≥2 RP. F30∩vent-860 results exhibited stronger correlations with fV20 and fMLD in patients with grade ≥2 (r=0.5509 in fV20 and 0.5320 in fMLD) and grade ≥3 RP (r=0.8770 in fV20 and 0.8518 in fMLD). Conclusions: RP dosimetric parameters correlated significantly with functional lung imaging.

  16. Down-regulation of vitamin D receptor in mammospheres: implications for vitamin D resistance in breast cancer and potential for combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehla Pervin

    Full Text Available Vitamin D signaling in mammary cancer stem cells (MCSCs, which are implicated in the initiation and progression of breast cancer, is poorly understood. In this study, we examined vitamin D signaling in mammospheres which are enriched in MCSCs from established breast cancer cell lines. Breast cancer cells positive for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(+ had increased ability to form mammospheres compared to ALDH(- cells. These mammospheres expressed MCSC-specific markers and generated transplantable xenografts in nude mice. Vitamin D receptor (VDR was significantly down-regulated in mammospheres, as well as in ALDH(+ breast cancer cells. TN aggressive human breast tumors as well as transplantable xenografts obtained from SKBR3 expressed significantly lower levels of VDR but higher levels of CD44 expression. Snail was up-regulated in mammospheres isolated from breast cancer cells. Inhibition of VDR expression by siRNA led to a significant change in key EMT-specific transcription factors and increased the ability of these cells to form mammospheres. On the other hand, over-expression of VDR led to a down-regulation of Snail but increased expression of E-cad and significantly compromised the ability of cells to form mammospheres. Mammospheres were relatively insensitive to treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D, the active form of vitamin D, compared to more differentiated cancer cells grown in presence of serum. Treatment of H-Ras transformed HMLE(HRas cells with DETA NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO-donor led to induction of MAP-kinase phosphatase -1 (MKP-1 and dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 in the mammospheres. Combined treatment of these cells with 1,25D and a low-concentration of DETA NONOate led to a significant decrease in the overall size of mammospheres and reduced tumor volume in nude mice. Our findings therefore, suggest that combination therapy using 1,25D with drugs specifically targeting key survival pathways in MCSCs warrant testing in

  17. Rehabilitation in cancer: Training and talking? Effects of physical training versus physical training combined with cognitive-behavioural therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May-de Groot, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. As a result of recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, the number of people surviving cancer is increasing. A subgroup of cancer survivors report long-lasting physical and psychological complaints including decreased cardiorespiratory capacity, decreased physical functioning, and

  18. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ≤18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ≤18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ≤18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ≤18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ≤18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ≤18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation

  19. Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoroenyi Amanam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related death and by 2030, it will be second only to lung cancer. We have seen tremendous advances in therapies for lung cancer as well as other solid tumors using a molecular targeted approach but our progress in treating pancreatic cancer has been incremental with median overall survival remaining less than one year. There is an urgent need for improved therapies with better efficacy and less toxicity. Small molecule inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and immune modulatory therapies have been used. Here we review the progress that we have made with these targeted therapies.

  20. Randomized study comparing full dose monotherapy (S-1 followed by irinotecan) and reduced dose combination therapy (S-1/oxaliplatin followed by S-1/irinotecan) as initial therapy for older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Österlund, Pia; Berglund, Åke

    2017-01-01

    be a sequential full-dose monotherapy chemotherapy approach or a dose-reduced combination chemotherapy approach. The oral 5FU prodrug S-1 seems to have less side effects than capecitabine and should be an optimal drug for older patients, but few data are available. Improved geriatric assessments are needed......-treatment characteristics and geriatric assessments. Discussion: The study will add knowledge on how to treat older mCRC patients who are not candidates for standard combination therapy. Furthermore it may provide understanding of efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy in older cancer patients and thus offer a better......Background: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a disease of older age, but there is a relative lack of knowledge about effects of chemotherapy in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. Little data can guide whether the strategy in older mCRC patients should...

  1. Synergistic enhancement of cancer therapy using a combination of heat shock protein targeted HPMA copolymer-drug conjugates and gold nanorod induced hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nate; Gormley, Adam; Frazier, Nick; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2013-08-28

    In the field of nanomedicine, selective delivery to cancer cells is a common goal, where active targeting strategies are often employed to increase tumor accumulation. In this study, tumor hyperthermia was utilized as a means to increase the active delivery of heat shock protein (HSP) targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-drug conjugates. Following hyperthermia, induced expression of cell surface heat shock protein (HSP) glucose regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) was utilized for targeted drug therapy. Conjugates bearing the anticancer agents aminohexylgeldanamycin (AHGDM), docetaxel (DOC), or cisplatin and the GRP78 targeting peptide WDLAWMFRLPVG were synthesized and characterized. Binding to cell surface expressed heat shock protein GRP78 on the surface of human prostate cancer DU145 cells was evaluated. HSP targeted AHGDM and DOC conjugates demonstrated active binding comparable to native targeting peptide. They were then assessed in vitro for the ability to synergistically induce cytotoxicity in combination with moderate hyperthermia (43 °C, 30 min). HSP targeted DOC conjugates exhibited high potency against DU145 cells with an IC₅₀ of 2.4 nM. HSP targeted AHGDM and DOC conjugates demonstrated synergistic effects in combination with hyperthermia with combination index values of 0.65 and 0.45 respectively. Based on these results, HSP targeted DOC conjugates were selected for in vivo evaluation. In DU145 tumor bearing mice, a single treatment of tumor hyperthermia, induced via gold nanorod mediated plasmonic photothermal therapy, and intravenous administration of HSP targeted HPMA copolymer-docetaxel at 10mg/kg resulted in maintained tumor regression for a period of 30 days. These results demonstrate the potential for tumor hyperthermia to increase the delivery of HSP targeted macromolecular chemotherapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a hybrid paclitaxel-loaded arsenite nanoparticle (HPAN) delivery system for synergistic combined therapy of paclitaxel-resistant cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei-yan; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Xiang-yu; Li, Jia-qian; Xiao, Xiao-ping; Yu, Lu-lu; Tang, Qun

    2017-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major reason for failure of chemotherapy in a variety of human tumors. For instance, paclitaxel (PTX) has been widely used as a first-line anticancer drug, but resistance to PTX is becoming increasingly serious. Herein, we propose a strategy of combined therapy to overcome MDR of PTX by introducing a hybrid paclitaxel-loaded gadolinium arsenite nanoparticle (HPAN), where PTX was conjugated with rod-shaped gadolinium arsenite (GdAsOx) nanoparticle (NP). Triggered by endogenous inorganic phosphate (Pi), the hybrid nanoparticles readily collapse, thereby releasing PTX and arsenic trioxide (ATO). An MTT assay indicated IC50 values for HPAN one order of magnitude lower than for a simple equivalent mixture of PTX and ATO against PTX-resistant human colon cancer cells (HCT 166), indicating remarkable synergistic effect. Species type-dependent cellular uptake, induced apoptosis, and cell cycle modulation were also evaluated. Cellular uptake tests indicate that the HPAN presents higher PTX intracellular loading for the PTX-resistant cells and longer intracellular retention time, displaying resistance to drug efflux from the cancer cell than pristine PTX or the equivalent mixture of PTX and ATO. Cell cycle and apoptosis tests consistently proved that addition of HPAN resulted in higher G2/M and apoptosis in PTX-resistant cells. In vivo anticancer experiments evidenced that HPAN had better therapeutic effect on the resistant tumor in the murine xenograft model than pristine PTX or a mixture of PTX and ATO. Our results suggest that HPAN might enhance the therapeutic index and overcome PTX resistance and also demonstrate that the combined therapy is not only related to the species of combined agents but also their physiochemical states.

  3. Development of a hybrid paclitaxel-loaded arsenite nanoparticle (HPAN) delivery system for synergistic combined therapy of paclitaxel-resistant cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fei-yan; Zhang, Yu [Nanchang University, College of Chemistry (China); Chen, Xiang-yu [Xiangya No.2 Hospital of Central South University, Department of Radiology (China); Li, Jia-qian; Xiao, Xiao-ping; Yu, Lu-lu; Tang, Qun, E-mail: tangqun@ncu.edu.cn [Nanchang University, Institute for Advanced Study (China)

    2017-04-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major reason for failure of chemotherapy in a variety of human tumors. For instance, paclitaxel (PTX) has been widely used as a first-line anticancer drug, but resistance to PTX is becoming increasingly serious. Herein, we propose a strategy of combined therapy to overcome MDR of PTX by introducing a hybrid paclitaxel-loaded gadolinium arsenite nanoparticle (HPAN), where PTX was conjugated with rod-shaped gadolinium arsenite (GdAsO{sub x}) nanoparticle (NP). Triggered by endogenous inorganic phosphate (Pi), the hybrid nanoparticles readily collapse, thereby releasing PTX and arsenic trioxide (ATO). An MTT assay indicated IC50 values for HPAN one order of magnitude lower than for a simple equivalent mixture of PTX and ATO against PTX-resistant human colon cancer cells (HCT 166), indicating remarkable synergistic effect. Species type-dependent cellular uptake, induced apoptosis, and cell cycle modulation were also evaluated. Cellular uptake tests indicate that the HPAN presents higher PTX intracellular loading for the PTX-resistant cells and longer intracellular retention time, displaying resistance to drug efflux from the cancer cell than pristine PTX or the equivalent mixture of PTX and ATO. Cell cycle and apoptosis tests consistently proved that addition of HPAN resulted in higher G2/M and apoptosis in PTX-resistant cells. In vivo anticancer experiments evidenced that HPAN had better therapeutic effect on the resistant tumor in the murine xenograft model than pristine PTX or a mixture of PTX and ATO. Our results suggest that HPAN might enhance the therapeutic index and overcome PTX resistance and also demonstrate that the combined therapy is not only related to the species of combined agents but also their physiochemical states.

  4. MET is a potential target for use in combination therapy with EGFR inhibition in triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Choi, Jong-Sun; Seo, Jinwon; Song, Ji-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Kwon, Mi Jung; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kundu, Juthika; Jung, Kyungsoo; Oh, Ensel; Shin, Young Kee; Choi, Yoon-La

    2014-05-15

    MET, a cell surface receptor for hepatocyte growth factor, is involved in the development of triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer (TNBC/BLBC). However, its utility as a therapeutic target in this subtype of breast cancer is poorly understood. To evaluate MET fully as a potential therapeutic target for TNBC/BLBC, we investigated the relationship between MET expression and clinical outcomes of patients with breast cancer and the functional effect of MET inhibition. Using automated immunohistochemistry (Ventana), we analyzed MET expression in 924 breast cancer patients with relevant clinicopathologic parameters. BLBC showed the strongest relationship with MET expression (57.5%, p breast cancer resulted in poor overall survival (p = 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS, p = 0.010). MET expression was relatively high in TNBC cell lines, and the silencing of MET via small interfering RNA reduced cell proliferation and migration. We observed reduced TNBC cell viability after treatment with the MET inhibitor PHA-665752. In the most drug-resistant cell line, MDA-MB-468, which showed elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, silencing of EGFR resulted in increased sensitivity to PHA-665752 treatment. We confirmed that PHA-665752 synergizes with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib to decrease the viability of MDA-MB-468 cells. TNBC patients coexpressing MET and EGFR showed significantly worse DFS than that in patients expressing EGFR alone (p = 0.021). Our findings strongly suggest that MET may be a therapeutic target in TNBC and that the combined therapy targeting MET and EGFR may be beneficial for the treatment of TNBC/BLBC patients.

  5. Nanotechnology in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Burcu; Ozpolat, Bulent; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide and advanced techniques for therapy are urgently needed. The development of novel nanomaterials and nanocarriers has allowed a major drive to improve drug delivery in cancer. The major aim of most nanocarrier applications has been to protect the drug from rapid degradation after systemic delivery and allowing it to reach tumor site at therapeutic concentrations, meanwhile avoiding drug delivery to normal sites as much as possible to reduce adverse effects. These nanocarriers are formulated to deliver drugs either by passive targeting, taking advantage of leaky tumor vasculature or by active targeting using ligands that increase tumoral uptake potentially resulting in enhanced antitumor efficacy, thus achieving a net improvement in therapeutic index. The rational design of nanoparticles plays a critical role since structural and physical characteristics, such as size, charge, shape, and surface characteristics determine the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, internalization and safety of the drugs. In this review, we focus on several novel and improved strategies in nanocarrier design for cancer therapy.

  6. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  7. Efficacy of Metabolically Supported Chemotherapy Combined with Ketogenic Diet, Hyperthermia, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Stage IV Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İyikesici, Mehmet Salih; Slocum, Abdul Kadir; Slocum, Ayshe; Berkarda, Ferhan Bulent; Kalamian, Miriam; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2017-07-07

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is more aggressive and metastatic than other breast cancer types. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is presently the predominant systemic therapy for TNBC patients. This case report highlights the influence of metabolically supported chemotherapy (MSCT), ketogenic diet (KD), hyperthermia (HT), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in an overweight 29-year-old woman with stage IV (T4N3M1) triple-negative invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The patient presented with an observable mass in her left breast detected during a physical examination in December 2015. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Category 5 tumor and multiple lymphadenomegaly in the left axilla. A Tru-Cut biopsy led to the diagnosis of a triple-negative nuclear grade 2 invasive ductal carcinoma. The patient was admitted to ChemoThermia Oncology Center, Istanbul, Turkey in October 2016, and a whole body (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan revealed a 77 mm x 55 mm primary tumor in her left breast, multiple left pectoral and axillary lymph nodes, multiple widespread liver masses, and an upper left nodular abdominal lesion. The patient received a treatment protocol consisting of MSCT, KD, HT, and HBOT. A follow-up whole body 18F-FDG PET-CT scan in February 2017 showed a complete therapeutic response with no evidence of abnormal FDG uptake. The patient continued to receive this treatment protocol and in April 2017 underwent a mastectomy, which revealed a complete pathological response consistent with the response indicated by her PET-CT imaging. This single case study presents evidence of a complete clinical, radiological, and pathological response following a six-month treatment period using a combination of MSCT and a novel metabolic therapy in a patient with stage IV TNBC.

  8. Nanotechnology Cancer Therapy and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanotechnology offers the means to target therapies directly and selectively to cancerous cells and neoplasms. With these tools, clinicians can safely and effectively deliver chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and the next generation of immuno- and gene therapi

  9. [Combination therapy of continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-FU and low dose consecutive cisplatin (CDDP), and the new oral anti-cancer drug S-1 for advanced gastro-intestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, T; Aiba, K; Araki, H; Suzuki, M; Terashima, M; Mikami, Y

    1999-03-01

    Highly effective treatment is required for patients with advanced GI cancer. Returning to the starting point for reconsideration of cancer chemotherapy, with the aim of attaining a therapy (self rescuing concept: SRC) with more potential efficacy and less toxicity than current therapy, we report two kinds of chemotherapy in the present paper. They were set up preclinically using the theory of 5-FU biochemical modulation, and demonstrated their usefulness in clinical practice. S-1 is a newly developed oral anti-cancer drug which is a combination of Tegafur (FT), a prodrug of 5-FU and two modulators (CDHP, an inhibitor of 5-FU degradation and Oxo, a selective inhibitor GI toxicity by 5-FU) at a molar ratio of 1:0.4:1. In combination with CDHP, 5-FU gradually released from FT remained longer in plasma, and consequently had high anti-tumor activity, while the combined Oxo significantly suppressed GI toxicity due to 5-FU. The response rate to S-1 of stomach cancer in a phase II study was 46.5% (60/129). Toxicity at more than G3 was less than 10%. In the combination therapy employing 5-FU by CVI (5-FU: 250-350 mg/body for 24 h, 4-6 wks) and low dose consecutive CDDP, CDDP acts mainly as a modulator of 5-FU (to increase 5-FU sensitivity for tumor by inhibition of intracellular Met incorporation). For this purpose, it was found that daily consecutive administration is required, even at low dose of CDDP (3-5 mg/body/day for 5 days). A high response rate (40-60%) was obtained for advanced GI cancer. Toxicity at more than G3 was less than 10%. On the other hand, the possibility has been suggested that so far as 5-FU is concerned, CVI every other day (500-750 mg/body/day for 3 days) is more favorable than long term CVI, with regard to decreasing GI and myelotoxicities based upon the difference in generation time between normal cell (GI mucous membrane and stem cell) and tumor cell cycles. The possibility is suggested that the above-mentioned chemotherapy can become a standard

  10. Antitumor efficacy of TRA-8 anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy in a human breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchsbaum, Donald J; Zhou, Tong; Grizzle, William E; Oliver, Patsy G; Hammond, Charlotte J; Zhang, Sijian; Carpenter, Mark; LoBuglio, Albert F

    2003-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (TRA-8) has been developed that binds to death receptor 5 (DR5), one of two death receptors bound by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the binding and cytotoxicity of TRA-8 to human breast cancer cell lines. The antitumor efficacy of TRA-8 was evaluated in a xenograft human breast cancer murine model, as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Anti: The binding of TRA-8 to a panel of nine human breast cancer cell lines was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity of TRA-8 alone and in the presence of Adriamycin or paclitaxel was measured in vitro using the ATP-lite assay. Antitumor efficacy was determined by treatment of nude mice bearing well-established s.c. DR5-positive 2LMP human breast cancer xenografts with TRA-8 alone or in combination with Adriamycin or paclitaxel. Tumor size and regression rates were determined. In addition, a study was carried out with TRA-8 and Adriamycin in combination with 3 Gy (60)Co irradiation of 2LMP xenografts on days 9 and 17. All nine human breast cancer cell lines expressed DR5 with TRA-8 reactivity varying from strongly to weakly positive. Four cell lines were sensitive to TRA-8 cytotoxicity with IC(50) of 17-299 ng/ml, whereas other cell lines had weak cytotoxicity or were resistant. In vivo studies demonstrated significant inhibition of growth of 2LMP xenografts by TRA-8 treatment alone. The combination of TRA-8 + Adriamycin or paclitaxel produced significant inhibition of tumor growth as compared with controls or either agent alone. An aggregate analysis of all 166 animals studied demonstrated that TRA-8 alone or in combination with Adriamycin, paclitaxel, or radiation produced a significant increase in tumor doubling time compared with any modality alone with mean doubling time in days of 12 (untreated), 14 (radiation), 17 (Adriamycin), 25 (paclitaxel), 39

  11. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with

  12. Combined effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and ionizing radiation in breast cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Prasad, Uttara; Shankar, Sunita; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shanaiah, Murthy; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent endogenous activator of the cell death pathway and functions by activating the cell surface death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). TRAIL is nontoxic in vivo and preferentially kills neoplastically transformed cells over normal cells by an undefined mechanism. Radiotherapy is a common treatment for breast cancer as well as many other cancers. Here we demonstrate that ionizing radiation can sensitize breast carcinoma ce...

  13. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  14. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate cancer overview? What are my treatment options? What ... any new developments in treating my disease? Prostate cancer overview Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  15. Superiority of aromatase inhibitor and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor combined delivery: Hyaluronate-targeted versus PEGylated protamine nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Mostafa, Shaimaa K; Helmy, Maged W; ElDemellawy, Maha A; Sheweita, Salah A

    2017-08-30

    Despite several reports have revealed the beneficial effect of co-administration of COX-2 inhibitors with aromatase inhibitors in managing postmenopausal breast cancer; no nanocarriers for such combined delivery have been developed till now. Therefore, protamine nanocapsules (PMN-NCs) have been developed to co-deliver letrozole (LTZ) that inhibits aromatase-mediated estrogen biosynthesis and celecoxib (CXB) that synergistically inhibits aromatase expression. Inspired by the CD44-mediated tumor targeting ability of hyaluronate (HA), we developed HA-coated PMN-NCs (HA-NCs) via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly. Moreover, multi-compartmental PEGylated phospholipid-CXB complex bilayer enveloping PMN-NCs (PEG-NCs) were designed for conferring biphasic CXB release from the phospholipid corona and oily core as well as enabling passive-targeting. The NCs demonstrated excellent stability, prolonged circulation and could be scaled up with the aid of spray-drying technology. Hemolysis, serum stability and cytotoxicity studies confirmed the superiority of combined LTZ-CXB nano-delivery. Mechanistically, the NCs especially HA-NCs and PEG-NCs demonstrated precious anti-tumor effects in vivo revealed as reduction in the tumor volume and aromatase level, increased apoptosis, as well as inhibition of VEGF, NF-κB and TNF-α augmented by histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Overall, our approach provided for the first time a potential strategy for targeted LTZ-CXB combined therapy of hormone-dependent breast cancer via singular nanocapsule delivery system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. p53-based Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David P.; Cheok, Chit Fang; Lain, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 functions is an almost universal feature of human cancer cells. This has spurred a tremendous effort to develop p53 based cancer therapies. Gene therapy using wild-type p53, delivered by adenovirus vectors, is now in widespread use in China. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses designed to replicate and kill only p53 defective cells and also the development of siRNA and antisense RNA's that activate p53 by inhibiting the function of the negative regulators Mdm2, MdmX, and HPV E6. The altered processing of p53 that occurs in tumor cells can elicit T-cell and B-cell responses to p53 that could be effective in eliminating cancer cells and p53 based vaccines are now in clinical trial. A number of small molecules that directly or indirectly activate the p53 response have also reached the clinic, of which the most advanced are the p53 mdm2 interaction inhibitors. Increased understanding of the p53 response is also allowing the development of powerful drug combinations that may increase the selectivity and safety of chemotherapy, by selective protection of normal cells and tissues. PMID:20463003

  17. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  18. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  19. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  20. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribova, O. V., E-mail: gribova79@mail.ru; Choynzonov, E. L., E-mail: nii@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Musabaeva, L. I., E-mail: musabaevaLI@oncology.tomsk.ru; Lisin, V. A., E-mail: Lisin@oncology.tomsk.ru; Novikov, V. A., E-mail: dr.vanovikov@gmail.com [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  1. The combination therapy of salinomycin and gefitinib using poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid-poly(ethylene glycol nanoparticles for targeting both lung cancer stem cells and cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhang,1,* Qi Zhang,1,* Jing Sun,2 Huijie Liu,1 Qingfeng Li1 1Department of Oncology, Xiangyang Central Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Hubei College of Arts and Science, Xiangyang 441000, Hubei, China; 2International Joint Cancer Institute, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Lung cancer (LC is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Evidences suggest that both LC cancer stem cells (CSCs and cancer cells are supposed to be eliminated to achieve superior treatment effect against LC. Salinomycin could eradiate CSCs in various types of cancers, and gefitinib is a first-line therapy in LC. The purpose of the present study was to develop salinomycin-loaded nanoparticles (salinomycin-NPs combined with gefitinib-loaded nanoparticles (gefitinib-NPs to eradicate both LC CSCs and cancer cells. Methods: Salinomycin and gefitinib were encapsulated separately by poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid-poly(ethylene glycol nanoparticles by the emulsion/solvent evaporation approach. The anti-LC activity of salinomycin-NPs and gefitinib-NPs was investigated. Results: Salinomycin-NPs and gefitinib-NPs are of ~140 nm in size, high drug encapsulation efficacy and sustained release of drugs. CD133+ LC CSCs showed the characteristics of CSCs, including significantly enhanced stem cell gene expression, tumorsphere formation ability, and tumorigenicity in mice. Both salinomycin and salinomycin-NPs are capable of selectively inhibiting LC CSCs, as reflected by their enhanced cytotoxic effects toward CD133+ LC CSCs and ability to reduce tumorsphere formation in LC cell lines, whereas gefitinib and gefitinib-NPs could significantly inhibit LC cells. Salinomycin-NPs and salinomycin could reduce the population of LC CSCs in the tumors in vivo. It is noteworthy that salinomycin-NPs combined with gefitinib-NPs inhibited the growth of tumors more efficiently compared with salinomycin

  2. A paradigm shift: Cancer therapy with peptide-based B-cell epitopes and peptide immunotherapeutics targeting multiple solid tumor types: Emerging concepts and validation of combination immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognizable and urgent need to speed the development and application of novel, more efficacious anti-cancer vaccine therapies that inhibit tumor progression and prevent acquisition of tumor resistance. We have created and established a portfolio of validated peptide epitopes against multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and we have identified the most biologically effective combinations of EGFR (HER-1), HER-2, HER-3, VEGF and IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics to selectively inhibit multiple receptors and signaling pathways. The strategy is based on the use of chimeric conformational B-cell epitope peptides incorporating "promiscuous" T-cell epitopes that afford the possibility of generating an enduring immune response, eliciting protein-reactive high-affinity anti-peptide antibodies as potential vaccines and peptide mimics that act as antagonists to receptor signaling that drive cancer metastasis. In this review we will summarize our ongoing studies based on the development of combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies that act synergistically to enhance immune-mediated tumor killing aimed at addressing mechanisms of tumor resistance for several tumor types.

  3. Lactate dehydrogenase predicts combined progression-free survival after sequential therapy with abiraterone and enzalutamide for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Keiichiro; Kimura, Takahiro; Onuma, Hajime; Kimura, Shoji; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Miki, Kenta; Egawa, Shin

    2017-07-01

    An array of clinical issues remains to be resolved for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including the sequence of drug use and drug cross-resistance. At present, no clear guidelines are available for the optimal sequence of use of novel agents like androgen-receptor axis-targeted (ARAT) agents, particularly enzalutamide, and abiraterone. This study retrospectively analyzed a total of 69 patients with CRPC treated with sequential therapy using enzalutamide followed by abiraterone or vice versa. The primary outcome measure was the comparative combined progression-free survival (PFS) comprising symptomatic and/or radiographic PFS. Patients were also compared for total prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-PFS, overall survival (OS), and PSA response. The predictors of combined PFS and OS were analyzed with a backward-stepwise multivariate Cox model. Of the 69 patients, 46 received enzalutamide first, followed by abiraterone (E-A group), and 23 received abiraterone, followed by enzalutamide (A-E group). The two groups were not significantly different with regard to basic data, except for hemoglobin values. In a comparison with the E-A group, the A-E group was shown to be associated with better combined PFS in Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.043). Similar results were obtained for total PSA-PFS (P = 0.049), while OS did not differ between groups (P = 0.62). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that pretreatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) values and age were significant predictors of longer combined PFS (P < 0.05). Likewise, multivariate analysis demonstrated that pretreatment hemoglobin values and performance status were significant predictors of longer OS (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggested the A-E sequence had longer combined PSA and total PSA-PFS compared to the E-A sequence in patients with CRPC. LDH values in sequential therapy may serve as a predictor of longer combined PFS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of a Synthetic Lethal Drug Combination That Targets the Energy Generation Triangle for Liver Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    unexplored therapeutic targets. While most normal tissues use HK1 for glycolysis , HK4 is the only HK isoform in hepatocytes. The transition from hepatocyte to...HCC is frequently accompanied by a complete switch from HK4 to the highly active HK2 isoform, and increased glycolysis (the “Warburg effect”). HK2...energy generation triangle” ( glycolysis , oxidative phosphorylation, and FAO) as a translational, effective and safe therapy for HCC. 15. SUBJECT

  5. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a label-free LC-MS/MS strategy to approach the identification of candidate protein biomarkers of disease recurrence in prostate cancer patients in a clinical trial of combined hormone and radiation therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Combined hormone and radiation therapy (CHRT) is one of the principle curative regimes for localised prostate cancer (PCa). Following treatment, many patients subsequently experience disease recurrence however; current diagnostics tests fail to predict the onset of disease recurrence. Biomarkers that address this issue would be of significant advantage.

  7. Mutagenesis after cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, K T; Caggana, M; Mauch, P M; Coleman, C N; Clark, J R; Liber, H L

    1993-01-01

    A subset of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and breast cancer patients have been reported to have elevated hprt mutant frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes after cessation of therapy. A subset of these patients are also known to develop second therapy-related malignancies. Therefore, it is clearly important to determine if these elevations in mutant frequency represent true, persistently elevated mutation frequencies. As a follow-up to our study of patients previously treated for HD, we recruited for a prospective study six previously treated HD patients and five patients who had been treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These individuals were studied several times over a 6-7 months. The results confirmed that a subset of patients have persistently high mutant frequencies when compared to 71 previously studied controls. The study was designed to determine if the elevated mutant frequencies of treated patients represented independent mutations or resulted from the in vivo expansion of single mutant cells. We used the polymerase chain reaction to examine DNA single strand conformation polymorphisms at the T-cell receptor-gamma locus of individual mutant clones. This analysis showed that 20.1% of the mutants from Hodgkin's disease patients and 17.5% of the mutants from squamous cell carcinoma patients were siblings. The sibling mutants generally did not persist over time. However, one patient had one mutant clone that persisted, but slowly decreased in prevalence over a 7 month sampling period. The data demonstrate that treatments for cancer result in persistently elevated mutation frequencies at the hprt locus in some, but not all, patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8143613

  8. Combination therapy: the next opportunity and challenge of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From an historical point of view, combination therapy was the basis for the care of important diseases like infection diseases or cancer. Today the "cocktail drug" of the Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART has reduced the death for HIV infection changing the outcome of such disease. Moreover, the combination of different strategies changed the course of transplants (both in haematology and surgical transplant. Different diseases with high social impact including cardiovascular, metabolic (obesity, hypercholesterolaemia and diabetes and autoimmune diseases, have better results with combinations of different drug classes of drugs. After recent successes in the immunotherapy field (Sepuleucel-T, ipilimumab and the new promising small molecule therapies, cancer should be the next challenge for combination strategies.

  9. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  10. A randomized phase 2 study of combination cediranib and olaparib versus olaparib alone as recurrence therapy in platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joyce F.; Barry, William T.; Birrer, Michael; Lee, Jung-Min; Buckanovich, Ronald J.; Fleming, Gini F.; Rimel, BJ; Buss, Mary K.; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Hurteau, Jean; Luo, Weixiu; Quy, Philippa; Whalen, Christin; Obermayer, Lisa; Lee, Hang; Winer, Eric P.; Kohn, Elise C.; Ivy, S. Percy; Matulonis, Ursula A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Olaparib is an oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor and cediranib is an oral anti-angiogenic with activity against VEGFR-1, 2, and 3. Both agents have antitumor activity in women with recurrent ovarian cancer, and the combination of these agents was active and had manageable toxicities in a Phase 1 trial. We asked whether the combination of cediranib and olaparib could improve progression-free survival compared to olaparib monotherapy in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Methods We conducted a randomized, open-label, phase 2 study to evaluate the activity of olaparib monotherapy compared with combination cediranib and olaparib in women with ovarian cancer with measurable platinum-sensitive, relapsed, high-grade serous or endometrioid disease or those with deleterious germline BRCA1/2 mutations (gBRCAm). Patients were randomized using permuted blocks within stratum defined by gBRCA status and prior anti-angiogenic therapy to receive olaparib capsules 400mg twice daily or the combination at the recommended phase 2 dose of cediranib 30mg daily and olaparib capsules 200mg twice daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) analyzed under intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01116648. The Phase 2 portion of the trial reported here is no longer accruing patients. Findings Forty-six of 90 randomized patients received olaparib alone, and 44 received cediranib/olaparib. Median PFS was significantly longer with cediranib/olaparib (17.7 vs. 9.0 mos, HR 0.42; p = 0.005). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were more common with cediranib/olaparib, including fatigue (12 vs. 5), diarrhea (10 vs. 0), and hypertension (18 vs. 0). Subset analysis within stratum defined by BRCA1/2 status demonstrated activity of cediranib/olaparib in both gBRCAm and gBRCAwt/u (wild-type/unknown) patients. Significant improvement in PFS occurred in gBRCAwt/u women receiving cediranib/olaparib (16.5 vs. 5.7 mos, p = 0

  11. Neutron therapy of resistant thyroid gland cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choynzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.; Musabaeva, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons c. The study included 45 patients with thyroid gland cancers who received the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy alone with the use of 6.3 MeV fast neutrons generated within U-120 cyclotron. The clinical trial of neutron-photon therapy used alone and in combination with the surgery for the patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer showed feasibility of increasing the effectiveness of treatment due to the reduction in the incidence of local recurrences. In addition, satisfactory treatment tolerance and absence of severe specific complications dictate the necessity of prospective studies to improve treatment outcomes.

  12. Combined Ventilation and Perfusion Imaging Correlates With the Dosimetric Parameters of Radiation Pneumonitis in Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Doi, Yoshiko; Nakashima, Takeo; Imano, Nobuki; Kawabata, Hideo; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Okabe, Tomoyuki; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate clinical correlations between dosimetric parameters associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) and functional lung imaging. Functional lung imaging was performed using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for ventilation imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for perfusion imaging, or both (V/Q-matched region). Using 4D-CT, ventilation imaging was derived from a low attenuation area according to CT numbers below different thresholds (vent-860 and -910). Perfusion imaging at the 10th, 30th, 50th, and 70th percentile perfusion levels (F10-F70) were defined as the top 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% hyperperfused normal lung, respectively. All imaging data were incorporated into a 3D planning system to evaluate correlations between RP dosimetric parameters (where fV20 is the percentage of functional lung volume irradiated with >20 Gy, or fMLD, the mean dose administered to functional lung) and the percentage of functional lung volume. Radiation pneumonitis was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Statistical significance was defined as a P value of lung cancer, and 12 patients for small cell lung cancer). Grades 1, 2, and ≥3 RP were observed in 16, 44, and 6 patients, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the percentage of functional lung volume and fV20 (r=0.4475 in vent-860 and 0.3508 in F30) or fMLD (r=0.4701 in vent-860 and 0.3128 in F30) in patients with grade ≥2 RP. F30∩vent-860 results exhibited stronger correlations with fV20 and fMLD in patients with grade ≥2 (r=0.5509 in fV20 and 0.5320 in fMLD) and grade ≥3 RP (r=0.8770 in fV20 and 0.8518 in fMLD). RP dosimetric parameters correlated significantly with functional lung imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Colon cancer survival with herbal medicine and vitamins combined with standard therapy in a whole-systems approach: ten-year follow-up data analyzed with marginal structural models and propensity score methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Michael; Broffman, Michael; van der Laan, Mark; Hubbard, Alan; Kushi, Lawrence; Abrams, Donald I; Gao, Jin; Colford, John M

    2011-09-01

    Although localized colon cancer is often successfully treated with surgery, advanced disease requires aggressive systemic therapy that has lower effectiveness. Approximately 30% to 75% of patients with colon cancer use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), but there is limited formal evidence of survival efficacy. In a consecutive case series with 10-year follow-up of all colon cancer patients (n = 193) presenting at a San Francisco Bay-Area center for Chinese medicine (Pine Street Clinic, San Anselmo, CA), the authors compared survival in patients choosing short-term treatment lasting the duration of chemotherapy/radiotherapy with those continuing long-term. To put these data into the context of treatment responses seen in conventional medical practice, they also compared survival with Pan-Asian medicine + vitamins (PAM+V) with that of concurrent external controls from Kaiser Permanente Northern California and California Cancer Registries. Kaplan-Meier, traditional Cox regression, and more modern methods were used for causal inference-namely, propensity score and marginal structural models (MSMs), which have not been used before in studies of cancer survival and Chinese herbal medicine. PAM+V combined with conventional therapy, compared with conventional therapy alone, reduced the risk of death in stage I by 95%, stage II by 64%, stage III by 29%, and stage IV by 75%. There was no significant difference between short-term and long-term PAM+V. Combining PAM+V with conventional therapy improved survival, compared with conventional therapy alone, suggesting that prospective trials combining PAM+V with conventional therapy are justified.

  14. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  15. Development of transrectal diffuse optical tomography combined with 3D-transrectal ultrasound imaging to monitor the photocoagulation front during interstitial photothermal therapy of primary focal prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Weersink, Robert; Veilleux, Israel; Mayo, Kenwrick; Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Alam, Adeel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial near-infrared laser thermal therapy (LITT) is currently undergoing clinical trials as an alternative to watchful waiting or radical surgery in patients with low-risk focal prostate cancer. Currently, we use magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based thermography to monitor treatment delivery and determine indirectly the completeness of the target tissue destruction while avoiding damage to adjacent normal tissues, particularly the rectal wall. However, incomplete tumor destruction has occurred in a significant fraction of patients due to premature termination of treatment, since the photocoagulation zone is not directly observed. Hence, we are developing transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT), in combination with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS), to address his limitation. This is based on the large changes in optical scattering expected upon tissue coagulation. Here, we present forward simulations of a growing coagulated lesion with optical scattering contrast, using an established finite element analysis software platform (NIRFAST). The simulations were validated in tissue-simulating phantoms, with measurements acquired by a state-of-the-art continuous wave (CW) TRDOT system and a recently assembled bench-top CW-DOT system, with specific source-detector configurations. Two image reconstruction schemes were investigated and evaluated, specifically for the accurate delineation of the posterior boundary of the coagulation zone as the critical parameter for treatment guidance in this clinical application.

  16. Feasibility and efficacy of accelerated weekly concomitant boost postoperative radiation therapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Luthi, Francois; Matzinger, Oscar; Betz, Michael; Dragusanu, Daniela; Bulling, Shelley; Bron, Luc; Pasche, Philippe; Seelentag, Walter; Mirimanoff, René O; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess feasibility and efficacy of weekly concomitant boost accelerated postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) with concomitant chemotherapy (CT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Conformal or intensity-modulated 66-Gy RT was performed in 5.5 weeks in 40 patients. Cisplatin was given at days 1, 22, and 43. Median follow-up was 36 months. Grade 3 mucositis, dysphagia, and erythema was observed in ten (25%), nine (23%), and six (13%) patients, respectively. Grade 3 or more anemia was observed in two (6%) patients, and leukopenia in five (13%) patients. No grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia was observed. Grade 3 nephrotoxicity was observed in one patient (3%). No treatment-related mortality was observed. Grade 2 or more xerostomia and edema were observed in ten (25%) and one (3%) patient, respectively. Locoregional relapse occurred in eight patients, and seven patients developed distant metastases. Median time to locoregional relapse was 6 months. Three-year overall, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 63%, 62%, and 81%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only prognostic factor was nodal status. Reducing overall treatment time using accelerated PORT/CT by weekly concomitant boost (six fractions per week) combined with concomitant cisplatin CT is easily feasible with acceptable morbidity.

  17. Combined high-intensity local treatment and systemic therapy in metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Luu, Michael; Yoshida, Emi J; Kim, Sungjin; Tighiouart, Mourad; David, John M; Shiao, Stephen L; Mita, Alain C; Scher, Kevin S; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that primary tumor ablation can improve survival for some cancer patients with distant metastases. This may be particularly applicable to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) because of its tropism for locoregional progression. This study included patients with metastatic HNSCC undergoing systemic therapy identified in the National Cancer Data Base. High-intensity local treatment was defined as radiation doses ≥ 60 Gy or oncologic resection of the primary tumor. Multivariate Cox regression, propensity score matching, landmark analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to account for imbalances in covariates, including adjustments for the number and location of metastatic sites in the subset of patients with this information available. In all, 3269 patients were included (median follow-up, 51.5 months). Patients undergoing systemic therapy with local treatment had improved survival in comparison with patients receiving systemic therapy alone in propensity score-matched cohorts (2-year overall survival, 34.2% vs 20.6%; P < .001). Improved survival was associated only with patients receiving high-intensity local treatment, whereas those receiving lower-intensity local treatment had survival similar to that of patients receiving systemic therapy without local treatment. The impact of high-intensity local therapy was time-dependent, with a stronger impact within the first 6 months after the diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.255; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.210-0.309; P < .001) in comparison with more than 6 months after the diagnosis (AHR, 0.622; 95% CI, 0.561-0.689; P < .001) in the multivariate analysis. A benefit was seen in all subgroups, in landmark analyses of 1-, 2-, and 3-year survivors, and when adjusting for the number and location of metastatic sites. Aggressive local treatment warrants prospective evaluation for select patients with metastatic HNSCC. Cancer 2017;123:4583-4593. © 2017 American Cancer

  18. Combination of interleukin-12 gene therapy, metronomic cyclophosphamide and DNA cancer vaccination directs all arms of the immune system towards tumor eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Van Audenhove, Isabel; Sanders, Niek N

    2014-08-10

    In this work a combination therapy that acts upon the immune suppressive, the innate and specific arms of the immune system is proposed. This combination therapy, which consists of intratumoral interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene therapy, human tyrosinase (hTyr) DNA vaccination and metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPX), was evaluated in a B16-F10 mouse model. The following groups were compared: (1) no treatment, (2) control vector, (3) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy, (4) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX, (5) intratumoral IL-12 gene therapy+metronomic CPX+hTyr DNA vaccination. Next to clinical efficacy and safety, we characterized acute effects of IL-12 and anti-tumor immune response after a second tumor challenge. All treatment groups showed increased survival and higher cure rates than control groups. Survival of non-cured mice was increased when metronomic CPX was combined with IL-12 gene therapy. Furthermore, mice that received metronomic CPX had significantly lower percentages of regulatory T cells. Addition of the hTyr DNA vaccine increased cure rate and resulted in increased survival compared to other treatment groups. We also demonstrated that the manifest necrosis within days after IL-12 gene therapy is at least partly due to IL-12 mediated activation of NK cells. All cured mice were resistant to a second challenge. A humoral memory response against the tumor cells was observed in all groups that received IL-12 gene therapy, while a cellular memory response was observed only in the vaccinated mice. In conclusion, every component of this combination treatment contributed a unique immunologic trait with associated clinical benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined Limb-Sparing Surgery and Radiation Therapy to Treat Sarcomas of the Hands and Feet: Long-Term Cancer Outcomes and Morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Zagars, Gunar K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moon, Bryan S.; Lin, Patrick P.; Lewis, Valerae O. [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh, E-mail: aguadagn@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcomas (STS) of the hands and feet. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 85 consecutive patients treated for STS of the hands (n=38, 45%) and feet (n=47, 55%) between 1966 and 2012. The median age was 41 years (range, 10-82 years of age). Sixty-seven patients (79%) received postoperative RT after resection of their tumor (median dose, 60 Gy; range, 45-70 Gy). The remaining 18 patients (21%) were treated with preoperative RT followed by tumor resection (median dose, 50 Gy; range, 50-64 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 140 months (range, 24-442 months). Five-year local control, overall survival, and disease-specific survival rates were 86%, 89%, and 89%, respectively. Positive or uncertain surgical margin status was the only factor adversely associated with local recurrence (19% vs 6% for negative margins, P=.046) but this lost significance on multivariate analysis when adjusting for RT dose ≥64 Gy. Of the 12 patients who had local relapses, 6 (50%) were salvaged, and only 2 of those required salvage amputation. Five patients had grade ≥3 late RT sequelae, with 2 patients (2%) having moderate limitations of limb function and 3 patients (4%) having severe limitations requiring procedures for skin ulceration. Conclusions: Limb-sparing surgery combined with RT provides excellent local control outcomes for sarcomas arising in the hands or feet. In patients who have local recurrence, salvage without amputation is possible. The excellent cancer control outcomes observed, considering the minimal impact on limb function, support use of combined modality, limb-sparing local therapy for STS arising in the hands or feet.

  20. Quality of Life of Patients with Spinal Metastasis from Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: A Longitudinal Study of Surgical Management Combined with Postoperative Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; He, Shaohui; Liu, Tielong; Yang, Xinghai; Zhao, Jian; Yu, Hongyu; Feng, Jiaojiao; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-10-04

    Patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin have limited life expectancy and poor quality of life. Surgery and radiation therapy remain the main treatment options, but, to our knowledge, there are limited data concerning quality-of-life improvement after surgery and radiation therapy and even fewer data on whether surgical intervention would affect quality of life. Patients were enrolled between January 2009 and January 2014 at the Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. The quality of life of 2 patient groups (one group that underwent surgery followed by postoperative radiation therapy and one group that underwent radiation therapy only) was assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire during a 6-month period. A subgroup analysis of quality of life was performed to compare different surgical strategies in the surgical group. A total of 287 patients, including 191 patients in the group that underwent surgery and 96 patients in the group that underwent radiation therapy only, were enrolled in the prospective study; 177 patients completed all 5 checkpoints and 110 patients had died by the final checkpoint. The surgery group had significantly higher adjusted quality-of-life scores than the radiation therapy group in each domain of the FACT-G questionnaire (all p life in patients with spinal metastasis from cancer of unknown primary origin in the 6-month assessment. In terms of surgical strategies, circumferential decompression seems better than laminectomy alone in quality-of-life improvement. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  2. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  3. Cancer Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have many choices to make about your cancer treatment. One choice you might be thinking about ... are acupuncture, chiropractic, and herbal medicines. People with cancer may use CAM to Help cope with the ...

  4. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G. (Department of Molecular and Tumour Radiobiology, National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary))

    2008-12-15

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  5. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so they cannot spread. How Does Targeted Therapy Work? Targeted therapy drugs work in a few different ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Serum Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Change After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Is Associated With Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients Undergoing Combined Modality Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shao-Lun; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Wu, Jian-Kuan [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jang-Ming; Huang, Pei-Ming [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chih-Hung [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason, E-mail: jasoncheng@ntu.edu.tw [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to investigate the association of clinical factors, dosimetric parameters, and biomarkers with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treated by neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) under strict pulmonary dose constraints and esophagectomy. Methods and Materials: We prospectively enrolled 112 patients undergoing trimodality treatment (including radiation therapy [40 Gy], concurrent taxane-/5-fluorouracil-based regimens, and radical esophagectomy) for ESCC. A PPC was defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome within 30 days after surgery. Serum samples were collected before and within 1 month after CCRT. The association of serum biomarkers with PPCs was detected by proximity ligation assay (PLA) and verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Associations of clinical factors, lung dosimetric parameters, and biomarkers with PPC were tested statistically. Results: Thirty-three patients (29.5%) had PPCs. None of the dosimetric parameters was associated with PPCs. Preoperative functional vital capacity (FVC) was significantly associated with PPCs (P=.004). Of the 15 PLA-screened biomarkers, posttreatment transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was borderline significantly associated with PPCs (P=.087). Patients with PPCs had significantly larger pre-CCRT to post-CCRT decrease in serum TGF-β1 concentration (−11,310 vs −5332 pg/mL, P=.005) and higher pre-CCRT to post-CCRT percent decline in serum TGF-β1 concentration (−37.4% vs −25.0%, P=.009) than patients without PPCs. On multivariate analysis, preoperative FVC (P=.003) and decrease in TGF-β1 >7040 pg/mL (P=.014) were independent factors associated with PPCs. Conclusions: Preoperative FVC and decrease in serum TGF-β1 level after dose-limited CCRT to the lung are associated with the development of PPCs.

  7. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura A; Eley, John G; Howell, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were...... to demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimizes the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment...

  8. What future for combination therapies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, John

    2003-01-01

    For most patients who require lipid-lowering treatment, statin monotherapy is the appropriate treatment. However, in those patients where statin monotherapy does not produce optimal lipid levels, the combination of a statin with niacin, a bile acid sequestrant, a fibric acid derivative, a

  9. Metformin synergizes 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination therapy through impairing intracellular ATP production and DNA repair in breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jaslyn Sian-Siu; Ng, Char-Hong; Tan, Si Hoey; Malik, Rozita Abdul; Teh, Yew-Ching; Tan, Boon-Shing; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; See, Mee-Hoong; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Yip, Cheng-Har; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2015-10-01

    Metformin, an AMPK activator, has been reported to improve pathological response to chemotherapy in diabetic breast cancer patients. To date, its mechanism of action in cancer, especially in cancer stem cells (CSCs) have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin, but not other AMPK activators (e.g. AICAR and A-769662), synergizes 5-fluouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination chemotherapy in non-stem breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells. We show that this occurs through an AMPK-dependent mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, the synergistic effects of metformin and FEC occurred in an AMPK-independent mechanism in breast CSCs. Further analyses revealed that metformin accelerated glucose consumption and lactate production more severely in the breast CSCs but the production of intracellular ATP was severely hampered, leading to a severe energy crisis and impairs the ability of CSCs to repair FEC-induced DNA damage. Indeed, addition of extracellular ATP completely abrogated the synergistic effects of metformin on FEC sensitivity in breast CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that metformin synergizes FEC sensitivity through distinct mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines and CSCs, thus providing further evidence for the clinical relevance of metformin for the treatment of cancers.

  10. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  11. Long-term results from a randomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant combined-modality therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oblak Irena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine in patients with locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. This report summarizes the results of the phase II study together with long-term (5-year follow-up. Methods Between June 2004 and January 2005, 57 patients with operable, clinical stage II-III adenocarcinoma of the rectum entered the study. Radiation dose was 45 Gy delivered as 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily was administered during radiotherapy and at weekends. Surgery was scheduled 6 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy. Patients received four cycles of postoperative chemotherapy comprising either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid days 1-14 every 3 weeks or bolus i.v. 5-fluorouracil 425 mg/m2/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m2/day days 1-5 every 4 weeks (choice was at the oncologist's discretion. Study endpoints included complete pathological remission, proportion of R0 resections and sphincter-sparing procedures, toxicity, survival parameters and long-term (5-year rectal and urogenital morbidity assessment. Results One patient died after receiving 27 Gy because of a pulmonary embolism. Fifty-six patients completed radiochemotherapy and had surgery. Median follow-up time was 62 months. No patients were lost to follow-up. R0 resection was achieved in 55 patients. A complete pathological response was observed in 5 patients (9.1%; T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 40%, 52.9% and 49.1%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate, recurrence-free survival, and local control was 61.4% (95% CI: 48.9-73.9%, 52.4% (95% CI: 39.3-65.5%, and 87.4% (95% CI: 75.0-99.8%, respectively. In 5 patients local relapse has occurred; dissemination was observed in 19 patients and secondary malignancies have occurred in 2 patients. The most frequent side-effect of the preoperative combined therapy was dermatitis

  12. Combination photodynamic therapy using 5-fluorouracil and aminolevulinate enhances tumor-selective production of protoporphyrin IX and improves treatment efficacy of squamous skin cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    In combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT), a small-molecule drug is used to modulate the physiological state of tumor cells prior to giving aminolevulinate (ALA; a precursor for protoporphyrin IX, PpIX). In our laboratory we have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can enhance therapeutic effectiveness of ALAbased photodynamic therapy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, only one (5-fluorouracil; 5-FU) is FDA-approved for skin cancer management. Here, we describe animal and human studies on 5-FU mechanisms of action, in terms of how 5-FU pretreatment leads to enhanced PpIX accumulation and improves selectivity of ALA-PDT treatment. In A431 subcutaneous tumors in mice, 5-FU changed expression of heme enzyme (upregulating coproporphyrinogen oxidase, and down-regulating ferrochelatase), inhibited tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67), enhanced differentiation (E-cadherin), and led to strong, tumor-selective increases in apoptosis. Interestingly, enhancement of apoptosis by 5-FU correlated strongly with an increased accumulation of p53 in tumor cells that persisted for 24 h post- PDT. In a clinical trial using a split-body, bilaterally controlled study design, human subjects with actinic keratoses (AK; preneoplastic precursors of SCC) were pretreated on one side of the face, scalp, or forearms with 5-FU cream for 6 days, while the control side received no 5-FU. On the seventh day, the levels of PpIX in 4 test lesions were measured by noninvasive fluorescence dosimetry, and then all lesions were treated with PDT using methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) and red light (635 nm). Relative amounts of PpIX were found to be increased ~2-fold in 5-FU pretreated lesions relative to controls. At 3 months after PDT, the overall clinical response to PDT (reduction in lesion counts) was 2- to 3-fold better for the 5-FU pretreated lesions, a clinically important result. In summary, 5-FU is a useful adjuvant to aminolevulinate-based PDT

  13. Temsirolimus and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) combination therapy in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer: phase Ib results and prediction of clinical outcome with FDG-PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Sonderen, M.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Desar, I.M.E.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Oyen, W.J.G.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Herpen, C.M.L. van

    2014-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) is active in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer. Preclinical data suggest that the combination of PLD with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor has an additive effect. The safety and recommended phase two dose (RPTD) of temsirolimus in

  14. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  15. Modeling cancer-immune responses to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePillis, L G; Eladdadi, A; Radunskaya, A E

    2014-10-01

    Cancer therapies that harness the actions of the immune response, such as targeted monoclonal antibody treatments and therapeutic vaccines, are relatively new and promising in the landscape of cancer treatment options. Mathematical modeling and simulation of immune-modifying therapies can help to offset the costs of drug discovery and development, and encourage progress toward new immunotherapies. Despite advances in cancer immunology research, questions such as how the immune system interacts with a growing tumor, and which components of the immune system play significant roles in responding to immunotherapy are still not well understood. Mathematical modeling and simulation are powerful tools that provide an analytical framework in which to address such questions. A quantitative understanding of the kinetics of the immune response to treatment is crucial in designing treatment strategies, such as dosing, timing, and predicting the response to a specific treatment. These models can be used both descriptively and predictively. In this chapter, various mathematical models that address different cancer treatments, including cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and combinations of both treatments, are presented. The aim of this chapter is to highlight the importance of mathematical modeling and simulation in the design of immunotherapy protocols for cancer treatment. The results demonstrate the power of these approaches in explaining determinants that are fundamental to cancer-immune dynamics, therapeutic success, and the development of efficient therapies.

  16. [Radiation therapy of locally advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hegemann, N-S; Li, M; Eze, C; Belka, C; Ganswindt, U

    2017-11-01

    The risk classification for localized prostate cancer is based on the groups "low", "intermediate", and "high-risk" prostate cancer. Following this established risk group definition, locally advanced prostate cancer (cT3/4N0M0) has to be classified as "high-risk" prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy or high-dose radiotherapy, which is combined with androgen deprivation, are the only curative standard treatments for locally advanced prostate cancer. Particularly adequate radiation doses, modern radiotherapy techniques like IMRT/IGRT, as well as long-term androgen suppression are essential for an optimal treatment outcome. In combination with definitive radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy should be started neoadjuvant/simultaneous to radiotherapy and is recommended to be continued after radiotherapy. Previous data suggest that 2‑year long-term androgen deprivation in this setting may not be inferior to 3‑year long-term androgen deprivation in high-risk patients. An additional radiation therapy of the lymphatic pathways in men with cN0 locally advanced/high-risk prostate cancer is still a matter of research. Ongoing trials may define selected subgroups with a suggested benefit at its best.

  17. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    of Medicinal Product Statistics provided individually updated exposure information. The National Cancer Register and Pathology Register provided ovarian cancer incidence data. Information on confounding factors and effect modifiers was from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 909,946 women without hormone-sensitive cancer or bilateral oophorectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ovarian cancer. RESULTS: In an average of 8.0 years of follow-up (7.3 million women-years), 3068 incident ovarian...

  18. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  19. Art therapy in cancer fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of art therapy, like painting, cutting, drawing, collage, creative visualization and color therapy. In the assessments, after the groups, the participants demonstrated the effects of art therapy, which described that the intervention allowed speak from the process of facing life to cancer fight. It is concluded that the techniques of art therapy provided self-knowledge, self-esteem and redemption sense of well-being with relaxation, and promote happiness and reduce stress.

  20. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  1. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is exposed to radiation. Whether IMRT leads to improved control of tumor growth and better survival compared ... treatments. Some patients may receive radiation therapy and chemotherapy at the same time. The timing of radiation ...

  2. Recent progress in nanotechnology for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mu-Fei; Lei, Lei; Guo, Sheng-Rong; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2010-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology significantly benefits clinical practice in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management. Especially, nanotechnology offers a promise for the targeted delivery of drugs, genes, and proteins to tumor tissues and therefore alleviating the toxicity of anticancer agents in healthy tissues. This article reviews current nanotechnology platforms for anticancer drug delivery, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, carbon nanotubes, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and nucleic acid-based nanoparticles [DNA, RNA interference (RNAi), and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)] as well as nanotechnologies for combination therapeutic strategies, for example, nanotechnologies combined with multidrug-resistance modulator, ultrasound, hyperthermia, or photodynamic therapy. This review raises awareness of the advantages and challenges for the application of these therapeutic nanotechnologies, in light of some recent advances in nanotechnologic drug delivery and cancer therapy.

  3. Targeted Therapies in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Dogan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common genital cancer in developed world. It is generally diagnosed in early stage and it has a favorable prognosis. However, advanced staged disease and recurrences are difficult to manage. There are some common genetic alterations related to endometrial carcinogenesis in similar fashion to other cancers. Personalized medicine, which means selection of best suited treatment for an individual, has gain attention in clinical care of patients in recent years. Targeted therapies were developed as a part of personalized or %u201Ctailored%u201D medicine and specifically acts on a target or biologic pathway. There are quite a number of molecular alteration points in endometrial cancer such as PTEN tumor suppressor genes, DNA mismatch repair genes, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and p53 oncogene which all might be potential candidates for tailored targeted therapy. In recent years targeted therapies has clinical application in ovarian cancer patients and in near future with the advent of new agents these %u201Ctailored%u201D drugs will be in market for routine clinical practice in endometrial cancer patients, in primary disease and recurrences as well.

  4. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0527 TITLE: Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Aik...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0527 5c...combination with irinotecan or cetuximab. Results: Colon cancer cell lines demonstrated varying sensitivity to MLN8237 with IC50 values ranging from 0.08 to

  5. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  6. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  7. Long-term outcomes of dynamic conformal arc irradiation combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in Japanese patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer: case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Kenji; Kamba, Tomomi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eijiro; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-02-01

    There are few reports of the outcomes of external beam radiotherapy in Asian males with localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of external beam irradiation using three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy, combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, in patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer. Between March 2003 and August 2007, 150 Japanese patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer were definitively treated with three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy. The median age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen values and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy period were 73 years, 9.4 ng/ml and 6 months, respectively. In principle, 74 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume, although the total dose was reduced to 70 Gy in patients with unfavorable risk factors, such as severe diabetes mellitus or anticoagulant therapy. No adjuvant hormonal therapy was given to any patient. Salvage hormonal therapy was started when the prostate-specific antigen value exceeded 4 ng/ml in a monotonically increasing manner. The median follow-up period was 79 months. Salvage hormonal therapy was initiated in 10 patients and the median prostate-specific antigen value at the initiation was 4.7 ng/ml. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of the biochemical relapse-free survival rate, the salvage hormonal therapy -free rate and the overall survival rate were 83.3% (95% confidence interval = 77.1-89.6%), 94.3% (95% confidence interval = 90.4-98.1%) and 96.3% (95% confidence interval = 93.1-99.5%), respectively. The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of developing more than Grade 2 late rectal and urinary toxicities were 5.5 and 2.9%, respectively. Three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy, with up to 74 Gy, in patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was well tolerated and achieved good biochemical control and survival outcomes.

  8. Degradation of HIF-1alpha under hypoxia combined with induction of Hsp90 polyubiquitination in cancer cells by hypericin: a unique cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilda Barliya

    Full Text Available The perihydroxylated perylene quinone hypericin has been reported to possess potent anti-metastatic and antiangiogenic activities, generated by targeting diverse crossroads of cancer-promoting processes via unique mechanisms. Hypericin is the only known exogenous reagent that can induce forced poly-ubiquitination and accelerated degradation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 in cancer cells. Hsp90 client proteins are thereby destabilized and rapidly degraded. Hsp70 client proteins may potentially be also affected via preventing formation of hsp90-hsp70 intermediate complexes. We show here that hypericin also induces enhanced degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α in two human tumor cell lines, U87-MG glioblastoma and RCC-C2VHL-/- renal cell carcinoma and in the non-malignant ARPE19 retinal pigment epithelial cell line. The hypericin-accelerated turnover of HIF-1α, the regulatory precursor of the HIF-1 transcription factor which promotes hypoxic stress and angiogenic responses, overcomes the physiologic HIF-1α protein stabilization which occurs in hypoxic cells. The hypericin effect also eliminates the high HIF-1α levels expressed constitutively in the von-Hippel Lindau protein (pVHL-deficient RCC-C2VHL-/- renal cell carcinoma cell line. Unlike the normal ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-dependent turnover of HIF-α proteins which occurs in normoxia, the hypericin-induced HIF-1α catabolism can occur independently of cellular oxygen levels or pVHL-promoted ubiquitin ligation of HIF-1α. It is mediated by lysosomal cathepsin-B enzymes with cathepsin-B activity being optimized in the cells through hypericin-mediated reduction in intracellular pH. Our findings suggest that hypericin may potentially be useful in preventing growth of tumors in which HIF-1α plays pivotal roles, and in pVHL ablated tumor cells such as renal cell carcinoma through elimination of elevated HIF-1α contents in these cells, scaling down the excessive angiogenesis

  9. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs Patient Safety Informed Consent Children's Assent Scientific Review Ending Trials ... induced hypertension and outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated ... Oncology 2013; 11:306. [PubMed Abstract] Gore L, DeGregori ...

  10. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons come...

  11. [Conversion therapy of advanced gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiangdong; Mao, Zonglei

    2017-10-25

    There are 30% to 40% of advanced gastric cancer patients who lose the opportunity of curative surgery at initial diagnosis, so chemotherapy is recommended as the main treatment modality, however, the overall prognosis is poor. Recently, a number of phase II( studies show an enormously ideal potential of conversion therapy in these patients. Conversion therapy uses rational chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy and so on combined with MDT assessment to translate initial unresectable case to resectable one, which obviously prolongs survival time and improves quality of life. In this review, we address the indications, development and our experiences of conversion therapy in advanced GC, which looks forward to providing the reference to clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Oxygen therapy as an additional component of cytostatic treatment for recurrent cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Savkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The data obtained by the authors suggest that the efficiency of standard cytostatic therapy for recurrent cervical cancer in combination with chemotherapy and oxygen therapy has increased and the tolerance of cytostatic treatment during oxygen therapy improved.

  13. Oxygen therapy as an additional component of cytostatic treatment for recurrent cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    R. F. Savkova; L. E. Rotobelskaya; L. F. Yudina; M. A. Gerashchenko; A. S. Dzasokhov

    2012-01-01

    The data obtained by the authors suggest that the efficiency of standard cytostatic therapy for recurrent cervical cancer in combination with chemotherapy and oxygen therapy has increased and the tolerance of cytostatic treatment during oxygen therapy improved.

  14. Periodontal disease preceding osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in cancer patients receiving antiresorptives alone or combined with targeted therapies: report of 5 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Razis, Evangelia; Galiti, Dimitra; Galitis, Evangelos; Labropoulos, Stefanos; Tsimpidakis, Antonis; Sgouros, Joseph; Karampeazis, Athanasios; Migliorati, Cesar

    2015-12-01

    We present clinical and radiologic data of periodontal tissue involvement preceding the appearance of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in 5 patients with solid tumors, who received antiresorptives alone or in combination with targeted therapies. Five patients with osteonecrosis before dental extraction were studied. Periodontal involvement was evidenced by pain, bleeding, fistula, purulence, swelling, periodontal pocket, and tooth mobility. Combined endoperiodontal lesions were considered in 1 patient. Duration of symptoms before ONJ diagnosis lasted 8 to 24 weeks. Routine therapy was performed in 2 of 5 patients. Widening of the periodontal ligament was observed in 4 patients, and dense alveolar bone was seen in 1 patient. Local complications of ONJ required dental extractions in 4 of 5 patients. Spontaneous tooth exfoliation was observed in 1 patient. Alveolar bone biopsies, after the extraction in 2 patients, confirmed osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis healed in 2 patients--1 after the dental extraction and 1 after 3 dental extractions and surgical debridement. Postextraction socket healed in 1 patient, and the area with exposed bone remained asymptomatic. Osteonecrosis progressed in 2 patients. Clinical and radiologic signs of periodontal tissue involvement, before dental extraction in patients treated with antiresorptives alone or in combination with targeted therapy, may represent developing osteonecrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ziconotide combination intrathecal therapy: rationale and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark S; Rauck, Richard L; Deer, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal analgesic used to manage moderate to severe chronic pain. Although ziconotide is approved in the United States for intrathecal monotherapy only, it is often used in combination with other intrathecal drugs in clinical practice. The need exists for a critical assessment of the currently available published literature on ziconotide combination therapy. This review summarizes and evaluates the publications from preclinical and clinical peer-reviewed experiments that have investigated the safety and effectiveness of ziconotide in combination with a variety of other drugs. Eleven relevant publications were identified through a systematic search of multiple databases. In preclinical studies, additive or synergistic antinociceptive effects were discovered when ziconotide was used in combination with morphine, clonidine, or baclofen; however, no additional antinociceptive effects were observed when bupivacaine was added to ziconotide therapy. Safety data from animal studies revealed that ziconotide did not exacerbate morphine-induced respiratory depression, or clonidine-induced hypotension or bradycardia; however, ziconotide did potentiate morphine-induced hypotension and inhibition of gastrointestinal tract motility. Results from 2 open-label trials indicated that combination ziconotide and morphine therapy produced greater analgesia than was produced by the use of either drug alone. Preliminary support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, baclofen, or hydromorphone was provided by case studies. Although clinical and preclinical studies provide some support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, hydromorphone, clonidine, or baclofen, strong evidence-based data are limited. Controlled, long-term clinical trials are warranted.

  16. Assessment of quality of life and changes in body composition in men with localized prostate cancer on hormone therapy combined with radiotherapy prostate cancer, quality of life, body composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Daniele de Campos; Salvajoli, Joao Victor; Gagliardi, Joao Fernando; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Cruz, Ticiane

    2014-07-01

    Objective: the aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life and changes in body composition in adult men (71.3 ± 6.9 years) with prostate cancer on hormone therapy combined with radiotherapy. Methodology: to assess the quality of life of individuals, we used the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), which is a tool developed to survey health status in the Medical Outcomes Study. This questionnaire was applied at the beginning and six months after the start of the study. Weight was measured and the percentage of fat was estimated from an anthropometric equation from Jackson and Pollock (1978). The period of assessments and reassessments was September 2009 to October 2010. Radiotherapy was performed in other hospitals (information contained in participant's data form), as the management of patients was conducted at the oncology pharmacy of Varzea do Carmo Specialties Clinic. Results: of the eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, five were worse with significant differences from the first to the second assessment. They are: overall health status (p <0.01), vitality (p <0.01), functional capacity (p <0.01), social functioning (p <0.01) and pain (p <0, 01). Body weight ranged statistically significant (p <0.01) between the first evaluation (75.3 ± 12.5kg) and the second evaluation (77.4 ± 12.5kg). The same occurred with the percentage of fat, where the initial values (25.1 ± 3.8%) and final (25.8 ± 3.5%) experienced statistically significant difference (p <0.01). Conclusion: the results of this study showed that hormone therapy combined with radiotherapy led to a gain of weight and body fat percentage in the men evaluated, as well as deterioration in the quality of life of these patients. Therefore, it is necessary to continue researching this topic in order to develop strategies that mitigate the side effects of hormone therapy. The risks of hormone therapy should be evaluated and compared with gains in order to define the length of treatment

  17. HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjetka Uršič Vrščaj

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sex steroids are not known to damage DNA directly. They can stimulate or inhibit cell proliferation, and thus can modulate tumor developmental progression.Results. Sex steroids-related tumors in women are represented by breast cancer and endometrial cancer, and a possible relationship exists between sex steroids and both ovarian and colon cancer. Among current ERT users or those who stopped use 1–4 years previously, the relative risk of having breast cancer diagnosed is low, increases by factor of 1.023 for each year of hormone use. An appropriate combination of estrogen and progestin does not appear to increase, and may even decrease, the risk of endometrial cancer. Studies on HRT and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer have produced conflicting results but most data seem to exclude a strong assotiation. It is important that available data suggest a reduced risk of benign colorectal adenoma and colon cancer for 30–40%.Conclusions. After breast cancer, endometrial cancer, melanoma or epithelial ovarian cancer HRT is not absolute contraindication. Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma should be considered to be a contraindication to HRT.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew A; Chabner, Bruce A

    2009-11-10

    Epigenetic processes are implicated in cancer causation and progression. The acetylation status of histones regulates access of transcription factors to DNA and influences levels of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity diminishes acetylation of histones, causing compaction of the DNA/histone complex. This compaction blocks gene transcription and inhibits differentiation, providing a rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors. In this review, we explore the biology of the HDAC enzymes, summarize the pharmacologic properties of HDAC inhibitors, and examine results of selected clinical trials. We consider the potential of these inhibitors in combination therapy with targeted drugs and with cytotoxic chemotherapy. HDAC inhibitors promote growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells, with minimal effects on normal tissue. In addition to decompaction of the histone/DNA complex, HDAC inhibition also affects acetylation status and function of nonhistone proteins. HDAC inhibitors have demonstrated antitumor activity in clinical trials, and one drug of this class, vorinostat, is US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Other inhibitors in advanced stages of clinical development, including depsipeptide and MGCD0103, differ from vorinostat in structure and isoenzyme specificity, and have shown activity against lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumors. Promising preclinical activity in combination with cytotoxics, inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, and inhibitors of proteasome function have led to combination therapy trials. HDAC inhibitors are an important emerging therapy with single-agent activity against multiple cancers, and have significant potential in combination use.

  19. RLIP76 Targeted Therapy for Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Jyotsana; Figarola, James; Horne, David; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent improvements in chemotherapeutic approaches to treating kidney cancer, this malignancy remains deadly if not found and removed at an early stage of the disease. Kidney cancer is highly drug-resistant, which may at least partially result from high expression of transporter proteins in the cell membranes of kidney cells. Although these transporter proteins can contribute to drug-resistance, targeting proteins from the ATP-binding cassette transporter family has not been effective in reversing drug-resistance in kidney cancer. Recent studies have identified RLIP76 as a key stress-defense protein that protects normal cells from damage caused by stress conditions, including heat, ultra-violet light, X-irradiation, and oxidant/electrophilic toxic chemicals, and is crucial for protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. RLIP76 is the predominant glutathione-electrophile-conjugate (GS-E) transporter in cells, and inhibiting it with antibodies or through siRNA or antisense causes apoptosis in many cancer cell types. To date, blocking of RLIP76, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, as a therapeutic strategy for kidney cancer has not yet been evaluated in human clinical trials, although there is considerable potential for RLIP76 to be developed as a therapeutic agent for kidney cancer. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying apoptosis caused by RLIP76 depletion, the role of RLIP76 in clathrin-dependent endocytosis deficiency, and the feasibility of RLIP76-targeted therapy for kidney cancer.

  20. Targeting in Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Mangues

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug developers recruit and combine principles, procedures and strategies from chemistry, pharmacology, nanotechnology and biotechnology, focusing on the generation of functional vehicles as nano-carriers of drugs for improved stability and enhanced intracellular delivery.[...

  1. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  2. Self-Monitoring and Self-Delivery of Photosensitizer-Doped Nanoparticles for Highly Effective Combination Cancer Therapy in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Xudong; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Yan, Li; Li, Shengliang; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Guangyu; Rogach, Andrey L; Yu, Peter K N; Shi, Peng; Tu, Lung-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ching; Zhang, Xiaohong; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-27

    Theranostic nanomedicine is capable of diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring the delivery and distribution of drug molecules and has received growing interest. Herein, a self-monitored and self-delivered photosensitizer-doped FRET nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery system (DDS) is designed for this purpose. During preparation, a donor/acceptor pair of perylene and 5,10,15,20-tetro (4-pyridyl) porphyrin (H2TPyP) is co-doped into a chemotherapeutic anticancer drug curcumin (Cur) matrix. In the system, Cur works as a chemotherapeutic agent. In the meantime, the green fluorescence of Cur molecules is quenched (OFF) in the form of NPs and can be subsequently recovered (ON) upon release in tumor cells, which enables additional imaging and real-time self-monitoring capabilities. H2TPyP is employed as a photodynamic therapeutic drug, but it also emits efficient NIR fluorescence for diagnosis via FRET from perylene. By exploiting the emission characteristics of these two emitters, the combinatorial drugs provide a real-time dual-fluorescent imaging/tracking system in vitro and in vivo, and this has not been reported before in self-delivered DDS which simultaneously shows a high drug loading capacity (77.6%Cur). Overall, our carrier-free DDS is able to achieve chemotherapy (Cur), photodynamic therapy (H2TPyP), and real-time self-monitoring of the release and distribution of the nanomedicine (Cur and H2TPyP). More importantly, the as-prepared NPs show high cancer therapeutic efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. We expect that the present real-time self-monitored and self-delivered DDS with multiple-therapeutic and multiple-fluorescent ability will have broad applications in future cancer therapy.

  3. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development...

  4. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  5. Combination antitumor therapy with targeted dual-nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xiaoyou; Song, Ge; Liu, Tongzhou; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-06-01

    Combination therapy is one of the important treatment strategies for cancer at present. However, the outcome of current combination therapy based on the co-administration of conventional dosage forms is suboptimal, due to the short half-lives of chemodrugs, their deficient tumor selectivity and so forth. Nanotechnology-based targeted delivery systems show great promise in addressing the associated problems and providing superior therapeutic benefits. In this review, we focus on the combination of therapeutic strategies between different nanomedicines or drug-loaded nanocarriers, rather than the co-delivery of different drugs via a single nanocarrier. We introduce the general concept of various targeting strategies of nanomedicines, present the principles of combination antitumor therapy with dual-nanomedicines, analyze their advantages and limitations compared with co-delivery strategies, and overview the recent advances of combination therapy based on targeted nanomedicines. Finally, we reviewed the challenges and future perspectives regarding the selection of therapeutic agents, targeting efficiency and the gap between the preclinical and clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Zafar [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Shukla, Yogeshwer, E-mail: yogeshwer_shukla@hotmail.com [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  7. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  8. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Sweet Ping, E-mail: sweet.ng@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod [Monash Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  9. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  10. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy i...

  11. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein.

  12. External-Beam Radiation Therapy and High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy in High and Very High Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Data on Clinical Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael, E-mail: rmartinezm@unav.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Cambeiro, Mauricio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio [Department of Medical Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Gaztanaga, Miren; Arbea, Leire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Pascual, Ignacio [Department of Urology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain); Aristu, Javier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarre (Spain)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 200 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (32.5%) or very high-risk prostate cancer (67.5%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen of 15.2 ng/mL, a clinical stage of T2c, and a Gleason score of 7. Treatment consisted of 54 Gy of external irradiation (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT]) followed by 19 Gy of HDR brachytherapy in four twice-daily treatments. ADT started 0-3 months before 3DCRT and continued for 2 years. Results: One hundred and ninety patients (95%) received 2 years of ADT. After a median follow-up of 3.7 years (range, 2-9), late Grade {>=}2 urinary toxicity was observed in 18% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 was observed in 5%. Prior transurethral resection of the prostate (p = 0.013) and bladder D{sub 50} {>=}1.19 Gy (p = 0.014) were associated with increased Grade {>=}2 urinary complications; age {>=}70 (p = 0.05) was associated with Grade {>=}3 urinary complications. Late Grade {>=}2 gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 9% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 in 1.5%. CTV size {>=}35.8 cc (p = 0.007) and D{sub 100} {>=}3.05 Gy (p = 0.01) were significant for increased Grade {>=}2 complications. The 5-year and 9-year biochemical relapse-free survival (nadir + 2) rates were 85.1% and 75.7%, respectively. Patients with Gleason score of 7-10 had a decreased biochemical relapse-free survival (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Intermediate-term results at the 5-year time point indicate a favorable outcome without an increase in the rate of late complications.

  13. [Radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Eui Kyu

    2008-02-01

    Radiotherapy has been offered to patients with pancreatic cancer, either in the adjuvant or definitive setting. However, the role of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer is increasingly doubted, especially after the introduction of gemcitabine to both domains. Although contradictory data exist, combined chemoradiotherapy improves both quantity and quality of life for patients with locally advanced tumors compared with radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy alone. Recently, induction chemotherapy strategy is being evaluated for better selection of patients for optimal benefit from consolidative chemoradiotherapy. Much controversy has been suggested concerning the role of adjuvant radiotherapy, but quality assurance for radiotherapy was not considered in the previously reported studies. Combined chemoradiotherapy in the adjuvant setting is still considered as a viable option. Current phase III randomized on-going studies will provide better answers on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Approach of combined cancer gene therapy and radiation: response of promoters to ionizing radiation; Approche de therapie genique anti-cancereuse combinee a l'irradiation: etude de la reponse de promoteurs aux radiations ionisantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstett, A

    2005-09-15

    Gene therapy is an emerging cancer treatment modality. We are interested in developing a radiation-inducible gene therapy system to sensitize the tumor vasculature to the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment. An expression system based on irradiation-inducible promoters will drive the expression of anti-tumor genes in the tumor vasculature. Solid tumors are dependent on angio genesis, a process in which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature. Vascular endothelial cells are un transformed and genetically stable, thus avoiding the problem of resistance to the treatments. Vascular endothelial cells may therefore represent a suitable target for this therapeutic gene therapy strategy.The identification of IR-inducible promoters native to endothelial cells was performed by gene expression profiling using cDNA micro array technology. We describe the genes modified by clinically relevant doses of IR. The extension to high doses aimed at studying the effects of total radiation delivery to the tumor. The radio-inductiveness of the genes selected for promoter study was confirmed by RT-PCR. Analysis of the activity of promoters in response to IR was also assessed in a reporter plasmid. We found that authentic promoters cloned onto a plasmid are not suitable for cancer gene therapy due to their low induction after IR. In contrast, synthetic promoters containing repeated sequence-specific binding sites for IR-activated transcription factors such as NF-{kappa}B are potential candidates for gene therapy. The activity of five tandemly repeated TGGGGACTTTCCGC elements for NF-{kappa}B binding in a luciferase reporter was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the response to fractionated low doses was improved in comparison to the total single dose. Thus, we put present evidence that a synthetic promoter for NF-{kappa}B specific binding may have application in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancer. (author)

  15. ORAL-THERAPY FOR SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF

    After a remarkable improvement of the very poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer with very simple therapy such as iv and oral cyclophosphamide the role of oral therapy has become minimal. However, since more than a decade results of combination chemotherapy are at a plateau and it is necessary to

  16. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, F; Luisetto, G; Basso, S M M; Basso, U; Brunello, A; Camozzi, V

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer remains one of the first leading causes of death in women, and currently endocrine treatment is of major therapeutic value in patients with estrogen-receptor positive tumors. Selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, aromatase inhibitors, and GnRH agonists are the drugs of choice. Tamoxifen, a partial nonsteroidal estrogen agonist, is a type II competitive inhibitor of estradiol at its receptor, and the prototype of SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors significantly lower serum estradiol concentration in postmenopausal patients, having no detectable effects on adrenocortical steroids formation, while GnRH agonists suppress ovarian function, inducing a menopause-like condition in premenopausal women. Endocrine therapy has generally a relatively low morbidity, leading to a significant reduction of mortality for breast cancer. The aim of chemoprevention is to interfere early with the process of carcinogenesis, reducing the risk of cancer development. As preventive agents, raloxifene and tamoxifene are equivalent, while raloxifene has more potent antiresorptive effects in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Endocrine treatment is usually considered a standard choice for patients with estrogen-receptor positive cancers and non-life-threatening advanced disease, or for older patients unfit for aggressive chemotherapy regimens. Several therapeutic protocols used in patients with breast cancer are associated with bone loss, which may lead to an increased risk of fracture. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice to treat such a drug-induced bone disease. The aim of this review is to outline current understanding on endocrine therapy of breast cancer. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  17. Temsirolimus and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) combination therapy in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer: phase Ib results and prediction of clinical outcome with FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers-Sonderen, Marye J; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Desar, Ingrid M E; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; Ottevanger, Petronella B; van Herpen, Carla M L

    2014-12-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) is active in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer. Preclinical data suggest that the combination of PLD with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor has an additive effect. The safety and recommended phase two dose (RPTD) of temsirolimus in combination with PLD were assessed. (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT was performed for early response monitoring. Nineteen patients with advanced breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer were treated with increasing doses of temsirolimus (10, 15, or 20 mg once weekly) and PLD (30 or 40 mg/m(2) once every 4 weeks). PLD was initiated 2 weeks after start of temsirolimus. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline, after 2 and 6 weeks. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic volume, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG, SUV × metabolic volume) were calculated. The RPTD was 15 mg temsirolimus and 40 mg/m(2) PLD. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were thrombocytopenia grade 3 with nose bleeding and skin toxicity grade 3. Most frequent treatment-related toxicities were nausea, fatigue, mucositis, and skin toxicity. Changes in TLG after 2 weeks predicted partial response (PR) after 10 weeks (p = 0.037). A rise in SUV between the second and sixth week predicted progression (PD) (p = 0.034) and was associated with worse progression free survival (PFS) (HR 1.068; p = 0.013). The RPTD was established at 15 mg temsirolimus weekly and PLD 40 mg/m(2) once every 4 weeks and the combination was safe. Early response evaluation with FDG-PET/CT may predict subsequent radiological PR and PD. This trial is registered under number NCT0098263.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Combined Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT and Docetaxel Compared with ADT Alone for Metastatic Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engel Ayer Botrel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and second most common cause of cancer mortality in older men in the United States (USA and Western Europe. Androgen-deprivation therapy alone (ADT remains the first line of treatment in most cases, for metastatic disease. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCT that compared the efficacy and adverse events profile of a chemohormonal therapy (ADT ± docetaxel for metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer (mHNPC.Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Data extracted from the studies were combined by using the hazard ratio (HR or risk ratio (RR with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI.The final analysis included 3 trials comprising 2,264 patients (mHNPC. Patients who received the chemohormonal therapy had a longer clinical progression-free survival interval (HR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.75; p<0.00001, and no heterogeneity (Chi2 = 0.64; df = 1 [p = 0.42]; I2 = 0%. The biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS also was higher in patients treated with ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.69; p<0.00001, also with no heterogeneity noted (Chi2 = 0.48; df = 2 [p = 0.79]; I2 = 0%. Finally, the combination of ADT with docetaxel showed a superior overall survival (OS compared with ADT alone (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.84; p<0.0001, with moderate heterogeneity (Chi2 = 3.84; df = 2 [p = 0.15]; I2 = 48%. A random-effects model analysis was performed, and the results remained favorable to the use of ADT plus docetaxel (HR = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.60 to 0.89; p = 0.002. In the final combined analysis of the high-volume disease patients, the use of the combination therapy also favored an increased overall survival (HR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.83; p = 0.0003. Regarding adverse events and severe toxicity (grade ≥3, the group receiving the combined therapy

  19. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Golas, Benjamin J; Yeung, Vincent W; Madoff, David C

    2014-12-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity: Implications for Multi-Targeted Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella D’Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major disease worldwide. Despite progress in cancer therapy, conventional cytotoxic therapies lead to unsatisfactory long-term survival, mainly related to development of drug resistance by tumor cells and toxicity towards normal cells. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, can exert anti-neoplastic activity by inducing apoptotic cell death in human cancer cells either alone or in combination with conventional therapies. Indeed, n-3 PUFAs potentially increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to conventional therapies, possibly improving their efficacy especially against cancers resistant to treatment. Moreover, in contrast to traditional therapies, n-3 PUFAs appear to cause selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells with little or no toxicity on normal cells. This review focuses on studies investigating the cytotoxic activity of n-3 PUFAs against cancer cells via apoptosis, analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying this effective and selective activity. Here, we highlight the multiple molecules potentially targeted by n-3 PUFAs to trigger cancer cell apoptosis. This analysis can allow a better comprehension of the potential cytotoxic therapeutic role of n-3 PUFAs against cancer, providing specific information and support to design future pre-clinical and clinical studies for a better use of n-3 PUFAs in cancer therapy, mainly combinational therapy.

  1. Effects of a physical therapy program combined with manual lymphatic drainage on shoulder function, quality of life, lymphedema incidence, and pain in breast cancer patients with axillary web syndrome following axillary dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngki; Do, Junghwa; Jung, Sunyoung; Kwon, Ohyun; Jeon, Jae Yong

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physical therapy (PT) combined with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) on shoulder function, pain, lymphedema, visible cords, and quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer patients with axillary web syndrome (AWS). In this prospective, randomized trial, 41 breast cancer patients with visible and palpable cords on the arm and axilla and a numeric rating scale (NRS) pain score of >3 were randomly assigned to PT (3 times/week for 4 weeks; n = 20) and PT combined with MLD (5 times/week for 4 weeks; PTMLD; n = 21) groups. MLD was performed by a physical therapist and the patients themselves during week 1 and weeks 2-4, respectively. Arm volume, shoulder function (muscular strength; active range of motion; and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand [DASH]); QOL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core and Breast Cancer-Specific QOL questionnaires), and pain (NRS) were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. QOL including functional and symptom aspects, shoulder flexor strength, DASH, and NRS scores were significantly improved in both groups after the 4-week intervention (P < 0.05). NRS score and arm volume were significantly lower in the PTMLD group than in the PT group (P < 0.05). Lymphedema was observed in the PT (n = 6), but not PTMLD, group (P < 0.05). PT improves shoulder function, pain, and QOL in breast cancer patients with AWS and combined with MLD decreases arm lymphedema.

  2. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels

    2016-01-01

    analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68–0.86 and 0.88, 0.80–0.96) and rectal cancer (0......Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50–79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were...... followed 1995–2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...

  3. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Thundimadathil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field.

  4. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundimadathil, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field. PMID:23316341

  5. Nitric Oxide Donor-Based Cancer Therapy: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhangjian; Fu, Junjie; Zhang, Yihua

    2017-09-28

    The increasing understanding of the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer biology has generated significant progress in the use of NO donor-based therapy to fight cancer. These advances strongly suggest the potential adoption of NO donor-based therapy in clinical practice, and this has been supported by several clinical studies in the past decade. In this review, we first highlight several types of important NO donors, including recently developed NO donors bearing a dinitroazetidine skeleton, represented by RRx-001, with potential utility in cancer therapy. Special emphasis is then given to the combination of NO donor(s) with other therapies to achieve synergy and to the hybridization of NO donor(s) with an anticancer drug/agent/fragment to enhance the activity or specificity or to reduce toxicity. In addition, we briefly describe inducible NO synthase gene therapy and nanotechnology, which have recently entered the field of NO donor therapy.

  6. Potential risk and benefit of the combination of trastuzumab to chemotherapy and radiation therapy in non-metastatic breast cancer; Benefice et risques potentiels de l'association du trastuzumab a la chimiotherapie et a la radiotherapie dans le cancer du sein non metastatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, Y. [CLCC Oscar-Lambret, Universite de Lille-2, Dept. d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Laharie-Mineur, H. [CLCC, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Gligorov, J. [APHP, Hopital Tenon, Cancer-Est, 75 - Paris (France); Azria, D. [CLCC Val d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, Inserm, EMI 0227, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2007-09-15

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is the first humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the HER2 antigen in breast cancer. HER2 receptor has been individualised 20 years ago. During the past 10 years, trastuzumab administration has radically modified the prognosis of the patients that are treated for HER2 positive breast cancer. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. While, trastuzumab based-regimens became the standard of care in the treatment of HER2/neu positive breast cancer, the optimal combination (concurrently or sequentially) to chemotherapy and radiation therapy is still unknown. Indeed, while the concurrent administration of trastuzumab and anthracyclines is not recommended because of a high risk of cardiac toxicity, there is no published data on the best sequence of trastuzumab and radiation therapy administration, particularly when internal mammary chain is involved. The benefit/risk ratio of the concurrent and sequential administration of trastuzumab with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will be discussed in this review. (authors)

  7. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wirth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy, anti-angiogenic gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, gene therapy-based immune modulation, correction/compensation of gene defects, genetic manipulation of apoptotic and tumor invasion pathways, antisense, and RNAi strategies. Cancer types, which have been targeted with gene therapy, include brain, lung, breast, pancreatic, liver, colorectal, prostate, bladder, head and neck, skin, ovarian, and renal cancer. Currently, two cancer gene therapy products have received market approval, both of which are in China. In addition, the stimulation of the host’s immune system, using gene therapeutic approaches, has gained vast interest. The intention of this review is to point out the most commonly viral and non-viral vectors and methods used in cancer gene therapy, as well as highlight some key results achieved in clinical trials.

  8. Cancer nanotechnology: application of nanotechnology in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ranjita; Acharya, Sarbari; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-10-01

    The application of nanotechnology for cancer therapy has received considerable attention in recent years. Cancer nanotechnology (an interdisciplinary area of research in science, engineering and medicine) is an upcoming field with extensive applications. It provides a unique approach and comprehensive technology against cancer through early diagnosis, prediction, prevention, personalized therapy and medicine. Target-specific drug therapy and methods for early diagnosis of pathologies are the priority research areas in which nanotechnology would play a vital part. This review focuses on the approaches of cancer nanotechnology in the advancement of cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carmustine and methotrexate in combination after whole brain radiation therapy in breast cancer patients presenting with brain metastases: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poujol Sylvain

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1999, patients presenting with brain metastases (BM from breast cancer (BC are treated in our institution with a carmustine (BCNU - methotrexate (MTX combination. We report here our clinical experience regarding this combination. Patients and Methods Patients were treated by a combination of BCNU 100 mg/m² on day 1 and MTX 600 mg/m² on day 1 and 15 of a 28 day cycle. Treatment was continued until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results 50 patients were treated between 1999 and 2007. 94% of the patients presented with concomitant extra-cerebral disease. Median number of previous metastatic setting chemotherapy regimens was 2 (0-5. Median number of cycles was 3 (1-20. There were 11 objective responses (23% [95%CI 12-37] among 48 evaluable patients. Median progression-free survival and overall survival (OS were 4.2 (95%CI: 2.8-5.3 and 6.9 (4.2-10.7 months respectively, with a one-year OS rate of 32% (20-46. Median Relative Dose Intensity for BCNU and MTX were 0.98 (0.31-1.1 and 0.96 (0.57-1.66 respectively. There were 2 presumed treatment-related deaths. One patient developed febrile neutropenia. Performance status, BS-BM score and presence of liver metastases were associated with OS in univariate analysis. Conclusions This combination appears to be effective and well tolerated in good performance status BC patients presenting with BM.

  10. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  11. Combination therapy in hypertension: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalra Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meticulous control of blood pressure is required in patients with hypertension to produce the maximum reduction in clinical cardiovascular end points, especially in patients with comorbidities like diabetes mellitus where more aggressive blood pressure lowering might be beneficial. Recent clinical trials suggest that the approach of using monotherapy for the control of hypertension is not likely to be successful in most patients. Combination therapy may be theoretically favored by the fact that multiple factors contribute to hypertension, and achieving control of blood pressure with single agent acting through one particular mechanism may not be possible. Regimens can either be fixed dose combinations or drugs added sequentially one after other. Combining the drugs makes them available in a convenient dosing format, lower the dose of individual component, thus, reducing the side effects and improving compliance. Classes of antihypertensive agents which have been commonly used are angiotensin receptor blockers, thiazide diuretics, beta and alpha blockers, calcium antagonists and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers are effective, as well as combinations that include renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers, in reducing BP. The majority of currently available fixed-dose combinations are diuretic-based. Combinations may be individualized according to the presence of comorbidities like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, heart failure, thyroid disorders and for special population groups like elderly and pregnant females.

  12. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  13. Oncolytic viruses in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Koskela, Markus J V; Heikkilä, Jari E; Hinkkanen, Ari E

    2007-09-08

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising form of gene therapy for cancer, employing nature's own agents to find and destroy malignant cells. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to this very topical field of research and to point out some of the current observations, insights and ideas circulating in the literature. We have strived to acknowledge as many different oncolytic viruses as possible to give a broader picture of targeting cancer using viruses. Some of the newest additions to the panel of oncolytic viruses include the avian adenovirus, foamy virus, myxoma virus, yaba-like disease virus, echovirus type 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, Saimiri virus, feline panleukopenia virus, Sendai virus and the non-human coronaviruses. Although promising, virotherapy still faces many obstacles that need to be addressed, including the emergence of virus-resistant tumor cells.

  14. Targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Li Yong [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Tsui, Wendy [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Zhang, David [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Song, Emma [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Qu, C F [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Kearsley, John [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Cancer Care Centre, Gray St, Kogarah 2217, NSW (Australia); Thompson, John [Sydney Melanoma Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown 2050 NSW (Australia)

    2004-08-21

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The {sup 213}Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 {mu

  15. Efficacy of Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer after Failure of First-Line Gemcitabine-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwang Hyun; Ryu, Ji Kon; Son, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jae Woo; Jang, Dong Kee; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-03-15

    Second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that progresses following gemcitabine-based treatment has not been established. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of second-line combination chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) in these patients. Between August 2011 and May 2014, all patients who received at least one cycle of XELOX (capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 days; oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m2 on day 1 of a 3-week cycle) combination chemotherapy for unresectable or recurrent PDAC were retrospectively recruited. The response was evaluated every 9 weeks, and the tumor response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival, and adverse events were assessed. Sixty-two patients were included; seven patients (11.3%) had a partial tumor response, and 20 patients (32.3%) had stable disease. The median progression-free and overall survival were 88 days (range, 35.1 to 140.9 days) and 158 days (range, 118.1 to 197.9 days), respectively. Patients who remained stable longer with frontline therapy (≥120 days) exhibited significantly longer progression-free and overall survival. The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events in patients were vomiting (8.1%) and anorexia (6.5%). There was one treatment-related mortality caused by severe neutropenia and typhlitis. Second-line XELOX combination chemotherapy demonstrated an acceptable response and survival rate in patients with advanced PDAC who had failed gemcitabine-based chemotherapy.

  16. Suicide gene therapy in cancer: where do we stand now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Sónia; Carle, Georges; Faneca, Henrique; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie

    2012-11-28

    Suicide gene therapy is based on the introduction into tumor cells of a viral or a bacterial gene, which allows the conversion of a non-toxic compound into a lethal drug. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in a large number of in vitro and in vivo studies, its application to cancer patients has not reached the desirable clinical significance. However, recent reports on pre-clinical cancer models demonstrate the huge potential of this strategy when used in combination with new therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize the different suicide gene systems and gene delivery vectors addressed to cancer, with particular emphasis on recently developed systems and associated bystander effects. In addition, we review the different strategies that have been used in combination with suicide gene therapy and provide some insights into the future directions of this approach, particularly towards cancer stem cell eradication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combination of photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy - evolving role in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Zheng

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality. It offers alternative options in the treatment of cancer and vascular diseases. In cancer treatment, PDT has been used primarily for localized superficial or endoluminal malignant and premalignant conditions. More recently, its application has also been expanded to solid tumors. However, its antitumor efficacy remains debatable and its acceptance still variable. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate that, in addition to the primary local cytotoxicity, PDT might induce secondary host immune responses, which may further enhance PDT's therapeutic effects on primary tumor as well as metastasis. Therefore, PDT-induced local and systemic antitumor immune response might play an important role in successful control of malignant diseases. Furthermore, PDT's antitumor efficacy might also be enhanced through an effective immunoadjuvant or immunomodulator. Our recent clinical data also indicate that improved clinical outcomes can be obtained by a combination of PDT and immunomodulation therapy for the treatment of pre-malignant skin diseases. For instance, the combination of topical ALA-PDT and Imiquimod is effective for the treatment of genital bowenoid papulosis. This presentation will also report our preliminary data in developing combination approaches of PDT and immunotherapy for actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and Bowen's disease.

  18. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF CANCER: AN UPDATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis, Patrizia; Berg, Kristian; Cengel, Keith A.; Foster, Thomas H.; Girotti, Albert W.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Juzeniene, Asta; Kessel, David; Korbelik, Mladen; Moan, Johan; Mroz, Pawel; Nowis, Dominika; Piette, Jacques; Wilson, Brian C.; Golab, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved, minimally invasive therapeutic procedure that can exert a selective cytotoxic activity toward malignant cells. The procedure involves administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by irradiation at a wavelength corresponding to an absorbance band of the sensitizer. In the presence of oxygen, a series of events lead to direct tumor cell death, damage to the microvasculature and induction of a local inflammatory reaction. Clinical studies revealed that PDT can be curative particularly in early-stage tumors. It can prolong survival in inoperable cancers and significantly improve quality of life. Minimal normal tissue toxicity, negligible systemic effects, greatly reduced long-term morbidity, lack of intrinsic or acquired resistance mechanisms, and excellent cosmetic as well as organ function-sparing effects of this treatment make it a valuable therapeutic option for combination treatments. With a number of recent technological improvements, PDT has the potential to become integrated into the mainstream of cancer treatment. PMID:21617154

  19. Photodynamic therapy of cancer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis, Patrizia; Berg, Kristian; Cengel, Keith A; Foster, Thomas H; Girotti, Albert W; Gollnick, Sandra O; Hahn, Stephen M; Hamblin, Michael R; Juzeniene, Asta; Kessel, David; Korbelik, Mladen; Moan, Johan; Mroz, Pawel; Nowis, Dominika; Piette, Jacques; Wilson, Brian C; Golab, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved, minimally invasive therapeutic procedure that can exert a selective cytotoxic activity toward malignant cells. The procedure involves administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by irradiation at a wavelength corresponding to an absorbance band of the sensitizer. In the presence of oxygen, a series of events lead to direct tumor cell death, damage to the microvasculature, and induction of a local inflammatory reaction. Clinical studies revealed that PDT can be curative, particularly in early stage tumors. It can prolong survival in patients with inoperable cancers and significantly improve quality of life. Minimal normal tissue toxicity, negligible systemic effects, greatly reduced long-term morbidity, lack of intrinsic or acquired resistance mechanisms, and excellent cosmetic as well as organ function-sparing effects of this treatment make it a valuable therapeutic option for combination treatments. With a number of recent technological improvements, PDT has the potential to become integrated into the mainstream of cancer treatment.

  20. Infliximab, azathioprine, or combination therapy for Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombel, Jean Frédéric; Sandborn, William J; Reinisch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The comparative efficacy and safety of infliximab and azathioprine therapy alone or in combination for Crohn's disease are unknown.......The comparative efficacy and safety of infliximab and azathioprine therapy alone or in combination for Crohn's disease are unknown....

  1. A Model to Estimate the Risk of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Combinations of Treatment-Related Factors of the Number of Dissected Axillary Nodes, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Lee, Nam Kwon; Jung, So-Youn; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Eun Sook; Kang, Han-Sung [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: shin.kyunghwan@gmail.com [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: The development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) is closely related to the number of dissected axillary lymph nodes (N-ALNs), chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. In this study, we attempted to estimate the risk of LE based on combinations of these treatment-related factors. Methods and Materials: A total of 772 patients with breast cancer, who underwent primary surgery with axillary lymph node dissection from 2004 to 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) was performed in 677 patients (88%). Among patients who received radiation therapy (n=675), 274 (35%) received supraclavicular radiation therapy (SCRT). Results: At a median follow-up of 5.1 years (range, 3.0-8.3 years), 127 patients had developed LE. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of LE was 17%. Among the 127 affected patients, LE occurred within 2 years after surgery in 97 (76%) and within 3 years in 115 (91%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that N-ALN (hazard ratio [HR], 2.81; P<.001), ACT (HR, 4.14; P=.048), and SCRT (HR, 3.24; P<.001) were independent risk factors for LE. The total number of risk factors correlated well with the incidence of LE. Patients with no risk or 1 risk factor showed a significantly lower 5-year probability of LE (3%) than patients with 2 (19%) or 3 risk factors (38%) (P<.001). Conclusions: The risk factors associated with LE were N-ALN, ACT, and SCRT. A simple model using combinations of these factors may help clinicians predict the risk of LE.

  2. Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yance, Donald R; Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiological pathways that support tumor development while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The authors will focus on natural health products (NHPs) that have a high degree of antiangiogenic activity but also describe some of their many other interactions that can inhibit tumor progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. NHPs target various molecular pathways besides angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the HER-2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the NF-kB transcription factor, the protein kinases, Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbalist has access to hundreds of years of observational data on the anticancer activity of many herbs. Laboratory studies are confirming the knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking on clinical trials. More data are required on dose response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations

  3. Study on radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T. (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-10-01

    In an attempt to clarify the effects of radiation therapy for prostatic cancer, the author studied 71 prostatic cancer patients with megavoltage radiation therapy at the Cancer Institute Hospital for the past 17 years between 1964 and 1980. Fifty nine out of 71 cases received combined treatment with hormone. Of 71, 28 patients were examined for remaining foci by transperineal needle biopsy at various times after irradiation. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 100% for stage A, 92% for stage B, 60.2% for stage C and 25.2% for stage D, respectively. Local control rates by digital rectal examination were 92.3% for stage B and 65.5% for stage C, whereas local atrophy rates were 61.5% for stage B and 31% for stage C cases. The positive rate of biopsy was 75%, negative rate was 20.8% and false negative rate was 4.2% within 1 year. The positive rate decreased to 63.6%, while negative rate increased to 31.8% and false positive rate was 4.6% after 1 year. Some cases, in whom the size of the prostate had decreased, showed good prognosis despite the presence of viable cells in biopsy specimens, therefore the waiting policy seemed indicated by frequent local palpation in future follow up to examine any regrowth in size of the lesion.

  4. Safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab combined with taxane therapy in Chinese patients with HER2-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: findings from the ATHENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing-he; Jiang, Ze-fei; Shen, Zhen-zhou; Guan, Zhong-zhen; Chen, Zheng-dong; Cheng, Ying; Zheng, Hong; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Xiao-jia; Tong, Zhong-sheng; Qin, Shu-kui; Luo, Yi; Yao, Min; Wang, Li-wei; He, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Three randomised trials have demonstrated that combining bevacizumab with first-line chemotherapy significantly improves progression-free survival versus chemotherapy alone in HER2-negative locally recurrent/metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC). However, data from Chinese populations are limited and possible differences between ethnic and geographic populations are unknown. This study was conducted to determine whether there are differences in safety and efficacy in patients with HER2-negative LR/mRC between Chinese and Western populations after they receive first-line bevacizumab combined with taxane-based therapy. In the single-arm, open-label, Avastin Therapy for Advanced Breast Cancer (ATHENA) study (NCT00448591), patients with HER2-negative LR/mBC received first-line bevacizumab (investigator's choice of 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks) combined with taxane-based therapy. The primary endpoint was safety profile and the secondary is time to progression (TTP). A subpopulation analysis was conducted to assess safety and efficacy in Chinese patients. Of 2264 patients treated in ATHENA, 202 were enrolled in China. Bevacizumab was combined with docetaxel in 90% of Chinese patients and paclitaxel in 10%. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were diarrhoea (in 5.0% of patients) and hypertension (in 2.5% of patients). Grade 3/4 proteinuria occurred in 0.5%. After median follow-up of 17.6 months and events in 56% of patients, median TTP was 9.0 months (95%CI, 8.4-11.1). Overall survival data were immature. We found no evidence of increased bevacizumab-related toxicity or reduced efficacy in Chinese LR/mBC patients receiving first-line bevacizumab-taxane therapy compared with predominantly Western populations. The safety profile was generally similar to previously reported LR/mBC trials. Subtle differences may be attributable to different lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese patients compared with the overall population. It appears

  5. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Ectopic pregnancy treatment by combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cymbaluk-Płoska Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Detectability of early stages of ectopic pregnancies has increased due to improvements in ultrasonographic and biochemical techniques. Since the patients’ future procreative plans must be taken into consideration when commencing treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the effects of treatment methods and their impact on fertility. The study included 91 patients treated surgically for ectopic pregnancy. The choice of treatment depended on patients’ general condition, ultrasonographic evaluation and serum level of beta-hCG. A combination of laparoscopic and conservative systemic treatment was applied in 70% of cases. More rapid beta-hCG reduction was noted when laparoscopy and intra-oviductal injection of hyperosmolar glucose or methotrexate (MTX were combined with intramuscular administration of MTX at a dose of 50 mg/m2. Follow-up examination of 66 patients revealed that the greatest number of spontaneous pregnancies (48% resulted after this combination therapy. We conclude that this combination treatment is safe and provides satisfactory results in terms of future fertility.

  7. Ectopic pregnancy treatment by combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymbaluk-Płoska, Aneta; Chudecka-Głaz, Anita; Kuźniak, Sławomir; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Detectability of early stages of ectopic pregnancies has increased due to improvements in ultrasonographic and biochemical techniques. Since the patients' future procreative plans must be taken into consideration when commencing treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the effects of treatment methods and their impact on fertility. The study included 91 patients treated surgically for ectopic pregnancy. The choice of treatment depended on patients' general condition, ultrasonographic evaluation and serum level of beta-hCG. A combination of laparoscopic and conservative systemic treatment was applied in 70% of cases. More rapid beta-hCG reduction was noted when laparoscopy and intra-oviductal injection of hyperosmolar glucose or methotrexate (MTX) were combined with intramuscular administration of MTX at a dose of 50 mg/m2. Follow-up examination of 66 patients revealed that the greatest number of spontaneous pregnancies (48%) resulted after this combination therapy. We conclude that this combination treatment is safe and provides satisfactory results in terms of future fertility.

  8. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication.

  9. Combination Therapy of Gefitinib and Korean Herbal Medicines Could be a Beneficial Option for Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangwook Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abstract Lung cancer has a high mortality rate and is often diagnosed at the metastatic stage. Gefitinib is a targeted molecular therapeutic drug used to treat patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Korean herbal medicines may also have therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer, reduce the side effects associated with ch

  10. Combination therapy design for maximizing sensitivity and minimizing toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock, Kevin; Berlow, Noah; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip

    2017-03-22

    Design of personalized targeted therapies involve modeling of patient sensitivity to various drugs and drug combinations. Majority of studies evaluate the sensitivity of tumor cells to targeted drugs without modeling the effect of the drugs on normal cells. In this article, we consider the individual modeling of drug responses to tumor and normal cells and utilize them to design targeted combination therapies that maximize sensitivity over tumor cells and minimize toxicity over normal cells. The problem is formulated as maximizing sensitivity over tumor cell models while maintaining sensitivity below a threshold over normal cell models. We utilize the constrained structure of tumor proliferation models to design an accelerated lexicographic search algorithm for generating the optimal solution. For comparison purposes, we also designed two suboptimal search algorithms based on evolutionary algorithms and hill-climbing based techniques. Results over synthetic models and models generated from Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer database shows the ability of the proposed algorithms to arrive at optimal or close to optimal solutions in significantly lower number of steps as compared to exhaustive search. We also present the theoretical analysis of the expected number of comparisons required for the proposed Lexicographic search that compare favorably with the observed number of computations. The proposed algorithms provide a framework for design of combination therapy that tackles tumor heterogeneity while satisfying toxicity constraints.

  11. Nanotechnologies in Pancreatic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Ayesha; Oluwasanmi, Adeolu; Moss, Darren; Curtis, Anthony; Hoskins, Clare

    2017-09-25

    Pancreatic cancer has been classified as a cancer of unmet need. After diagnosis the patient prognosis is dismal with few surviving over 5 years. Treatment regimes are highly patient variable and often the patients are too sick to undergo surgical resection or chemotherapy. These chemotherapies are not effective often because patients are diagnosed at late stages and tumour metastasis has occurred. Nanotechnology can be used in order to formulate potent anticancer agents to improve their physicochemical properties such as poor aqueous solubility or prolong circulation times after administration resulting in improved efficacy. Studies have reported the use of nanotechnologies to improve the efficacy of gemcitabine (the current first line treatment) as well as investigating the potential of using other drug molecules which have previously shown promise but were unable to be utilised due to the inability to administer through appropriate routes-often related to solubility. Of the nanotechnologies reported, many can offer site specific targeting to the site of action as well as a plethora of other multifunctional properties such as image guidance and controlled release. This review focuses on the use of the major nanotechnologies both under pre-clinical development and those which have recently been approved for use in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  12. Downsizing Chemotherapy for Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer Patients Treated with Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin Combination Therapy Followed by Radical Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Nakadai, Eri; Kishimoto, Takashi; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshidome, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    We have treated patients with initially unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) by administering gemcitabine and have found that surgical resection became feasible in some downsized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of downsizing combination chemotherapy using gemcitabine plus cisplatin to treat initially unresectable locally advanced BTC. The subjects of the study were 150 consecutive patients who were treated for BTC between October 2011 and April 2014. Downsizing chemotherapy was carried out for 39 patients (26.0 %) whose lesions were unresectable because of locally advanced BTC. Reduction in tumor size with downsizing chemotherapy was seen in 18 patients, and surgical resection was performed in 10 of 39 patients (25.6 %). Median survival time in patients with surgical resection following downsizing chemotherapy and those with chemotherapy alone was 17.9 and 12.4 months, respectively (p = 0.0378). According to the historical comparison between gemcitabine and gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy, there is no significant difference in overall survival. However, there was a significant difference for the pathologic response rate (≥Grade III) to be higher in patients with gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy compared with gemcitabine monotherapy. Preoperative downsizing chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin provides longer survival by the conversion to the surgical resection in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced BTC. It may have the potential for disease eradication as a new multidisciplinary approach for initially unresectable locally advanced BTC.

  13. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  14. Music therapy in a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael M; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana E; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-01-01

    The use of music as a therapeutic tool in health and medicine dates back to ancient times. In modern Western medicine, music therapy has been available since the 1950s and is now often incorporated into conventional medicine care. Music therapy is a common modality that is used in hospital settings as part of complementary and integrative medicine programs. It is also a key therapeutic tool used within most integrative medicine programs at large cancer centers in the United States. When used in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments, music therapy has been found to help patients promote a better quality of life; better communicate their fear, sadness, or other feelings; and better manage stress, while alleviating physical pain and discomfort. In this article, we review the literature on the value of integrating music therapy in cancer care and describe the experience of music therapy at a large comprehensive cancer center and the benefits that patients with cancer obtain from this service.

  15. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  16. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  17. Survival Outcomes for Combined Modality Therapy for Sinonasal Undifferentiated Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Phoebe; Manes, R Peter; Schwam, Zachary G; Judson, Benjamin L

    2017-01-01

    Objective Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Multi-institutional studies examining outcomes of combined modality treatment versus other treatment modalities have not been performed. The objective of our study was to present outcomes for multimodality therapy through use of the National Cancer Database. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting National Cancer Database. Methods A total of 435 cases of SNUC diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 were identified. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to find 5-year cumulative survival rates. Multivariate Cox regression evaluated overall survival based on treatment when adjusting for other prognostic factors (age, primary site, sex, race, comorbidity, insurance, and TNM stage). Within the surgery + chemoradiotherapy group, survival analysis was also performed to compare outcomes for induction and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 41.5%, and 36.1% of patients received surgery with chemoradiotherapy. In multivariate analysis, surgery + chemoradiotherapy was associated with significantly improved overall survival versus surgery + radiotherapy and radiotherapy but not significantly different from chemoradiotherapy. Within the surgery + chemoradiotherapy group, induction and adjuvant chemotherapy groups did not have associated differences in survival. Conclusion Combined modality therapy (chemoradiotherapy or surgery + chemoradiotherapy) is associated with improved survival outcomes versus other treatment modalities in patients with sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma.

  18. Taking out the JNK: A window of opportunity to improve cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Petranel T

    2016-05-01

    c-JUN-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is a stress-induced response that enables survival of normal cells and is also utilized by cancer cells to evade therapy. Combining JNK inhibitors with standard therapies provides a potential strategy for overcoming drug resistance. Use of the optimal combination dosing and scheduling may substantially improve outcomes for cancer patients.

  19. Non-invasive Photodynamic Therapy in Brain Cancer by Use of Tb3+-Doped LaF3 Nanoparticles in Combination with Photosensitizer Through X-ray Irradiation: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Hua; Jenh, Yi-Jhen; Wu, Sheng-Kai; Chen, Yo-Shen; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain cancer has produced exciting results in clinical trials over the past decade. PDT is based on the concept that a photosensitizer exposed to a specific light wavelength produces the predominant cytotoxic agent, to destroy tumor cells. However, delivering an efficient light source to the brain tumor site is still a challenge. The light source should be delivered by placing external optical fibers into the brain at the time of surgical debulking of the tumor. Consequently, there exists the need for a minimally invasive treatment for brain cancer PDT. In this study, we investigated an attractive non-invasive option on glioma cell line by using Tb3+-doped LaF3 scintillating nanoparticles (LaF3:Tb) in combination with photosensitizer, meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (MTCP), followed by activation with soft X-ray (80 kVp). Scintillating LaF3:Tb nanoparticles, with sizes of approximately 25 nm, were fabricated. The particles have a good dispersibility in aqueous solution and possess high biocompatibility. However, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the glioma cells while the LaF3:Tb nanoparticles with MTCP were exposed under X-ray irradiation. The study has demonstrated a proof of concept as a non-invasive way to treat brain cancer in the future.

  20. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  1. Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Romaniuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238, delanzomib (CEP-18770, oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047 and marizomib (NPI-0052.

  2. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for skin field cancerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braathen, L R; Morton, C A; Basset-Seguin, N

    2012-01-01

    at least equivalent efficacy and tolerability, field directed therapies are therefore often more worthwhile than lesion targeted approaches. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with its selective sensitization and destruction of diseased tissue is one ideal form of therapy for this indication. In the following...... paper the use of PDT for the treatment of field cancerized skin is reviewed and recommendations are given for its use....

  4. [The normative combined therapy for recurrent sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bengang; Sun, Yiqing; Miao, Xutao; Wang, Xin; Li, Wenjun

    2014-06-01

    To assess the treatment outcome after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) in patients with recurrent sinusitis and to research which factors could influence the clinical outcome. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in 55 patients. The clinical outcome and epithelization of mucosa after ESS were evaluated by Chinese ENT Association criteria. The total cure rate was 81.82%, effective rate was 92.73%. The mean period of epithelization after operation was 13.2 weeks. No serious complication occurred. The treatment efficacy can be greatly improved by the normative combined therapy which include the standard and orderly perioperative treatment ,the overall shape and nasalization of nasal cavity, postoperative follow-up and clearing cav ity after ESS.

  5. HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer: new possibilities for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Artamonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to modern approaches in HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer therapy. Recently treatment algorithm for this type of cancer included trastuzumab plus cytostatic in first line, continuation of trastuzumab with another chemotherapy regimen in second line, further switch to lapatinib and eventual return to trastuzumab after progression. Nowadays our options are broader owing to new anti-HER-2 agents which are pertruzumab and T-DM1. Now the most effective therapy regimen in first line is double HER-2 blockade (trastuzumab + pertuzumab in combination with docetaxel. Benefit of new agent T-DM1 versus combination of lapatinib and capecitabin is proved in patients progressed on trastuzumab and taxanes. T-DM1 also showed high efficacy as salvage therapy in intensively pretreated patients with meta- static HER-2-positive breast cancer who progressed on taxanes, trastuzumab and lapatinib.

  6. Efficacy and safety in older patient subsets in studies of endocrine monotherapy versus combination therapy in patients with HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A; Tolaney, Sara M

    2017-11-04

    Prospective information regarding the tolerability and efficacy of endocrine therapy (ET) alone and in combination with targeted agents in older patients in the metastatic setting is limited. This review summarizes available trial data in this population. We searched PubMed for Phase 2 or 3 trials with age-stratified patient cohorts (≥ 65 vs. < 65 years in most studies) with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer treated with ET ± targeted agents. We identified 19 studies reporting 10 clinical trials. Efficacy was similar in age-stratified subsets. There was a reduced disease progression risk for ET + everolimus, palbociclib, or ribociclib versus ET alone. In the first-line setting, median progression-free survival (mPFS) in older patients was 8.5, 26.2 months, and not reached with letrozole + temsirolimus, palbociclib, and ribociclib, respectively, and in younger patients was 9.0, 18.8 months, and not reached, respectively. In the second-line setting, older patients had mPFS of 6.8 and 9.9 months with everolimus + exemestane and palbociclib + fulvestrant, respectively, and younger patients had mPFS of 8.1 and 9.5 months, respectively. Tolerability was worse for combination therapy versus monotherapy. No age-related differences in discontinuations were observed for CDK4/6 inhibitors, although a higher rate of treatment discontinuation was observed for patients ≥ 70 years receiving everolimus + exemestane. Adverse event rates were similar in age-stratified subsets. ET + CDK4/6 or mTOR inhibitors are likely safe and effective in older patients with HR+, HER2- advanced breast cancer.

  7. Glycol Chitosan-Based Fluorescent Theranostic Nanoagents for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Kyu Rhee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Theranostics is an integrated nanosystem that combines therapeutics with diagnostics in attempt to develop new personalized treatments with enhanced therapeutic efficacy and safety. As a promising therapeutic paradigm with cutting-edge technologies, theranostic agents are able to simultaneously deliver therapeutic drugs and diagnostic imaging agents and also monitor the response to therapy. Polymeric nanosystems have been intensively explored for biomedical applications to diagnose and treat various cancers. In recent years, glycol chitosan-based nanoagents have been developed as dual-purpose materials for simultaneous diagnosis and therapy. They have shown great potential in cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutics and nucleic acid and photodynamic therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent progress and potential applications of glycol chitosan-based fluorescent theranostic nanoagents for cancer treatments and discuss their possible underlying mechanisms.

  8. Translational Approaches towards Cancer Gene Therapy: Hurdles and Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the cancer gene therapy approaches, gene silencing, suicide/apoptosis inducing gene therapy, immunogene therapy and targeted gene therapy are deemed to sub­stantially control the biological consequences of genomic changes in cancerous cells. Thus, a large number of clinical trials have been conducted against various malignancies. In this review, we will discuss recent translational progresses of gene and cell therapy of cancer. Methods: Essential information on gene therapy of cancer were reviewed and discussed towards their clinical translations. Results: Gene transfer has been rigorously studied in vitro and in vivo, in which some of these gene therapy endeavours have been carried on towards translational investigations and clinical applications. About 65% of gene therapy trials are related to cancer therapy. Some of these trials have been combined with cell therapy to produce personalized medicines such as Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, marketed by Dendreon, USA for the treatment of asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Conclusion: Translational approach links two diverse boundaries of basic and clinical researches. For successful translation of geno­medicines into clinical applications, it is essential 1 to have the guidelines and standard operating procedures for development and application of the genomedicines specific to clinically relevant biomarker(s; 2 to conduct necessary animal experimental studies to show the “proof of concept” for the proposed genomedicines; 3 to perform an initial clinical investigation; and 4 to initiate extensive clinical trials to address all necessary requirements. In short, translational researches need to be refined to accelerate the geno­medicine development and clinical applications.

  9. Erlotinib therapy after initial platinum doublet therapy in patients with EGFR wild type non-small cell lung cancer: results of a combined patient-level analysis of the NCIC CTG BR.21 and SATURN trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Leon, Larry; Klughammer, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    The clinical benefit of erlotinib in treating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) wildtype non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been questioned. We examined the impact of erlotinib in confirmed EGFR wildtype patients in two placebo-controlled phase III trials: the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group BR.21 (BR.21) and Sequential Tarceva in Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (SATURN) trials. Combined re-analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with known wildtype EGFR, estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves and compared by two-sided log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for potential confounders. Additional analyses assessed comparability of patients with known and unknown EGFR mutation status to determine generalizability of the two study populations. Mutation status was known in 25% (n=184 of 731) of the BR.21, and 49% (n=437 of 889) of the SATURN populations, of which 82% (n=150) and 89% (n=388) respectively had wildtype EGFR. HR for PFS was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.59-0.85; P<0.01) and for OS was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.59-0.88; P<0.01). Baseline characteristics and outcome (PFS and OS) distributions were similar for patients with known and unknown EGFR status, suggesting generalizability of the EGFR wildtype data. Erlotinib benefit was sustained in all clinical subsets. Erlotinib provided a consistent and significant improvement in survival for patients with EGFR wildtype NSCLC in both studies, individually and in combination. The benefit of erlotinib does not appear to be limited to patients with activating mutations of EGFR.

  10. [Multilateral Strategies Utilizing Exosomes for Cancer Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida-Aoki, Nao; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-05-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles which transfer their components such as RNA, DNA, and proteins from one cell to another cell. The components are released to the cytoplasm of the recipient cells, having an effect on the cells. Cancerderived exosomes promote cancer progression, invasion, gain of drug resistance, and metastasis. Recently, according to their characteristics, it is expected to apply exosomes to cancer therapies, such as utilizing exosomes as drug delivery systems(DDS) for anticancer drugs and as cancer vaccines to enhance immunity to cancer cells. More, as the cancer-derived exosomes have cancer-promoting effects on multiple stages, inhibiting the function of the cancer-derived exosomes would be helpful to cancer therapies by suppressing cancer progression. DDS and cancer vaccines utilizing exosomes are now undergoing clinical studies, although DDS is suffering from loading efficiency. Treatments by inhibiting the functions of cancer-derived exosomes have still only few reports at experimental levels. Recently, we showed in a mouse model that disruption of cancer-derived exosomes by antibodies could suppress lung metastasis of the human breast cancer cells. Exosomes will provide us the multiple strategies to fight with cancer, which can be applied to cancers from many organs. It is important to confirm safety and overcome technical problems to bring exosomes in practical use.

  11. Conditioning neoadjuvant therapies for improved immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Zachary; Manjili, Saeed H; Habibi, Mehran; Guruli, Georgi; Toor, Amir A; Payne, Kyle K; Manjili, Masoud H

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by combining conventional therapies with anti-PD1/PD-L1 immunotherapies, have renewed interests in immunotherapy of cancer. The emerging concept of conventional cancer therapies combined with immunotherapy differs from the classical concept in that it is not simply taking advantage of their additive anti-tumor effects, but it is to use certain therapeutic regimens to condition the tumor microenvironment for optimal response to immunotherapy. To this end, low dose immunogenic chemotherapies, epigenetic modulators and inhibitors of cell cycle progression are potential candidates for rendering tumors highly responsive to immunotherapy. Next generation immunotherapeutics are therefore predicted to be highly effective against cancer, when they are used following appropriate immune modulatory compounds or targeted delivery of tumor cell cycle inhibitors using nanotechnology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Virotherapy: cancer gene therapy at last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsland, Alan E; Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Evans, T R Jeffry

    2016-01-01

    For decades, effective cancer gene therapy has been a tantalising prospect; for a therapeutic modality potentially able to elicit highly effective and selective responses, definitive efficacy outcomes have often seemed out of reach. However, steady progress in vector development and accumulated experience from previous clinical studies has finally led the field to its first licensed therapy. Following a pivotal phase III trial, Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec/T-Vec) received US approval as a treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma in October 2015, followed several weeks later by its European authorisation. These represent the first approvals for an oncolytic virotherapy. Imlygic is an advanced-generation herpesvirus-based vector optimised for oncolytic and immunomodulatory activities. Many other oncolytic agents currently remain in development, providing hope that current success will be followed by other diverse vectors that may ultimately come to constitute a new class of clinical anti-cancer agents. In this review, we discuss some of the key oncolytic viral agents developed in the adenovirus and herpesvirus classes, and the prospects for further enhancing their efficacy by combining them with novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  15. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  16. Cancer incidence and novel therapies developed in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Iwasaki

    2012-01-01

    -injected into the body to exert their action against the cancer. There are different kinds of Immuno-cell therapies being practised in more than 25 private and public institutions in Japan using Natural Killer (NK cells, Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, Tumour Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL, Lymphokine activated Killer (LAK cells, Dendritic cells and Gamma Delta T (γδ T cells. [7] Importantly most of the innovations in cell based therapies in the world have been made in Japan because immunotherapy is a part of the Japanese Health care system and routine therapies for cancer in Japan. There have been randomized clinical trials on Immuno-cell therapy for liver cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, ovarian cancer with the results suggesting statistically significant increase in survival rate and increase in disease free survival rate. [8, 9, 10, 11] There are more than 25 institutions in Japan performing such cell based immunotherapies. A comprehensive review by Egawa et al on 1401 patients showed that when Immuno-cell therapy was combined with the conventional therapies, the efficacy increased upto 20-30%. [7] Immuno-cell is the least toxic of all therapies and can be administered even to terminally ill cancer patients. [12] Contrast to drugs, as autologous cell based Immuno-therapies are from the patient’s own blood and as they are custom tailored to each patient, though expensive, the adverse effects are minimal. To conclude, cancer-Immunocell therapies are the future of cancer therapies and further research is needed to enhance its efficacy and validate the results. References: 1.Cancer Statistics in Japan 2011. http://ganjoho.jp/data/public/statistics/backnumber/2011/files/cancer_statistics_2011.pdf2.Japan Cancer Society. Statistics on dynamic trends in Population compiled by the Ministry of Health, Labour and welfare. http://www.jcancer.jp/english/cancerinjapan/3.Maehara Y. Current Status of Cancer Treatment in Japan, and Future Prospects for the Japan Society of Clinical

  17. First-in-Class CDK4/6 Inhibitor Palbociclib Could Usher in a New Wave of Combination Therapies for HR+, HER2- Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Women with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative breast cancer-the most common subtype-have new options as palbociclib and similar drugs debut. This article outlines the rationale and evidence for their use.

  18. CERN launches new cancer therapy initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The first meeting of a new European network for research in cancer therapy was held at CERN, in February 2002. ENLIGHT, the European Network for Research in Light Ion Therapy aims to coordinate the development of a variety of projects at European facilities for "light ion therapy" - a form of radiation therapy that uses beams of the nuclei of lightweight atoms" (1/2 page).

  19. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjees Hasan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  20. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers......, including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women...

  1. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers......Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from......, including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women...

  2. Oxaliplatin and Infliximab Combination Synergizes in Inducing Colon Cancer Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenya; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2017-02-12

    BACKGROUND Colon cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers and causes millions of deaths each year. There are still no effective treatments for colon cancer patients who are at advanced stage. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) might be a good therapy target due to its widely-accepted roles in regulating multiple important biological processes, especially in promoting inflammation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We evaluated the expression of TNF-α in 108 human colon cancer tissue samples and 2 colon cancer cell lines (CT26 and HCT116), and analyzed its prognostic values. Further, we explored the roles and mechanism of anti-TNF-α treatment in combination with chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS We found that TNF-α was highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines. The survival analysis and Cox regression analysis indicated that high TNF-α was an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer. In addition, anti-TNF-α treatment enhanced the effects of chemotherapy in the xenograft mouse model through inducing ADCC and CDC effects. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that TNF-α is an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer, and anti-TNF-α might benefit colon cancer patients.

  3. New Strategies Using Antibody Combinations to Increase Cancer Treatment Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Corraliza-Gorjón

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have proven their high value in antitumor therapy over the last two decades. They are currently being used as the first-choice to treat some of the most frequent metastatic cancers, like HER2+ breast cancers or colorectal cancers, currently treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin and bevacizumab (Avastin, respectively. The impressive therapeutic success of antibodies inhibiting immune checkpoints has extended the use of therapeutic antibodies to previously unanticipated tumor types. These anti-immune checkpoint antibodies allowed the cure of patients devoid of other therapeutic options, through the recovery of the patient’s own immune response against the tumor. In this review, we describe how the antibody-based therapies will evolve, including the use of antibodies in combinations, their main characteristics, advantages, and how they could contribute to significantly increase the chances of success in cancer therapy. Indeed, novel combinations will consist of mixtures of antibodies against either different epitopes of the same molecule or different targets on the same tumor cell; bispecific or multispecific antibodies able of simultaneously binding tumor cells, immune cells or extracellular molecules; immunomodulatory antibodies; antibody-based molecules, including fusion proteins between a ligand or a receptor domain and the IgG Fab or Fc fragments; autologous or heterologous cells; and different formats of vaccines. Through complementary mechanisms of action, these combinations could contribute to elude the current limitations of a single antibody which recognizes only one particular epitope. These combinations may allow the simultaneous attack of the cancer cells by using the help of the own immune cells and exerting wider therapeutic effects, based on a more specific, fast, and robust response, trying to mimic the action of the immune system.

  4. [Development of ultrasonic cancer therapy using ultrasound sensitive liposome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Utoguchi, Naoki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been utilized as a useful tool for diagnosis and therapy. US mediated drug and gene delivery is paid to attention as a non-invasive system. The combination of US and microbubbles generated microjet stream by inducing disruption of bubbles and resulted in enhancing permeability of cell membrane. This phenomenon has been utilized as driving force for drug and gene delivery. Recently, we developed ultrasound sensitive liposome [Bubble liposome (BL)] containing perfluoropropane gas. US combined with BL could effectively transfer gene in vivo compared to conventional cationic liposomes. Using this method, we succeeded to obtain a therapeutic effect in cancer gene therapy with Interleukin-12 corded plasmid DNA. Therefore, it is expected that US combined with BL might be a useful non-viral vector system. From this result, the fusion of liposomal and ultrasound technologies would be important for establishment of advanced cancer therapy.

  5. How to evaluate combination therapy using interferon and nucleos(tide analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B is still one of the most important chronic diseases in China because of its high relevance to liver cirrhosis and hepatic cell cancer (HCC. Currently, interferon and nucleos(tide analogues are two main treatments for chronic hepatitis B, but they have advantages and disadvantages. More investigations are needed to explore better ways for treating this disease, and combination therapy might be one of the options. This article analyzes the advances in various combination therapies and points out views about the selection of combination therapies and patients.

  6. Hormone therapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of benefits: Taking Tamoxifen for 5 years after breast cancer surgery cuts the chance of cancer coming back by half. Some studies show that taking it for 10 years may work even better. It reduces the risk that cancer ...

  7. Dendrimer-based nanoparticles for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that nanoparticles in the form of dendrimers may be a keystone in the future of therapeutics. The field of oncology could soon be revolutionized by novel strategies for diagnosis and therapy employing dendrimer-based nanotherapeutics. Several aspects of cancer therapy would be involved. Diagnosis using imaging techniques such as MRI will be improved by the incorporation of dendrimers as advanced contrast agents. This might involve novel contrast agents targeted specifically to cancer cells. Dendrimers can also be being applied to a variety of cancer therapies to improve their safety and efficacy. A strategy, somewhat akin to the "Trojan horse," involves targeting anti-metabolite drugs via vitamins or hormones that tumors need for growth. Further applications of dendrimers in photodynamic therapy, boron neutron capture therapy, and gene therapy for cancer are being examined. This presentation will cover the fundamentals of research utilizing dendrimers for cancer diagnosis and therapy. An evaluation of this new technologies will detail what advantage dendrimer based therapeutics might have over conventional cancer drugs.

  8. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer: Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C Wilson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles of photodynamic therapy (PDT, using drugs (photosensitizers that are activated by light to become cytotoxic, provide the basis for understanding the current and potential future clinical applications in gastroenterology, general oncology and other specialities. The properties of photosensitizers are key to their biological efficacy, while lasers and optical fibres allow convenient and flexible light delivery for endoscopic use. PDT has several distinct and unique advantages, both as a stand-alone treatment and in combination with other established modalities. The current limitations are also recognized, as is the need for rigorous randomized trials of this emerging technology. The fluorescence of many photosensitizers may be useful, either for (endoscopic diagnosis or for PDT treatment guidance and monitoring.

  9. Current Approaches of Photothermal Therapy in Treating Cancer Metastasis with Nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Hong; He, Bin; Zeng, Lijuan; Tan, Tao; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Guo, Shengrong; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis accounts for the high mortality of many types of cancer. Owing to the unique advantages of high specificity and minimal invasiveness, photothermal therapy (PTT) has been evidenced with great potential in treating cancer metastasis. In this review, we outline the current approaches of PTT with respect to its application in treating metastatic cancer. PTT can be used alone, guided with multimodal imaging, or combined with the current available therapies for effective treatment of cancer metastasis. Numerous types of photothermal nanotherapeutics (PTN) have been developed with encouraging therapeutic efficacy on metastatic cancer in many preclinical animal experiments. We summarize the design and performance of various PTN in PTT alone and their combinational therapy. We also point out the lacking area and the most promising approaches in this challenging field. In conclusion, PTT or their combinational therapy can provide an essential promising therapeutic modality against cancer metastasis.

  10. Pancreatic cancer vaccine: a unique potential therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paola Cappello, Moitza Principe, Francesco Novelli Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA is a lethal disease and is one of the cancers that is most resistant to traditional therapies. Historically, neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy has provided any significant increase in the survival of patients with PDA. Despite intensive efforts, any attempts to improve the survival in the past 15 years have failed. This holds true even after the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their involvement in pathways that are considered to be important in PDA development and progression. Recently, however, FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin treatment has provided a limited survival advantage in patients with advanced PDA. Therefore, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival rate of patients with PDA. Results from the last 10 years of research in the field of PDA have helped to identify new immunological targets and develop new vaccines that are capable of stimulating an immune response. In addition, the information obtained about the role of the tumor microenvironment in suppressing the immune response and the possibility of targeting PDA microenvironment to limit immune suppression and enhance the response of effector T-cells has opened new avenues for treating this incurable disease. The time is ripe for developing new therapeutic approaches that are able to effectively counteract the progression and spreading of PDA. This review discusses the potential prospects in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer through vaccination and its combination therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, targeting of the tumor microenvironment, and inhibition of immunological

  11. Bosutinib in combination with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole: a phase II trial in postmenopausal women evaluating first-line endocrine therapy in locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Neven, Patrick; Lebrun, Fabienne; Bellet, Meritxell; Xu, Binghe; Sarosiek, Tomasz; Chow, Louis; Goss, Paul; Zacharchuk, Charles; Leip, Eric; Turnbull, Kathleen; Bardy-Bouxin, Nathalie; Duvillié, Ladan; Láng, István

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine therapy resistance in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer (BC) may involve crosstalk between HRs and growth factor signaling pathways. We evaluated bosutinib, a dual Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has previously demonstrated some antitumor activity in BC, plus letrozole as first-line endocrine therapy in locally advanced or metastatic HR+/HER2- BC. METHODS; Sixteen postmenopausal women were enrolled in a phase II study evaluating the safety/efficacy of bosutinib plus letrozole. In the single-arm safety/dose-confirming lead-in (part 1), patients received oral bosutinib at 400 mg/day plus letrozole at 2.5 mg/day; adverse events (AEs) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were monitored, and initial efficacy was assessed. A randomized efficacy/safety phase (part 2) was planned to evaluate the combination versus letrozole monotherapy. Fifteen of 16 subjects experienced treatment-related AEs, most commonly diarrhea (69%). Treatment-related hepatotoxicity AEs (primarily alanine aminotransferase [ALT] or aspartate aminotransferase [AST] elevations) occurred in 6 of 16 patients (38%). Four of 15 evaluable patients (27%) experienced a DLT (grade 3/4 ALT/AST elevations, n = 2; grade 3 rash, n = 1; grade 3 diarrhea or vomiting, n = 1), including 1 Hy's law hepatotoxicity case. All DLTs resolved following treatment discontinuation. One patient achieved confirmed partial response; one had stable disease for >24 weeks. Study termination occurred before part 2. The unfavorable risk-benefit ratio did not warrant further investigation of bosutinib plus letrozole.

  12. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Noel, Agnès

    With the emergence of the tumor microenvironment as an essential ingredient of cancer malignancy, therapies targeting the host compartment of tumors have begun to be designed and applied in the clinic...

  14. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  15. Incidence of cancer and overall risk of mortality in individuals treated with raltegravir-based and non-raltegravir-based combination antiretroviral therapy regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Zangerle, R; Machala, L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There are currently few data on the long-term risk of cancer and death in individuals taking raltegravir (RAL). The aim of this analysis was to evaluate whether there is evidence for an association. METHODS: The EuroSIDA cohort was divided into three groups: those starting RAL...

  16. MR Guided Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of Gene Therapy Combined with Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    with a concentration of 12 μl/ mg for tumor sample digestion . The vial was suspended in a water bath at a temperature of 55 °C for 1 h. The vial was...Plasma pharmacokinetics of adriamycin and adriamycinol—Implications for the design of invitro experiments and treatment protocols,” Cancer Res. 43, 3417

  17. A Phase I/II Study of Combination Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy and Weekly OGX-011 Prior to Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer, Clusterin, Antisense Oligonucleotide, Mthoxyethyl Gapmer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...alkaline phosphatase- Fab fragment (Roche Ap- plied Science, Penzberg, Germany) diluted 1:100 was applied, and after two 10-minute washes and...PerkinElmer Applied Biosystems, Branchburg, NJ) and 20 units of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). The

  18. Focal therapy for prostate cancer. Alternative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Veiga, F; Martínez-Breijo, S; Solsona-Narbón, E; Hernández, C; Ciudin, A; Ribal, M J; Dickinson, L; Moore, C; Ahmed, H; Rodríguez Antolín, A; Breda, A; Gaya, J; Portela-Pereira, P; Emberton, M

    2014-09-01

    The great controversy surrounding the treatment of localized prostate cancer is related with its possibilities of radical treatment or active surveillance. The objective of this paper is to analyze the rationale selection among current focal therapy modalities regarding tumor and patient selection. Current articles about advantages and disadvantages on the treatment of localized prostate cancer as well as information about focal therapy regarding tumour selection, characteristics and indications cited in MEDLINE search were reviewed. Focal therapy standardized criteria must be: low risk tumors, PSA15. Focal therapy is an alternative for localized prostate cancer treatment. However, some aspects of their diagnosis and selection criteria should be defined by prospective studies which should provide knowledge about the indication for focal therapy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Adjuvant radiation therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer: experience with combination of external radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy; Radioterapia adjuvante no tratamento do cancer de endometrio: experiencia com a associacao de radioterapia externa e braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro Soares; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio de Assis; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Salvajoli, Joao Victor [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radioterapia]. E-mail: michael.chen@ig.com.br; Nishimoto, Ines Nobuko [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos

    2005-12-01

    Objective: To review the results of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for the treatment of endometrial carcinoma. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 141 patients treated with EBRT and HDR-BT after surgery between January 1993 and January 2001. EBRT was performed with a median dose of 45 Gy, and HDR-BT was performed with a median dose of 24 Gy, with four weekly insertions of 6 Gy. The median age of the patients was 63 years and the disease stage distribution was: CS I (FIGO), 52.4%; CS II, 13.5%; CS III, 29.8%; CS IV, 4.3%. Results: With a median follow-up of 53.7 months, the disease free survival (DFS) at five years was: CS I, 88.0%; CS II, 70.8%; CS III, 55.1%; CS IV, 50.0% (p = 0.0003). Global survival after five years was: CS I, 79.6%; CS II, 74.0%; CS III, 53.6%; CS IV, 100.0% (p = 0.0062). Factors affecting the DFS were histological grade and serous-papillary histology. Recurrence of the disease was observed in 33 cases, 13 (9.2%) of these occurred in the pelvis, vagina or vaginal vault. EBRT + HDR-BT of the vaginal vault allowed disease control in 90.8% of the cases. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is essential for loco-regional control of endometrial cancer and can achieve excellent cure rates in the initial stages. In more advanced stages, therapeutic failure frequently appears as distant metastases suggesting the need for complementary systemic therapy using new treatment modalities, particularly chemotherapy. (author)

  20. A case study of single-pill combination therapy: the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination for treatment of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianhai; Chen, David Y-K

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, combination therapy has received growing popularity as a powerful therapeutic tactic for the treatment of diseases. The justifications and benefits of combination therapy are far-reaching, including but not limited to addressing unmet medical needs such as cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS, improved clinical efficacy and safety with reduced dosage of a single medication, understanding the underlying science of the disease, alleviating pharmaco-economic impacts, and better drug life-cycle management. Using the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination therapy as a case study, a comprehensive overview of the successful discovery and development of the single-pill combination, Vytorin, is presented in this review. A cursory introduction to combination therapy and the rationale for the ezetimibe/simvastatin combination for the treatment of hyperlipidemia provides an instructive entry point. The discovery and mode of action of simvastatin and ezetimibe monotherapies set the scene for a detailed discussion on the discovery and development of Vytorin, with emphasis on bioequivalency studies, clinical efficacy and safety profile studies, and the economic consequences of the single-pill combination therapy. Large-scale outcome clinical trials are also discussed to demonstrate the long-term effects of Vytorin. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Intrathecal Therapy for Cancer-Related Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Allen W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The increasing incidence of cancer survivorship has shifted treatment of cancer-related pain from short-term analgesia to long-term chronic pain management. As a result, alternatives to oral analgesics, such as intrathecal therapy, may be beneficial for patients with cancer-related pain. The authors review the use of intrathecal therapy in the management of cancer-related pain. Methods. The Medline database was searched for English-language articles that included “ziconotide” or “morphine” AND (“cancer” OR “malignant”) AND “intrathecal” in title or abstract. Available abstracts from scientific congresses in the areas of neuromodulation and oncology were also reviewed. Results. Intrathecal therapy provides pain relief with reduced systemic concerns in patients with cancer-related pain. Patients should undergo multidisciplinary evaluation and, in most cases, drug trialing before intrathecal pump implantation. Morphine, an opioid (µ-opioid receptor antagonist), and ziconotide, a nonopioid (selective N-type calcium channel inhibitor), are both approved for intrathecal analgesia; however, tolerance and safety concerns may deter the use of intrathecal morphine. Ziconotide has also shown efficacy for reduction of cancer-related pain; however, proper dosing and titration must be used to prevent adverse events. There is little information available on use of intrathecal therapies specifically in cancer survivors. Conclusions. Treatment of cancer-related pain has shifted toward chronic pain management strategies, especially among cancer survivors. Intrathecal therapy provides an alternate route of administration of chronic pain medications (e.g., morphine and ziconotide) for cancer patients with and without active disease, although additional research is needed to support effectiveness in cancer survivors. PMID:28025375

  2. Third-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundgaard, M.G.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    , panitumumab. As a result, third-line treatment is now a necessary step in the optimal treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a literature review of English language publications on third-line therapy for MCRC from January 2000 to April 2007. Data......BACKGROUND: The past years' therapy for colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly with the introduction of novel cytotoxic agents such as irinotecan, capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Further advances have been achieved with the integration of targeted agents such as bevacizumab, cetuximab and recently......OS of 16 months. With irinotecan and 5-FU, mOS around 8 months were reported and with cetuximab combined with irinotecan, the highest mOS was 9.8 months. CONCLUSION: Third-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer may improve mOS for patients with MCRC. Therefore, randomized studies should be conducted...

  3. A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1/2 study of tivantinib (ARQ 197) in combination with irinotecan and cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type KRAS who have received first-line systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Cathy; Bessudo, Alberto; Hart, Lowell L; Severtsev, Aleksey; Gladkov, Oleg; Müller, Lothar; Kopp, Mikhail V; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Langdon, Robert; Kotiv, Bogdan; Barni, Sandro; Hsu, Ching; Bolotin, Ellen; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Schwartz, Brian; Bendell, Johanna C

    2016-07-01

    Cetuximab in combination with an irinotecan-containing regimen is a standard treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type (KRAS WT), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We investigated the addition of the oral MET inhibitor tivantinib to cetuximab + irinotecan (CETIRI) based on preclinical evidence that activation of the MET pathway may confer resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. Previously treated patients with KRAS WT advanced or mCRC were enrolled. The phase 1, open-label 3 + 3, dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and maximally tolerated dose of tivantinib plus CETIRI. The phase 2, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of biweekly CETIRI plus tivantinib or placebo was restricted to patients who had received only one prior line of chemotherapy. The phase 2 primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The recommended phase 2 dose was tivantinib (360 mg/m(2) twice daily) with biweekly cetuximab (500 mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (180 mg/m(2)). Among 117 patients evaluable for phase 2 analysis, no statistically significant PFS difference was observed: 8.3 months on tivantinib vs. 7.3 months on placebo (HR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.33; P = 0.38). Subgroup analyses trended in favor of tivantinib in patients with MET-High tumors by immunohistochemistry, PTEN-Low tumors, or those pretreated with oxaliplatin, but subgroups were too small to draw conclusions. Neutropenia, diarrhea, nausea and rash were the most frequent severe adverse events in tivantinib-treated patients. The combination of tivantinib and CETIRI was well tolerated but did not significantly improve PFS in previously treated KRAS WT mCRC. Tivantinib may be more active in specific subgroups. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  4. Glucose Addiction in Cancer Therapy: Advances and Drawbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Sara; Pinheiro, Céline; Reis, Rui Manuel; Martinho, Olga; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    While normal differentiated cells primarily use mitochondrial respiration to generate the required energy for cellular processes, most cancer cells rely on glycolysis, even in sufficient oxygen conditions. This phenomenon is known as the "Warburg effect" or aerobic glycolysis and the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells towards this altered energy metabolism is currently recognized as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". Aerobic glycolysis underlies the rapid growth of tumor cells, with high rates of glucose consumption and lactic acid production, leading to cellular acidosis. Metabolic reprogramming renders cancer cells dependent on specific metabolic enzymes or pathways that could be exploited in cancer therapy. The development of treatments that target tumor glucose metabolism is receiving renewed attention, with several drugs targeting metabolic pathways currently in clinical trials. The search for suitable targets, however, is limited by the high plasticity of the metabolic network that can induce compensatory routes. Deregulated glucose metabolism is a prominent feature associated with resistance to classical chemotherapy or oncogene-targeted therapies, strengthening the clinical potential of combining these therapies with glycolysis inhibitors. The aim of this review is to compare the advances of different therapeutic strategies targeting the glucose "addiction" of tumor cells, highlighting their potential as effective weapons against cancer. We further discuss recent evidence for the involvement of glucose metabolism as a compensatory response to the use of drugs that target different signaling pathways, where the combination with glycolysis inhibitors could prove extraordinarily useful.

  5. Photocatalyzing CO2 to CO for Enhanced Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Di-Wei; Li, Bin; Li, Chu-Xin; Xu, Lu; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Lei, Qi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2017-11-01

    Continuous exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) can sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy while protect normal cells from apoptosis. The Janus face of CO thus provides an ideal strategy for cancer therapy. Here, a photocatalytic nanomaterial (HisAgCCN) is introduced to transform endogenous CO2 to CO for improving cancer therapy in vivo. The CO production rate of HisAgCCN reaches to 65 µmol h-1 gmat-1 , which can significantly increase the cytotoxicity of anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) by 70%. Interestingly, this study finds that HisAgCCN can enhance mitochondria biogenesis and aggravate oxidative stress in cancer cells, whereas protect normal cells from chemotherapy-induced apoptosis as well. Proteomics and metabolomics studies reveal that HisAgCCN can enhance mitochondria biogenesis and aggravate oxidative stress in cancer cells specifically. In vivo studies indicate that HisAgCCN/DOX combination therapy presents a synergetic tumor inhibition, which might provide a new direction for clinical cancer therapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Combination therapy in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M S; Staib, R L; Wicks, L M

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease without a cure, which can lead to right heart failure and death. Over the past decades, several therapeutic advances have been developed for the management of PAH. Although these agents have demonstrated clinical safety and efficacy, some patients may require additional drug therapy due to a lack of response or disease progression. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of various combination PAH therapies. A systematic search was conducted using the MEDLINE database (1966 and June 2012) for relevant clinical studies. Searches were limited to English, human and clinical trial using the terms sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil, phosphodiesterase inhibitor, prostacyclin, prostaglandin, epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost, endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, ambrisentan, sitaxsentan and pulmonary hypertension. Overall, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, the majority of trials demonstrated clinical efficacy in improving functional class, reducing pulmonary pressure, or increasing exercise capacity. Most trials were uncontrolled with small sample sizes investigating the acute effects of combination therapy and lacking long-term clinical outcomes. Adjunctive therapy was well tolerated by most patients. Overall, combination therapy is relatively safe and well tolerated. Published guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for monotherapy. However, suggestions for combination therapy in refractory PAH patients are lacking. Several studies evaluating several combination therapies have been published. The preferred combination treatment among several PAH drug therapies remain controversial. Therefore, clinicians should consider ease of administration, cost, and tolerability when choosing specific combination therapies. Combination therapy appears promising for patients who are refractory to treatment or whose disease progression is not well controlled

  7. Development of drug delivery systems for radionuclide therapy using a combination therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, On Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    For the development of new controlled drug delivery systems, the application of combination therapy using angiogenesis inhibitor and tumor static agents has drawn great attention. This approach would be very beneficial for cancer treatment especially when a new drug deliver system utilizing biodegradable polymers is developed. Therefore, the present study for the combination therapy of angiogenesis inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents was to carry out prior to the development of the novel drug delivery. In present study, the ability of inhibition on cell growth was investigated with treatment of anti-angiogenetic agent and anticancer agent. Thalidomide was used as an antivasculatory agents and Doxorubicine was treated as a chemotherapeutic agent. To demonstrate apoptotic process in in-vitro study, TUNEL assay was carried out. Also, the alteration of p53 level was examined by using western blotting. For the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR3, MKN45, SNU719, C6, L929, T98G, Hep3B and Calu6 were applied. Results showed that Thalidomide inhibited cell growth in tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner and Doxorubicin as well. A significant synergistic effect on the apoptotic was noticed in the combination treatment of Thalidomide and Doxorubicin compared to a single treatment of either drug. Therefore, it can be concluded that the mechanism of cytotoxicity was due to the enhancement of apoptosis in early cell death with combination treatment in tumor cell lines.

  8. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  9. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  10. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., -40...

  11. Photodynamic therapy for esophageal cancer. Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, B D

    2000-08-01

    Although clinical studies with photodynamic therapy have been conducted for over 25 years, only recently has this technique become widely available for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Studies have demonstrated that it is as effective as Nd:YAG therapy for advanced esophageal malignancies while technically being somewhat easier to perform. Preliminary studies in early esophageal cancer also show effectiveness. In many ways, PDT is still in its infancy, and its exact role compared to other endoscopic treatments of esophageal cancer remains to be defined. It is expected that the development of new photosensitizers and light delivery systems will further expand the role of PDT in the diagnosis and management of esophageal neoplasms.

  12. Dance as a therapy for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Gurbuz; Ogce, Filiz

    2005-01-01

    Even though the field of medicine has developed tremendously, the wide variety of cancer is still among chronic and life threatening disease today. Therefore, the specialists constantly research and try every possible way to find cure or preventive ways to stop its further development. For this reason, studies concerning the chronic disease such as cancer have been spread to many different fields. In this regard, many other alternative ways besides medicine, are used in prevention of cancer. Nutritional therapy, herbal therapy, sportive activities, art therapy, music therapy, dance therapy, imagery, yoga and acupuncture can be given as examples. Among these, dance/movement therapy which deals with individuals physical, emotional, cognitive as well as social integration is widely used as a popular form of physical activity. The physical benefits of dance therapy as exercise are well documented. Studies have shown that physical activity is known to increase special neurotransmitter substances in the brain (endorphins), which create a state of well-being. And total body movement such as dance enhances the functions of other body systems, such as circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, and muscular systems. Regarding its unique connection to the field of medicine, many researches have been undertaken on the effects of dance/movement therapy in special settings with physical problems such as amputations, traumatic brain injury, and stroke, chronic illnesses such as anorexia, bulimia, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, AIDS, and arthritis. Today dance/movement therapy is a well recognized form of complementary therapy used in hospitals as well as at the comprehensive clinical cancer centres.

  13. Imaging Neoadjuvant Therapy Response in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amy M; Mankoff, David A; Joe, Bonnie N

    2017-11-01

    The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients is increasing beyond the scope of locally advanced disease. Imaging provides important information in assessing response to therapy as a complement to conventional tumor measurements via physical examination. The purpose of this article is to discuss the advantages and limitations of current assessment methods, as well as review functional and molecular imaging approaches being investigated as emerging techniques for evaluating neoadjuvant therapy response for patients with primary breast cancer. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  14. Functionalized nanobodies for cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vught, R.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer treatment is complicated by the high similarity between cancerous and healthy tissue. New anti-cancer drugs, the monoclonal antibodies, act on one specific molecule/process and thereby minimize side effects. Despite that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific and harbor multiple

  15. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, advances in ionizing radiation therapy are competitive to non-ionizing ones, as for example the laser light based therapy, resulting in a synergism that has revolutionized medicine. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive (e.g. through flexible endoscopes) therapeutic procedures in the management of patients represents a very interesting treatment option. Moreover, as the major breakthrough in cancer management is the individualized patient treatment, new biophotonic techniques, e.g. photo-activated drug carriers, help...

  16. Will nanotechnology influence targeted cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jan; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-04-01

    The rapid development of techniques that enable synthesis (and manipulation) of matter on the nanometer scale and the development of new nanomaterials will play a large role in disease diagnosis and treatment, specifically in targeted cancer therapy. Targeted nanocarriers are an intriguing means to selectively deliver high concentrations of cytotoxic agents or imaging labels directly to the cancer site. Often, solubility issues and an unfavorable biodistribution can result in a suboptimal response of novel agents even though they are very potent. New nanoparticulate formulations allow simultaneous imaging and therapy ("theranostics"), which can provide a realistic means for the clinical implementation of such otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review, we did not attempt to provide a complete overview of the rapidly enlarging field of nanotechnology in cancer; rather, we presented properties specific to nanoparticles and examples of their uses, which show their importance for targeted cancer therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Soylu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the structured but flexible psychosocial interventions that could be applied to patients with cancer. In many studies the positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychological morbidity and improving the quality of life of cancer patients have been shown. In this article, the contents and techniques of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with cancer and its effectiveness in commonly seen psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. The aim of this article is to contribute positively to physicians and nurses in Turkey for early detection of psychological distress and referral to the therapist that would clearly increase the quality of life of cancer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 257-270

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and other targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Pelin; Tempero, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to be a challenging disease to treat because of its aggressive nature, advanced stage at the time of diagnosis, and limited treatment options that are available. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy provides modest benefit to patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Recently, a FOLFIRINOX regimen revealed improved response in overall and progression-free survival over single-agent gemcitabine in metastatic pancreatic cancer, but there is still much needed advancement in the systemic treatment of pancreatic cancer. There is a growing interest in the development of novel agents, while our understanding of molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to expand. With identification of various molecular pathways in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis, potential targets for drug development have been pursued with the use of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors. Although preclinical studies with multiple targeted therapies demonstrated encouraging results in pancreatic cancer, only erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, showed a marginal survival benefit in a phase III clinical trial, when combined with gemcitabine. As further signaling pathways and their importance in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis are better understood, further clinical trials will need to be designed to study these targeted agents as single agents, in combination with other novel agents or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this review, we present the current knowledge on targeted therapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and its application in clinical practice.

  19. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dost, Rutger J.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; de Jong, Igle J.

    Purpose Recurrent prostate cancer is usually treated by combining radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy. To stage the cancer, choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT can be performed. It is generally thought that androgen deprivation therapy does not influence choline PET/CT. In this

  20. A phase two randomised trial of neratinib monotherapy versus lapatinib plus capecitabine combination therapy in patients with HER2+ advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Miguel; Bonneterre, Jacques; Geyer, Charles E; Ito, Yoshinori; Ro, Jungsil; Lang, Istvan; Kim, Sung-Bae; Germa, Caroline; Vermette, Jennifer; Wang, Kenneth; Wang, Kongming; Awada, Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    The safety and efficacy of neratinib monotherapy were compared with that of lapatinib plus capecitabine in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER2+), locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer and prior trastuzumab treatment. Patients received neratinib 240 mg/d continuously (n=117) or lapatinib 1250 mg/d continuously plus capecitabine 2000 mg/m(2) per day on days 1-14 of each 21-d cycle (n=116). The primary aim was to demonstrate non-inferiority of neratinib for progression-free survival (PFS). The non-inferiority of neratinib was not demonstrated when compared with lapatinib plus capecitabine (hazard ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.60; non-inferiority margin, 1.15). Median PFS for neratinib was 4.5 months versus 6.8 months for lapatinib plus capecitabine and median overall survival was 19.7 months versus 23.6 months. Objective response rate (neratinib, 29% versus lapatinib plus capecitabine, 41%; P=0.067) and clinical benefit rate (44% versus 64%; P=0.003) were lower for the neratinib arm but consistent with previously reported results. In both treatment arms, diarrhoea was the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event of any grade (neratinib, 85% versus lapatinib plus capecitabine, 68%; P=0.002) and of grade 3/4 (28% versus 10%; P<0.001), but was typically managed with concomitant anti-diarrhoeal medication and/or study treatment modification. Importantly, neratinib had no significant skin toxicity. The results are considered as inconclusive since neither inferiority nor non-inferiority of treatment with neratinib versus lapatinib plus capecitabine could be demonstrated. The study confirmed relevant single-agent clinical activity and acceptable overall tolerability of neratinib in patients with recurrent HER2+ advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Valladares

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.. In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine. We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present.

  2. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruebo, Manuel [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Mariano Esquillor, Edif. I+D, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, Madrid 28046 (Spain); Sáez-Gutierrez, Berta; Lambea, Julio; Tres, Alejandro [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Mariano Esquillor, Edif. I+D, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Avda. San Juan Bosco 50009, Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Avda. Gómez Laguna, 25, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Valladares, Mónica [Lonza Biologics Porriño, A relva s/n, Porriño (Pontevedra) 36410 (Spain); González-Fernández, África, E-mail: africa@uvigo.es [Immunology Department, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Pontevedra) 36310 (Spain)

    2011-08-12

    Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.). In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine). We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present.

  3. DNA origami applications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomprasert, Anuttara; Kangsamaksin, Thaned

    2017-08-01

    Due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer, the development of cancer diagnosis and therapy is still progressing, and a complete understanding of cancer biology remains elusive. Recently, cancer nanomedicine has gained much interest as a promising diagnostic and therapeutic strategy, as a wide range of nanomaterials possess unique physical properties that can render drug delivery systems safer and more effective. Also, targeted drug delivery and precision medicine have now become a new paradigm in cancer therapy. With nanocarriers, chemotherapeutic drugs could be directly delivered into target cancer cells, resulting in enhanced efficiency with fewer side-effects. DNA, a biomolecule with molecular self-assembly properties, has emerged as a versatile nanomaterial to construct multifunctional platforms; DNA nanostructures can be modified with functional groups to improve their utilities as biosensors or drug carriers. Such applications have become possible with the advent of the scaffolded DNA origami method. This breakthrough technique in structural DNA nanotechnology provides an easier and faster way to construct DNA nanostructures with various shapes. Several experiments proved that DNA origami nanostructures possess abilities to enhance efficacies of chemotherapy, reduce adverse side-effects, and even circumvent drug resistance. Here, we highlight the principles of the DNA origami technique and its applications in cancer therapeutics and discuss current challenges and opportunities to improve cancer detection and targeted drug delivery. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Efficacy of Olanzapine Combined Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Resistant to Standard Antiemetic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masakazu; Kasamatsu, Yuka; Kado, Nobuhiro; Kuji, Shiho; Tanaka, Aki; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka; Hirashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Olanzapine is proved to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). But its efficacy in combination with standard antiemetic therapy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to prove the preventive effect of olanzapine for the prevention of CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy when used with standard antiemetic therapy. Gynecologic cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy who had grade 2 or 3 nausea in overall phase (0-120 h after chemotherapy) despite standard therapy were assigned to this study. From the next cycles to cycles in which patients developed grade 2 or 3 nausea, they received olanzapine with standard therapy. 5 mg oral olanzapine was administered for 7 days from the day before chemotherapy. The effectiveness of preventive administration of olanzapine was evaluated retrospectively. The primary endpoint was nausea control rate (grade 0 or 1) with olanzapine. Fifty patients were evaluable. The nausea control rate with olanzapine was improved from 58% to 98% in acute phase (0-24 h after chemotherapy) and 2% to 94% in delayed phase (24-120 h after chemotherapy). In overall phase, the nausea control rate improved from 0% to 92%, and it was statistically significant (P improvement in control of refractory nausea.

  5. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Majeed Al-Shammari,1 Huda Rameez,2 Maha F Al-Taee2 1Department of Experimental Therapy, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Research, Mustansiriyah University, 2Department of Biotechnology, College of Science, Baghdad University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies.Keywords: oncolytic viruses, virotherapy, combination therapy

  6. HIFU therapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or ADT alone. The widely accepted definition of high-risk prostate was first proposed by D'Amico based on a pretreatment Gleason score of ≥8, clinical stage T3, PSA level ≥20 ng/mL. There is no trial that compares traditional methods of treatment of such patients with HIFU therapy. Here we explored the effectiveness of the HIFU in multimodal treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer. Materials & Methods. 701 patients with high risk prostate cancer were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2013. Gleason score were 8-10, stage T3N0M0, age 69 (58-86) years, mean PSA before treatment 43.3 (22.1-92.9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume - 59.3 (38-123) cc. 248 patients were treated by HIFU. We compare this group of patients with patients who undertook EBRT: number 196, and ADT: number 257. Mean follow-up time 58 months (6-72). Results. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients after HIFU were 73.8 %, after EBRT - 63.0 % and after ADT - 18.1%. Conclusions. Our experience showed that HIFU therapy in combined treatment were successful for high risk prostate cancer.

  7. HER2 breast cancer therapies: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Conleth G Murphy; Shanu Modi

    2009-01-01

    Conleth G Murphy, Shanu ModiBreast Cancer Medicine Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Amplification of the HER2 gene and/or overexpression of its protein product have been found in up to 25% to 30% of human breast cancers and have been shown to be associated with poorer outcomes compared to ‘HER2 normal’ breast cancer. Research has focused on developing therapies directed to the HER2 receptor and its pathway....

  8. Two-Photon Photosensitizer-Polymer Conjugates for Combined Cancer Cell Death Induction and Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging: Structure/Photodynamic Therapy Efficiency Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepraga, Cristina; Marotte, Sophie; Ben Daoud, Edna; Favier, Arnaud; Lanoë, Pierre-Henri; Monnereau, Cyrille; Baldeck, Patrice; Andraud, Chantal; Marvel, Jacqueline; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse; Leverrier, Yann

    2017-11-10

    One of the challenges of photodynamic therapy is to increase the penetration depth of light irradiation in the tumor tissues. Although two-photon excitation strategies have been developed, the two-photon absorption cross sections of clinically used photosensitizers are generally low (below 300 GM). Besides, photosensitizers with high cross section values are often non-water-soluble. In this research work, a whole family of photosensitizer-polymer conjugates was synthesized via the covalent binding of a photosensitizer with a relatively high cross section along a biocompatible copolymer chain. The resulting photosensitizer-polymer conjugates were water-soluble and could be imaged in cellulo by two-photon microscopy thanks to their high two-photon absorption cross sections (up to 2600 GM in water, in the NIR range). In order to explore the structure/photodynamic activity relationship of such macromolecular photosensitizers, the influence of the polymer size, photosensitizer density, and presence of charges along the polymer backbone was investigated (neutral, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic conjugates were compared). The macromolecular photosensitizers were not cytotoxic in the absence of light irradiation. Their kinetics of cellular uptake in the B16-F10 melanoma cell line were followed by flow cytometry over 24 h. The efficiency of cell death upon photoactivation was found to be highly correlated to the cellular uptake in turn correlated to the global charge of the macromolecular photosensitizer which appeared as the determining structural parameter.

  9. Management of the oral sequelae of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L; Rankin, K Vendrell

    2012-05-01

    Oral cancer and the oral sequelae of treatment for oral and other malignancies can significantly affect a patient's oral and systemic health, as well as have a profound impact on quality of life. Compromised oral health prior to, during, and following cancer therapy can affect treatment outcomes. Increasingly, dental professionals in the community are being called upon to provide care for these individuals. Radiation therapy is routinely used for tumors of the head and neck, delivering a concentrated radiation dose to the tumor, but also to the immediately surrounding tissue. Oral complications are related to the site radiated and the total radiation dose. Cancer chemotherapy is provided as a primary treatment for some cancers and as an adjunctive modality for other cancers. The goal is to eradicate the rapidly growing cells of the tumor, but chemotherapy is often toxic to other cells that rapidly divide normally including the oral mucosa. The use of combined chemotherapy and radiation is now considered standard for most locally advanced tumors of the head and neck. The toxicities of this combined therapy are essentially the same as with radiation alone, but develop more rapidly and are typically more severe when they reach maximum level. The most common oral sequelae of cancer treatment are: xerostomia, the sensation of a dry mouth as a result of damage to the salivary glands and/or medication; mucositis, the inflammation and ulceration of the oral mucosa; and infection as a result of the loss of mucosal integrity. Management of oral health during cancer therapy includes identifying at-risk patients, patient education, appropriate pretreatment interventions, and timely management of complications. Appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures will help minimize the risk of oral and associated systemic complications, improve treatment outcomes, and improve the patient's quality of life.

  10. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of this study is to develop a strategy to identify molecular markers of response of advanced prostate cancer to specific therapies using clinically...combination treatment strategies are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for identifying molecular markers of response of...and comprehensively characterize the xenografts and human donor tumors. Subtask 1: Establish new and expand existing prostate cancer PDXs from bone

  11. The war against cancer: Suicide gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzeyyen Izmirli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society announced that 1.6 million new cancer cases are projected to occur in the USA in 2016. One of the most innovative approaches against cancer is suicide gene therapy, in which suicide-inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. When cancer treatments target the total elimination of tumor cells, there will be no side effects for normal cells. Cancer tissues are targeted through various targeted transport methods, followed by tissue-specific enzymes converting a systemically suitable prodrug into an active drug in the tumor. Suicidal genes are delivered by transporters, such as viral and non-viral vectors, into cancer cells. Suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene with prodrug ganciclovir, cytosine deaminase gene, carboxyl esterase/irinotecan, varicella zoster virus thymidine kinase/6-methoxypurine arabinonucleoside, nitroreductase Nfsb/5-(aziridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide, carboxypeptidase G2/4-[(2-chloroethyl(2- mesyloxyethylamino]benzoyl-L-glutamic acid, cytochrome p450-isofosfamide, and cytochrome p450-cyclophosphamide. The goal of this review is to summarize the different suicide gene systems and gene delivery vectors addressed to cancer cells, with a particular emphasis on recently developed systems. Finally, we briefly describe the advantageous clinical applications and potential side effects of suicide gene therapy.

  12. The role of combination therapy in managing pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein-Ardeschir Ghofrani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a complex, progressive disease with several pathobiological mechanisms, including the endothelin, nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways. Current treatments for PAH target one of these pathways and, in more severe cases or instances of disease worsening, may be combined with a view to target multiple pathways in parallel. Treatment combination is performed sequentially (as an intensification from initial monotherapy or upfront (use of two or more therapies in treatment-naı¨ve patients. Whilst combination therapy has been historically considered to be an option for the treatment of PAH, supporting evidence was typically limited to expert opinion, clinical experience and registry data. Data from randomised controlled trials on sequential combination therapy in particular has grown in recent years, resulting in a change in the level of recommendations in the latest update to the PAH treatment algorithm. However, short-term trials have shown inconsistent results, and have not been powered to assess morbidity/mortality outcomes. More recent data from long-term trials suggest a potential clinical benefit associated with sequential combination therapy. In this review we will introduce the concept of combination therapy, consider the latest evidence for both sequential and upfront combination therapy, and discuss additional considerations when initiating combination therapy in clinical practice.

  13. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite significant cost differences, the comparative effect of combination treatments of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) with and without biologic agents has rarely been examined. Thus we performed a network meta-analysis on the effect of combination therapies...... on progression of radiographic joint erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and Findings: The following combination drug therapies compared versus single DMARD were investigated: Double DMARD: 2 DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, injectable gold, cyclosporine, chloroquine...

  14. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Penninger JM, Kroemer G. AIF and cyclophilin A coop- erate in apoptosis-associated chromatinolysis. Oncogene 2004; 23:1514–1521. Cardoso F, Durbecq V, Laes ...effects of estrogen and antie- strogen on in vitro clonogenic growth of human breast cancers in soft agar, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 82 (1990) 1146–1149

  15. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaiyan Shima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development.

  16. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June, E-mail: hjlee@kcch.re.kr; Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kcch.re.kr

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  17. Focal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer: An Emerging Approach for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Nomura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A widespread screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA has led increased diagnosis of localized prostate cancer along with a reduction in the proportion of advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Over the past decade, interest in focal therapy as a less morbid option for the treatment of localized low-risk prostate cancer has recently been renewed due to downward stage migration. Focal therapy stands midway between active surveillance and radical treatments, combining minimal morbidity with cancer control. Several techniques of focal therapy have potential for isolated ablation of a tumor focus with sparing of uninvolved surround tissue demonstrating excellent short-term cancer control and a favorable patient’s quality of life. However, to date, tissue ablation has mostly used for near-whole prostate gland ablation without taking advantage of accompanying the technological capabilities. The available ablative technologies include cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP. Despite the interest in focal therapy, this technology has not yet been a well-established procedure nor provided sufficient data, because of the lack of randomized trial comparing the efficacy and morbidity of the standard treatment options. In this paper we briefly summarize the recent data regarding focal therapy for prostate cancer and these new therapeutic modalities.

  18. HIFU as a Neoadjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, P.; Xing, F.; Huang, X.; Zhu, H.; Lo, H. W.; Zhong, X.; Pruitt, S.; Robertson, C.

    2011-09-01

    To broaden the application spectrum of HIFU in cancer therapy, we performed a pilot experiment to evaluate the potential of using HIFU as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Mice bearing wild-type B16F10 melanoma inoculated subcutaneously were either untreated (control) or treated by HIFU, CPA-7 or HIFU+CPA-7 before surgical resection of the primary tumor two days after HIFU treatment. The animals were then followed for four weeks or up to the humane endpoint to determine local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival rate. The results demonstrate that animals treated by HIFU+CPA-7 (which is a small molecule that suppresses STAT3 activity) had a significantly lower recurrence rate, and slower growth of the recurrent tumor, with concomitantly higher survival rate, followed by those treated with CPA-7 and HIFU, respectively. Immunological assays revealed that CPA-7 treatment could significantly lower STAT3, and subsequently, Treg activities. In particular, the combination of HIFU and CPA-7 can induce a much stronger anti-tumor immune response than HIFU or surgery alone, as assessed by CTL and IFN-γ secretion. Overall, our results suggest that HIFU in combination with immunotherapy strategies has the potential to be used as a neoadjuvant therapy to prime the host with a strong anti-tumor immune response before surgical resection of the primary tumor. This multimodality, combinational therapy has the potential to greatly broaden the range of HIFU applications in cancer therapy with lower tumor recurrence and improved survival rate.

  19. Oligonucleotide-based theranostic nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Reza; Ozpolat, Bulent; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2016-05-01

    Theranostic approaches, combining the functionality of both therapy and imaging, have shown potential in cancer nanomedicine. Oligonucleotides such as small interfering RNA and microRNA, which are powerful therapeutic agents, have been effectively employed in theranostic systems against various cancers. Nanoparticles are used to deliver oligonucleotides into tumors by passive or active targeting while protecting the oligonucleotides from nucleases in the extracellular environment. The use of quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles and tagging with contrast agents, like fluorescent dyes, optical or magnetic agents and various radioisotopes, has facilitated early detection of tumors and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we review the advantages of theranostic applications in cancer therapy and imaging, with special attention to oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

  20. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor I. Barrena Medel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer remains a major women's health problem due to its high lethality. Despite great efforts to develop effective prevention and early detection strategies, most patients are still diagnosed at advanced stages of disease. This pattern of late presentation has resulted in significant challenges in terms of designing effective therapies to achieve long-term cure. One potential promising strategy is the application of targeted therapeutics that exploit a myriad of critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review examines three of the most provocative targeted therapies with current or future applicability in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  1. Aptamer-mediated cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Qiao, Greg; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Yong; Wei, Ming Q; Qiao, Liang; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Zhu, Yimin; Zheng, Conglong; Pu, Chunwen; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer as a genetic disorder is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Conventional anticancer options such as chemo- and/or radio-therapy have their own drawbacks and could not provide a cure in most cases at present. More effective therapeutic strategies with less side effects are urgently needed. Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single strand DNA or RNA molecules that can bind to their target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Such site-specific binding ability of aptamers facilitates the delivery and interaction of exogenous nucleic acids with diseased genes. Thus, aptamer-guided gene therapy has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy in addition to the classic treatment regimen. Aptamers can directly deliver anti-cancer nucleic acids, e.g. small interfering RNA, micro RNA, antimicroRNA and small hairpin RNA, to cancer cells or function as a targeting ligand to guide nanoparticles containing therapeutic nucleic acids. This review focuses on recent progress in aptamer-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and other types of cancers, shedding light on the potential of this novel approach of targeted cancer gene therapy.

  2. Adjuvant Therapy of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Edith A.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Andorfer, Cathy A

    2010-01-01

    Patients with the triple negative subtype of breast cancer have an overall poor outcome, with earlier relapses, distinct patterns of metastases, and lack of specific targets for treatment selection. Classification of these tumors has begun to be modified by inclusion of immunohistochemistry for various markers, and gene profiling, to further characterize this subtype of breast cancer, may aid in the identification of new targeted therapies. Anthracyclines and taxanes remain the standard of ca...

  3. Suicide Gene Therapy for Cancer - Current Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Sakkas, Antonios; Yarmus, Lonny; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2013-08-09

    Current cancer treatments may create profound iatrogenic outcomes. The adverse effects of these treatments still remain, as the serious problems that practicing physicians have to cope with in clinical practice. Although, non-specific cytotoxic agents constitute an effective treatment modality against cancer cells, they also tend to kill normal, quickly dividing cells. On the other hand, therapies targeting the genome of the tumors are both under investigation, and some others are already streamlined to clinical practice. Several approaches have been investigated in order to find a treatment targeting the cancer cells, while not affecting the normal cells. Suicide gene therapy is a therapeutic strategy, in which cell suicide inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. The two major suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are: cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine and the herpes simplex virus/ganciclovir. The novel strategies include silencing gene expression, expression of intracellular antibodies blocking cells' vital pathways, and transgenic expression of caspases and DNases. We analyze various elements of cancer cells' suicide inducing strategies including: targets, vectors, and mechanisms. These strategies have been extensively investigated in various types of cancers, while exploring multiple delivery routes including viruses, non-viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, and stem cells. We discuss various stages of streamlining of the suicide gene therapy into clinical oncology as applied to different types of cancer. Moreover, suicide gene therapy is in the center of attention as a strategy preventing cancer from developing in patients participating in the clinical trials of regenerative medicine. In oncology, these clinical trials are aimed at regenerating, with the aid of stem cells, of the patients' organs damaged by pathologic and/or iatrogenic factors. However, the stem cells carry the risk of neoplasmic transformation. We discuss

  4. Hyperbilirubinemia without Transaminitis during Combined Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Baba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Daclatasvir (DCV and asunaprevir (ASV are direct-acting antivirals (DAAs used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Combined therapy with DCV and ASV shows high efficacy and safety even in patients with cirrhosis. We encountered a patient exhibiting severe hyperbilirubinemia during combined therapy, which is an unreported side effect of DCV and ASV. A 78-year-old woman with cirrhosis developed hyperbilirubinemia >10 mg/dl without transaminitis 3 weeks after starting combined therapy. We suspected DAAs-induced liver disorder and discontinued treatment, which resulted in the improvement of hyperbilirubinemia. Caution is required in the use of DAAs for patients with advanced cirrhosis.

  5. Cardiovascular disease after cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthe M.P. Aleman

    2014-06-01

    Better knowledge of these cardiac effects will contribute to both primary and secondary prevention of late complications where exposure to cardiotoxic treatment is unavoidable. Also surrogate markers would help to identify patients at increased risk of cardiotoxicity. Evidence-based screening guidelines for CVD following cancer are also needed. Finally, risk prediction models should be developed to guide primary treatment choice and appropriate follow up after cancer treatment.

  6. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes ... your fluid intake. • Treat the skin exposed to radiation with special care. Stay out of the sun, ...

  7. Gene and Stem Cell Therapy: Alone or in Combination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both gene and stem cell therapies hold great promise in the treatment of many genetic diseases and are currently focus of interest for many investigators. While both approaches are offering great and valuable treatment options for devastating and life-threatening diseases, they hold much greater promise in combination. Methods: As there are multiple options in selecting gene transfer vehicles among the non-viral and viral vectors, there are also many options among the different transplantable cell types ranging from lineage-restricted progenitor cells to multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Here, combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy is discussed. Results: Several successful gene and stem cell therapies have been reported both in animal and human trials. Combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy can be carried out sequentially where the cell transplantation and the in vivo gene therapy are accomplished one after the other; or, as it is more commonly practiced, they can be carried out as ex vivo gene therapy where the transplantable cells are genetically modified outside the body before being transplanted into the body. Conclusion: The combination of the stem-cell technology with gene therapy has the potential of providing both regenerative tissue and therapeutic material simultaneously; therefore, having the benefits of both technologies.

  8. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Melatonin in pathogenesis and therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, T; Lakshmi, N K; Ahuja, Y R

    2006-12-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted by the pineal gland to transduce the body's circadian rhythms. An internal 24 hour time keeping system (biological clock) regulated by melatonin, controls the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin production is a highly conserved evolutionary phenomenon. The indole hormone is synthesized in the pinealocytes derived from photoreceptors. Altered patterns and/or levels of melatonin secretion have been reported to coincide with sleep disorders, jetlag, depression, stress, reproductive activities, some forms of cancer and immunological disorders. Lately, the physiological and pathological role of melatonin has become a priority area of investigation, particularly in breast cancer, melanoma, colon cancer, lung cancer and leukemia. According to the 'melatonin hypothesis' of cancer, the exposure to light at night (LAN) and anthropogenic electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) is related to the increased incidence of breast cancer and childhood leukaemia via melatonin disruption. Melatonin's hypothermic, antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, attribute it to an immunomodulator and an oncostatic agent as well. Many clinical studies have envisaged the potential therapeutic role of melatonin in various pathophysiological disorders, particularly cancer. A substantial reduction in risk of death and low adverse effects were reported from various randomized controlled trials of melatonin treatment in cancer patients. This review summarizes the physiological significance of melatonin and its potential role in cancer therapy. Furthermore, the article focuses on melatonin hypothesis to represent the cause-effect relationship of the three aspects: EMF, LAN and cancer.

  10. Photodynamic therapy for lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Charles B; Cengel, Keith A

    2014-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a form of non-ionizing radiation therapy that uses a drug, called a photosensitizer, combined with light to produce singlet oxygen ((1)O2) that can exert anti-cancer activity through apoptotic, necrotic, or autophagic tumor cell death. PDT is increasingly being used to treat thoracic malignancies. For early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), PDT is primarily employed as an endobronchial therapy to definitively treat endobronchial or roentgenographically occult tumors. Similarly, patients with multiple primary lung cancers may be definitively treated with PDT. For advanced or metastatic NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), PDT is primarily employed to palliate symptoms from obstructing endobronchial lesions causing airway compromise or hemoptysis. PDT can be used in advanced NSCLC to attempt to increase operability or to reduce the extent of operation intervention required, and selectively to treat pleural dissemination intraoperatively following macroscopically complete surgical resection. Intraoperative PDT can be safely combined with macroscopically complete surgical resection and other treatment modalities for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) to improve local control and prolong survival. This report reviews the mechanism of and rationale for using PDT to treat thoracic malignancies, details prospective and major retrospectives studies of PDT to treat NSCLC, SCLC, and MPM, and describes improvements in and future roles and directions of PDT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer therapy leading to state of cancer metabolism depression for efficient operation of small dosage cytotoxic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponizovskiy MR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available “Prolonged medical starvation” as the method of cancer therapy was borrowed from folk healers Omelchenko A and Breuss R. Author was convinced in efficiency of this method of cancer treatment via examination of cured patients and on own experience. The mechanism of this method of cancer therapy operates via Warburg effect targeting that promotes efficient cancer treatment with small cytotoxic drugs. Just it was described the mechanism of Warburg effect as well as mechanism transmutation of mitochondrial function in cancer metabolism which are exhibited in connection with operation of described method cancer therapy. There were described the biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of formations resistance to some cytotoxic drugs and recurrence cancer disease after disease remission which occur sometimes as result of treatment with great dosage of cytotoxic drugs. Also it was described the benefits of use the method “Prolonged medical starvation” with decreased dosage of cytotoxic drugs for cancer treatment. The significance of this work that it was substantiated the mechanism operation of combination “Prolonged medical starvation” with small dosages cytotoxic drugs of cancer treatment, which mechanism leads to prevention recurrence cancer disease and resistance to anticancer drugs in comparison with intensive anticancer chemotherapy with great dosages of cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy. Also the offered concepts of cancer therapy mechanism gave possibility to explain mechanisms of some results of experiments eliminating the doubts of the authors these experiments.

  12. Occupational therapy use by older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Cutchin, Malcolm P; Weinberger, Morris; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Occupational therapy may significantly improve cancer survivors' ability to participate in activities, thereby improving quality of life. Little is known, however, about the use of occupational therapy services by adults with cancer. The objective of this study was to understand what shapes patterns of occupational therapy use to help improve service delivery. We examined older (age >65 yr) adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or melanoma (skin) cancer between 2004 and 2007 (N = 27,131) using North Carolina Central Cancer Registry data linked to Medicare billing claims. Survivors who used occupational therapy within 1 yr before their cancer diagnosis were more likely to use occupational therapy after diagnosis but also experienced the highest levels of comorbidities. Survivors with Stage 4 cancers or lung cancer were less likely to use occupational therapy. These findings suggest possible disparities in utilization of occupational therapy by older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe June 2013 Print this issue Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer Send us your comments By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ... therapies for some patients. Endometrial cancer affects the lining ...

  14. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  15. POSSIBILITIES OF THERAPY OF HER-2-POSITIVE REGIONAL BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Belokhvostova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer heads the list of malignant neoplasms in women. In this connection the regional forms of cancer are diagnosed in one fourth of the patients. The treatment of regional cancer begins with systemic therapy and aimed at gaining of state fit for operation. The choice of modern treatment strategy is based on determination of molecular subtype of the tumor. One of them is referred to HER-2-positive cancer, requiring the administration of additional targeted therapy. This form of cancer is referred to prognostically pejorative tumors, as it’s more aggressive, leads to fast metastasis and early death of the patients. The “golden standard” of systemic chemotherapy is defined as administration of docetaxel and trastuzumab,  and antracyclic drugs, which also prove to be efficient. However concomitant administration of trastuzumab and antracyclines is limited due to their cardiotoxicity. Chemotherapy is not always efficient and, upon recommendations both of Russian and international oncologists, radiotherapy is the next stage of treatment. The question about radiosensibility of HER-2-positive tumors is still open and worth studying. Addition of radiotherapy to regional cancer treatment regimen in combination with the targeted therapy and chemotherapy may contribute to obtaining better survival rate and disease control. There are still no clearly defined standard for the sequence of chemo-radiation therapy. Simultaneous  chemo-radiatiojn  therapy results in  reliably better loco-regional control of tumor and  enables to gain a  higher degree of pathomorphological response on the one hand, and it may result in development of serious adverse effects on the other hand. Striving for improvement of immediate results of antineoplastic therapy, including that of regional cancer, by combining various methods, one should keep in mind the increasing action toxicity, which may have a considerable impact on the patients’ quality of living

  16. Cancer stem cells: the theory and perspectives in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Justyna; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Pesz, Karolina A; Sasiadek, Maria M

    2008-01-01

    The cancer stem cell theory elucidates not only the issue of tumour initiation and development, tumour's ability to metastasise and reoccur, but also the ineffectiveness of conventional cancer therapy. This review examines stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, heterogeneity, and resistance to apoptosis. The 'niche' hypothesis is presented, and mechanisms of division, differentiation, self-renewal and signalling pathway regulation are explained. Epigenetic alterations and mutations of genes responsible for signal transmission may promote the formation of cancer stem cells. We also present the history of development of the cancer stem cell theory and discuss the experiments that led to the discovery and confirmation of the existence of cancer stem cells. Potential clinical applications are also considered, including therapeutic models aimed at selective elimination of cancer stem cells or induction of their proper differentiation.

  17. A review of immune therapy in cancer and a question: can thermal therapy increase tumor response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joan M C

    2017-11-03

    Immune therapy is a successful cancer treatment coming into its own. This is because checkpoint molecules, adoptive specific lymphocyte transfer and chimeric antigen T-cell (CAR-T) therapy are able to induce more durable responses in an increasing number of malignancies compared to chemotherapy. In addition, immune therapies are able to treat bulky disease, whereas standard cytotoxic therapies cannot treat large tumour burdens. Checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies are becoming widely used in the clinic and although more complex, adoptive lymphocyte transfer and CAR-T therapies show promise. We are learning that there are nuances to predicting the successful use of the checkpoint inhibitors as well as to specific-antigen adoptive and CAR-T therapies. We are also newly aware of a here-to-fore unrealised natural force, the status of the microbiome. However, despite better understanding of mechanisms of action of the new immune therapies, the best responses to the new immune therapies remain 20-30%. Likely the best way to improve this somewhat low response rate for patients is to increase the patient's own immune response. Thermal therapy is a way to do this. All forms of thermal therapy, from fever-range systemic thermal therapy, to high-temperature HIFU and even cryotherapy improve the immune response pre-clinically. It is time to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in vivo to test for optimal timing of the combinations that will best enhance tumour response and then to begin to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in the clinic as soon as possible.

  18. Tumor biology and cancer therapy – an evolving relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lother Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of palliative chemotherapy is to increase survival whilst maintaining maximum quality of life for the individual concerned. Although we are still continuing to explore the optimum use of traditional chemotherapy agents, the introduction of targeted therapies has significantly broadened the therapeutic options. Interestingly, the results from current trials put the underlying biological concept often into a new, less favorable perspective. Recent data suggested that altered pathways underlie cancer, and not just altered genes. Thus, an effective therapeutic agent will sometimes have to target downstream parts of a signaling pathway or physiological effects rather than individual genes. In addition, over the past few years increasing evidence has suggested that solid tumors represent a very heterogeneous group of cells with different susceptibility to cancer therapy. Thus, since therapeutic concepts and pathophysiological understanding are continuously evolving a combination of current concepts in tumor therapy and tumor biology is needed. This review aims to present current problems of cancer therapy by highlighting exemplary results from recent clinical trials with colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients and to discuss the current understanding of the underlying reasons.

  19. Biomaterial-Based Implantable Devices for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Sue Anne; Danti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    This review article focuses on the current local therapies mediated by implanted macroscaled biomaterials available or proposed for fighting cancer and also highlights the upcoming research in this field. Several authoritative review articles have collected and discussed the state-of-the-art as well as the advancements in using biomaterial-based micro- and nano-particle systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy. On the other hand, implantable biomaterial devices are emerging as highly versatile therapeutic platforms, which deserve an increased attention by the healthcare scientific community, as they are able to offer innovative, more effective and creative strategies against tumors. This review summarizes the current approaches which exploit biomaterial-based devices as implantable tools for locally administrating drugs and describes their specific medical applications, which mainly target resected brain tumors or brain metastases for the inaccessibility of conventional chemotherapies. Moreover, a special focus in this review is given to innovative approaches, such as combined delivery therapies, as well as to alternative approaches, such as scaffolds for gene therapy, cancer immunotherapy and metastatic cell capture, the later as promising future trends in implantable biomaterials for cancer applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

  1. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hormonal replacement therapy after gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Mariani, Luca; Marenco, Davide; Robba, Claudio; Peano, Elisa; Kubatzki, Franziska; Sismondi, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Thousands of women are treated each year for gynaecological cancers; many of these are already in menopause, while other younger patients will go into early menopause due to surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The aim of this paper is to review the biological and clinical evidence in favour and against hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use after gynaecological cancers. With the exception of breast and endometrial cancer, there is no biological evidence that HRT may increase the recurrence risk. In women with previous endometrial cancer, HRT use is not supported by univocal and conclusive data to formulate specific recommendations, whereas most authors suggest that oestrogens may be used after adequate information about risks and benefits. The use of HRT in breast cancer patients is, at present, considered contra-indicated, even if results of clinical trials are not concordant. Therapeutic non-hormonal alternatives may be proposed to these patients.

  3. Combining oncolytic virotherapy with p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of gen...

  4. Perception of the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West Nigeria and perception of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Design and methods-About 180 pre-tested questionnaires were administered to randomly selected nurses out of which 155 were sufficiently completed and ...

  5. Rational design of non-resistant targeted cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Overington, John P.; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major problems in targeted cancer therapy. A major cause of resistance is changes in the amino acids that form the drug-target binding site. Despite of the numerous efforts made to individually understand and overcome these mutations, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape that can prospectively estimate drug-resistance mutations. Here we describe and computationally validate a framework that combines the cancer-specific likelihood with the resistance impact to enable the detection of single point mutations with the highest chance to be responsible of resistance to a particular targeted cancer therapy. Moreover, for these treatment-threatening mutations, the model proposes alternative therapies overcoming the resistance. We exemplified the applicability of the model using EGFR-gefitinib treatment for Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and Lung Squamous Cell Cancer (LSCC) and the ERK2-VTX11e treatment for melanoma and colorectal cancer. Our model correctly identified the phenotype known resistance mutations, including the classic EGFR-T790M and the ERK2-P58L/S/T mutations. Moreover, the model predicted new previously undescribed mutations as potentially responsible of drug resistance. Finally, we provided a map of the predicted sensitivity of alternative ERK2 and EGFR inhibitors, with a particular highlight of two molecules with a low predicted resistance impact. PMID:28436422

  6. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy.

  7. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  8. Enhancing photodynamic therapy of refractory solid cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, R.

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the activation of a photosensitizer by (laser) light to locally produce highly destructive reactive oxygen species. When employed for cancer treatment, PDT is able to induce tumor cell death, microvascular damage, and an anti-tumor immune response. All these

  9. How Can Gastric Cancer Molecular Profiling Guide Future Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Simona; Giordano, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third greatest global cause of cancer-related deaths. Despite its high prevalence, only recently have comprehensive genomic surveys shed light on its molecular alterations. As surgery is the only curative treatment strategy and chemotherapy has shown limited efficacy, new treatments are urgently needed. Many molecular therapies for gastric cancer have entered clinical trials but-apart from Trastuzumab and Ramucirumab-all have failed. We analyze the current knowledge of the genetic 'landscape' of gastric cancers, elaborating on novel, preclinical approaches. We posit that this knowledge lays the basis for identifying bona fide molecular targets and developing solid therapeutic approaches, requiring accurate patient selection and taking advantage of preclinical models to assist clinical development of novel combination strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New Approaches for Prostate Cancer Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    such as collagens COL1A1, COL4A1 , Figure 1. Generation of PC-3 cell lines stably expressing siRNA against PDEF and morphologic and adhesion effects of...as the collagens COL1A1, COL4A1 , and COL4A2 and integrins ITGA6, ITGA5 , and ITGA3 , as well as the positive signaling regulators FAK (PTK2),MYLK

  11. Targeted therapy: A novel approach in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Winnifred Christy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with head and neck cancer present with locally advanced disease. Locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN poses one of the most complex management challenges. This stage of disease is still potentially curable, but requires combined-modality therapy. One of the novel approaches is the use of targeted agents, particularly the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors, in treatment strategies in LA-SCCHN. A Medline search covering topics related to targeted therapies in head and neck cancer over the last two decades was made and the facts were compiled. Cetuximab was the first novel agent to obtain regulatory approval in the United States for the treatment of patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer HNSCC. Cetuximab has been evaluated in combination with radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, and induction chemotherapies, and was found to increase the overall survival rates in all the arms without raising the toxicity level of the combined modality of treatment significantly. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors Gefinitib and Erlotinib also produced an average response rate of 11% and 4% in different studies and also prolonged the disease control rates when used with chemotherapy. This paper will review the role of targeted agents, particularly the EGFR inhibitors, in the present treatment strategies in advanced, recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglei Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease among all gynecologic malignancies and is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Although the standard combination of surgery and chemotherapy was initially effective in patients with ovarian cancer, disease relapse commonly occurred due to the generation of chemoresistance. It has been reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs are involved in drug resistance and cancer recurrence. Over the past decades, increasing studies have been done to identify CSCs from human ovarian cancer cells. The present paper will summarize different investigations on ovarian CSCs, including isolation, mechanisms of chemoresistance, and therapeutic approaches. Although there are still numerous challenges to translate basic research to clinical applications, understanding the molecular details of CSCs is essential for developing effective strategies to prevent ovarian cancer and its recurrence.

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  14. Liver-directed therapies in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Janivette; Choti, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Historically, the majority of patients that presented with metastatic disease to the liver were treated with systemic chemotherapy only but advances in imaging, surgical techniques, and non-resectional approaches have expanded the indications for liver-directed interventions. Current approaches used in patients with liver-only or liver-dominant metastatic disease include surgical resection, direct tumor ablation strategies, the use of intra-arterial infusions, and radiation therapies. The use of these liver-directed therapies in selected patients with colorectal liver metastases has led to significant improvements in overall survival. We review the clinical data and progress using liver-directed therapies in the treatment of colorectal liver metastases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  16. Polo-like kinase 1 as target for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiß Lily

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1 is an interesting molecule both as a biomarker and as a target for highly specific cancer therapy for several reasons. Firstly, it is over-expressed in many cancers and can serve as a biomarker to monitor treatment efficacy of Plk1 inhibitors. Furthermore, the Plk1 enzyme is expressed only in dividing cells and is a major regulator of the cell cycle. It controls entry into mitosis and regulates the spindle checkpoint. The expression of Plk1 in normal cells is not nearly as strong as that in cancer cells, which makes Plk1 a discriminating tartget for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RNA interference experiments in vitro and in vivo have indicated that downregulation of Plk1 expression represents an attractive concept for cancer therapy. Over the years, a number of Plk1 inhibitors have been discovered. Many of these inhibitors are substances that compete with ATP for the substrate binding site. The ATP-competitive inhibitor BI 6727 is currently being clinically tested in cancer patients. Another drug in development, poloxin, is the first Polo-box domain inhibitor of Plk1. This compound is a derivative of the natural product, thymoquinone, derived from Nigella sativa. A novel and promising strategy is to synthesize bifunctional inhibitors that combine the high binding affinity of ATP inhibitors with the specificity of competitive inhibitors.

  17. Implant survival rate after oral cancer therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Almas, Khalid; Romanos, George E

    2010-12-01

    The overall im