WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer clinical trial

  1. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  2. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  3. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  4. Altruism among participants in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Tony H; Weeks, Jane C; Cook, E Francis; Joffe, Steven

    2011-10-01

    Patients' motivations for participation in cancer clinical trials are incompletely understood. Even less is known about the factors that influence participants' motivations for enrolling in trials. We studied the reasons why adult patients and parents of pediatric patients agree to participate in cancer trials. We focused on the role of altruism across all phases of trial. We surveyed adult patients and parents of pediatric patients participating in phase I, II, or III cancer clinical trials. We asked respondents why they agreed to enroll, and examined correlates of altruistic motivation using univariate and multivariate analyses. Among 205 adults and 48 parents of children participating in cancer trials, 47% reported that altruistic motivations were 'very important' to their decisions to enroll. In multivariate analysis with phase III trial participants as the reference group, phase I trial participants least often identified altruism as a 'very important' motivation for enrolling (phase I OR 0.4, 95% CI (confidence interval) 0.2-0.8; phase II OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.5, overall P = 0.017). Thirty-three respondents (13%) reported being motivated primarily by altruism. In multivariate analysis, participants with poor prognoses-defined as an expected 5-year disease-free survival of ≤ 10%-reported altruism as their primary motivation less often than those with better prognoses (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.5, P = 0.001). Altruistic motivations did not differ between adult patients and parents of pediatric participants. The data are derived from related academic medical centers in one city, and the study sample reflects limited sociodemographic diversity, thereby limiting generalizability to other settings. Although cancer trial participants commonly report that altruism contributed to their decision to enroll, it is rarely their primary motivation for study participation. Participants in early phase trials and those with poor prognoses are least often motivated by altruism.

  5. Hyperthermia-related clinical trials on cancer treatment within the ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; van Rhoon, Gerard; Crezee, Hans; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Bodis, Stephan; Beck, Marcus; Nadobny, Jacek; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. This paper summarises all recent clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. The records of 175,538 clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were

  6. Inclusion of Minority Patients in Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: The Role of the Clinical Trial Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaplan, Celia P

    2007-01-01

    .... While inroads to increasing minority inclusion in breast cancer clinical trials have been made, recent reports continue to demonstrate lower enrollment among African Americans, Asian Americans...

  7. The National Clinical Trials Network: Conducting Successful Clinical Trials of New Therapies for Rare Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Anne F.; Welch, John J.; Verschraegen, Claire F.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Rare cancers account for 27% of neoplasms diagnosed each year, and 25% of cancer-related deaths in the United States. However, rare cancers show some of the highest response rates to targeted therapies, probably due to identification of oncogenic drivers with little inter-patient variability. Although the low incidence of rare cancers make large scale randomized trials involving single histologies difficult to perform, drugs have been successfully developed in rare cancers utilizing clinical trial designs that combine microscopic anatomies. Such trials are being pursued within the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), which possesses unique qualifications to perform widespread molecular screening of tumors for patient enrollment onto therapeutic clinical trials. When larger clinical trials are needed to determine optimum treatment strategies in rare cancers, the NCTN's broad reach in North America and internationally, and ability to partner with both US-based and international research organizations, can make these challenging studies feasible. PMID:26433554

  8. Decision making for cancer clinical trial participation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycki, Barbara A

    2010-11-01

    To describe what is known about the factors that influence cancer clinical trial decision making. PubMed database and reference lists of identified articles. Variations in research design and methods, including sample characteristics, instrumentation, time between decision made and measurement of decision making, and response rates, have effects on what is known about decision making for cancer clinical trial participation. Communication, whether in the form of education about a cancer clinical trial or as a personal invitation to join, is an important factor influencing decision making. Personal and system factors influence the outcomes of decision making for cancer clinical trials. The process of decision making for cancer clinical trials is understudied. Nevertheless, the currently available cancer clinical trial decision-making literature suggests a multitude of factors that influence the outcomes of the decision to accept or decline clinical trial participation, as well as the psychosocial consequences of decisional regret, pressures, and satisfaction. The decision-making process of cancer clinical trials is a fertile area for research and, subsequently, evidence-based interventions. Oncology nurses are in a position to facilitate the process and to relieve the pressures patients perceive regarding decision making for cancer clinical trials that will benefit individuals and, ultimately, society.

  9. Scientific Review in Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific review ensures that studies are based on sound science, which contributes to the safety of clinical trial participants. Learn about the role of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs), and government agenci

  10. Lung Cancer Screening and Smoking Cessation Clinical Trials: SCALE Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Anne M; Rothman, Alexander J; Almirall, Daniel; Begnaud, Abbie; Chiles, Caroline; Cinciripini, Paul M; Fu, Steven S; Graham, Amanda L; Lindgren, Bruce R; Melzer, Anne C; Ostroff, Jamie S; Seaman, Elizabeth L; Taylor, Kathryn L; Toll, Benjamin A; Zeliadt, Steven B; Vock, David M

    2017-10-04

    National recommendations for lung cancer screening for former and current smokers aged 55-80 years with a 30-pack year smoking history create demand to implement efficient and effective systems to offer smoking cessation on a large scale. These older, high-risk smokers differ from participants in past clinical trials of behavioral and pharmacologic interventions for tobacco dependence. There is a gap in knowledge about how to best design systems to extend reach and treatments to maximize smoking cessation in the context of lung cancer screening. Eight clinical trials, seven funded by the National Cancer Institute and one by the VHA, address this gap and form the Smoking Cessation within the Context of Lung Cancer Screening (SCALE) collaboration. This paper describes methodological issues related to the design of these clinical trials: clinical workflow, participant eligibility criteria, screening indication (baseline or annual repeat screen), assessment content, interest in stopping smoking, and treatment delivery method and dose, all of which will affect tobacco treatment outcomes. Tobacco interventions consider the "teachable moment" offered by lung cancer screening, how to incorporate positive and negative screening results, and coordination of smoking cessation treatment with clinical events associated with lung cancer screening. Unique data elements, such as perceived risk of lung cancer and costs of tobacco treatment are of interest. Lung cancer screening presents a new and promising opportunity to reduce morbidity and mortality from lung cancer that can be amplified by effective smoking cessation treatment. SCALE teamwork and collaboration promises to maximize knowledge gained from the clinical trials.

  11. An Update on Randomized Clinical Trials in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Kayla; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Numerous clinical trials reveal new innovations and therapies that continually change the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Earlier trials have changed the standard of care from radical mastectomy to breast conservation therapy and individualized treatment based on tumor-specific biology. As research continues and long-term follow-up results become available, updated reviews on randomized clinics trials become exceedingly important in discerning the most effective and oncologically safe therapies to provide optimal outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Analysis of Maryland cancer patient participation in National Cancer Institute-supported cancer treatment clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquet, Claudia R; Ellison, Gary L; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2009-05-01

    We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI's Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved.

  13. Unique perception of clinical trials by Korean cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su Jin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, the number of clinical trials has increased rapidly in East Asia, especially for gastric and hepatobiliary cancer that are prevalent in Asian populations. However, the actual degree of understanding or perceptions of clinical trials by cancer patients in East Asian countries have seldom been studied. Methods Between July 1st and November 30th of 2011, we conducted a prospective study to survey cancer patients regarding their awareness of, and willingness to participate in, a clinical trial. Patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary cancer who visited the Hematology-Oncology outpatient clinic at Samsung Medical Center (SMC were enrolled. A total of 21 questions were asked including four questions which used the Visual analogue scale (VAS score. Results In this survey study, 1,000 patients were asked to participate and 675 patients consented to participate (67.5%. The awareness of clinical trials was substantially higher in patients who had a higher level of education (pp=0.004, and had a higher economic status (p=0.001. However, the willingness to participate in a clinical trial was not affected by the level of education or economic status of patients. The most influential factors for patient willingness to participate were a physician recommendation (n=181, 26.8%, limited treatment options (n=178, 26.4%, and expectations of effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs (n=142, 21.0%. Patients with previous experience in clinical trials had a greater willingness to participate in clinical trials compared to patients without previous experience (p Conclusions This large patient cohort survey study showed that Korean cancer patients are more aware of clinical trials, but awareness did not translate into willingness to participate.

  14. COP - Pet Owners - Open Clinical Trials | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current Open Clinical Trials If you are interested in learning more about the eligibility requirements for any of open studies listed below, please contact the nearest participating University or Christina Mazcko. To search studies being conducted by other groups please visit Vet Cancer Trials. This will allow you to search by location and tumor type.

  15. Primary care physicians' attitudes and beliefs about cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Weiss, Elisa S; Michaels, Margo; Patel, Shilpa; D'Agostino, Thomas A; Peterson, Emily B; Binz-Scharf, Maria Christina; Blakeney, Natasha; McKee, M Diane

    2017-10-01

    Cancer clinical trials give patients access to state-of-the-art treatments and facilitate the translation of findings into mainstream clinical care. However, patients from racial and ethnic minority groups remain underrepresented in clinical trials. Primary care physicians are a trusted source of information for patients, yet their role in decision-making about cancer treatment and referrals to trial participation has received little attention. The aim of this study was to determine physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer clinical trials, their experience with trials, and their interest in appropriate training about trials. A total of 613 physicians in the New York City area primarily serving patients from ethnic and racial minority groups were invited via email to participate in a 20-min online survey. Physicians were asked about their patient population, trial knowledge and attitudes, interest in training, and personal demographics. Using calculated scale variables, we used descriptive statistical analyses to better understand physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about trials. A total of 127 physicians completed the survey. Overall, they had low knowledge about and little experience with trials. However, they generally had positive attitudes toward trials, with 41.4% indicating a strong interest in learning more about their role in trials, and 35.7% indicating that they might be interested. Results suggest that Black and Latino physicians and those with more positive attitudes and beliefs were more likely to be interested in future training opportunities. Primary care physicians may be an important group to target in trying to improve cancer clinical trial participation among minority patients. Future work should explore methods of educational intervention for such interested providers.

  16. Patient income level and cancer clinical trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Joseph M; Hershman, Dawn L; Albain, Kathy S; Moinpour, Carol M; Petersen, Judith A; Burg, Kenda; Crowley, John J

    2013-02-10

    Studies have shown an association between socioeconomic status (SES) and quality of oncology care, but less is known about the impact of patient SES on clinical trial participation. We assessed clinical trial participation patterns according to important SES (income, education) and demographic factors in a large sample of patients surveyed via an Internet-based treatment decision tool. Logistic regression, conditioning on type of cancer, was used. Attitudes toward clinical trials were assessed using prespecified items about treatment, treatment tolerability, convenience, and cost. From 2007 to 2011, 5,499 patients were successfully surveyed. Forty percent discussed clinical trials with their physician, 45% of discussions led to physician offers of clinical trial participation, and 51% of offers led to clinical trial participation. The overall clinical trial participation rate was 9%. In univariate models, older patients (P = .002) and patients with lower income (P = .001) and education (P = .02) were less likely to participate in clinical trials. In a multivariable model, income remained a statistically significant predictor of clinical trial participation (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.94; P = .01). Even in patients age ≥ 65 years, who have universal access to Medicare, lower income predicted lower trial participation. Cost concerns were much more evident among lower-income patients (P income patients were less likely to participate in clinical trials, even when considering age group. A better understanding of why income is a barrier may help identify ways to make clinical trials better available to all patients and would increase the generalizability of clinical trial results across all income levels.

  17. Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  18. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  19. Adding value to clinical trial registries: insights from Australian Cancer Trials Online, a website for consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, Rachel; Barratt, Alexandra; Askie, Lisa; McGeechan, Kevin; Arora, Sheena; Crossing, Sally; Currow, David; Tattersall, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Clinical trials registries are now operating in the USA, Europe, Australia, China, and India and more are planned. Trial registries could be an excellent source of information about clinical trials for patients and others affected by cancer as well as health care professionals, but may be difficult for patients to navigate and use. An opportunity arose in Australia to develop a consumer friendly cancer clinical trials website (Australian Cancer Trials Online (ACTO), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au) using an automated data feed from two large clinical trial registries. In this article, we describe aspects of this new website, and explore ways in which such a website may add value to clinical trial data which are already collected and held by trial registries. The development of ACTO was completed by a Web company working in close association with staff at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), and with consumer representatives. Data for the website were sourced directly and only from clinical trial registries, thus avoiding the creation of an additional trials database. It receives an automated, daily data feed of newly registered cancer clinical trials from both the ANZCTR and Clinical Trials.gov. The development of ACTO exemplifies the advantage of a local clinical trial registry working with consumers to provide accessible information about cancer clinical trials to meet consumers' information needs. We found that the inclusion of a lay summary added substantial value for consumers, and recommend that consideration be given to adding a lay summary to the mandatory data items collected by all trial registries. Furthermore, improved navigation, decision support tools, and consistency in data collection between clinical trial registries will also enable consumer websites to provide additional value for users. Clinical trial registration is not compulsory in Australia. If the additional cancer items (including a lay summary) are not provided

  20. Qualitative analysis of clinical research coordinators' role in phase I cancer clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Fujiwara

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Clinical research coordinators were insightful about the needs of patients and took a meticulous approach to the phase I cancer clinical trial process, allowing time to connect with patients and to coordinate the inter-professional research team. Additionally, education in advanced oncology care was valuable for comforting participants in cancer clinical trials.

  1. Disparities in Cancer Clinical Trials: An Analysis of Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Moniek Felder, Tisha; Pena, Gabriela D.; Chapital, Bridget F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Disparities in enrollment of adults in cancer clinical trials are well documented, but little is known about the attention given to this topic in comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans. We assessed the extent to which CCC plans address disparities in clinical trials and whether jurisdictions whose plans address disparities also mandate third-party reimbursement for clinical trial participation. Methods We analyzed 57 CCC plans identified from Cancer PLANET (Plan, Link, Act, Net...

  2. Use of crowdsourcing for cancer clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Amanda; Sablinski, Tomasz; Diefenbach, Michael; Foster, Marc; Greenberg, Alex; Holland, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Patient and physician awareness and acceptance of trials and patient ineligibility are major cancer clinical trial accrual barriers. Yet, trials are typically conceived and designed by small teams of researchers with limited patient input. We hypothesized that through crowdsourcing, the intellectual and creative capacity of a large number of researchers, clinicians, and patients could be harnessed to improve the clinical trial design process. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and utility of using an internet-based crowdsourcing platform to inform the design of a clinical trial exploring an antidiabetic drug, metformin, in prostate cancer. Over a six-week period, crowd-sourced input was collected from 60 physicians/researchers and 42 patients/advocates leading to several major (eg, eligibility) and minor modifications to the clinical trial protocol as originally designed. Crowdsourcing clinical trial design is feasible, adds value to the protocol development process, and may ultimately improve the efficiency of trial conduct. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) endometrial cancer clinical trials planning meeting: taking endometrial cancer trials into the translational era.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creutzberg, C.L.; Kitchener, H.C.; Birrer, M.J.; Landoni, F.; Lu, K.H.; Powell, M.; Aghajanian, C.; Edmondson, R.; Goodfellow, P.J.; Quinn, M.; Salvesen, H.B.; Thomas, G.; Ottevanger, N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The second Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) Endometrial Cancer Clinical Trials Planning Meeting was held on December 1, 2012, and included international multidisciplinary representatives of the 24 member groups. The aims were to review recent advances in molecular pathology of

  4. [Preventive vaccines and immunotherapy clinical trials against cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a public health problem among women worldwide, especially in emerging nations. To improve CC control, new adjuvant therapeutic strategies are required. Advances in immunology, genomics and proteomics have accelerated our understanding of the genetic and cellular basis of many cancer types. CC is a member of virus-related neoplasms and its initiation and promotion is associated with persistent infection of oncogenic human papillomavirus. During viral infection and associated-transforming developing lesions, the HPVs co-express non-structural and structural proteins. These early or late proteins are the antigenic target of the immune response. The intervention to stimulate the humoral or cellular immune anti-HPV response is the objective of the immunoprevention and immunotherapy against CC. Recently in a controlled phase III trial of HPV type 16 vaccine using virus-like particles of L1 capsid of HPV-16, the incidence was reduced of both HPV-16 infection and HPV-16-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Although preliminary results of immunotherapy clinical trials against CC did not modify the clinical status, they occasionally show improvement of lymphocyte response against HPV. A recent immunotherapy trial using dendritic cells pulsed with HPV-18 E7 oncoprotein as adjuvant resulted in temporal remission and improved performance status in a patient with metastatic CC. New and different vaccine preventive trials against HPV are being put into practice and clinically tested. It is hoped that in the future it may be possible to eradicate cervical cancer. The success of immunotherapy anti-HPV clinical trials in CC patients will be determined at a future time. The scientific basis for the development of papillomavirus prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against persistent infection and preinvasive-invasive associated cervical lesions along with the present status of immunopreventive and immunotherapy clinical trials against cervical cancer

  5. A guide to clinical trials for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results to see what works best. Current cancer medicines, tests, and treatments used by most health care providers ... your health. Research costs, such as the study medicine, or extra visits or tests, may need to be covered by the research ...

  6. Black raspberries in cancer clinical trials: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A; Mallery, Susan R; Stoner, Gary D

    Black raspberries (BRB) inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models, including in vivo models of oral, esophageal, colon, breast and skin cancer. Promising preclinical results have led to clinical evaluations in cancer patients or patients at increased risk for cancer development. To summarize clinical investigations targeting cancer or precancerous lesions with BRB and discuss future directions. A thorough literature search was conducted through December 1, 2015 to identify all published studies evaluating BRB in cancer focused clinical trials. Research investigating BRB in clinical settings report positive effects on preneoplastic lesions or cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and colon. BRB treatment resulted in: histologic regression of oral intraepithelial neoplasia associated with improved histologic grade and significantly reduced loss of heterozygosity at tumor suppressor gene loci, modulated genes linked to RNA processing and growth factor recycling; in the colon, BRB inhibited FAP-associated polyp progression, demethylated tumor suppressor genes and improved plasma cytokine profiles; in Barrett's patients, BRB consumption increased tissue levels of GST-pi and decreased 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress. The precise dose, duration and optimum mode of BRB delivery for cancer inhibition remains to be fully elucidated. Common themes across studies support that BRB are anti-proliferative, anti- inflammatory, reduce oxidative stress and restore tumor suppressive activity. Future directions are included in the conclusions section.

  7. Analysis and presentation. Clinical trials on prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, S; Taube, A; Sylvester, R; Oesterling, J E

    1997-04-01

    To present guidelines for the analysis and presentation of clinical trials on prostate cancer. Textbooks in statistics and oncology were searched for information, as were separate articles on the topic. Previously published advice was fused with own experience. Minimum key points are given for the sections: Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion, and Summary. The importance of 1 primary question in any clinical trial is stressed. The value of a detailed presentation of the trial design, the patient population and the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the characterization of the disease, the treatment schedules, and toxicity is underlined. Application of various statistical methods for different endpoints is suggested. Maturity of data, time for publication, and avoidance of publication bias are discussed. Some common pitfalls in the statistical analyses of clinical results are indicated. The impact of prognostic factors, proper staging procedures, and secondary treatments on the interpretation of survival analysis is pointed out. A shift from the (mis-)use of the P value in favor of confidence intervals is strongly encouraged. The use of comparing the survival of responders versus nonresponders is to be abandoned. A few practical hints concerning the presentation are offered. The minimum of data that should be presented in absolute numbers is indicated. Also, the data that should be provided in both graphic and numeric format are exemplified. Examples of essential graphic illustrations are provided. The need for improvements in the design analysis, and presentation of clinical trials is reemphasized. Finally, numerous references are listed. The article is addressed not only to authors and readers of clinical trials, but also to editors of medical journals. The suggested guidelines may be useful in the analysis, presentation, and interpretation of clinical trials on prostate cancer. Moreover, compliance with these guidelines may facilitate comparisons

  8. Decision Aids Can Support Cancer Clinical Trials Decisions: Results of a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Mary C; Kuzemchak, Marie D; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Perkins, Hannah; Liu, Jingxia; Byrne, Margaret M

    2016-12-01

    Cancer patients often do not make informed decisions regarding clinical trial participation. This study evaluated whether a web-based decision aid (DA) could support trial decisions compared with our cancer center's website. Adults diagnosed with cancer in the past 6 months who had not previously participated in a cancer clinical trial were eligible. Participants were randomized to view the DA or our cancer center's website (enhanced usual care [UC]). Controlling for whether participants had heard of cancer clinical trials and educational attainment, multivariable linear regression examined group on knowledge, self-efficacy for finding trial information, decisional conflict (values clarity and uncertainty), intent to participate, decision readiness, and trial perceptions. Two hundred patients (86%) consented between May 2014 and April 2015. One hundred were randomized to each group. Surveys were completed by 87 in the DA group and 90 in the UC group. DA group participants reported clearer values regarding trial participation than UC group participants reported (least squares [LS] mean = 15.8 vs. 32, p trial participation among cancer patients facing this preference-sensitive choice. Although better informing patients before trial participation could improve retention, more work is needed to examine DA impact on enrollment and retention. This paper describes evidence regarding a decision tool to support patients' decisions about trial participation. By improving knowledge, helping patients clarify preferences for participation, and facilitating conversations about trials, decision aids could lead to decisions about participation that better match patients' preferences, promoting patient-centered care and the ethical conduct of clinical research. ©AlphaMed Press.

  9. Current academic clinical trials in ovarian cancer: Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup and US National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Edward L; Birrer, Michael J; Hoskins, William J; Marth, Christian; Petryshyn, Ray; Quinn, Michael; Thomas, Gillian M; Kitchener, Henry C; Aghajanian, Carol; Alberts, David S; Armstrong, Deborah; Brown, Jubilee; Coleman, Robert L; Colombo, Nicoletta; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Michael; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Hunsberger, Sally; Kaye, Stan; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Lee, Susanna; Look, Katherine; Mannel, Robert; McNeish, Iain A; Minasian, Lori; Oza, Amit; Paul, Jim; Poveda, Andres; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Schoenfeldt, Mason; Swart, Ann Marie; von Gruenigen, Vivian; Wenzel, Lari

    2010-10-01

    To review the current status of large phase academic clinical trials for women with ovarian cancer, address cross-cutting issues, and identify promising areas for future collaboration. In May 2009, the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup, which represents 19 Cooperative Groups conducting trials for women with gynecologic cancer, and the US National Cancer Institute convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting. The topics covered included the impact of new developments in cancer biology upon molecular targets and novel agents, pharmacogenomics, advances in imaging, the potential benefit of diet and exercise to reduce the risk of recurrence, academic partnership with industry, statistical considerations for phases 2 and 3 trials, trial end points, and symptom benefit and health-related quality-of-life issues. The clinical trials discussed spanned the spectrum of ovarian cancer from initial diagnosis, staging, and cytoreductive surgery to consolidation chemotherapy, and treatment of recurrent disease. Ongoing and effective collaboration with industry, government, and patients aims to ensure that the most important scientific questions can be answered rapidly. We encourage women with ovarian cancer and their oncologists to consider participation in the academic clinical trials conducted by the member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup.

  10. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:19711497

  11. Partnering around cancer clinical trials (PACCT): study protocol for a randomized trial of a patient and physician communication intervention to increase minority accrual to prostate cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggly, Susan; Hamel, Lauren M; Heath, Elisabeth; Manning, Mark A; Albrecht, Terrance L; Barton, Ellen; Wojda, Mark; Foster, Tanina; Carducci, Michael; Lansey, Dina; Wang, Ting; Abdallah, Rehab; Abrahamian, Narineh; Kim, Seongho; Senft, Nicole; Penner, Louis A

    2017-12-02

    Cancer clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments and represent state-of-the-art cancer treatment, but only a small percentage of patients ever enroll in a trial. Under-enrollment is an even greater problem among minorities, particularly African Americans, representing a racial/ethnic disparity in cancer care. One understudied cause is patient-physician communication, which is often of poor quality during clinical interactions between African-American patients and non-African-American physicians. Partnering Around Cancer Clinical Trials (PACCT) involves a transdisciplinary theoretical model proposing that patient and physician individual attitudes and beliefs and their interpersonal communication during racially discordant clinical interactions influence outcomes related to patients' decisions to participate in a trial. The overall goal of the study is to test a multilevel intervention designed to increase rates at which African-American and White men with prostate cancer make an informed decision to participate in a clinical trial. Data collection will occur at two NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Participants include physicians who treat men with prostate cancer and their African-American and White patients who are potentially eligible for a clinical trial. The study uses two distinct research designs to evaluate the effects of two behavioral interventions, one focused on patients and the other on physicians. The primary goal is to increase the number of patients who decide to enroll in a trial; secondary goals include increasing rates of physician trial offers, improving the quality of patient-physician communication during video recorded clinical interactions in which trials may be discussed, improving patients' understanding of trials offered, and increasing the number of patients who actually enroll. Aims are to 1) determine the independent and combined effects of the two interventions on outcomes; 2) compare the effects of the

  12. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) Endometrial Cancer Clinical Trials Planning Meeting: taking endometrial cancer trials into the translational era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzberg, Carien L; Kitchener, Henry C; Birrer, Michael J; Landoni, Fabio; Lu, Karen H; Powell, Melanie; Aghajanian, Carol; Edmondson, Richard; Goodfellow, Paul J; Quinn, Michael; Salvesen, Helga B; Thomas, Gillian

    2013-10-01

    The second Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) Endometrial Cancer Clinical Trials Planning Meeting was held on December 1, 2012, and included international multidisciplinary representatives of the 24 member groups. The aims were to review recent advances in molecular pathology of endometrial cancer, focusing on molecular-based therapy, and to identify key hypotheses and issues to be addressed through international collaborative clinical trials. Reviews and summaries of current knowledge were presented followed by parallel working group sessions for surgery, adjuvant and systemic therapy, and translational research. Plenary discussions were held to integrate translational and clinical issues, and a final discussion session to agree on key trial concepts. Proposals to take forward on the following trials were agreed: (1) lymphadenectomy to direct adjuvant treatment in women with high-risk endometrial cancer, including a sentinel node substudy; (2) conservative therapy for low-risk endometrial cancers in morbidly obese women with high surgical risks and for fertility-sparing treatment in premenopausal patients; (3) adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage carcinosarcoma. A proposal was made that a GCIG Early Phase Consortium be developed to serve as an international platform for rapid assessment of biomarkers.

  13. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  14. The landscape of precision cancer medicine clinical trials in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Nitin; Stensland, Kristian D; Hendricks, Ryan; Galsky, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Advances in tumor biology and multiplex genomic analysis have ushered in the era of precision cancer medicine. Little is currently known, however, about the landscape of prospective "precision cancer medicine" clinical trials in the U.S. We identified all adult interventional cancer trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov between September 2005 and May 2013. Trials were classified as "precision cancer medicine" if a genomic alteration in a predefined set of 88 genes was required for enrollment. Baseline characteristics were ascertained for each trial. Of the initial 18,797 trials identified, 9094 (48%) were eligible for inclusion: 684 (8%) were classified as precision cancer medicine trials and 8410 (92%) were non-precision cancer medicine trials. Compared with non-precision cancer medicine trials, precision cancer medicine trials were significantly more likely to be phase II [RR 1.19 (1.10-1.29), pmedicine trials required 38 unique genomic alterations for enrollment. The proportion of precision cancer medicine trials compared to the total number of trials increased from 3% in 2006 to 16% in 2013. The proportion of adult cancer clinical trials in the U.S. requiring a genomic alteration for enrollment has increased substantially over the past several years. However, such trials still represent a small minority of studies performed within the cancer clinical trials enterprise and include a small subset of putatively "actionable" alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Model of Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-making Informed by African-American Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Jennifer A; Mbah, Olive; Xu, Jiayun; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Saleem, Haneefa; Sakyi, Kwame; Ford, Jean G

    2015-06-01

    Clinical trials are critical to advancing cancer treatment. Minority populations are underrepresented among trial participants, and there is limited understanding of their decision-making process and key determinants of decision outcomes regarding trial participation. To understand research decision-making among clinical trial-eligible African-American cancer patients at Johns Hopkins, we conducted seven focus groups (n=32) with trial-offered patients ≥ 18 years diagnosed with lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer ≤ 5 years. Three "acceptor" and four "decliner" focus groups were conducted. Questions addressed: attitudes towards clinical trials, reasons for accepting or declining participation, and recommendations to improve minority recruitment and enrollment. Data were transcribed and analyzed using traditional approaches to content and thematic analysis in NVivo 9.0. Data coding resulted in themes that supported model construction. Participant experiences revealed the following themes when describing the decision-making process: Information gathering, Intrapersonal perspectives, and Interpersonal influences. Decision outcomes included the presence or absence of decision regret and satisfaction. From these themes, we generated a Model of Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-making. Our model should be tested in hypothesis-driven research to elucidate factors and processes influencing decision balance and outcomes of trial-related decision-making. The model should also be tested in other disparities populations and for diagnoses other than cancer.

  16. Patient-reported outcomes in cancer cachexia clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelwright, Sally J; Johnson, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures should be used when measuring concepts best known to the patient. To maximize the translation of findings into clinical practice, PRO measures that are most relevant for the patient group, should be used and careful reporting of the PRO results is required. The study reviews the use of PRO assessments in cancer cachexia randomized controlled trials. Most, but not all, recent cancer cachexia randomized controlled trials include PRO measures, and significant informative results have been found. PRO measures are rarely the primary endpoint. Most frequently, health -related quality of life and/or symptoms are assessed. However, instruments which are not cancer cachexia-specific are often used. Reporting of PRO data is generally poor. Patient-centred care cannot be delivered without patient-centred outcome information and the assessment of the efficacy of interventions is partly determined by whether there is a measurable perceived patient benefit. To improve the chance of finding significant and useful results, investigators should use cancer cachexia-specific instruments and report their studies carefully.

  17. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Role of Clinical Trial Participation in Cancer Research: Barriers, Evidence, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Joseph M.; Cook, Elise; Tai, Eric; Bleyer, Archie

    2017-01-01

    OVERVIEW Fewer than 1 in 20 adult cancer patients enroll in cancer clinical trials. But although barriers to trial participation have been the subject of frequent study, the rate of trial participation has not changed substantially over time. Barriers to trial participation are structural, clinical, and attitudinal, and differ according to demographic and socioeconomic factors. In this paper, we characterize the nature of cancer clinical trial barriers, and we consider global and local strategies for reducing barriers. We also consider the specific case of adolescents with cancer, and show that the low rate of trial enrollment in this age group strongly correlates with limited improvements in cancer population outcomes compared to other age groups. Our analysis suggests that a clinical trial system that enrolls patients at higher rates produces treatment advances at a faster rate and corresponding improvements in cancer population outcomes. Viewed in this light, the issue of clinical trial enrollment is foundational, lying at the heart of the cancer clinical trial endeavor. Fewer barriers to trial participation would allow trials to be completed more quickly and would improve the generalizability of trial results. Moreover, increased accrual to trials is important to patients, since trials provide patients the opportunity to receive the newest treatments. In an era of increasing emphasis on a treatment decision-making process that incorporates the patient perspective, the opportunity for patients to choose trial participation for their care is vital. PMID:27249699

  19. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Santos Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  20. Recommendations for Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn; Ballard, Rachel M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Courneya, Kerry S; Daniels, Elvan C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frank, Elizabeth S; Goodwin, Pamela J; Irwin, Melinda L; Levit, Laura A; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Minasian, Lori M; O'Rourke, Mark A; Pierce, John P; Stein, Kevin D; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hudis, Clifford A

    2015-11-20

    Observational evidence has established a relationship between obesity and cancer risk and outcomes. Interventional studies have demonstrated the feasibility and benefits of lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis, and guidelines recommend weight management and regular physical activity in cancer survivors; however, lifestyle interventions are not a routine part of cancer care. The ASCO Research Summit on Advancing Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors sought to identify the knowledge gaps that clinical trials addressing energy balance factors in cancer survivors have not answered and to develop a roadmap for the design and implementation of studies with the potential to generate data that could lead to the evidence-based incorporation of weight management and physical activity programs into standard oncology practice. Recommendations highlight the need for large-scale trials evaluating the impact of energy balance interventions on cancer outcomes, as well as the concurrent conduct of studies focused on dissemination and implementation of interventions in diverse populations of cancer survivors, including answering critical questions about the degree of benefit in key subgroups of survivors. Other considerations include the importance of incorporating economic metrics into energy balance intervention trials, the need to establish intermediate biomarkers, and the importance of integrating traditional and nontraditional funding sources. Establishing lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis as a routine part of cancer care will require a multipronged effort to overcome barriers related to study development, funding, and stakeholder engagement. Given the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in cancer survivors in the United States and elsewhere, energy balance interventions hold the potential to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in millions of patients, and it is essential that we move forward in determining their role in cancer care with the same care and

  1. Cancer Patients’ Fears Related to Clinical Trial Participation: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskan, Alexis; Wells, Kristen J.; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Meade, Cathy D.; Pratt Pozo, Christie L.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Patient-related barriers have hindered cancer patients’ abilities to participate in the decision-making processes to participate in clinical trials. However, little is known about patients’ emotional barrier of fear and how physicians influence this barrier. We conducted 48 in-depth interviews with cancer patients to determine their knowledge and attitudes about participating in clinical trials, transcribed interviews verbatim, and qualitatively analyzed the transcripts using content analysis. For the purpose of this manuscript, we focused on findings related to the role of the emotional barrier of fear in cancer patients’ perceptions of participating in clinical trials. The majority of cancer patients (n=40, 83.3%) discussed fears surrounding clinical trials, particularly as it related to cancer diagnosis, clinical trial participation, and fear of the unknown. In conclusion, providers might consider addressing the role of fear in patients’ considering participating in a clinical trial. PMID:22271582

  2. Prevention of Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Clinical Trials and Future Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Ian; Kristal, Alan; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an excellent target for prevention, to reduce both mortality and the burden of overdetection of potential inconsequential disease whose diagnosis increases cost, morbidity, and anxiety. The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial has demonstrated that finasteride significantly reduces the risk of prostate cancer but only low-grade disease; overall survival is unaffected. In the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) clinical trial, selenium had no effect on prosta...

  3. Vaccine-based clinical trials in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Boezen, H. Marike; Melief, Kees J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    Ovarian cancer vaccines are one of the new treatment strategies under investigation in epithelial ovarian cancer. This article discusses the results of different immunization strategies, points out potential pitfalls in study designs and provides possible solutions for augmentation of clinical

  4. Perspectives on Palliative Care in Cancer Clinical Trials: Diverse Meanings from Multidisciplinary Cancer Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle A; Kent, Erin E; Castro, Kathleen M; Ellis, Erin M; Ferrer, Rebecca A; Falisi, Angela L; Gaysynsky, Anna; Huang, Grace C; Palan, Martha A; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care (PC) is often misunderstood as exclusively pertaining to end-of-life care, which may be consequential for its delivery. There is little research on how PC is operationalized and delivered to cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials. We sought to understand the diverse perspectives of multidisciplinary oncology care providers caring for such patients in a teaching hospital. We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews with 19 key informants, including clinical trial principal investigators, oncology fellows, research nurses, inpatient and outpatient nurses, spiritual care providers, and PC fellows. Questions elicited information about the meaning providers assigned to the term "palliative care," as well as their experiences with the delivery of PC in the clinical trial context. Using grounded theory, a team-based coding method was employed to identify major themes. Four main themes emerged regarding the meaning of PC: (1) the holistic nature of PC, (2) the importance of symptom care, (3) conflict between PC and curative care, and (4) conflation between PC and end-of-life care. Three key themes emerged with regard to the delivery of PC: (1) dynamics among providers, (2) discussing PC with patients and family, and (3) the timing of PC delivery. There was great variability in personal meanings of PC, conflation with hospice/end-of-life care, and appropriateness of PC delivery and timing, particularly within cancer clinical trials. A standard and acceptable model for integrating PC concurrently with treatment in clinical trials is needed.

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner ... the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are testing ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This method helps ensure that any differences observed during a ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers ( ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ... are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ... lung, and blood disorders. By engaging the research community and a broad group of stakeholders and advisory ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ...

  14. Clinical trials focusing on cancer pain educational interventions: core components to include during planning and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Carla R; Biondo, Patricia D; Cummings, Greta; Hagen, Neil A

    2010-08-01

    Robust recommendations on the reporting of methods and results of clinical trials such as therapeutic intervention trials are widely used, such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) recommendation. There has not been agreement on analogous publication standards for educational intervention trials, making interpretation of educational intervention studies difficult. The purpose of this report is to describe common deficiencies in reporting of educational intervention trials for cancer pain control, and to offer suggestions for authors to consider as they plan their studies, and report and publish research findings for educational interventions that use randomized controlled trials and other educational trial methodologies. A systematic review of published knowledge translation intervention trials intended to improve cancer pain was undertaken, of which most were educational interventions. Many educational intervention clinical trials designed to improve management of cancer pain appeared methodologically weak, and their results were more difficult to interpret because of reporting deficiencies. In the course of the review, patterns of deficiencies in reporting of methods and trial results were documented. Deficiencies in reporting were compared with the CONSORT recommendations for reporting clinical trials, and parallel recommendations were drafted for educational intervention trials. Patterns of deficiency in reporting cancer pain educational intervention trials were synthesized into seven domains, generically applicable to a range of study designs. Draft recommendations intended to address these deficiencies were constructed to improve communication of educational research results. Development of a standardized reporting template for clinical trials in cancer pain educational interventions could advance knowledge transfer research and thereby increase effectiveness of national and international cancer control policy designed to support cancer

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about the new approach's risks and benefits. ... Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of ...

  16. Feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials. A case study of breast cancer trials from ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M R; Miotto, R; Gao, J; Weng, C

    2013-01-01

    When standard therapies fail, clinical trials provide experimental treatment opportunities for patients with drug-resistant illnesses or terminal diseases. Clinical Trials can also provide free treatment and education for individuals who otherwise may not have access to such care. To find relevant clinical trials, patients often search online; however, they often encounter a significant barrier due to the large number of trials and in-effective indexing methods for reducing the trial search space. This study explores the feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials and informs designs to automate these processes. We decomposed 80 randomly selected stage III breast cancer clinical trials into a vector of eligibility features, which were organized into a hierarchy. We clustered trials based on their eligibility feature similarities. In a simulated search process, manually selected features were used to generate specific eligibility questions to filter trials iteratively. We extracted 1,437 distinct eligibility features and achieved an inter-rater agreement of 0.73 for feature extraction for 37 frequent features occurring in more than 20 trials. Using all the 1,437 features we stratified the 80 trials into six clusters containing trials recruiting similar patients by patient-characteristic features, five clusters by disease-characteristic features, and two clusters by mixed features. Most of the features were mapped to one or more Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, demonstrating the utility of named entity recognition prior to mapping with the UMLS for automatic feature extraction. It is feasible to develop feature-based indexing and clustering methods for clinical trials to identify trials with similar target populations and to improve trial search efficiency.

  17. Design-phase prediction of potential cancer clinical trial accrual success using a research data mart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Jack W; Balestrucci, Luanne; Chatterjee, Devjani; Zhan, Tingting

    2013-12-01

    Many cancer interventional clinical trials are not completed because the required number of eligible patients are not enrolled. To assess the value of using a research data mart (RDM) during the design of cancer clinical trials as a predictor of potential patient accrual, so that less trials fail to meet enrollment requirements. The eligibility criteria for 90 interventional cancer trials were translated into i2b2 RDM queries and cohort sizes obtained for the 2 years prior to the trial initiation. These RDM cohort numbers were compared to the trial accrual requirements, generating predictions of accrual success. These predictions were then compared to the actual accrual performance to evaluate the ability of this methodology to predict the trials' likelihood of enrolling sufficient patients. Our methodology predicted successful accrual (specificity) with 0.969 (=31/32 trials) accuracy (95% CI 0.908 to 1) and predicted failed accrual (sensitivity) with 0.397 (=23/58 trials) accuracy (95% CI 0.271 to 0.522). The positive predictive value, or precision rate, is 0.958 (=23/24) (95% CI 0.878 to 1). A prediction of 'failed accrual' by this methodology is very reliable, whereas a prediction of accrual success is less so, as causes of accrual failure other than an insufficient eligible patient pool are not considered. The application of this methodology to cancer clinical design would significantly improve cancer clinical research by reducing the costly efforts expended initiating trials that predictably will fail to meet accrual requirements.

  18. University of Washington Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Sylvie Aubin, PhD Fad diets and dietary supplements for prostate cancer. What works and what doesn’t? Mark Moyad, MD Agenda is subject...Higano discussed the immunotherapy trials within the Consortium. In a “Meet the Expert” session, she spoke on the side effects of androgen...Hsp27. This Phase 2 study has been designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of OGX-427 plus low-dose prednisone versus low dose prednisone

  19. Training Needs of Clinical and Research Professionals to Optimize Minority Recruitment and Retention in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Soumya J; Durant, Raegan W; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Cook, Elise D; Fouad, Mona N; Vickers, Selwyn M; Konety, Badrinath R; Rutland, Sarah B; Simoni, Zachary R; Martin, Michelle Y

    2017-08-03

    The study of disparities in minority recruitment to cancer clinical trials has focused primarily on inquiries among minority patient populations. However, clinical trial recruitment is complex and requires a broader appreciation of the multiple factors that influence minority participation. One area that has received little attention is minority recruitment training for professionals who assume various roles in the clinical trial recruitment process. Therefore, we assessed the perspectives of cancer center clinical and research personnel on their training and education needs toward minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. Ninety-one qualitative interviews were conducted at five U.S. cancer centers among four stakeholder groups: cancer center leaders, principal investigators, referring clinicians, and research staff. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analyses focused on response data related to training for minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. Four prominent themes were identified: (1) Research personnel are not currently being trained to focus on recruitment and retention of minority populations; (2) Training for minority recruitment and retention provides for a specific focus on factors influencing minority research participation; (3) Training on cultural awareness may help to bridge cultural gaps between potential minority participants and research professionals; (4) Views differ regarding the importance of research personnel training designed to focus on recruitment of minority populations. There is a lack of systematic training for minority recruitment. Many stakeholders acknowledged the benefits of minority recruitment training and welcomed training that focuses on increasing cultural awareness to increase the participation of minorities in cancer clinical trials.

  20. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buunen, M; Bonjer, H J; Hop, W C J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... participants. Children and Clinical Studies Learn about the importance of children in clinical studies and get answers to common questions. NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Get additional guidance on participating ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ... based on what is known to work in adults. To improve clinical care of children, more studies ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you to explore NIH Clinical Center for patient recruitment and clinical trial information. For more information, please email the NIH Clinical Center Office of Patient Recruitment at cc-prpl@cc.nih.gov or call ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies ... medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a database of clinical studies (past and present) funded or ...

  5. Clinical Application of Targeted Deep Sequencing in Solid-Cancer Patients and Utility for Biomarker-Selected Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Nayoung K D; Park, Joon Oh; Ahn, Soomin; Yun, Jae-Won; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Peter J; Kim, Hee Cheol; Sohn, Tae Sung; Choi, Dong Il; Cho, Jong Ho; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Hong, Sung No; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Jeeyun

    2017-10-01

    Molecular profiling of actionable mutations in refractory cancer patients has the potential to enable "precision medicine," wherein individualized therapies are guided based on genomic profiling. The molecular-screening program was intended to route participants to different candidate drugs in trials based on clinical-sequencing reports. In this screening program, we used a custom target-enrichment panel consisting of cancer-related genes to interrogate single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy number variants, and a subset of gene fusions. From August 2014 through April 2015, 654 patients consented to participate in the program at Samsung Medical Center. Of these patients, 588 passed the quality control process for the 381-gene cancer-panel test, and 418 patients were included in the final analysis as being eligible for any anticancer treatment (127 gastric cancer, 122 colorectal cancer, 62 pancreatic/biliary tract cancer, 67 sarcoma/other cancer, and 40 genitourinary cancer patients). Of the 418 patients, 55 (12%) harbored a biomarker that guided them to a biomarker-selected clinical trial, and 184 (44%) patients harbored at least one genomic alteration that was potentially targetable. This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase. This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and ... trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the benefits of lowering ...

  7. Venous Thrombosis and Cancer: from Mouse Models to Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, Y.; Geddings, J. E.; Ay, C.; Mackman, N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients have a ~4 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes our current knowledge of VTE and cancer from mouse models to clinical studies. Notably, risk of VTE varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of VTE than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance VTE. For example, increased levels of circulating tumor-derived, tissue factor-positive microvesicles may trigger VTE. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, tumor-derived IL-6 and hepatic thrombopoietin has been linked to increased platelet production and thrombosis. In addition, mouse models of mammary and lung cancer showed that tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor causes neutrophilia and activation of neutrophils. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that enhance thrombosis. Cell-free DNA in the blood derived from cancer cells, NETs and treatment with cytotoxic drugs can activate the clotting cascade. These studies suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for VTE in patients with different types of cancer. Preventing and treating VTE in cancer patients is challenging; the current recommendations are to use low molecular weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent VTE in cancer patients. PMID:25988873

  8. Venous thrombosis and cancer: from mouse models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, Y; Geddings, J E; Ay, C; Mackman, N

    2015-08-01

    Cancer patients have a ~4 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes our current knowledge of VTE and cancer, from mouse models to clinical studies. Notably, the risk of VTE varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of VTE than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance VTE. For example, increased levels of circulating tumor-derived, tissue factor-positive microvesicles may trigger VTE. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, tumor-derived IL-6 and hepatic thrombopoietin have been linked to increased platelet production and thrombosis. In addition, mouse models of mammary and lung cancer showed that tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor causes neutrophilia and activation of neutrophils. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that enhance thrombosis. Cell-free DNA in the blood derived from cancer cells, NETs and treatment with cytotoxic drugs can activate the clotting cascade. These studies suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for VTE in patients with different types of cancer. Preventing and treating VTE in cancer patients is challenging; the current recommendations are to use low-molecular-weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent VTE in cancer patients. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Trends in the application of dynamic allocation methods in multi-arm cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Gregory R; Tang, Patricia A; Welch, Stephen A; Chen, Eric X

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic allocation (DA) methods which attempt to balance baseline prognostic factors between treatment arms, can be used in multi-arm clinical trials to sequentially allocate patients to treatment. Although some experts express concern regarding the validity of inference from trials using DA, others believe DA methods produce more credible results. A review of published multi-arm cancer clinical trials was conducted to explore the frequency of DA use in oncology. Multi-arm phase III clinical trials of at least 100 patients per arm, published in 13 major oncology journals from 1995-2005 were manually reviewed. Information about reported use of DA methods, or randomization via random permuted blocks (PB), was extracted along with trial characteristics. Of 476 published clinical trials, 112 (23.5%) reported using some form of DA method, while 103 (21.6%) reported using PB methods. Most trials (403 or 84.7%) reported stratifying on at least one baseline factor. The mean number of stratification factors was 2.70 per trial, and 78.6% of DA trials reported 3 or more stratification factors compared with 30.2% of non-DA trials (p complete details of the allocation method used, thus it is possible some manuscripts reported incorrect allocation methods. Journals were selected which were assumed to publish most large, multi-arm clinical trials in cancer from 1995-2005, however, some trials were likely reported in journals other than what was reviewed. DA methods are frequently used in multi-arm cancer clinical trials. The use of DA appears to becoming more common over time and are used more frequently when an academic cooperative group is involved. No relationship between industry funded trials or geographic region and allocation method was observed. Clinical Trials 2010; 7: 227-234. http://ctj.sagepub.com.

  10. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed...... of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. CONCLUSIONS: The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language...

  11. Choosing relevant endpoints for older breast cancer patients in clinical trials: an overview of all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Glas, N. A.; Hamaker, M. E.; Kiderlen, M.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Mooijaart, S. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; van Munster, B. C.; Portielje, J. E. A.; Liefers, G. J.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing ageing of western societies, the proportion of older breast cancer patients will increase. For several years, clinicians and researchers in geriatric oncology have urged for new clinical trials that address patient-related endpoints such as functional decline after treatment of

  12. Chinese herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Xiang; Wang, Li-Qiong; Grant, Suzanne J; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of cancer-related fatigue. We systematically searched seven electronic databases and two trial registries for randomized clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included trials using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were synthesized using RevMan 5.2 software. A total of 10 trials involving 751 participants with cancer-related fatigue were identified and the methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. Chinese herbal medicine used alone or in combination with chemotherapy or supportive care showed significant relief in cancer-related fatigue compared to placebo, chemotherapy or supportive care based on single trials. Chinese herbal medicine plus chemotherapy or supportive care was superior to chemotherapy or supportive care in improving quality of life. Data from one trial demonstrated Chinese herbal medicine exerted a greater beneficial effect on relieving anxiety but no difference in alleviating depression. Seven trials reported adverse events and no severe adverse effects were found in Chinese herbal medicine groups. The findings from limited number of trials suggest that Chinese herbal medicine seems to be effective and safe in the treatment of cancer-related fatigue. However, the current evidence is insufficient to draw a confirmative conclusion due to the poor methodological quality of included trials. Thus, conducting rigorously designed trials on potential Chinese herbal medicine is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adverse event reporting in cancer clinical trial publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Latif, Asma; McBride, Russell B; Stensland, Kristian D; Wisnivesky, Juan; Haines, Lindsay; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-01-10

    Reporting adverse events is a critical element of a clinical trial publication. In 2003, the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group generated recommendations regarding the appropriate reporting of adverse events. The degree to which these recommendations are followed in oncology publications has not been comprehensively evaluated. A review of citations from PubMed, Medline, and Embase published between Jan 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011, identified eligible randomized, controlled phase III trials in metastatic solid malignancies. Publications were assessed for 14 adverse event-reporting elements derived from the CONSORT harms extension statement; a completeness score (range, 0 to 14) was calculated by adding the number of elements reported. Linear regression analysis identified which publication characteristics associated with reporting completeness. A total of 175 publications, with data for 96,125 patients, were included in the analysis. The median completeness score was eight (range, three to 12). Most publications (96%) reported only adverse events occurring above a threshold rate or severity, 37% did not specify the criteria used to select which adverse events were reported, and 88% grouped together adverse events of varying severity. Regression analysis revealed that trials without a stated funding source and with an earlier year of publication had significantly lower completeness scores. Reporting of adverse events in oncology publications of randomized trials is suboptimal and characterized by substantial selectivity and heterogeneity. The development of oncology-specific standards for adverse event reporting should be established to ensure consistency and provide critical information required for medical decision-making.

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and ... drugs, and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking ... people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, ...

  16. Expanding Local Cancer Clinical Trial Options: Analysis of the Economic Impact of the Midwest Cancer Alliance in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, J Atlee; Gurley-Calvez, Tami; Krebill, Hope; Lai, Sue Min; Christiadi; Doolittle, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Patients benefit from receiving cancer treatment closer to home when possible and at high-volume regional centers when specialized care is required. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the economic impact of retaining more patients in-state for cancer clinical trials and care, which might offset some of the costs of establishing broader cancer trial and treatment networks. Kansas Cancer Registry data were used to estimate the number of patients retained in-state for cancer care following the expansion of local cancer clinical trial options through the Midwest Cancer Alliance based at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The 2014 economic impact of this enhanced local clinical trial network was estimated in four parts: Medical spending was estimated on the basis of National Cancer Institute cost-of-care estimates. Household travel cost savings were estimated as the difference between in-state and out-of-state travel costs. Trial-related grant income was calculated from administrative records. Indirect and induced economic benefits to the state were estimated using an economic impact model. The authors estimated that the enhanced local cancer clinical trial network resulted in approximately $6.9 million in additional economic activity in the state in 2014, or $362,000 per patient retained in-state. This estimate includes $3.6 million in direct spending and $3.3 million in indirect economic activity. The enhanced trial network also resulted in 45 additional jobs. Retaining patients in-state for cancer care and clinical trial participation allows patients to remain closer to home for care and enhances the state economy.

  17. A pilot study on the quality of data management in a cancer clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, E; van der Velden, J W; Siers, A; Hamersma, E A

    1987-06-01

    Twelve institutional data managers were asked to independently code the data from a patient chart of one patient in an ovarian cancer trial. They abstracted data from the medical record and filled out three types of trial forms (on-study, chemotherapy, and summary forms). The analysis of the processed data revealed that the median rate of errors was 13% for the 12 data managers. The error rate differed among the types of trial forms. The factors causing these errors were mistakes in interpretation, documentation, and coding. The level of experience of the data managers proved to be an important factor. It became clear that the documentation in the medical record was inadequate. We conclude that data managers as well as physicians involved in cancer clinical trials need specific training and that the quality of data management in cancer clinical trials is an important issue for further investigation.

  18. Breast cancer survivors willingness to participate in an acupuncture clinical trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Mackenzie, Elizabeth R; Lam, Regina; Casarett, David; Seluzicki, Christina M; Barg, Frances K; Mao, Jun J

    2014-05-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modality that shows promise as a component of supportive breast cancer care. Lack of robust recruitment for clinical trial entry has limited the evidence base for acupuncture as a treatment modality among breast cancer survivors. The objective of this study is to identify key decision-making factors among breast cancer survivors considering entry into an acupuncture clinical trial for treatment of symptoms. Semistructured interviews were conducted among African-American (n=12) and Caucasian (n=13) breast cancer survivors. Verbatim transcripts were made and analyzed by two or more independent coders using NVivo software. Major recurring themes were identified and a theoretical framework developed. Six themes emerged reflecting key attributes of the decision to enter a clinical trial: (1) symptom appraisal, (2) practical barriers (e.g., distance and travel), (3) beliefs about the interventions (e.g., fear of needles and dislike of medications), (4) comfort with elements of clinical trial design (e.g., randomization, the nature of the control intervention, and blinding), (5) trust, and (6) altruism. African-American and Caucasian women weighed similar attributes but differed in the information sources sought regarding clinical trial entry and in concerns regarding the use of a placebo in a clinical trial. Our findings contribute to the development of a theoretical model of decision making for breast cancer survivors considering participation in a CAM clinical trial. Insights regarding the decision making process can inform interventions to support informed decision making and robust recruitment to CAM trials among cancer survivors.

  19. Current status of clinical trials in head and neck cancer 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jeffrey C; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; O'Sullivan, Brian; Cohen, Ezra W; Mann, Bhupinder S; Adelstein, David J

    2015-03-01

    The last few years have seen significant increase in the number of available clinical trials in head and neck cancer. It has been difficult to stay abreast of these efforts because multiple cooperative groups and institutions are engaged in their recruitment. This review presents the state of the art of available clinical trials organized around major research themes. Published literature, published cooperative group monographs, expert review. Initial themes in head and neck cancer clinical trial development were first identified along with examples. Opinions from an international panel of multidisciplinary experts were then solicited. Current major themes of head and neck clinical trials centered on 5 major themes: (1) recognition of human papillomavirus oropharynx cancer and optimal treatment strategies, (2) defining the role of transoral surgery in head and neck cancer treatment, (3) improving postoperative adjuvant treatment, (4) investigation of rare malignancies, and (5) the importance of biomarker-driven, innovative, and targeted therapy investigation. A number of exciting clinical trials are currently in development or accrual with the potential for tremendous impact and improvement of the treatment of head and neck cancer. Awareness by practicing otolaryngologists and trainees of these current themes will be essential for study accrual, success, and improvement in the care of head and neck cancer. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Revisiting a longstanding clinical trial exclusion criterion: impact of prior cancer in early-stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Laccetti, Andrew L; Xuan, Lei; Halm, Ethan A; Gerber, David E

    2017-03-14

    Early-stage lung cancer represents a key focus of numerous multicenter clinical trials, but common exclusion criteria such as a prior cancer diagnosis may limit enrollment. We examined the prevalence and prognostic impact of a prior cancer diagnosis among patients with early-stage lung cancer. We identified patients>65 years of age with early-stage lung cancer diagnosed 1996-2009 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Prior cancers were characterized by type, stage, and timing with respect to the lung cancer diagnosis. All-cause and lung cancer specific-survival rates were compared between patients with and without prior cancer using Cox regression analyses and propensity scores. Among 42,910 patients with early-stage lung cancer, one-fifth (21%) had a prior cancer. The most common prior cancers were prostate (21%), breast (18%), gastrointestinal (17%), and other genitourinary (15%). Most prior cancers were localized, and 61% were diagnosed within 5 years of the lung cancer diagnosis. There was no difference in all-cause survival between patients with and without prior cancer (hazard ratio [HR] 1.01; P=0.52). Lung cancer specific survival was improved among patients with prior cancer (HR 0.79; Pcancer history may exclude a substantial proportion of patients with early-stage lung cancer from enrollment in clinical trials. Without adverse effect on clinical outcomes, inclusion of patients age >65 years with prior cancer in clinical trials should be considered to improve study accrual, completion rates, and generalizability.

  1. Identification of accrual barriers onto breast cancer prevention clinical trials: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, Robert H; Kennedy, Michael H; Kulesher, Robert R; Lemon, Stephenie C; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing a woman's decision to participate in a breast cancer prevention clinical trial. Nine healthcare organizations in Massachusetts cooperated in the present project. The authors performed a case-control study to compare responses between the study group (Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene [STAR] trial eligible, but not enrolled) and the control group (STAR trial participants) on 12 factors previously identified as barriers to accrual for clinical trials. Eight hypotheses were tested using multiple logistic regression to estimate the strength of the association for each factor on the dependent variable (study participation). The study samples were similar to the general population of eligible breast cancer prevention clinical trial subjects in the counties where the participating organizations were located, the state of Massachusetts, and nationally published STAR trial data. Results of a mailed questionnaire showed that when adjusting for subject demographics, and in the presence of other questions, 4 factors significantly influenced a woman's decision to enroll onto a breast cancer prevention clinical trial more than other eligible subjects: 1) clinician expertise and qualifications (P=.012; odds ratio [OR], 4.903; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-17.04); 2) personal desire to participate (P=.033; OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.10-9.06); 3) perceived value of the trial (P=.020; OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.18-7.21); and 4) level of trial inconvenience (P=.002; OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.44). Addressing these issues in the relationship between patients and clinicians should improve accrual to breast cancer prevention clinical trials. Copyright (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  2. The Cervix Cancer Research Network: Increasing Access to Cancer Clinical Trials in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Suneja, Gita; Bacon, Monica; Small, William; Sang Y Ryu; Kitchener, Henry C; Gaffney, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN), a su...

  3. The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN): Increasing access to cancer clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Gita eSuneja; Monica eBacon; William eSmall; Sang Y Ryu; Kitchener, Henry C; Gaffney, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN), a sub...

  4. The cervix cancer research network: increasing access to cancer clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Gita; Bacon, Monica; Small, William; Ryu, Sang Y; Kitchener, Henry C; Gaffney, David K

    2015-01-01

    The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN), a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials. To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE. The CCRN has successfully enrolled eight sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients.

  5. The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN: Increasing access to cancer clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita eSuneja

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN, a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials.Results: To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE.Discussion: The CCRN has successfully enrolled 10 sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients.

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... The results from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT was already in common ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results from other relevant studies. These results may ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ... minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general ...

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ... the new approach. You also will have the support of a team of health care providers, who ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical trials that are testing new medicines or medical devices. The FDA reviews applications for new medicines ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ... taking part in a clinical trial. Your treatment team also may ask you to do other tasks. ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees all research ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ... in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about ...

  19. Patient internet use surrounding cancer clinical trials: clinician perceptions and responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian; Schramm, Sarah; Hillis, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Clinician perceptions of patient internet use related to clinical trials are not well documented. This exploratory study surveyed how cancer care providers at one NCI-designated cancer center viewed patient internet use surrounding cancer trials, including whether it affected patient decision making regarding trial enrollment. The sample included 20 oncologists (59%) and 14 (41%) nurses (n=34). Most clinicians (n=26; 76%) perceived the internet as having an effect on whether or not patients decided to enroll in a cancer trial. Two thirds (n=17; 65%) felt that this effect was positive, including in terms of enhancing patient knowledge of, access to, and enrollment in trials. Clinicians were asked if they ever discussed with their patients the topic of going online to find out more about cancer trials. Over half (n=18; 58%) who responded (n=31) to this item said yes; the rest (n=13; 42%) said no. The majority (n=10; 77%) in the "no" category were among those who reported that the internet had an effect on patient decision making. These data provisionally suggest that clinicians may see the internet as having mostly a positive effect on patient decision making about cancer trials, but that their communication efforts with patients do not always logically follow from this perception. Provider-patient discussion about internet use may be an opportunity for clinicians to contribute to improved patient knowledge of and enrollment in cancer trials. More research is needed to confirm and explain the gap between clinician perception and communication regarding trial-related internet use by cancer patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics of clinical trials to support approval of orphan vs nonorphan drugs for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Myers, Jessica A; Avorn, Jerry

    2011-06-08

    The Orphan Drug Act incentivizes medication development for rare diseases, offering substantial financial benefits to the manufacturer. Orphan products constitute most new drug approvals in oncology, but safety and efficacy questions have emerged about some of these agents. To define characteristics of orphan cancer drugs and their pivotal clinical trials and to compare these with nonorphan drugs. We identified all new orphan and nonorphan drugs approved between 2004 and 2010 to treat cancer. We then collected data on key development variables from publicly available information on the US Food and Drug Administration's Web site and in the Code of Federal Regulations. We assessed clinical testing dates, approved indications, and regulatory characteristics (regular vs accelerated review, advisory committee review, postmarketing commitments). We then compared design features (randomization, blinding, primary end point) of pivotal trials supporting approval of orphan and nonorphan drugs and rates of adverse safety outcomes (deaths not attributed to disease progression, serious adverse events, dropouts) in pivotal trials. Fifteen orphan and 12 nonorphan drugs were approved between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2010. Pivotal trials of orphan drugs had smaller participant numbers (median, 96 [interquartile range {IQR}, 66-152] vs 290 [IQR, 185-394] patients exposed to the drug; P Orphan and nonorphan pivotal trials varied in their blinding (P = .04), with orphan trials less likely to be double-blind (4% vs 33%). Primary study outcomes also varied (P = .04), with orphan trials more likely to assess disease response (68% vs 27%) rather than overall survival (8% vs 27%). More treated patients had serious adverse events in trials of orphan drugs vs trials of nonorphan drugs (48% vs 36%; odds ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.92; P = .04). Compared with pivotal trials used to approve nonorphan cancer drugs, pivotal trials for recently approved orphan drugs for

  1. Issues and challenges with integrating patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials supported by the National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Bryan, Charlene J; Aaronson, Neil; Blackmore, C Craig; Brundage, Michael; Cella, David; Ganz, Patricia A; Gotay, Carolyn; Hinds, Pamela S; Kornblith, Alice B; Movsas, Benjamin; Sloan, Jeff; Wenzel, Lari; Whalen, Giles

    2007-11-10

    The objective of this report is to provide a historical overview of and the issues and challenges inherent in the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into multinational cancer clinical trials in the cancer cooperative groups. An online survey of 12 cancer cooperative groups from the United States, Canada, and Europe was conducted between June and August of 2006. Each of the cooperative groups designated one respondent, who was a member of one of the PRO committees within the cooperative group. There was a 100% response rate, and all of the cancer clinical trial cooperative groups reported conducting PRO research. PRO research has been conducted in the cancer cooperative groups for an average of 15 years (range, 6 to 30 years), and all groups had multidisciplinary committees focused on the design of PRO end points and the choice of appropriate PRO measures for cancer clinical trials. The cooperative groups reported that 5% to 50% of cancer treatment trials and an estimated 50% to 75% of cancer control trials contained PRO primary and secondary end points. There was considerable heterogeneity among the cooperative groups with respect to the formal and informal policies and procedures or cooperative group culture towards PROs, investigator training/mentorship, and resource availability for the measurement and conduct of PRO research within the individual cooperatives. The challenges faced by the cooperative groups to the incorporation of PROs into cancer clinical trials are varied. Some common opportunities for improvement include the adoption of standardized training/mentorship mechanisms for investigators for the conduct of PRO assessments and data collection and the development of minimal criteria for PRO measure acceptability. A positive cultural shift has occurred in most of the cooperative groups related to the incorporation of PROs in clinical trials; however, financial and other resource barriers remain and need to be addressed.

  2. Issues and Challenges With Integrating Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Trials Supported by the National Cancer Institute–Sponsored Clinical Trials Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Bryan, Charlene J.; Aaronson, Neil; Blackmore, C. Craig; Brundage, Michael; Cella, David; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gotay, Carolyn; Hinds, Pamela S.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Movsas, Benjamin; Sloan, Jeff; Wenzel, Lari; Whalen, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this report is to provide a historical overview of and the issues and challenges inherent in the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into multinational cancer clinical trials in the cancer cooperative groups. Methods An online survey of 12 cancer cooperative groups from the United States, Canada, and Europe was conducted between June and August of 2006. Each of the cooperative groups designated one respondent, who was a member of one of the PRO committees within the cooperative group. Results There was a 100% response rate, and all of the cancer clinical trial cooperative groups reported conducting PRO research. PRO research has been conducted in the cancer cooperative groups for an average of 15 years (range, 6 to 30 years), and all groups had multidisciplinary committees focused on the design of PRO end points and the choice of appropriate PRO measures for cancer clinical trials. The cooperative groups reported that 5% to 50% of cancer treatment trials and an estimated 50% to 75% of cancer control trials contained PRO primary and secondary end points. There was considerable heterogeneity among the cooperative groups with respect to the formal and informal policies and procedures or cooperative group culture towards PROs, investigator training/mentorship, and resource availability for the measurement and conduct of PRO research within the individual cooperatives. Conclusion The challenges faced by the cooperative groups to the incorporation of PROs into cancer clinical trials are varied. Some common opportunities for improvement include the adoption of standardized training/mentorship mechanisms for investigators for the conduct of PRO assessments and data collection and the development of minimal criteria for PRO measure acceptability. A positive cultural shift has occurred in most of the cooperative groups related to the incorporation of PROs in clinical trials; however, financial and other resource barriers remain and need

  3. Landscape of early clinical trials for childhood and adolescence cancer in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, F; Gallego, S; Cañete, A; Mora, J; Diaz de Heredia, C; Cruz, O; Fernández, J M; Rives, S; Madero, L; Castel, V; Cela, M E; Ramírez, G; Sábado, C; Acha, T; Astigarraga, I; Sastre, A; Muñoz, A; Guibelalde, M; Moreno, L

    2016-07-01

    Despite numerous advances, survival remains dismal for children and adolescents with poor prognosis cancers or those who relapse or are refractory to first line treatment. There is, therefore, a major unmet need for new drugs. Recent advances in the knowledge of molecular tumor biology open the door to more adapted therapies according to individual alterations. Promising results in the adult anticancer drug development have not yet been translated into clinical practice. We report the activity in early pediatric oncology trials in Spain. All members of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Hematology Oncology (SEHOP) were contacted to obtain information about early trials open in each center. 22 phase I and II trials were open as of May 2015: 15 for solid tumors (68 %) and 7 for hematological malignancies (32 %). Fourteen (64 %) were industry sponsored. Since 2010, four centers have joined the Innovative Therapies For Children With Cancer, an international consortium whose aim is developing novel therapies for pediatric cancers. A substantial number of studies have opened in these 5 years, improving the portfolio of trials for children. Results of recently closed trials show the contribution of Spanish investigators, the introduction of molecularly targeted agents and their benefits. Clinical trials are the way to evaluate new drugs, avoiding the use of off-label drugs that carry significant risks. The Spanish pediatric oncology community through the SEHOP is committed to develop and participate in collaborative academic trials, to favor the advancement and optimization of existing therapies in pediatric cancer.

  4. Clinical Trials - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clínicos: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Clinical Trials - English ... PDF American Cancer Society Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language ...

  5. Nutritional Science Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Current status of clinical trials assessing oncolytic virus therapy for urological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Homma, Yukio; Todo, Tomoki

    2017-05-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy has recently been recognized as a promising new option for cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in cancer cells, thus killing them without harming normal cells. Notably, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly called OncoVEX(GM)(-)(CSF) ), an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable melanoma in October 2015, and was subsequently approved in Europe and Australia in 2016. The efficacies of many types of oncolytic viruses against urological cancers have been investigated in preclinical studies during the past decade, and some have already been tested in clinical trials. For example, a phase I trial of the third-generation oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type 1, G47Δ, in patients with prostate cancer was completed in 2016. We summarize the current status of clinical trials of oncolytic virus therapy in patients with the three major urological cancers: prostate, bladder and renal cell cancers. In addition to Herpes simplex virus type 1, adenoviruses, reoviruses, vaccinia virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus have also been used as parental viruses in these trials. We believe that oncolytic virus therapy is likely to become an important and major treatment option for urological cancers in the near future. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. The Impacts of Inclusion in Clinical Trials on Outcomes among Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a devastating and incurable disease. Over the past decade, the implementation of clinical trials both with and without molecular targeted therapeutics has impacted the daily clinical treatment of patients with MBC. In this study, we determine whether including MBC patients in clinical trials affects clinical outcomes.We retrospectively reviewed data for a total of 863 patients diagnosed with initial or recurrent (after receiving adjuvant systemic treatments following surgery metastatic disease between January 2000 and December 2013. Data were obtained from the breast cancer database of Samsung Medical Center.Among the 806 patients selected for inclusion, 188 (23% had participated in clinical trials. A total of 185 clinical trials were conducted from 2000 to 2014. When compared with earlier periods (n = 10 for 2000-2004, clinical trial enrollment significantly increased over time (n = 103 for 2005-2009, P = 0.024; n = 110 for 2010-2014, P = 0.046. Multivariate analyses revealed that biologic subtype, distant recurrence free interval (DRFI, and clinical trial enrollment were independent predictors of overall survival. Patients who participated in clinical trials showed improved survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.59-0.95, which was associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of death. However, subgroup analysis showed that this improved survival benefit was not maintained in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC.Although not conclusive, we could speculate that there were differences in the use of newer agents or regimens over time, and these differences appear to be associated with improved survival.

  8. Personalised and Precision Medicine in Cancer Clinical Trials: Panacea for Progress or Pandora's Box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Mark; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials have been one of the key foundations for significant advances in oncology. However, there is a clear recognition within the academic, care delivery and pharmaceutical/biotech communities that our current model of clinical trial discovery and development is no longer fit for purpose. Delivering transformative cancer care should increasingly be our mantra, rather than maintaining the status quo of, at best, the often miniscule incremental benefits that are observed with many current clinical trials. As we enter the era of precision medicine for personalised cancer care (precision and personalised medicine), it is important that we capture and utilise our greater understanding of the biology of disease to drive innovative approaches in clinical trial design and implementation that can lead to a step change in cancer care delivery. A number of advances have been practice changing (e.g. imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukaemia, Herceptin in erb-B2-positive breast cancer), and increasingly we are seeing the promise of a number of newer approaches, particularly in diseases like lung cancer and melanoma. Targeting immune checkpoints has recently yielded some highly promising results. New algorithms that maximise the effectiveness of clinical trials, through for example a multi-stage, multi-arm type design are increasingly gaining traction. However, our enthusiasm for the undoubted advances that have been achieved are being tempered by a realisation that these new approaches may have significant cost implications. This article will address these competing issues, mainly from a European perspective, highlight the problems and challenges to healthcare systems and suggest potential solutions that will ensure that the cost/value rubicon is addressed in a way that allows stakeholders to work together to deliver optimal cost-effective cancer care, the benefits of which can be transferred directly to our patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Parallel multicentre randomised trial of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering participation in phase 3 cancer treatment trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Martin H N; Jefford, Michael; Martin, Andrew; Olver, Ian; Thompson, John F; Brown, Richard F; Butow, Phyllis N

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of a clinical trial question prompt list in patients considering enrolment in cancer treatment trials. Tertiary cancer referral hospitals in three state capital cities in Australia. 88 patients with cancer attending three cancer centres in Australia, who were considering enrolment in phase 3 treatment trials, were invited to enrol in an unblinded randomised trial of provision of a clinical trial question prompt list (QPL) before consenting to enrol in the treatment trial. We developed and pilot tested a targeted QPL for patients with cancer considering clinical trial participation (the clinical trial QPL). Consenting patients were randomised to receive the clinical trial QPL or not before further discussion with their oncologist and/or trial nurse about the treatment trial. Questionnaires were completed at baseline and within 3 weeks of deciding on treatment trial participation. scores on the Quality of Informed Consent questionnaire (QuIC). 88 patients of 130 sought for the study were enrolled (43 males), and 45 received the clinical trial QPL. 49% of trials were chemotherapy interventions for patients with advanced disease, 35% and 16% were surgical adjuvant and radiation adjuvant trials respectively. 70 patients completed all relevant questionnaires. 28 of 43 patients in the control arm compared with 39 of 45 patients receiving the clinical trial QPL completed the QuIC (p=0.0124). There were no significant differences in the QuIC scores between the randomised groups (QuIC part A p=0.08 and QuIC part B p=0.92). There were no differences in patient satisfaction with decisions or in anxiety levels between the randomised groups. Use of a question prompt list did not significantly change the QuIC scores in this randomised trial. ANZCTR 12606000214538 prospectively registered 31/5/2006. Results, ACTRN12606000214538. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  10. Anti-angiogenic drugs currently in Phase II clinical trials for gynecological cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xia-wei; Zhang, Zhi-rong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2013-09-01

    Numerous female patients suffer from gynecological cancers every year. When it comes to recurrent or chemoresistant cancers, there are limited treatment options. For decades, much enthusiasm has been shown for novel therapeutic strategies for cancers, and anti-angiogenesis agents appear to be a potential option. Since several promising angiogenesis inhibitors for certain cancers have been approved by Food and Drug Administration, more and more anti-angiogenic drugs are put into clinical trials. In this review, the anti-angiogenic agents in Phase II clinical trials for gynecological cancer treatment are highlighted. This review mainly focuses on 5-year reports on angiogenesis inhibitors concerning ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, uterine leiomysarcoma and endometrial cancer. Inhibitors reviewed in this paper include bevacizumab, volociximab, aflibercept, temsirolimus, enzastaurin, trebananib, sunitinib, imatinib, pazopanib, sorafenib and nintedanib. These anti-angiogenic drugs while used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, presented mixed results in treating gynecological cancers. The real challenge is how to take best advantage of the anti-angiogenesis hypothesis for therapeutic benefit. Much remains to be done before these molecules work efficaciously in treating gynecological cancer.

  11. Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials and Drug Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing...manuscript resulting from the work described in Aim 2 has been published in the journal European Urology, titled: “Effects of Cabozantinib on Pain...resulting from work described in Aim 3 has been published by the journal Cancer, titled: “Pain Palliation Measurement in Cancer Clinical Trials: The

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... educational programs and materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of Health ( ... III clinical trial is required to have a Data and Safety Monitoring Board ... of a group of research and study topic experts. The NIH also requires ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether surgery or other medical treatments ... board consists of a group of research and study topic experts. The NIH also ... alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH ...

  15. Estimating breast cancer-specific and other-cause mortality in clinical trial and population-based cancer registry cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, James J; Huang, Lan; Ries, Lynn; Reichman, Marsha; Mariotto, Angela; Feuer, Eric

    2009-11-15

    To compute net cancer-specific survival rates using population data sources (eg, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] Program), 2 approaches primarily are used: relative survival (observed survival adjusted for life expectancy) and cause-specific survival based on death certificates. The authors of this report evaluated the performance of these estimates relative to a third approach based on detailed clinical follow-up history. By using data from Cancer Cooperative Group clinical trials in breast cancer, the authors estimated 1) relative survival, 2) breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) determined from death certificates, and 3) BCSS obtained by attributing cause according to clinical events after diagnosis, which, for this analysis was considered the benchmark "true" estimate. Noncancer life expectancy also was compared between trial participants, SEER registry patients, and the general population. Among trial patients, relative survival overestimated true BCSS in patients with lymph node-negative breast cancer; whereas, in patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer, the 2 estimates were similar. For higher risk patients (younger age, larger tumors), relative survival accurately estimated true BCSS. In lower risk patients, death certificate BCSS was more accurate than relative survival. Noncancer life expectancy was more favorable among trial participants than in the general population and among SEER patients. Tumor size at diagnosis, which is a potential surrogate for screening use, partially accounted for this difference. In the clinical trials, relative survival accurately estimated BCSS in patients who had higher risk disease despite more favorable other-cause mortality than the population at large. In patients with lower risk disease, the estimate using death certificate information was more accurate. For SEER data and other data sources where detailed postdiagnosis clinical history was unavailable, death

  16. Linkage of clinical trial and administrative data: a survey of cancer patient preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, A E; Leung, Y W; Pater, J L; Brown, M C; Bell, E; Howell, D; Kassam, Z; Willing, S; Tian, C; Liu, G

    2017-06-01

    Personal health information, including diagnoses and hospital admissions, is routinely collected in administrative databases. Patients enrolling on clinical trials consent to separate collection and storage of their personal health information. We evaluated patient preferences for linking long-term data from administrative databases with clinical trials. Adults with cancer attending outpatient clinics at 3 Ontario hospitals were surveyed about their willingness, when faced with the hypothetical scenario of participating in a clinical trial, to provide potentially identifying information such as initials and date of birth to facilitate long-term research access to normally deidentified publicly collected databases. Of 569 patients surveyed, 335 (59%) were women, 452 (79%) were white, 385 (68%) had a post-secondary education, and 386 (68%) had never participated in a clinical trial. Median age in the group was 59 years. Most participants (93%, cohort 1) would allow long-term access to their information and allow personal information to be used to match clinical trial with administrative data. At the time of clinical trial closure, two thirds of participants (68%, cohort 2) preferred to make additional clinical information available through linkage with administrative databases, and 8 (9%) preferred to have no further information made available to researchers. No significant differences were found in the subset of patients who were part of a clinical trial and those who had never participated (p = 0.65). Almost all patients would allow a clinical trial research team to access their confidential information, providing a more comprehensive assessment of an intervention's long-term risks and benefits.

  17. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer: the first wave of translational clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R; Kratzke, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    The field of oncolytic virus therapy, the use of live, replicating viruses for the treatment of cancer, has expanded rapidly over the past decade. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity against a number of different cancer types. Several agents have entered clinical trials and promising results have led to late stage clinical development for some viruses. The early clinical trials have demonstrated that oncolytic viruses by themselves have potential to result in tumor regression. Engineering of viruses to express novel genes have also led to the use of these vectors as a novel form of gene therapy. As a result, interest in oncolytic virus therapy has gained traction. The following review will focus on the first wave of clinical translation of oncolytic virus therapy, what has been learned so far, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group - The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consortium; The Cancer Institute of New Jersey/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; Robert Wood Johnson Medical School...University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer...cilengitide in children with refractory brain tumors: pediatric brain tumor consortium study PBTC-012. J Clin Oncol 26:919–924 29. Moreno J, DeBono

  19. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group: The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    cerebrovascular accident , myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary artery stenting within 6 months of enrollment, or a history of venous thrombosis...Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: NCI 8476 Dr. David Smith JHU (Princess Margaret Hospital ) Activated at UM site on 10/20/2011. On-hold to...University Hospital , Philadelphia, PA; New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY; Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN; ImClone

  20. Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctors, nurses and care specialists who specialize in carrying out clinical trials that are testing new treatments. ... as an outpatient . However, you are responsible for costs related to your initial screening. Even though most ...

  1. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0595 TITLE: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi- Institutional Validation... Institutional Validation Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0595 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel Lin, MD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...to report. Other Products As part of this project we continue to maintain a large biospecimen repository with associated clinical and demographic

  2. Current status and future prospects of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) clinical trials in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Renee A; O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Zivanovic, Oliver; Chi, Dennis S

    2017-08-01

    The natural history of advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is one of clinical remission after surgery and platinum/taxane-based intravenous (IV) and/or intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy followed by early or late recurrence in the majority of patients. Prevention of progression and recurrence remains a major hurdle in the management of ovarian cancer. Recently, many investigators have evaluated the use of normothermic and hyperthermic intraoperative IP drug delivery as a management strategy. This is a narrative review of the current status of clinical trials of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in ovarian cancer and the future directions for this treatment strategy. The existing studies on HIPEC in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are mostly retrospective in nature, are heterogeneous with regards to combined inclusion of primary and recurrent disease and lack unbiased data. Until data are available from evidence-based trials, it is reasonable to conclude that surgical cytoreduction and HIPEC is a rational and interesting, though still investigative, approach in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer, whose use should be employed within prospective clinical trials.

  3. Characterization of Black Raspberry Functional Food Products for Cancer Prevention Human Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junnan; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Vodovotz, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Our team is designing and fully characterizing black raspberry (BRB) food products suitable for long-term cancer prevention studies. The processing, scale-up, and storage effects on the consistency, quality, bioactive stability, and sensory acceptability of two BRB delivery systems of various matrices are presented. BRB dosage, pH, water activity, and texture were consistent in the scale-up production. Confections retained >90% of anthocyanins and ellagitannin after processing. Nectars had >69% of anthocyanins and >66% of ellagitannin retention, which varied with BRB dosage due to the processing difference. Texture remained unchanged during storage. BRB products consumed in a prostate cancer clinical trial were well accepted in sensory tests. Thus, this study demonstrates that two different BRB foods can be formulated to meet quality standards with a consistent bioactive pattern and successfully scaled up for a large human clinical trial focusing on cancer risk and other health outcomes. PMID:24345009

  4. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  5. A systematic review of adverse event reporting in companion animal clinical trials evaluating cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Michelle A

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate methods used to ascertain, define, and report adverse events (AEs) in companion animal clinical trials involving cancer treatment. DESIGN Systematic review. SAMPLE English-language articles describing prospective clinical trials involving dogs and cats with naturally occurring cancer published in peer-reviewed journals between 2008 and 2014. PROCEDURES Reports were identified via MEDLINE and CAB database searches combined with a hand-searching strategy. General article characteristics were abstracted and summarized. Data for AE reporting were collected with a 14-item checklist adapted from the 2004 CONSORT extension for reporting harms. Study characteristics associated with the AE reporting checklist score were identified by means of linear regression analysis. RESULTS 168 articles with data for 6,132 animals were included. Standardized terminology was significantly more likely to be used to describe AEs for trials that included chemotherapy (92/115 [80.0%]) than for trials that did not (16/53 [30.2%]). Median AE reporting checklist score was 5 out of 14 (range, 0 to 12). Poorly reported items included methods and time frame of AE ascertainment, AE data analysis, and reasons for treatment discontinuation and death. Trials with industry funding, a single-arm design, and treatment with chemotherapy were associated with a significantly higher quality of AE reporting. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Reporting of adverse events in veterinary clinical trials evaluating cancer treatment was selective and heterogeneous. Harms associated with cancer treatments could be underestimated because of suboptimal collection and reporting of AE data. Findings supported the adoption of a higher standard for AE surveillance and reporting in veterinary patients.

  6. Characteristics and outcomes of breast cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynce, Filipa; Blackburn, Matthew J; Cai, Ling; Wang, Heping; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Isaacs, Claudine; Pohlmann, Paula R

    2017-11-08

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women. Given the availability of approved therapies and abundance of phase II and III clinical trials, historically few BC patients have been referred for consideration of participation on a phase I trial. We were interested in determining whether clinical benefit rates differed in patients with BC from other patients enrolled in phase I trials. We performed a retrospective analysis of all Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) sponsored phase I trials from 1993 to 2012. We report an analysis of demographic variables, rates of response to treatment, grade 4 toxicities, and treatment-related deaths. De-identified data from 8087 patients were analyzed, with 1,376 having a diagnosis of BC. The median time from initial cancer diagnosis to enrollment in a CTEP-sponsored phase I clinical trial was 614 days for all patients. Breast cancer patients were enrolled on average 790 days after initial diagnosis, while non-BC patients had a median enrollment time of 582 days (p enrolled on phase I clinical trials, BC patients tend to derive clinical benefit from these therapies with similar toxicity profile. This evidence further supports enrollment of BC patients on phase I trials.

  7. Why cancer patients enter randomized clinical trials: exploring the factors that influence their decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Whelan, Timothy J; Schiff, Susan; Dubois, Sacha; Crooks, Dauna; Haines, Patricia T; DeRosa, Diane; Roberts, Robin S; Gafni, Amiram; Pritchard, Kathleen; Levine, Mark N

    2004-11-01

    Few interventions have been designed and tested to improve recruitment to clinical trials in oncology. The multiple factors influencing patients' decisions have made the prioritization of specific interventions challenging. The present study was undertaken to identify the independent predictors of a cancer patient's decision to enter a randomized clinical trial. A list of factors from the medical literature was augmented with a series of focus groups involving cancer patients, physicians, and clinical research associates (CRAs). A series of questionnaires was developed with items based on these factors and were administered concurrently to 189 cancer patients, their physicians, and CRAs following the patient's decision regarding trial entry. Forward logistic regression modeling was performed using the items significantly correlated (by univariate analysis) with the decision to enter a clinical trial. A number of items were significantly correlated with the patient's decision. In the multivariate logistic regression model, the patient's perception of personal benefit was the most important, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.08 (P decision-making process were also important. These included whether the CRA helped with the decision (OR = 1.71; P decision was hard for the patient to make (OR = 0.52; P decision-making process while respecting the need for information and patient autonomy may also lead to meaningful improvements in accrual.

  8. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contracts section of the NIH website. Find NICHD Clinical Trials NIH maintains the ClinicalTrials.gov website as the main database of publicly and privately funded clinical trials. Each trial has its own pre-defined research ...

  9. Cancer clinical trials in the era of genomic signatures: biomedical innovation, clinical utility, and regulatory-scientific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli-Laven, Nina; Bourret, Pascale; Keating, Peter; Cambrosio, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The paper examines two large-scale, North American and European clinical trials designed to validate two commercially available genomic tumor signatures that predict a patient's risk of breast cancer recurrence and response to chemotherapy. The paper builds on empirical evidence from the two trials to explore the emergence of diverse regulatory-scientific hybrids; that is, the paper discusses configurations of genomic practice and bioclinical work that depend on linkages between technical, commercial, patient, clinical, and legal interests and institutions. The development of the genomic signatures for each trial--Oncotype DX and MammaPrint--has followed quite different routes. Oncotype began as a commercial platform: the company that produced it did not discover a signature but rather constructed it by asking users at every step what clinical question they wanted the signature to answer and what data would be credible in that regard. The test has been designed to minimally disrupt existing clinical workflows. MammaPrint, on the other hand, began as a breast cancer signature: the researchers who discovered it, at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), established a company to commercialize it as a test after the fact. MammaPrint requires a change in pathologists' routines. Thus, while these two trials signify a new departure for clinical cancer trials on a number of levels--they both incorporate new models of interaction between biotech companies and public research, and they both aim to establish the clinical relevance of genomic markers--they also embody different socio-technical scripts: one attempts to accommodate established routines, while the other openly challenges prevailing evidential hierarchies and existing biomedical configurations.

  10. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group: The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    not allowed to be initiated while on the study. No concurrent herbal or food supplements (such as PC-SPES or saw palmetto) other than a daily...University of California, San Francisco; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street , Box 1711, San Francisco, CA 94143-1711

  11. Insurance denials for cancer clinical trial participation after the Affordable Care Act mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Christine B; Antonelli, Kaitlyn R; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Saint Onge, Jarron M; Ellis, Shellie D

    2017-08-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a mandate requiring most private health insurers to cover routine patient care costs for cancer clinical trial participation; however, the impact of this provision on cancer centers' efforts to accrue patients to clinical trials has not been well described. First, members of cancer research centers and community-based institutions (n = 252) were surveyed to assess the status of insurance denials, and then, a focused survey (n = 77) collected denial details. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine associations between the receipt of denials and site characteristics. Overall, 62.7% of the initial survey respondents reported at least 1 insurance denial during 2014. Sites using a precertification process were 3.04 times more likely to experience denials (95% confidence interval, 1.55-5.99; P ≤ .001), and similar rates of denials were reported from sites located in states with preexisting clinical trial coverage laws versus states without them (82.3% vs 85.1%; χ = 50.7; P ≤ .001). Among the focused survey sites, academic centers reported denials more often than community sites (71.4% vs 46.4%). The failure of plans to cover trial participation was cited as the most common reason provided for denials (n = 33 [80.5%]), with nearly 80% of sites (n = 61) not receiving a coverage response from the insurer within 72 hours. Despite the ACA's mandate for most insurers to cover routine care costs for cancer clinical trial participation, denials and delays continue. Denials may continue because some insurers remain exempt from the law, or they may signal an implementation failure. Delays in coverage may affect patient participation in trials. Additional efforts to eliminate this barrier will be needed to achieve federal initiatives to double the pace of cancer research over the next 5 years. Future work should assess the law's effectiveness at the patient level to inform these efforts

  12. Seeking informed consent to Phase I cancer clinical trials: identifying oncologists' communication strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard; Bylund, Carma L; Siminoff, Laura A; Slovin, Susan F

    2011-04-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the gateway to effective new cancer treatments. Many physicians have difficulty when discussing Phase I clinical trials. Research demonstrates evidence of suboptimal communication. Little is known about communication strategies used by oncologists when recruiting patients for Phase I trials. We analyzed audio recorded Phase I consultations to identify oncologists' communication strategies. Subjects were consecutive cancer patients from six medical oncologists attending one of three outpatient clinics at a major Cancer Center in the United States. Sixteen patients signed informed consent for audio recording of their consultations in which a Phase I study was discussed. These were transcribed in full and analyzed to identify communication strategies. Six communication themes emerged from the analysis: (1) orienting, (2) educating patients, (3) describing uncertainty and prognosis, (4) persuading, (5) decision making, and (6) making a treatment recommendation. As expected, although there was some common ground between communication in Phase I and the Phase II and III settings, there were distinct differences. Oncologists used persuasive communication, made explicit recommendations, or implicitly expressed a treatment preference and were choice limiting. This highlights the complexity of discussing Phase I trials and the need to develop strategies to aid oncologists and patients in these difficult conversations. Patient centered communication that values patient preferences while preserving the oncologist's agenda can be a helpful approach to these discussions. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cancer patient decision making related to clinical trial participation: an integrative review with implications for patients' relational autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer A H; Balneaves, Lynda G

    2015-04-01

    Oncology clinical trials are necessary for the improvement of patient care as they have the ability to confirm the efficacy and safety of novel cancer treatments and in so doing, contribute to a solid evidence base on which practitioners and patients can make informed treatment decisions. However, only 3-5 % of adult cancer patients enroll in clinical trials. Lack of participation compromises the success of clinical trials and squanders an opportunity for improving patient outcomes. This literature review summarizes the factors and contexts that influence cancer patient decision making related to clinical trial participation. An integrative review was undertaken within PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases for articles written between 1995 and 2012 and archived under relevant keywords. Articles selected were data-based, written in English, and limited to adult cancer patients. In the 51 articles reviewed, three main types of factors were identified that influence cancer patients' decision making about participation in clinical trials: personal, social, and system factors. Subthemes included patients' trust in their physician and the research process, undue influence within the patient-physician relationship, and systemic social inequalities. How these factors interact and influence patients' decision-making process and relational autonomy, however, is insufficiently understood. Future research is needed to further elucidate the sociopolitical barriers and facilitators of clinical trial participation and to enhance ethical practice within clinical trial enrolment. This research will inform targeted education and support interventions to foster patients' relational autonomy in the decision-making process and potentially improve clinical trial participation rates.

  14. Lung cancer patients' decisions about clinical trials and the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pratt, Christie L; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D; Paternoster, Bonnie; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O; Vaughn, Elizabeth J; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person's attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned behavior suggests that people may make greater efforts to perform a behavior if they feel they have a high level of control over it. In this examination of data, we explored the application of the theory of planned behavior to patient's decisions about participating in a clinic trial. Twelve respondents in this study had previously participated in a clinical trial for lung cancer and nine respondents had declined a clinical trial for lung cancer. The data were analyzed with regard to the four constructs associated with the theory of planned behavior: behavioral intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Results indicate that the theory of planned behavior may be a useful tool to examine psychosocial needs in relation to behavioral intention of clinical trial participation.

  15. Clinical trials of antioxidants as cancer prevention agents: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M; Kucuk, Omer; Jones, Dean P

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the most important human clinical trials of antioxidants as cancer prevention agents conducted to date, provide an overview of currently ongoing studies, and discuss future steps needed to advance research in this field. To date there have been several large (at least 7000 participants) trials testing the efficacy of antioxidant supplements in preventing cancer. The specific agents (diet-derived direct antioxidants and essential components of antioxidant enzymes) tested in those trials included β-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, selenium, retinol, zinc, riboflavin, and molybdenum. None of the completed trials produced convincing evidence to justify the use of traditional antioxidant-related vitamins or minerals for cancer prevention. Our search of ongoing trials identified six projects at various stages of completion. Five of those six trials use selenium as the intervention of interest delivered either alone or in combination with other agents. The lack of success to date can be explained by a variety of factors that need to be considered in the next generation research. These factors include lack of good biological rationale for selecting specific agents of interest; limited number of agents tested to date; use of pharmacological, rather than dietary, doses; and insufficient duration of intervention and follow-up. The latter consideration underscores the need for alternative endpoints that are associated with increased risk of neoplasia (i.e., biomarkers of risk), but are detectable prior to tumor occurrence. Although dietary antioxidants are a large and diverse group of compounds, only a small proportion of candidate agents have been tested. In summary, the strategy of focusing on large high-budget studies using cancer incidence as the endpoint and testing a relatively limited number of antioxidant agents has been largely unsuccessful. This lack of success in previous trials should not preclude us from seeking novel

  16. Clinical trial insurance coverage for cancer patients under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine B. Mackay

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Three main factors limit the effectiveness of the ACA provisions in expanding clinical trial coverage: 1 ‘grandfathered’ self-funded employer plans not subject to state Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA regulations, 2 Medicaid coverage limits not addressed under the ACA, 3 populations that remain uninsured. Kansas saw a negligible increase in insurance coverage as a result of the ACA thus lack of insurance coverage is likely to remain a concern for cancer patients.

  17. Meet Clinical Trial Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Meet Clinical Trial Participants Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table ... Articles Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All / Meet Clinical Trial Participants / North Carolinians Volunteer for Knee ...

  18. Textbook of clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Simon; Machin, David; Green, Sylvan B

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 The Development of Clinical Trials Simon...

  19. Audio-recorded information to patients considering participation in cancer clinical trials - a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenmar, Mia; Johansson, Hemming; Wilking, Nils; Hatschek, Thomas; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2014-09-01

    Patient information in cancer clinical trial is challenging. The value of audio-recording interventions for patients considering participating in clinical trials is unclear. The primary aim of this randomized study was to investigate effects of audio-recorded information on knowledge and understanding in patients considering participation in a clinical trial. Patients scheduled for information about a phases 2 or 3 trial by one of the 13 participating oncologists at the Department of Oncology during the study period (2008-2013) were eligible. The intervention consisted of an audio-recording on compact disc (CD) of the information at the medical consultation in which the patients were informed about a trial. Knowledge and understanding was measured by the questionnaire, Quality of Informed Consent. A total of 130 patients were randomized, 70% of the calculated sample size (n = 186). Sixty-seven patients were randomized to the intervention. In total, 101 patients (78%) completed questionnaires. No statistical significant differences were found between the groups with respect to knowledge and understanding. The level of knowledge was relatively high, with the exceptions of the risks associated with, and the unproven nature of, the trial. Overall, patients who declined participation scored statistically significant lower on knowledge. The present study was underpowered and the results should therefore be interpreted with caution. Still, 130 patients were included with a response rate of 78%. A CD including the oral information about a clinical trial did not show any effects on knowledge or understanding. However, the levels of knowledge were high, possible due to the high levels of education in the study group. Information on risks associated with the trial is still an area for improvement.

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ... stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the ... bias. "Bias" means that human choices or other factors not related to the protocol affect the trial's ...

  2. Approaches to interim analysis of cancer randomised clinical trials with time to event endpoints: A survey from the Italian National Monitoring Centre for Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Rosa Marisa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although interim analysis approaches in clinical trials are widely known, information on current practice of planned monitoring is still scarce. Reports of studies rarely include details on the strategies for both data monitoring and interim analysis. The aim of this project is to investigate the forms of monitoring used in cancer clinical trials and in particular to gather information on the role of interim analyses in the data monitoring process of a clinical trial. This study focused on the prevalence of different types of interim analyses and data monitoring in cancer clinical trials. Methods Source of investigation were the protocols of cancer clinical trials included in the Italian registry of clinical trials from 2000 to 2005. Evaluation was restricted to protocols of randomised studies with a time to event endpoint, such as overall survival (OS or progression free survival (PFS. A template data extraction form was developed and tested in a pilot phase. Selection of relevant protocols and data extraction were performed independently by two evaluators, with differences in the data assessment resolved by consensus with a third reviewer, referring back to the original protocol. Information was obtained on a general characteristics of the protocol b disease localization and patient setting; c study design d interim analyses; e DSMC. Results The analysis of the collected protocols reveals that 70.7% of the protocols incorporate statistical interim analysis plans, but only 56% have also a DSMC and be considered adequately planned. The most concerning cases are related to lack of any form of monitoring (20.0% of the protocols, and the planning of interim analysis, without DSMC (14.7%. Conclusion The results indicate that there is still insufficient attention paid to the implementation of interim analysis.

  3. SHORT OVERVIEW OF CLINICAL TRIALS WITH CURRENT IMMUNOTHERAPEUTIC TOOLS FOR CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Nepomnyashchikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over last decade, a substantial progress has been made, with respect to understanding of cancer biology and its interplay with the host immune system. Different immunotherapeutic drugs based on recombinant cytokines and monoclonal antibodies are widely used in cancer therapy, and a large number of experimental cancer treatments have been developed, many of which are currently undergoing various stages of clinical trials. Recent endorsement of a recombinant oncolytic herpesvirus T-VEC for the treatment of melanoma was an important step towards a more safe and efficient anticancer therapeutics. In this review, we shall mention only some of the most promising cancer immunotherapy strategies, namely, immune checkpoint inhibitors, cellular therapy and oncolytic viruses. 

  4. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2017;123:1259-1271. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. Screening sensitivity and sojourn time from breast cancer early detection clinical trials: mammograms and physical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Zelen, M

    2001-08-01

    To estimate sensitivities of breast cancer screening modalities and preclinical duration of the disease from eight breast cancer screening clinical trials. Screening programs invariably lead to diagnosis of disease before signs or symptoms are present. Two key quantities of screening programs are the sensitivity of the disease detection modality and the mean sojourn time (MST). The observed screening histories in a periodically screened cohort make it possible to estimate these quantities of interest. We applied recently developed statistical methods to data from eight randomized breast cancer screening trials to estimate the sensitivities of early detection modalities and MST. Moreover, when a screening trial involved two screening modalities, our methods enabled the estimation of the individual sensitivity of each screening modality. We analyzed breast cancer data from several screening trials and have relatively complete data from the Health Insurance Plan (HIP), Edinburgh, and two Canadian studies. The screening sensitivity for mammography, physical examination, and MST were, respectively, HIP: 0.39, 0.47, and 2.5 years; Edinburgh: 0.63, 0.40, and 4.3 years; Canadian (age 40 to 49 at entry): 0.61, 0.59, and 1.9 years; Canadian (age 50 to 59 at entry): 0.66, 0.39, and 3.1 years. The public debate on early breast cancer detection is mainly centered on mammograms. However, the current study indicates that a physical examination is of comparable importance. Cautious interpretation of trial differences is required as a result of various experimental designs and the age dependency of screening sensitivity and MST.

  6. Project Zero Delay: a process for accelerating the activation of cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Pilat, Susan; Bartolazzi, Marcel; Sanders, Dwana; Van Wart Hood, Jill; Tucker, Stanley D; Webster, Kevin; Mallamaci, Michael A; Strand, Steven; Babcock, Eileen; Bast, Robert C

    2009-09-10

    Drug development in cancer research is lengthy and expensive. One of the rate-limiting steps is the initiation of first-in-human (phase I) trials. Three to 6 months can elapse between investigational new drug (IND) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the entry of a first patient. Issues related to patient participation have been well analyzed, but the administrative processes relevant to implementing clinical trials have received less attention. While industry and academia often partner for the performance of phase I studies, their administrative processes are generally performed independently, and their timelines driven by different priorities: safety reviews, clinical operations, regulatory submissions, and contracting of clinical delivery vendors for industry; contracts, budgets, and institutional review board approval for academia. Both processes converge on US Food and Drug Administration approval of an IND. In the context of a strategic alliance between M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, a concerted effort has been made to eliminate delays in implementing clinical trials. These efforts focused on close communications, identifying and matching key timelines, alignment of priorities, and tackling administrative processes in parallel, rather than sequentially. In a recent, first-in-human trial, the study was activated and the first patient identified in 46 days from completion of the final study protocol and about 48 hours after final US Food and Drug Administration IND approval, reducing the overall timeline by about 3 months, while meeting all clinical good practice guidelines. Eliminating administrative delays can accelerate the evaluation of new drugs without compromising patient safety or the quality of clinical research.

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research—that is, who is eligible. Each trial must include only people who fit the patient traits ... to take part in the study. Each trial must include only people who fit the patient traits ...

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also requires DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs for some earlier phase trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or ...

  9. Definitions, End Points, and Clinical Trial Designs for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Recommendations From the International Bladder Cancer Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Sylvester, R.J.; Bohle, A.; Palou, J.; Lamm, D.L.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on appropriate clinical trial designs in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) based on current literature and expert consensus of the International Bladder Cancer Group. METHODS: We reviewed published trials, guidelines, meta-analyses, and reviews and

  10. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  11. Metformin in pancreatic cancer treatment: from clinical trials through basic research to biomarker quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2016-10-01

    Three major chemotherapy strategies have emerged in the treatment of PDAC in the recent past: multiple drug combination, stroma depletion, and use of nanodrug therapy. Anti-diabetic metformin was shown to improve the outcome of a number of cancer types the first seminal report on an observational study published in 2005 and the first hospital-based case-control study on pancreatic cancer in 2009. In this review paper, we confront the findings of a selected number of epidemiological studies and clinical trials on the use of metformin in pancreatic cancer treatment with basic knowledge and research. We particularly emphasize on the point that contradictory clinical results likely originate from heterogeneous study design due to a trial and error approach rather than an evidence-based and scientific approach. A non-rigorous selection of patients suffering from PDAC and often a poor understanding of the biological mechanism of metformin coupled with lack of scientific data has led to general statements on metformin positive or negative action, another aspect which we highlight in the review. We here present a few pathways which in our opinion are predominant for pancreatic cancer specifically: mitochondrial activity, AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition, and decreased IGF-1R and HIF-1α expression. We stress on the need for a better stratification of patients and a more rigorous planning of clinical trials not only focusing on classical parameters but also on potential predictive biomarkers (AMPK, mTOR, HIF-1α, IGF-1R) and metformin dosage for positive outcome.

  12. Patient Perceptions of Illness Identity in Cancer Clinical Trial Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Dailey, Phokeng M; Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Rhodes, Nancy D; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-06-16

    When patients are diagnosed with cancer, they begin to negotiate their illness identity in relation to their past and future selves, their relationships, and their group memberships. Thus, how patients view their cancer in relation to their other identities may affect how and why they make particular decisions about treatment options. Using the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI), the current study explores: (1) how and why illness identity is framed across identity layers in relation to one particular cancer treatment: participation in a cancer clinical trial (CT); and (2) how and why patients experience identity conflicts while making their treatment decisions. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were analyzed for 46 cancer patients who were offered a CT. Results of a grounded theory analysis indicated that patients expressed separate identity frames (e.g., personal, relational, and communal), aligned identity frames (e.g., personal and communal), and identity conflicts (e.g., personal-personal). This study theoretically shows how and why patient illness identity relates to cancer treatment decision-making as well as how and why patients relate (and conflict) with the cancer communal identity frame. Practical implications include how healthcare providers and family members can support patient decision-making through awareness of and accommodating to identity shifts.

  13. Strategies of persuasion in offers to participate in cancer clinical trials I: Topic placement and topic framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen; Eggly, Susan; Winckles, Andrew; Albrecht, Terrance L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are the gold standard in medical research evaluating new treatments in cancer care; however, in the United States, too few patients enroll in trials, especially patients from minority groups. Offering patients the option of a clinical trial is an ethically-charged communicative event for oncologists. One particularly vexed ethical issue is the use of persuasion in trial offers. Based on a corpus of 22 oncology encounters with Caucasian-American (n = 11) and African-American (n = 11) patients, this discourse analysis describes oncologists' use of two persuasive strategies related to the linguistic structure of trial offers: topic placement and topic framing. Findings are presented in total and by patient race, and discussed in terms of whether these strategies may constitute ethical or unethical persuasion, particularly with respect to the ethical issue of undue influence and the social issue of underrepresentation of minorities in cancer clinical trials.

  14. PI3K inhibitors as new cancer therapeutics: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massacesi C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cristian Massacesi,1 Emmanuelle Di Tomaso,2 Patrick Urban,3 Caroline Germa,4 Cornelia Quadt,5 Lucia Trandafir,1 Paola Aimone,3 Nathalie Fretault,1 Bharani Dharan,4 Ranjana Tavorath,4 Samit Hirawat4 1Novartis Oncology, Paris, France; 2Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research Inc, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 4Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 5Novartis Pharmaceuticals KK, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: The PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathway is frequently activated in cancer. PI3K inhibitors, including the pan-PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (BKM120 and the PI3Kα-selective inhibitor alpelisib (BYL719, currently in clinical development by Novartis Oncology, may therefore be effective as anticancer agents. Early clinical studies with PI3K inhibitors have demonstrated preliminary antitumor activity and acceptable safety profiles. However, a number of unanswered questions regarding PI3K inhibition in cancer remain, including: what is the best approach for different tumor types, and which biomarkers will accurately identify the patient populations most likely to benefit from specific PI3K inhibitors? This review summarizes the strategies being employed by Novartis Oncology to help maximize the benefits of clinical studies with buparlisib and alpelisib, including stratification according to PI3K pathway activation status, selective enrollment/target enrichment (where patients with PI3K pathway-activated tumors are specifically recruited, nonselective enrollment with mandatory tissue collection, and enrollment of patients who have progressed on previous targeted agents, such as mTOR inhibitors or endocrine therapy. An overview of Novartis-sponsored and Novartis-supported trials that are utilizing these approaches in a range of cancer types, including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiforme, is also described. Keywords: PI3K

  15. PI3K inhibitors as new cancer therapeutics: implications for clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massacesi, Cristian; Di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Urban, Patrick; Germa, Caroline; Quadt, Cornelia; Trandafir, Lucia; Aimone, Paola; Fretault, Nathalie; Dharan, Bharani; Tavorath, Ranjana; Hirawat, Samit

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway is frequently activated in cancer. PI3K inhibitors, including the pan-PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (BKM120) and the PI3Kα-selective inhibitor alpelisib (BYL719), currently in clinical development by Novartis Oncology, may therefore be effective as anticancer agents. Early clinical studies with PI3K inhibitors have demonstrated preliminary antitumor activity and acceptable safety profiles. However, a number of unanswered questions regarding PI3K inhibition in cancer remain, including: what is the best approach for different tumor types, and which biomarkers will accurately identify the patient populations most likely to benefit from specific PI3K inhibitors? This review summarizes the strategies being employed by Novartis Oncology to help maximize the benefits of clinical studies with buparlisib and alpelisib, including stratification according to PI3K pathway activation status, selective enrollment/target enrichment (where patients with PI3K pathway-activated tumors are specifically recruited), nonselective enrollment with mandatory tissue collection, and enrollment of patients who have progressed on previous targeted agents, such as mTOR inhibitors or endocrine therapy. An overview of Novartis-sponsored and Novartis-supported trials that are utilizing these approaches in a range of cancer types, including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiforme, is also described.

  16. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max S. Wicha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  17. Opportunities and challenges in incorporating ancillary studies into a cancer prevention randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Phyllis J; Tangen, Catherine M; Darke, Amy K; Arnold, Kathryn B; Hartline, JoAnn; Yee, Monica; Anderson, Karen; Caban-Holt, Allison; Christen, William G; Cassano, Patricia A; Lance, Peter; Klein, Eric A; Crowley, John J; Minasian, Lori M; Meyskens, Frank L

    2016-08-12

    closure of the primary trial was different for each of the ancillary trials. The ancillary studies allowed study sites to broaden the research opportunities for their participants. Their implementation was efficient because of the established infrastructure of the primary trial. Implementation of these ancillary trials took substantial planning and coordination but enriched the overall primary trial. NCT00006392-S0000 : Selenium and Vitamin E in Preventing Prostate Cancer (SELECT) (4 October 2000). NCT00780689-S0000A :  Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease by Vitamin E and Selenium (PREADVISE) (25 June 2002). NCT00784225-S0000B : Vitamin E and/or Selenium in Preventing Cataract and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Men on SELECT SWOG-S0000 (SEE) (31 October 2008). NCT00706121-S0000D : Effect of Vitamin E and/or Selenium on Colorectal Polyps in Men Enrolled on SELECT Trial SWOG-S0000 (ACP) (26 June 2008). NCT00063453-S0000C : Vitamin E and/or Selenium in Preventing Loss of Lung Function in Older Men Enrolled on SELECT Clinical Trial SWOG-S0000 (26 June 2003).

  18. Preclinical Models Provide Scientific Justification and Translational Relevance for Moving Novel Therapeutics into Clinical Trials for Pediatric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, David M; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Dyer, Michael A

    2015-12-15

    Despite improvements in survival rates for children with cancer since the 1960s, progress for many pediatric malignancies has slowed over the past two decades. With the recent advances in our understanding of the genomic landscape of pediatric cancer, there is now enthusiasm for individualized cancer therapy based on genomic profiling of patients' tumors. However, several obstacles to effective personalized cancer therapy remain. For example, relatively little data from prospective clinical trials demonstrate the selective efficacy of molecular-targeted therapeutics based on somatic mutations in the patient's tumor. In this commentary, we discuss recent advances in preclinical testing for pediatric cancer and provide recommendations for providing scientific justification and translational relevance for novel therapeutic combinations for childhood cancer. Establishing rigorous criteria for defining and validating druggable mutations will be essential for the success of ongoing and future clinical genomic trials for pediatric malignancies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's ...

  1. African American Participation in Oncology Clinical Trials--Focus on Prostate Cancer: Implications, Barriers, and Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Tyler, Robert; Sartor, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, the incidence and mortality rates of many cancers, especially prostate cancer, are disproportionately high among African American men compared with Caucasian men. Recently, mortality rates for prostate cancer have declined more rapidly in African American versus Caucasian men, but prostate cancer is still the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in African American men in the United States. Compared with Caucasian men, prostate cancer occurs at younger ages, has a higher stage at diagnosis, and is more likely to progress after definitive treatments in African American men. Reasons for racial discrepancies in cancer are multifactorial and potentially include socioeconomic, cultural, nutritional, and biologic elements. In addition to improving access to novel therapies, clinical trial participation is essential to adequately establish the risks and benefits of treatments in African American populations. Considering the disproportionately high mortality rates noted in these groups, our understanding of the natural history and responses to therapies is limited. This review will explore African American underrepresentation in clinical trials with a focus on prostate cancer, and potentially effective strategies to engage African American communities in prostate cancer research. Solutions targeting physicians, investigators, the community, and health care systems are identified. Improvement of African American participation in prostate cancer clinical trials will benefit all stakeholders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiahuai; Cang, Shundong; Ma, Yuehua; Petrillo, Richard L; Liu, Delong

    2010-02-04

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  3. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrillo Richard L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone deacetylases (HDACs can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  4. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Seth P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Dinney, Colin P.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Groshen, Susan; Hahn, Noah M.; Hansel, Donna; Kwiatkowski, David; O’Donnell, Michael; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Svatek, Robert; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Apolo, Andrea B.; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Callahan, Margaret; Cha, Eugene K.; Drake, Charles; Jarow, Jonathan; Kamat, Ashish; Kim, William; Knowles, Margaret; Mann, Bhupinder; Marchionni, Luigi; McConkey, David; McShane, Lisa; Ramirez, Nilsa; Sharabi, Andrew; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Solit, David; Tangen, Catherine M.; Amiri, Abdul Tawab; Van Allen, Eliezer; West, Pamela J.; Witjes, J. A.; Quale, Diane Zipursky

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from NCI, FDA, National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), advocacy and the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The meeting goals and objectives were to: 1) create a collaborative environment in which the greater bladder research community can pursue future optimally designed novel clinical trials focused on the theme of molecular targeted and immune-based therapies in NMIBC; 2) frame the clinical and translational questions that are of highest priority; and 3) develop two clinical trial designs focusing on immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Despite successful development and implementation of large Phase II and Phase III trials in bladder and upper urinary tract cancers, there are no active and accruing trials in the NMIBC space within the NCTN. Disappointingly, there has been only one new FDA approved drug (Valrubicin) in any bladder cancer disease state since 1998. Although genomic-based data for bladder cancer are increasingly available, translating these discoveries into practice changing treatment is still to come. Recently, major efforts in defining the genomic characteristics of NMIBC have been achieved. Aligned with these data is the growing number of targeted therapy agents approved and/or in development in other organ site cancers and the multiple similarities of bladder cancer with molecular subtypes in these other cancers. Additionally, although bladder cancer is one of the more immunogenic tumors, some tumors have the ability to attenuate or eliminate host immune responses. Two trial concepts emerged from the meeting including a window of opportunity trial (Phase 0) testing an FGFR3 inhibitor and a second multi-arm multi-stage trial testing combinations

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems promising, the ... Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... scale phase III trials begin, the FDA provides input on how these studies should be done. Patient ... of stakeholders and advisory groups, NHLBI has received input and has established a multi-pronged approach to ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop ... IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the study begins. An IRB will only approve research that deals ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, researchers also may not be told which treatments ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

  10. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  11. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup: Recommendations on incorporating patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Florence; Hilpert, Felix; Okamoto, Aikou; Stuart, Gavin; Ochiai, Kasunori; Friedlander, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Despite the support for including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life in clinical trials, there have been deficiencies in how these have been assessed and reported in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) clinical trials. To redress this, the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference, included a plenary session entitled 'How to include PROs in clinical trials'. The perspective is a summary of the recommendations made by the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup unanimously agreed on the importance of PROs and PRO end-points in EOC clinical trials. They recognised that effort must be made to ensure the integrity of collection of PRO data and to avoid missing data. PRO end-points should be based on the PRO hypotheses, be context specific and reflect the patient population and the objectives of treatment (e.g. first line, maintenance therapy, early or late relapse). The PRO end-points inform the choice of PRO measures used in the trial and how the results are analysed and reported. There was agreement that progression-free survival should be supported by PROs among patients with late relapse (platinum sensitive) and that progression-free survival alone was not sufficient as the primary end-point of clinical trials in patients with platinum resistant/refractory EOC and PROs should be included as either the primary/co-primary end-point in this subset of patients. Novel approaches to measure the benefit of palliative chemotherapy such as time until definitive deterioration of Health-Related Quality of Life were recommended. There was consensus to endorse the ISOQOL and CONSORT-PRO guidelines on the inclusion and reporting of PRO endpoints in protocols and that all future EOC Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup trials should adhere to these. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of socioeconomic status as measured by education level on survival in breast cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, James E; Kornblith, Alice B; Holland, Jimmie C; Paskett, Electra D

    2013-02-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of socioeconomic status, as measured by education, on the survival of breast cancer patients treated on 10 studies conducted by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B. Sociodemographic data, including education, were reported by the patient at trial enrollment. Cox proportional hazards model stratified by treatment arm/study was used to examine the effect of education on survival among patients with early stage and metastatic breast cancer, after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The patient population included 1020 patients with metastatic disease and 5146 patients with early stage disease. Among metastatic patients, factors associated with poorer survival in the final multivariable model included African American race, never married, negative estrogen receptor status, prior hormonal therapy, visceral involvement, and bone involvement. Among early stage patients, significant factors associated with poorer survival included African American race, separated/widowed, post/perimenopausal, negative/unknown estrogen receptor status, negative progesterone receptor status, >4 positive nodes, tumor diameter >2 cm, and education. Having not completed high school was associated with poorer survival among early stage patients. Among metastatic patients, non-African American women who lacked a high school degree had poorer survival than other non-African American women, and African American women who lacked a high school education had better survival than educated African American women. Having less than a high school education is a risk factor for death among patients with early stage breast cancer who participated in a clinical trial, with its impact among metastatic patients being less clear. Post-trial survivorship plans need to focus on women with low social status, as measured by education. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer: Prospects and Disappointments in Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N. Rom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing the risk of lung cancer, or preventing its development in high-risk individuals, would have a huge impact on public health. The most effective means to decrease lung cancer incidence is to eliminate exposure to carcinogens. However, with recent advances in the understanding of pulmonary carcinogenesis and the identification of intermediate biomarkers, the prospects for the field of chemoprevention research have improved dramatically. Here we review the most recent research in lung cancer chemoprevention—focusing on those agents that have been investigated in human clinical trials. These agents fall into three major categories. First, oxidative stress plays an important role in pulmonary carcinogenesis; and therefore, antioxidants (including vitamins, selenium, green tea extracts, and isothiocyanates may be particularly effective in preventing the development of lung cancer. Second, inflammation is increasingly accepted as a crucial factor in carcinogenesis, and many investigators have focused on anti-inflammatory agents, such as glucocorticoids, NSAIDs, statins, and PPARγ agonists. Finally, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is recognized to play a central role in tobacco-induced carcinogenesis, and inhibitors of this pathway, including myoinositol and metformin, are promising agents for lung cancer prevention. Successful chemoprevention will likely require targeting of multiple pathways to carcinogenesis—both to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy.

  14. The Impact of Concomitant Medication Use on Patient Eligibility for Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh J. Borad, Kelly K. Curtis, Hani M. Babiker, Martin Benjamin, Raoul Tibes, Ramesh K. Ramanathan, Karen Wright, Amylou C. Dueck, Gayle Jameson, Daniel D. Von Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant medication (CM use may result in Phase I cancer clinical trial ineligibility due to concern for potential CM-investigational drug interactions or alteration of investigational drug absorption. Few studies have examined the impact of CM use on trial eligibility. Methods: We reviewed records of 274 patients on Phase I trials at a single academic institution. Demographics, CM identities and classes, CM discontinuation, reasons, and incidence of CM substitution were recorded. CM-investigational drug cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme interactions were documented. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics. Results: 273 of 274 patients (99.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 98.9-100% took CM, with a median of 8 CM per patient (range 0 - 42. CM discontinuation occurred in 67 cases (25%, 95% CI 19-30%. The most common CM classes discontinued were herbal (17 cases, 25%, 95% CI 16-37% and proton pump inhibitors (15 cases, 22%, 95% CI 12-32%. CM discontinuation reasons were: protocol prohibition (32 cases, 48%, 95% CI 36-60%; potential CM-investigational drug interaction (25 cases, 37%, 95% CI 26-49%; other (10 cases, 15%, 95% CI 6-23%. A potential CM-investigational drug CYP interaction was noted in 122 cases (45%, 95% CI 39-50%. CM potentially weakly decreased investigational drug metabolism in 52 cases (43%, 95% CI 34-51%, and potentially strongly decreased investigational drug metabolism in 17 cases (14%, 95% CI 8-20%. Investigational drug potentially weakly decreased CM metabolism in 39 cases (32%, 95% CI 24-40%, and potentially strongly decreased CM metabolism in 28 cases (23%, 95% CI 15-30%. CM substitution occurred in 36/67 cases (54%, 95% CI 41-66% where CM were discontinued to allow for eventual participation in clinical trials. Overall in 2 cases (0.7%, 95% CI 0.1-2.6%, patients were protocol ineligible because CM could not be discontinued or substituted. Conclusions: This study highlights the high prevalence of

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and ...

  16. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O

    2011-01-01

    in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions...... for improvements, 21 key issues were defined and validated through a questionnaire in an independent group of breast cancer patient advocates. Clear messages, emotionally neutral expressions, careful descriptions of side effects, clear comparisons between different treatment alternatives and information about...

  17. Hope for a cure and altruism are the main motives behind participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, T; Hansson, M G; Nygren, P; Nordin, K; Kihlbom, U

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to carry out randomised clinical cancer trials (RCTs) in order to evaluate new, potentially useful treatments for future cancer patients. Participation in clinical trials plays an important role in determining whether a new treatment is the best therapy or not. Therefore, it is important to understand on what basis patients decide to participate in clinical trials and to investigate the implications of this understanding for optimising the information process related to study participation. The aims of this study were to (1) describe motives associated with participation in RCTs, (2) assess if patients comprehend the information related to trial enrolment, and (3) describe patient experiences of trial participation. Questionnaires were sent to 96 cancer patients participating in one of nine ongoing clinical phase 3 trials at the Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden. Eighty-eight patients completed the questionnaire (response rate 92%); 95% of these were patients in adjuvant therapy and 5% participated in clinical trials on palliative care. Two main reasons for participation were identified: personal hope for a cure and altruism. Patients show adequate understanding of the information provided to them in the consent process and participation entails high patient satisfaction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Treatment outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer patients who are ineligible for a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Akira Ueda, Ayumu Hosokawa, Kohei Ogawa, Hiroki Yoshita, Takayuki Ando, Shinya Kajiura, Haruka Fujinami, Kengo Kawai, Jun Nishikawa, Kazuto Tajiri, Masami Minemura, Toshiro SugiyamaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice, and assess whether chemotherapy provided a clinical benefit for patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria of the clinical trial.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 75 patients who received first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer between April 2006 and September 2011. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (GEM alone, S-1 (tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium alone, or GEM plus S-1. Patients were divided into the clinical trial eligible group (arm eligible or the ineligible group (arm ineligible. We evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the chemotherapy.Results: A total of 23 patients out of 75 (31% belonged to the ineligible group, for the following reasons: 20 patients had poor performance status, eight had massive ascites, one had synchronous malignancy, and one had icterus. The median progression-free survival (PFS was 3.5 months, and the median overall survival (OS was 6.7 months in all patients. In arm eligible, median PFS was 4.5 months, and median OS was 10.5 months. In arm ineligible, median PFS was 1.1 months, and median OS was 2.9 months.Conclusion: The outcome of the patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria was very poor. It is important to select the patients that could benefit from either chemotherapy or optimal supportive care.Keywords: gemcitabine, S-1, clinical practice

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taking the same treatment the same way. These patients are closely watched by Data and Safety Monitoring Boards. Even if you don't directly ... risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as ... trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. ...

  20. Most children with cancer are not enrolled on a clinical trial in Canada: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Jason D; Barber, Randy; Bergeron, Rose-Émilie; Carret, Anne Sophie; Dix, David; Kulkarni, Ketan; Martineau, Emilie; Randall, Alicia; Stammers, David; Strahlendorf, Caron; Strother, Douglas R; Truong, Tony H; Sung, Lillian

    2017-06-05

    Primary objective was to describe the proportion of children newly diagnosed with cancer enrolled on a therapeutic clinical trial. Secondary objectives were to describe reasons for non-enrollment and factors associated with enrollment on trials. In this retrospective cohort study, we included children newly diagnosed with cancer between 0 and 14 years of age and diagnosed from 2001 to 2012. We used data from the Cancer in Young People in Canada (CYP-C) national pediatric cancer population-based database. CYP-C captures all cases of pediatric cancer (0-14 years) diagnosed and treated at one of the 17 tertiary pediatric oncology centers in Canada. Non-enrollment was evaluated using univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. There were 9204 children with cancer included, of whom 2533 (27.5%) were enrolled on a clinical trial. The most common reasons cited for non-enrollment were lack of an available trial (52.2%) and physician choice (11.2%). In multiple regression, Asian and Arab/west Asian race were associated with lower enrollment (P = 0.006 and P = 0.032 respectively). All cancer diagnoses were more likely to be enrolled compared to astrocytoma and children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had an almost 18-fold increased odds of enrollment compared to astrocytoma (P enrollment (P enrolled onto therapeutic clinical trials and lack of an available trial is the most common reason contributing to non-enrollment. Future research should better understand reasons for lack of trial availability and physician preferences to not offer trials.

  1. Qualitative inquiry: a method for validating patient perceptions of palliative care while enrolled on a cancer clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Christina; Ulrich, Connie M; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Baker, Karen; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is a vital component of patient-centered care. It has increasingly become central to the management and care of seriously ill patients by integrating physical, psychosocial, and spiritual supportive services. Through qualitative inquiry, this paper examines cancer patients' perceptions of the process and outcomes of the pain and palliative care consultative services they received while enrolled in a clinical trial. A qualitative analysis of open-ended questions was conducted from a sub-sample of patients (n = 34) with advanced cancers enrolled in a randomized controlled trial exploring the efficacy of a palliative care consult service. Two open-ended questions focused on patient perceptions of continued participation on their primary cancer clinical trials and their perceptions of interdisciplinary communication. THREE OVERARCHING THEMES EMERGED WHEN ASKED WHETHER RECEIVING PAIN AND PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES MADE THEM MORE LIKELY TO REMAIN ENROLLED IN THEIR PRIMARY CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL: patients' past experiences with care, self-identified personal characteristics and reasons for participation, and the quality of the partnership. Four themes emerged related to interdisciplinary communication including: the importance of developing relationships, facilitating open communication, having quality communication, and uncertainty about communication between the cancer clinical trial and palliative care teams. Our findings suggest the importance of qualitative inquiry methods to explore patient perceptions regarding the efficacy of palliative care services for cancer patients enrolled in a cancer clinical trial. Validation of patient perceptions through qualitative inquiry regarding their pain and palliative care needs can provide insight into areas for future implementation research. NIH Office of Human Subjects Research Protection OHSRP5443 and University of Pennsylvania 813365.

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preexisting differences between the patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" ... Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in ... Clinical research is done only if doctors don't know whether a new approach works well in ...

  6. Hospitalizations During Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review of Real World vs Clinical Trial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Rebecca M; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the risk of hospitalization due to treatment-related toxic effects is essential for patients, their clinicians, and health systems. Unplanned hospitalizations represent potential gaps in patient care; definition of these gaps allows characterization and identification of areas for quality improvement. To compare the rates of hospitalization in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) receiving chemotherapy in the "real world" vs clinical trial settings and to identify factors associated with hospitalization. A systematic review of Medline and EMBASE was conducted for records dating from database inception (1946 and 1974, respectively) through December 2014 to identify articles reporting rates of hospitalization during chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Both observational studies and clinical trials were eligible. This report focuses on patients with mNSCLC receiving chemotherapy because data were available for this clinical scenario in both the clinical trial and observational setting, allowing comparison. Summary statistics were used to describe results, and the χ2 test was used to compare hospitalization rates. Of the 74 articles reporting hospitalization rates during chemotherapy, 10 studies, all published after 2004, examined chemotherapy in mNSCLC, 5 randomized clinical trials (3962 patients) and 5 observational studies (8624 patients). Chemotherapy regimens included doublet therapy, single-agent therapy, or chemotherapy type unspecified. The real world cohort was older (71 vs 63 years). All real world studies reported on comorbidities, while clinical trials reported performance status. The aggregate hospitalization rate among real world patients was significantly higher than among trial patients (51% vs 16%) (odds ratio, 7.7; 95% CI, 7.0-8.4; P chemotherapy were associated with hospitalization during chemotherapy in clinical trials, while type of chemotherapy was a risk factor in observational studies. Clinical trials in

  7. Adaptive radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: initial clinical outcomes from a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David L; Garden, Adam S; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen, Yipei; Zhang, Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  9. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and her initial results. Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Milena tuvo un ... Story 09/23/2014 Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Children and Clinical ...

  10. Improving decision making about clinical trial participation - a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for women considering participation in the IBIS-II breast cancer prevention trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juraskova, I; Butow, P; Bonner, C; Bell, M L; Smith, A B; Seccombe, M; Boyle, F; Reaby, L; Cuzick, J; Forbes, J F

    2014-01-01

    .... This study investigated whether decision aids (DAs) can reduce decisional difficulties among women considering participation in the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study-II (IBIS-II) trial...

  11. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  12. Statistical issues for design and analysis of single-arm multi-stage phase II cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2015-05-01

    Phase II trials have been very widely conducted and published every year for cancer clinical research. In spite of the fast progress in design and analysis methods, single-arm two-stage design is still the most popular for phase II cancer clinical trials. Because of their small sample sizes, statistical methods based on large sample approximation are not appropriate for design and analysis of phase II trials. As a prospective clinical research, the analysis method of a phase II trial is predetermined at the design stage and it is analyzed during and at the end of the trial as planned by the design. The analysis method of a trial should be matched with the design method. For two-stage single arm phase II trials, Simon's method has been the standards for choosing an optimal design, but the resulting data have been analyzed and published ignoring the two-stage design aspect with small sample sizes. In this article, we review analysis methods that exactly get along with the exact two-stage design method. We also discuss some statistical methods to improve the existing design and analysis methods for single-arm two-stage phase II trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A pilot study on the quality of data management in a cancer clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, E. van der; Velden, J.W. van der; Siers, A.; Hamersma, E.A.M.

    Twelve institutional data managers were asked to independently code the data from a patient chart of one patient in an ovarian cancer trial. They abstracted data from the medical record and filled out three types of trial forms (on-study, chemotherapy, and summary forms). The analysis of the

  14. Participation in a clinical trial for a child with cancer is burdensome for a minority of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Ivana M M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Zwaan, C Michel; Pieters, Rob; Passchier, Jan; Darlington, Anne-Sophie E

    2016-09-01

    This study explored how parents who had lost a child to cancer felt about them taking part in a clinical trial. A retrospective questionnaire was sent to parents who had lost a child to cancer. They were asked whether their child took part in a clinical trial during their palliative phase, their motives for their child's participation, how they perceived their child's burden and whether they would, hypothetically speaking, enrol again. The 24 parents of 16 deceased children who had participated in a clinical trial explained their motives for their child's participation. The most common answers, with multiple responses, were treatment for future patients (n = 16), hope for a cure (n = 9) and prolonging their child's life (n = 6). Eight parents said that participating was not burdensome for their child and four said it was very burdensome, with others answering in between. None of the parents would decline participation if they would be in the same situation again. Performing clinical trials, even in a vulnerable population, such as children with cancer at the end of life, may not always lead to increased burden. None of the parents would in future, given the same circumstances, decline participation in a clinical trial. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals: From experimental models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Girish B; Hudlikar, Rasika R; Kumar, Gaurav; Gandhi, Khushboo; Mahimkar, Manoj B

    2016-02-26

    Chemoprevention is one of the cancer prevention approaches wherein natural/synthetic agent(s) are prescribed with the aim to delay or disrupt multiple pathways and processes involved at multiple steps, i.e., initiation, promotion, and progression of cancer. Amongst environmental chemopreventive compounds, diet/beverage-derived components are under evaluation, because of their long history of exposure to humans, high tolerability, low toxicity, and reported biological activities. This compilation briefly covers and compares the available evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and probable mechanism of chemoprevention by selected dietary phytochemicals (capsaicin, curcumin, diallyl sulphide, genistein, green/black tea polyphenols, indoles, lycopene, phenethyl isocyanate, resveratrol, retinoids and tocopherols) in experimental systems and clinical trials. All the dietary phytochemicals covered in this review have demonstrated chemopreventive efficacy against spontaneous or carcinogen-induced experimental tumors and/or associated biomarkers and processes in rodents at several organ sites. The observed anti-initiating, anti-promoting and anti-progression activity of dietary phytochemicals in carcinogen-induced experimental models involve phytochemical-mediated redox changes, modulation of enzymes and signaling kinases resulting to effects on multiple genes and cell signaling pathways. Results from clinical trials using these compounds have not shown them to be chemopreventive. This may be due to our: (1) inability to reproduce the exposure conditions, i.e., levels, complexity, other host and lifestyle factors; and (2) lack of understanding about the mechanisms of action and agent-mediated toxicity in several organs and physiological processes in the host. Current research efforts in addressing the issues of exposure conditions, bioavailability, toxicity and the mode of action of dietary phytochemicals may help address the reason for observed mismatch that may ultimately

  16. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / About Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical ... is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether ...

  17. An eClinical trial system for cancer that integrates with clinical pathways and electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keiichi; Yamanaka, Kenya; Hatano, Etsuro; Sumi, Eriko; Ishii, Takamichi; Taura, Kojiro; Iguchi, Kohta; Teramukai, Satoshi; Yokode, Masayuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Fukushima, Masanori

    2012-08-01

    Various information technologies currently are used to improve the efficiency of clinical trials. However, electronic medical records (EMRs) are not yet linked to the electronic data capture (EDC) system. Therefore, the data must be extracted from medical records and transcribed to the EDC system. Clinical pathways are planned process patterns that are used in routine clinical practice and are easily applicable to the medical care and evaluation defined in a trial protocol. However, few clinical pathways are intended to increase the efficiency of clinical trials. Our purpose is to describe the design and development of a new clinical trial process model that enables the primary use of EMRs in clinical trials by integrating clinical pathways and EMRs. We designed a new clinical trial model that uses EMR data directly in clinical trials and developed a system to follow this model. We applied the system to an investigator-initiated clinical trial and examined whether all data were extracted correctly. At the protocol development stage, our model measures endpoints based on clinical pathways with the same diagnosis. Next, medical record descriptions and the format of the statistical data are defined. According to these observations, screens for entry of data, which are used both in clinical practice and for study, are prepared into EMRs with an EMR template, and screens are prepared for data checks on our EMR retrieval system (ERS). In an actual trial, patients are registered and randomly assigned to a protocol treatment. The protocol treatment is executed according to clinical pathways, and the data are recorded to EMRs using EMR templates. The data are checked by a local data manager using reports created by the ERS. After edit checks and corrections, the data are extracted by the ERS, archived in portable document format (PDF) with an electronic signature, and transferred in comma-separated values (CSV) format to a coordinating centre. At the coordinating centre

  18. Opportunities and challenges in incorporating ancillary studies into a cancer prevention randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Darke, Amy K.; Arnold, Kathryn B.; Hartline, JoAnn; Yee, Monica; Anderson, Karen; Caban-Holt, Allison; Christen, William G.; Patricia A Cassano; Lance, Peter; Eric A Klein; Crowley, John J.; Minasian, Lori M.; Meyskens, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prostate cancer prevention study funded by the National Cancer Institute and conducted by SWOG (Southwest Oncology Group). A total of 35,533 men were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (vitamin E + placebo, selenium + placebo, vitamin E + selenium, placebo + placebo). At the time of the trial’s development, NIH had invested substantial resources in evaluat...

  19. Proctitis 1 Week after Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Implications for Clinical Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Ima; Cyr, Robyn A; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian Timothy; Chen, Leonard N; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL). While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity 1 week following prostate SBRT. Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4). Bowel QOL was assessed using the EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID) in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of 1/2 standard deviation (SD) from the baseline score. One-hundred and three patients with a minimum of 3 months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p < 0.0001) 1 week after SBRT and returned to baseline at 3 months after SBRT (0.0%, p = 0.66). Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at 1 week after treatment and returned to baseline by 3 months. Toxicity assessment at 1 week can therefore minimize recall bias and should aid in the design of future clinical trials focused on accurately capturing

  20. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  1. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are anal...... data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making.......Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures......-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes...

  2. Patient navigation improves cancer diagnostic resolution: an individually randomized clinical trial in an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Peter C; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Thorland, William; Valverde, Patricia; Fairclough, Diane

    2012-10-01

    Barriers to timely resolution of abnormal cancer screening tests add to cancer health disparities among low-income, uninsured, and minority populations. We conducted a randomized trial to evaluate the impact of lay patient navigators on time to resolution and completion of follow-up testing among patients with abnormal screening tests in a medically underserved patient population. Denver Health, the safety-net health care system serving Denver, is one of 10 performance sites participating in the Patient Navigation Research Program. Of 993 eligible subjects with abnormal screening tests randomized to navigation and no-navigation (control) arms and analyzed, 628 had abnormal breast screens (66 abnormal clinical breast examinations, 304 BIRADS 0, 200 BIRADS 3, 58 BIRADS 4 or 5) whereas 235 had abnormal colorectal and 130 had abnormal prostate screens. Time to resolution was significantly shorter in the navigated group (stratified log rank test, P < 0.001). Patient navigation improved diagnostic resolution for patients presenting with mammographic BIRADS 3 (P = 0.0003) and BIRADS 0 (P = 0.09), but not BIRADS 4/5 or abnormal breast examinations. Navigation shortened the time for both colorectal (P = 0.0017) and prostate screening resolution (P = 0.06). Participant demographics included 72% minority, 49% with annual household income less than $10,000, and 36% uninsured. Patient navigation positively impacts time to resolution of abnormal screening tests for breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers in a medically underserved population. By shortening the time to and increasing the proportion of patients with diagnostic resolution patient navigation could reduce disparities in stage at diagnosis and improve cancer outcomes. 2012 AACR

  3. Randomized clinical trial of a family intervention for prostate cancer patients and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L; Mood, Darlene W; Schafenacker, Ann; Montie, James E; Sandler, Howard M; Forman, Jeffrey D; Hussain, Maha; Pienta, Kenneth J; Smith, David C; Kershaw, Trace

    2007-12-15

    Few intervention studies have been conducted to help couples manage the effects of prostate cancer and maintain their quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether a family-based intervention could improve appraisal variables (appraisal of illness or caregiving, uncertainty, hopelessness), coping resources (coping strategies, self-efficacy, communication), symptom distress, and quality of life in men with prostate cancer and their spouses. For this clinical trial, 263 patient-spouse dyads were stratified by research site, phase of illness, and treatment; then, they were randomized to the control group (standard care) or the experimental group (standard care plus a 5-session family intervention). The intervention targeted couples' communication, hope, coping, uncertainty, and symptom management. The final sample consisted of 235 couples: 123 couples in the control group and 112 couples in the experimental group. Data collection occurred at baseline before randomization and at 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months. At 4-month follow-up, intervention patients reported less uncertainty and better communication with spouses than control patients, but they reported no other effects. Intervention spouses reported higher quality of life, more self-efficacy, better communication, and less negative appraisal of caregiving, uncertainty, hopelessness, and symptom distress at 4 months compared with controls, and some effects were sustained to 8 months and 12 months. Men with prostate cancer and their spouses reported positive outcomes from a family intervention that offered them information and support. Programs of care need to be extended to spouses who likely will experience multiple benefits from intervention. 2007 American Cancer Society

  4. Managing cancer pain and symptoms of outpatients by rotation to sustained-release hydromorphone: a prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Wartenberg, Hans Christian; Elsen, Christian; Wittmann, Maria; Diederichs, Marta; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this prospective clinical trial we examined the technique of opioid rotation to oral sustained-release hydromorphone for controlling pain and symptoms in outpatients with cancer pain. METHODS: Before and after rotation, 50 patients were assessed by Numerical Analog Scales [Numerical

  5. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer: The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, William N; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E W; Lin, Heather Y; Gillenwater, Ann M; Martin, Jack W; Lingen, Mark W; Boyle, Jay O; Shin, Dong M; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M

    2016-02-01

    Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. Oral erlotinib treatment (150 mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. Oral cancer-free survival (CFS). A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74% and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.68-2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74% vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.25-3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and found to be associated with increased EGFR copy number (the target of the intervention

  7. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jun Liang,1 Mingyan E,2 Gang Wu,3 Lujun Zhao,4 Xia Li,5 Xia Xiu,6 Ning Li,1 Bo Chen,1 Zhouguang Hui,1 Jima Lv,1 Hui Fang,1 Yu Tang,1 Nan Bi,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Yirui Zhai,1 Tao Li,1 Dongfu Chen,1 Shuangmei Zou,7 Ning Lu,7 Rolando Perez-Rodríguez,8 Junqi Zheng,9 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Radiotherapy, Tongji Cancer Center Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Radiotherapy, LiaoNing Province Cancer Hospital, Shenyang, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Radiotherapy, Beijing Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 7Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 8Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba; 9School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaObjective: To determine the safety and therapeutic effects of nimotuzumab (h-R3 combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer.Methods: This Phase II clinical trial involved 42 patients with stage II (inoperable or refused surgery to stage IV (supraclavicular lymph node metastasis only esophageal cancers treated between November 2008 and July 2010. All patients had squamous cell carcinomas, and all received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 200 mg nimotuzumab per week during radiotherapy.Results: There were 9, 25, and 8 patients with stage II, III and IV disease, respectively. All except two patients received 50–70 Gy radiation; 37 patients (88.1% received more than five nimotuzumab doses. Grade III toxicities (21.4% of all adverse events included esophagitis and gastrointestinal, dermatological and hematological

  8. Clinical Trials in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  9. Testing the utility of a cancer clinical trial specific Question Prompt List (QPL-CT) during oncology consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard F.; Bylund, Carma L.; Li, Yuelin; Edgerson, Shawna; Butow, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Objective A Question Prompt List (QPL) is a proven, simple intervention to aid patients to be active participants in consultations with their physicians by asking questions. We aimed to further develop and test the efficacy of a targeted QPL for clinical trials (QPL-CT). Methods Breast, Lung and Genitourinary cancer patients who were facing a discussion about a therapeutic clinical trial completed short pre- and post-consultation questionnaires and used the QPL-CT in their discussions with their oncologists. Results: 30 participants were recruited from 6 oncologists All QPL-CT questions were selected by at least one-third of participants. Participants mostly wanted and asked questions about personal trial benefit. Oncologists provided information about personal benefit to varying degrees, thus patients did not ask some questions. Patients were still left with some unasked and unanswered questions. Conclusion The QPL-CT has potential as a simple, inexpensive intervention to aid such communication. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate the efficacy of the QPL-CT in improving cancer patient outcomes. Practice Implications These preliminary finding suggest that important areas of clinical trials are overlooked in clinical consultations. The QPL-CT may be an effective method to encourage oncologists to endorse patient question asking about clinical trials and prompt patient questions. PMID:22390854

  10. Cartographic Mapping and Travel Burden to Assess and Develop Strategies to Improve Minority Access to National Cancer Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins, E-mail: deborah.w.bruner@emory.edu [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yeager, Katherine A.; Bruner, Jesse; Curran, Walter [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To assess how accrual to clinical trials is related to US minority population density relative to clinical trial site location and distance traveled to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trial sites. Methods and Materials: Data included member site address and ZIP codes, patient accrual, and patient race or ethnicity and ZIP code. Geographic Information System maps were developed for overall, Latino, and African American accrual to trials by population density. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess differences in distance traveled by site, type of trial, and race or ethnicity. Results: From 2006 to 2009, 6168 patients enrolled on RTOG trials. The RTOG US site distribution is generally concordant with overall population density. Sites with highest accrual are located throughout the United States and parts of Canada and do not cluster, nor does highest minority accrual cluster in areas of highest US minority population density. Of the 4913 US patients with complete data, patients traveled a median of 11.6 miles to participate in clinical trials. Whites traveled statistically longer distances (12.9 miles; P<.0001) to participate, followed by Latinos (8.22 miles) and African Americans (5.85 miles). Patients were willing to drive longer distances to academic sites than community sites, and there was a trend toward significantly longer median travel for therapeutic versus cancer control or metastatic trials. Conclusions: Location matters, but only to a degree, for minority compared with nonminority participation in clinical trials. Geographic Information System tools help identify gaps in geographic access and travel burden for clinical trials participation. Strategies that emerged using these tools are discussed.

  11. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...... scales and survival. RESULTS: Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0...

  12. Addressing clinical trials: can the multidisciplinary Tumor Board improve participation? A study from an academic women's cancer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Lindsay; Stuckey, Ashley; Hirway, Priya; Raker, Christina A; Bandera, Christina A; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Granai, Cornelius O; Legare, Robert D; Sakr, Bachir J; Dizon, Don S

    2010-03-01

    The Tumor Board (TB) allows for an interdisciplinary approach to cancer treatment designed to encourage evidence-based treatment. However, its role in facilitating clinical trial participation has not been reported. We aimed to determine whether a prospective TB is an effective strategy for trial recruitment and to identify steps within the TB process that facilitate discussion of trial eligibility and optimize accrual. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of women presented to Gynecologic Oncology TB between March and December 2008. Patient demographics, TB recommendations, and post-TB patient discussions were abstracted. These were compared to data derived from the Department of Oncology Research to determine research team awareness of eligible patients and confirm trial enrollment(s). Data analysis was completed with Chi-square test; risk ratios and confidence intervals were calculated as summary measures. We reviewed 1213 case presentations involving 916 women. Overall, 358 TB recommendations (30%) identified eligible patients, of which enrollment consisted of 87 (24%) trials (6% therapeutic trials and 18% non-therapeutic trials). Compared to other types of TB recommendations, those involving trials were discussed less frequently at post-TB patient visits (79% vs. 44%). Documentation of trial discussion at the post-TB visit was more likely to result in trial participation, versus solely relying on the research staff to communicate enrollment eligibility with the treating team (RR 2.5, p=0.006). Patients identified by the TB were 2.5-times as likely to enroll in a clinical trial, but trials were mentioned only 44% of the time. Interventions that facilitate trial discussions during post-TB meetings are needed to improve trial participation.

  13. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  14. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  15. EFFECT OF THERAPEUTIC TOUCH ON PAIN RELATED PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaee, Amir; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Rassouli, Maryam; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; AlaviMajd, Hamid; Farahmand, Seyed Kazem

    2016-06-01

    In patients with cancer, pain may influence their life style, and feeling of satisfaction and comfort, leading to fatigue, and cause impairment of their quality of life, personal relationships, sleep and daily activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on pain related parameters of in patients with cancer. In a randomized clinical trial a total of 90 male patients referring to Specialized Oncology Hospital in Mashhad, were conveniently selected and randomly divided into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The intervention consisted of TT in 7 sessions for a 4-week period. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire along with the Brief Pain Inventory, which were then analyzed and compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. By comparing scores parameters of pain scales (general activity, mood, walking ability, relations with other people and sleep) in the three groups, there was no significant difference at the beginning of the first session. However, a significant difference was observed at the end of TT sessions between the three groups (p= 0.001). Furthermore, the groups were compared two-by-two by using Mann-Whitney test and Bonferroni correction, and the result indicated significant differences between the two intervention and placebo groups as well as between the two intervention and control groups. The results of the study showed that TT had a positive impact on the positive management of pain related parameters in cancer patients. Therefore, TT is suggested to be used by healthcare providers as a complementary method for managing pain and its parameters.

  16. The efficacy of herbal therapy on quality of life in patients with breast cancer: self-control clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lai Yi Eliza; Wong, Chun Kwok; Leung, Ping Chung; Lam, Wei Kei Christopher

    2010-07-21

    Mounting evidence indicates that herbal therapy is effective in alleviating anxiety, lessening cancer treatment-related side-effects, and facilitating rehabilitation. This is the first trial to examine the herbal therapy of combined yunzhi and danshen on quality of life among breast cancer patients. A multicenter, longitudinal, and self-control study was used. Eighty-two breast cancer patients were given combined yunzhi and danshen capsules for six months on a daily basis. Data collection including quality of life, vitality status and adverse effects were taken. Results showed a significant improvement in physical function, role-physical, role-emotion and health transition (P cancer patients. Therefore, herbal therapy has a potentially important role to play in managing psychological distress in cancer patients. This study also suggests that herbal therapy is clinically acceptable and can be used safely with breast cancer patients.

  17. Clinical trial enrollment, patient characteristics, and survival differences in prospectively registered metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Pfeiffer, Per; Cavalli-Björkman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trial accrual patterns were examined to determine whether metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients enrolled in trials are representative of a general cancer population concerning patient characteristics and survival. METHODS: A total of 760 mCRC patients referred for their first...... in 61% of the patients. Approximately one-third (36%) of patients receiving chemotherapy were included in a trial. The main reason for nonparticipation was failed eligibility criteria (69%). The median survival after chemotherapy was 15.8 months for all patients, and 18 months after combination...... chemotherapy. Trial patients had better prognostic characteristics and significantly longer survival than nontrial patients: 21.3 months versus 15.2 months when receiving combination chemotherapy. Poor performance status was the main reason for giving best supportive care only, and the median survival...

  18. Prospective molecular profiling of canine cancers provides a clinically relevant comparative model for evaluating personalized medicine (PMed trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Paoloni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting. METHODOLOGY: A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77% successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days. Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type. CONCLUSIONS: Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (<1 week. Clustering data show robust signatures by cancer type but also showed patient-to-patient heterogeneity in drug predictions. This lends further support to the inclusion of a heterogeneous population of

  19. Prostate specific antigen only androgen independent prostate cancer: natural history, challenges in management and clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Charles J; Beer, Tomasz M

    2007-09-01

    There is no current standard of care for patients with nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer, a condition defined by increasing serum prostate specific antigen despite anorchid testosterone levels and no radiographic evidence of metastases. A consensus panel was convened to review data and propose a strategy for trial design and prioritization. Published literature on the natural history of nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer was reviewed. A panel discussion was held, focusing on reviewing current and past trials, and the development of research priorities for patients in this disease state. Based on 1 report the natural history of nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer is relatively long but heterogeneous. External validation of these published findings has not been performed. Clinical trial design in this setting is impeded by heterogeneity and lack of knowledge about the natural history, prolonged time to clinical end points, such as the development of metastases or death, and a lack of knowledge about how intermediate end points, eg the development of bone metastases, are related to the long-term outcome, eg survival. In clinical practice a reluctance to use therapies with substantial toxicity as well as a lack of outcome data on such patients leaves a vacuum in which there is no standard of care, although secondary hormonal manipulations are widely used. Further research is needed to define the natural history of this disease state, educate patients and clinicians about its distinct natural history and develop informative clinical trial designs suited to this patient population.

  20. Enrollment in clinical cancer trials: how are we doing and what are the obstacles to improving enrollment rates? A 2-year retrospective review of pediatric cancer trial enrollment in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; De Silva, Mandy P; Bradbeer, Peter; Cross, Siobhan

    2014-11-01

    Clinical trials contribute to the establishment of the best therapy for children with cancer. This study looks at rates of enrollment in therapeutic clinical trials over a 2-year period in New Zealand and examines the reasons for nonenrollment. All new diagnoses of cancer in children aged 16 or younger over the period of 1 January, 2009 to 31 December, 2010 were identified through the New Zealand Child Cancer Registry. Clinical trial enrollment status was identified from the medical records. For those not enrolled, the reason for nonenrollment was ascertained. A total of 28% of children diagnosed with cancer who received chemotherapy with curative intent in this time period were enrolled on clinical trials. The 2 most common reasons for nonenrollment in this study were that no study was open locally in which to enroll children (27%) or that previously open-clinical trials were closed to accrual at the time of the child's diagnosis (20%). In New Zealand, enrollment rates on clinical trials for children with cancer are lower than expected.

  1. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  2. A pilot study on the quality of data management in a cancer clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Putten, E. van der; Velden, J.W. van der; Siers, A.; Hamersma, E.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve institutional data managers were asked to independently code the data from a patient chart of one patient in an ovarian cancer trial. They abstracted data from the medical record and filled out three types of trial forms (on-study, chemotherapy, and summary forms). The analysis of the processed data revealed that the median rate of errors was 13% for the 12 data managers. The error rate differed among the types of trial forms. The factors causing these errors were mistakes in interpret...

  3. Critical issues in cancer vaccine trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Guy T; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Peoples, George E

    2015-12-16

    As the clinical experience with cancer vaccines and cancer immunotherapy increases, there are important lessons that can be learned from the successes and failures of past trials. Many lessons affect the design and conduct of clinical trials themselves. Appropriate patient selection, clinical trial design, immunologic monitoring, and appropriate endpoints are all essential to the efficiency and success of bringing cancer vaccines from conception to clinical use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  5. How well informed is the informed consent for cancer clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Laeeq; Kuo, James; Yip, Desmond; Mejia, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the content of informed consent forms for clinical trials in medical oncology to assess readability, determine their completeness, and identify any shortcomings. Informed consent forms for Phase I-III studies that were conducted at two tertiary care cancer centers over a 3-year period were reviewed. Information pertaining to length of the informed consent form, research regimen/methods, treatment agent, potential risks, and benefits was extracted. The reading level was assessed by Flesch-Kincaid and Gunning-Fog index readability tests. All of the 112 informed consent forms clearly stated the voluntary nature of participation. Nearly one half of the forms (51.8%) were of Phase I studies. The median length of informed consent form was 20 pages (range: 8-28). A detailed estimation of the frequency or intensity of risks (range: 3-8 pages) was provided. The average reading level of the informed consent forms was high (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level of 9.8), which corresponds roughly to 10th-grade reading level. Less than 15% of all consent forms were written at the recommended eighth-grade reading level. A substantial number of forms did not report a potential risk to pregnant/lactating women (16.9%), mechanism of action of the investigational agent (34.8%), study schema (77.6%), a possibility of receiving sub-therapeutic dose (37%), or death (12.5%). Nearly one half of the forms (49.1%) stated clearly that individual participants may not benefit. Overall, these informed consent forms provided a detailed description of the trials in accordance to international guidelines. However, there remains room for improvement, particularly in areas of readability and document length. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  7. Antiproliferative and metabolic effects of metformin in a preoperative window clinical trial for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Kevin M; Rambally, Brooke S; DiFurio, Megan J; Sampey, Brante P; Gehrig, Paola A; Makowski, Liza; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2015-02-01

    We conducted a preoperative window study of metformin in endometrial cancer (EC) patients and evaluated its antiproliferative, molecular and metabolic effects. Twenty obese women with endometrioid EC were treated with metformin (850 mg) daily for up to 4 weeks prior to surgical staging. Expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were measured by immunohistochemistry. Global, untargeted metabolomics analysis of serum pre- and postmetformin treatment, and matched tumor, was performed. Metformin reduced proliferation by 11.75% (P = 0.008) based on the comparison of pre- and posttreatment endometrial tumors. A total of 65% of patients responded to metformin as defined by a decrease in Ki-67 staining in their endometrial tumors post-treatment. Metformin decreased expression of phosphorylated (p)-AMPK (P = 0.00001), p-Akt (P = 0.0002), p-S6 (51.2%, P = 0.0002), p-4E-BP-1 (P = 0.001), and ER (P = 0.0002) but not PR expression. Metabolomic profiling of serum indicated that responders versus nonresponders to treatment were more sensitive to metformin's effects on induction of lipolysis, which correlated with increased fatty acid oxidation and glycogen metabolism in matched tumors. In conclusion, metformin reduced tumor proliferation in a pre-operative window study in obese EC patients, with dramatic effects on inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Metformin induced a shift in lipid and glycogen metabolism that was more pronounced in the serum and tumors of responders versus nonresponders to treatment.This study provides support for therapeutic clinical trials of metformin in obese patients with EC. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Survival of Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Enrolled in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Carmona, Amir; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Flores-Estrada, Diana; Macedo-Pérez, Eleazar Omar; Martínez-Hernández, Jorge Negueb; Corona-Cruz, José Francisco; Cardona, Andrés F; de la Garza, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Up-to-date oncological therapy has been accomplished through the results of clinical trials (CTs). We analyzed the overall survival (OS) of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its relation to CT enrollment. The study included 1,042 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología. All patients received treatment according to the national and international guidelines. Data were collected from medical records. Patients were subgrouped on the basis of their CT enrollment as follows: participants in any CT (ACT), exclusively intervention CTs (ICT) or exclusively pharmaceutical-sponsored CTs (PCT). The CT enrollment effect was assessed through a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Thirty percent of the patients were in ACT, 28.3% in ICT and 13.7% in PCT. Female gender (p = 0.001), adenocarcinoma histology (p = 0.018), positive EGFR mutation (p = 0.006), and better ECOG performance status (<2) (p ≤ 0.0001) were more frequent in patients enrolled in CT; further, tobacco smoking (p ≤ 0.0001) and KRAS mutation (p = 0.001) were more frequent in patients who were not enrolled in a CT. Enrollment in ACT was associated with a better OS (hazard ratio: 0.47-0.74). NSCLC patients enrolled in a CT have an improved survival in an independent manner to other prognostic factors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Rethinking the therapeutic misconception: social justice, patient advocacy, and cancer clinical trial recruitment in the US safety net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nancy J

    2014-09-20

    Approximately 20% of adult cancer patients are eligible to participate in a clinical trial, but only 2.5-9% do so. Accrual is even less for minority and medically underserved populations. As a result, critical life-saving treatments and quality of life services developed from research studies may not address their needs. This study questions the utility of the bioethical concern with therapeutic misconception (TM), a misconception that occurs when research subjects fail to distinguish between clinical research and ordinary treatment, and therefore attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures in the safety net setting. This paper provides ethnographic insight into the ways in which research is discussed and related to standard treatment. In the course of two years of ethnographic fieldwork in a safety net hospital, I conducted clinic observations (n=150 clinic days) and in-depth in-person qualitative interviews with patients (n=37) and providers (n=15). I used standard qualitative methods to organize and code resulting fieldnote and interview data. Findings suggest that TM is limited in relevance for the interdisciplinary context of cancer clinical trial recruitment in the safety net setting. Ethnographic data show the value of the discussions that happen prior to the informed consent, those that introduce the idea of participation in research. These preliminary discussions are elemental especially when recruiting underserved and vulnerable patients for clinical trial participation who are often unfamiliar with medical research and how it relates to medical care. Data also highlight the multiple actors involved in research discussions and the ethics of social justice and patient advocacy they mobilize, suggesting that class, inequality, and dependency influence the forms of ethical engagements in public hospital settings. On the ground ethics of social justice and patient advocacy are more relevant than TM as guiding ethical principles in the context of

  10. Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT Study: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wit G Ardine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a major problem of cancer patients. Thirty percent of cancer survivors report serious fatigue three years after finishing treatment. There is evidence that physical exercise during cancer treatment reduces fatigue. This may also lead to an improvement of quality of life. Such findings may result in a decrease of healthcare related expenditures and societal costs due to sick leave. However, no studies are known that investigated these hypotheses. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to assess the effect of exercise during cancer treatment on reducing complaints of fatigue and on reducing health service utilisation and sick leave. Methods/Design The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment study is a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 150 breast and 150 colon cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment. Participants will be randomised to an exercise or a control group. In addition to the usual care, the exercise group will participate in an 18-week supervised group exercise programme. The control group will be asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. Study endpoints will be assessed after 18 weeks (short term and after 9 months (long term. Validated questionnaires will be used. Primary outcome: fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and Fatigue Quality List and cost-effectiveness, health service utilisation and sick leave. Secondary outcome: health related quality of life (European Organisation Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life questionnaire-C30, Short Form 36 healthy survey, impact on functioning and autonomy (Impact on functioning and autonomy questionnaire, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, physical fitness (aerobic peak capacity, muscle strength, body composition and cognitive-behavioural aspects. To register health service utilisation and sick leave, participants will keep diaries including the EuroQuol-5D. Physical activity level

  11. New clinical trial will test COXEN’s ability to choose best therapy for patients with advanced bladder cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Genitourinary Malignancies Branch is now enrolling participants for a clinical trial that will evaluate whether analyzing a tumor’s genetic profile can identify which approved anticancer drugs are most likely to benefit individual patients whose bladder cancer has stopped responding to standard treatments. Learn more...

  12. Clinical trials of cancer screening in the developing world and their impact on cancer healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Sauvaget, C; Ramadas, K; Ngoma, T; Teguete, I; Muwonge, R; Naud, P; Nessa, A; Kuhaprema, T; Qiao, Y

    2011-11-01

    Several research and training initiatives were organized by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in collaboration with national institutions in countries such as Angola, Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Republic of Congo, Guinea, India, Mali, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, Peru, Tanzania and Thailand among others, to address feasible and effective means of early detection and prevention of cervical, breast and oral cancers. The impact of these activities, that involved over 600 000 participants and more than 1200 healthcare personnel trained on strengthening the local health services in terms of infrastructure, human resources and service delivery aspects in host countries and other regions, is addressed here. These studies, inbuilt in appropriate health services platforms, have resulted in the development and sustenance of several continuing point of care services of screening and treatment in most host countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, and have catalysed regional early detection programmes in India, China and Thailand. The IARC collaborative studies have evolved into major focal points of training and extending services in many countries. The large evidence base, resulting from ours and other studies is likely, in due course, to facilitate much wider scaling up of screening and treatment services through organised programmes.

  13. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  14. Treg depletion inhibits efficacy of cancer immunotherapy: implications for clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Curtin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg infiltrate human glioblastoma (GBM; are involved in tumor progression and correlate with tumor grade. Transient elimination of Tregs using CD25 depleting antibodies (PC61 has been found to mediate GBM regression in preclinical models of brain tumors. Clinical trials that combine Treg depletion with tumor vaccination are underway to determine whether transient Treg depletion can enhance anti-tumor immune responses and improve long term survival in cancer patients.Using a syngeneic intracrabial glioblastoma (GBM mouse model we show that systemic depletion of Tregs 15 days after tumor implantation using PC61 resulted in a decrease in Tregs present in tumors, draining lymph nodes and spleen and improved long-term survival (50% of mice survived >150 days. No improvement in survival was observed when Tregs were depleted 24 days after tumor implantation, suggesting that tumor burden is an important factor for determining efficacy of Treg depletion in clinical trials. In a T cell dependent model of brain tumor regression elicited by intratumoral delivery of adenoviral vectors (Ad expressing Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L and Herpes Simplex Type 1-Thymidine Kinase (TK with ganciclovir (GCV, we demonstrate that administration of PC61 24 days after tumor implantation (7 days after treatment inhibited T cell dependent tumor regression and long term survival. Further, depletion with PC61 completely inhibited clonal expansion of tumor antigen-specific T lymphocytes in response to the treatment.Our data demonstrate for the first time, that although Treg depletion inhibits the progression/eliminates GBM tumors, its efficacy is dependent on tumor burden. We conclude that this approach will be useful in a setting of minimal residual disease. Further, we also demonstrate that Treg depletion, using PC61 in combination with immunotherapy, inhibits clonal expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells, suggesting that new, more

  15. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  16. Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) Study: design of a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Miranda J; May, Anne M; Koppejan-Rensenbrink, Ria Ag; Gijsen, Brigitte C M; van Breda, Eric; de Wit, G Ardine; Schröder, Carin D; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Lindeman, Eline; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H M

    2010-06-09

    Fatigue is a major problem of cancer patients. Thirty percent of cancer survivors report serious fatigue three years after finishing treatment. There is evidence that physical exercise during cancer treatment reduces fatigue. This may also lead to an improvement of quality of life. Such findings may result in a decrease of healthcare related expenditures and societal costs due to sick leave. However, no studies are known that investigated these hypotheses. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to assess the effect of exercise during cancer treatment on reducing complaints of fatigue and on reducing health service utilisation and sick leave. The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment study is a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 150 breast and 150 colon cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment. Participants will be randomised to an exercise or a control group. In addition to the usual care, the exercise group will participate in an 18-week supervised group exercise programme. The control group will be asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. Study endpoints will be assessed after 18 weeks (short term) and after 9 months (long term). Validated questionnaires will be used. fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and Fatigue Quality List) and cost-effectiveness, health service utilisation and sick leave. Secondary outcome: health related quality of life (European Organisation Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life questionnaire-C30, Short Form 36 healthy survey), impact on functioning and autonomy (Impact on functioning and autonomy questionnaire), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), physical fitness (aerobic peak capacity, muscle strength), body composition and cognitive-behavioural aspects. To register health service utilisation and sick leave, participants will keep diaries including the EuroQuol-5D. Physical activity level will be measured using the Short Questionnaire to Assess Health

  17. An Open Letter to the Cancer Community Regarding Community Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is in the process of combining its two community-based research networks to create a single network that builds on the strengths of the Community Clinical Oncology Program/Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Prog

  18. The role of active vaccination in cancer immunotherapy: lessons from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, Haydn T; Sanda, Martin G

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, a number of different immunotherapeutic strategies have shown impressive results in cancer patients. These successful approaches include blockade of immunosuppressive molecules like PD-1 and CTLA-4, adoptive transfer of patient derived and genetically modified T-cells, and vaccines that stimulate tumor antigen specific T-cells. However, several large vaccine trials recently failed to reach designated primary endpoints. In light of the success of other immunotherapeutic approaches, these negative results raise the questions of why vaccines have not generated a better response, and what the role of active vaccination will be moving forward in cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The eCALM Trial-eTherapy for cancer appLying mindfulness: online mindfulness-based cancer recovery program for underserved individuals living with cancer in Alberta: protocol development for a randomized wait-list controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernicke Kristin A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated stress can exacerbate cancer symptom severity, and after completion of primary cancer treatments, many individuals continue to have significant distress. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR is an 8-week group psychosocial intervention consisting of training in mindfulness meditation and yoga designed to mitigate stress, pain, and chronic illness. Efficacy research shows face-to-face (F2F MBCR programs have positive benefits for cancer patients; however barriers exist that impede participation in F2F groups. While online MBCR groups are available to the public, none have been evaluated. Primary objective: determine whether underserved patients are willing to participate in and complete an online MBCR program. Secondary objectives: determine whether online MBCR will mirror previous efficacy findings from F2F MBCR groups on patient-reported outcomes. Method/design The study includes cancer patients in Alberta, exhibiting moderate distress, who do not have access to F2F MBCR. Participants will be randomized to either online MBCR, or waiting for the next available group. An anticipated sample size of 64 participants will complete measures online pre and post treatment or waiting period. Feasibility will be tracked through monitoring numbers eligible and participating through each stage of the protocol. Discussion 47 have completed/completing the intervention. Data suggest it is possible to conduct a randomized waitlist controlled trial of online MBCR to reach underserved cancer survivors. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01476891

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologically advanced prostate cancer a randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian, M.; Thompson, J.R.; Catherine, M.; Tangen, P.H.; Paradelo, J.; Scott Lucia, M.; Miller, G.; Troyer, D.; Messing, E.; Forman, J.; Chin, J.; Swanson, G.; Canby-Hagino, E.; Crawford, E.D

    2008-01-15

    Context - Despite a stage-shift to earlier cancer stages and lower tumor volumes for prostate cancer, pathologically advanced disease is detected at radical prostatectomy in 38% to 52% of patients. However, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is unknown. Objective - To determine whether adjuvant radiotherapy improves metastasis-free survival in patients with stage pT3 NO MO prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients - Randomized, prospective, multi-institutional, US clinical trial with enrollment between August 15, 1988, and January 1, 1997 (with database frozen for statistical analysis on September 21, 2005). Patients were 425 men with pathologically advanced prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Intervention - Men were randomly assigned to receive 60 to 64 Gy of external beam radiotherapy delivered to the prostatic fossa (n = 214) or usual care plus observation (n = 211). Main Outcome Measures - Primary outcome was metastasis-free survival, defined as time to first occurrence of metastatic disease or death due to any cause. Secondary outcomes included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, recurrence-free survival, overall survival, freedom from hormonal therapy, and postoperative complications. Results - Among the 425 men, median follow-up was 10.6 years (inter-quartile range, 9.2-12.7 years). For metastasis-free survival,76 (35.5%) of 214 men in the adjuvant radiotherapy group were diagnosed with metastatic disease or died (median metastasis-free estimate, 14.7 years), compared with 91 (43.1%) of 211 (median metastasis-free estimate, 13.2 years) of those in the observation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02; P = .06). There were no significant between-group differences for overall survival (71 deaths, median survival of 14.7 years for radiotherapy vs 83 deaths, median survival of 13.8 years for observation; HR, 0.80; 95% Cl, 0.58-1.09; P =.16). PSA relapse (median PSA relapse-free survival

  1. Antiproliferative and metabolic effects of metformin in a preoperative window clinical trial for endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Kevin M; Rambally, Brooke S; DiFurio, Megan J; Sampey, Brante P; Gehrig, Paola A; Makowski, Liza; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a preoperative window study of metformin in endometrial cancer (EC) patients and evaluated its antiproliferative, molecular and metabolic effects. Twenty obese women with endometrioid EC were treated with metformin (850 mg) daily for up to 4 weeks prior to surgical staging. Expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were measured by immunohistochemistry. Global, untargeted metabolomics analysis of serum pre- and postmetformin treatment, and matched tumor, was performed. Metformin reduced proliferation by 11.75% (P = 0.008) based on the comparison of pre- and posttreatment endometrial tumors. A total of 65% of patients responded to metformin as defined by a decrease in Ki-67 staining in their endometrial tumors post-treatment. Metformin decreased expression of phosphorylated (p)-AMPK (P = 0.00001), p-Akt (P = 0.0002), p-S6 (51.2%, P = 0.0002), p-4E-BP-1 (P = 0.001), and ER (P = 0.0002) but not PR expression. Metabolomic profiling of serum indicated that responders versus nonresponders to treatment were more sensitive to metformin's effects on induction of lipolysis, which correlated with increased fatty acid oxidation and glycogen metabolism in matched tumors. In conclusion, metformin reduced tumor proliferation in a pre-operative window study in obese EC patients, with dramatic effects on inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Metformin induced a shift in lipid and glycogen metabolism that was more pronounced in the serum and tumors of responders versus nonresponders to treatment.This study provides support for therapeutic clinical trials of metformin in obese patients with EC. PMID:25417601

  2. Clinical Trials with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Pisano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, increasing attention has been progressively focused on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD, whose unique formulation prolongs the persistence of the drug in the circulation and potentiates intratumor accumulation. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has become a major component in the routine management of epithelial ovarian cancer. In 1999 it was first approved for platinum-refractory ovarian cancer and then received full approval for platinum-sensitive recurrent disease in 2005. PLD remains an important therapeutic tool in the management of recurrent ovarian cancer in 2012. Recent interest in PLD/carboplatin combination therapy has been the object of phase III trials in platinum-sensitive and chemonaïve ovarian cancer patients reporting response rates, progressive-free survival, and overall survival similar to other platinum-based combinations, but with a more favorable toxicity profile and convenient dosing schedule. This paper summarizes data clarifying the role of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD in ovarian cancer, as well as researches focusing on adding novel targeted drugs to this cytotoxic agent.

  3. Clinical trials with pegylated liposomal Doxorubicin in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Carmela; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cavaliere, Carla; Tambaro, Rosa; Facchini, Gaetano; Scaffa, Cono; Losito, Simona; Pizzolorusso, Antonio; Pignata, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, increasing attention has been progressively focused on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), whose unique formulation prolongs the persistence of the drug in the circulation and potentiates intratumor accumulation. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has become a major component in the routine management of epithelial ovarian cancer. In 1999 it was first approved for platinum-refractory ovarian cancer and then received full approval for platinum-sensitive recurrent disease in 2005. PLD remains an important therapeutic tool in the management of recurrent ovarian cancer in 2012. Recent interest in PLD/carboplatin combination therapy has been the object of phase III trials in platinum-sensitive and chemonaïve ovarian cancer patients reporting response rates, progressive-free survival, and overall survival similar to other platinum-based combinations, but with a more favorable toxicity profile and convenient dosing schedule. This paper summarizes data clarifying the role of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in ovarian cancer, as well as researches focusing on adding novel targeted drugs to this cytotoxic agent.

  4. Challenges and methodology in the incorporation of biomarkers in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte S; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Fiorentino, Francesca; Brown, Robert; Ashby, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    Biomarkers can be used to establish more homogeneous groups using the genetic makeup of the tumour to inform the selection of treatment for each individual patient. However, proper preclinical work and stringent validation are needed before taking forward biomarkers into confirmatory studies. Despite the challenges, incorporation of biomarkers into clinical trials could better target appropriate patients, and potentially be lifesaving. The authors conducted a systematic review to describe marker-based and adaptive design methodology for their integration in clinical trials, and to further describe the associated practical challenges. Studies published between 1990 to November 2015 were searched on PubMed. Titles, abstracts and full text articles were reviewed to identify relevant studies. Of the 4438 studies examined, 57 studies were included. The authors conclude that the proposed approaches may readily help researchers to design biomarker trials, but novel approaches are still needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of overall survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: development of a prognostic model through a crowdsourced challenge with open clinical trial data

    OpenAIRE

    Guinney, Justin; Tao WANG; Laajala, Teemu D; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Bare, J. Christopher; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Khan, Suleiman A.; Peddinti, Gopal; Airola, Antti; Pahikkala, Tapio; Mirtti, Tuomas; Yu, Thomas; Bot, Brian M.; Shen, Liji; Abdallah, Kald

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improvements to prognostic models in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have the potential to augment clinical trial design and guide treatment strategies. In partnership with Project Data Sphere, a not-for-profit initiative allowing data from cancer clinical trials to be shared broadly with researchers, we designed an open-data, crowdsourced, DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) challenge to not only identify a better prognostic model for ...

  6. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buunen, M; Bonjer, H J; Hop, W C J

    2009-01-01

    clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...

  7. Gaining control over breast cancer risk: Transforming vulnerability, uncertainty, and the future through clinical trial participation - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Whitehouse, Katie; Daly, Mary; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-11-01

    Concepts of disease risk and its management are central to processes of medicalisation and pharmaceuticalisation. Through a narrative perspective, this paper aims to understand how such macro-level developments may (or may not) be experienced individually, and how an algorithm that is used for recruitment into a clinical trial may structure individual notions of being 'at risk' and 'in need of treatment'. We interviewed 31 women participating in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR), a chemoprevention trial conducted in the US between 1999 and 2006. Interviews were thematically analysed. Women in the study had experienced the threat of breast cancer and felt vulnerable to developing the disease prior to STAR participation. The diagnosis of 'being at risk' for cancer through an algorithm that determined risk-eligibility for STAR, opened up the possibility for the women to heal. The trial became a means to recognise and collectivise the women's experiences of vulnerability. Through medication intake, being cared for by study coordinators, and the sense of community with other STAR participants, trial participation worked to transform women's lives. Such transformative experiences may nevertheless have been temporary, enduring only as long as the close links to the medical institution through trial participation lasted. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  8. Gaining control over breast cancer risk: Transforming vulnerability, uncertainty, and the future through clinical trial participation – a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Whitehouse, Katie; Daly, Mary; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Concepts of disease risk and its management are central to processes of medicalisation and pharmaceuticalisation. Through a narrative perspective, this paper aims to understand how such macro-level developments may (or may not) be experienced individually, and how an algorithm that is used for recruitment into a clinical trial may structure individual notions of being ‘at risk’ and ‘in need of treatment’. We interviewed thirty-one women participating in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR), a chemoprevention trial conducted in the US between 1999 and 2006. Interviews were thematically analysed. Women in the study had experienced the threat of breast cancer and felt vulnerable to developing the disease prior to STAR participation. The diagnosis of ‘being at risk’ for cancer through an algorithm that determined risk-eligibility for STAR, opened up the possibility for the women to heal. The trial became a means to recognise and collectivise the women's experiences of vulnerability. Through medication intake, being cared for by study coordinators, and the sense of community with other STAR participants, trial participation worked to transform women's lives. Such transformative experiences may nevertheless have been temporary, enduring only as long as the close links to the medical institution through trial participation lasted. PMID:26235092

  9. Development and Validation of a Clinical Trial Accrual Predictive Regression Model at a Single NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Wendy R; Cranmer, Lee D

    2016-05-01

    Clinical study sites often do not achieve anticipated accrual to clinical trials, wasting critical patient, material, and human resources. The expensive and extensive process to bring a drug to approval highlights the need to streamline clinical pipeline processes. We sought to create a predictive accrual model to be used when considering clinical trial activation at the level of the individual site. This retrospective cohort study used 7 years of registry data from treatment and supportive care interventional studies at a single academic cancer center to build a negative binomial regression model with local and protocol variables known prestudy. Actual, team-predicted, and model-predicted accrual and sensitivity/specificity were calculated. To build the model, 207 trials were used. Investigational drug application, disease team, number of national sites, local Institutional Review Board use, total national accrual time, accrual completed, and national enrollment goal were independently and significantly associated with accrual. Predicted accrual was 94% of actual, maintaining predictive value at multiple cutoff values. Validation included 61 trials. The model correctly predicted whether a study would accrue at least 4 subjects 75% of the time. Correlation at the category level was 44.3%, and model sensitivity and specificity are 70% and 78%, respectively. We identified and validated national and local key factors associated with accrual at our site. This methodology has not been previously validated broadly with the intent of trial feasibility. Model validation shows it to be an accurate and quick metric in anticipating accrual success that can be used for resource allocation. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  10. Effects of exercise on sleep problems in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorf, Karen; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Schmidt, Martina E

    2017-04-01

    Sleep problems frequently affect breast cancer patients during and after treatment and reduce their quality of life. Treatment strategies are mostly unknown. Thus, we assessed within a randomized controlled trial whether a 12-week exercise program starting with the radiotherapy influences sleep trajectories. Sleep quality and problems were assessed via self-report in 160 breast cancer patients before, during, and 2, 6, and 12 months after participation in a trial investigating resistance exercise versus a relaxation control group concomitant with radiotherapy. As additional comparison group, 25 age-matched healthy women exercised and followed identical study procedures. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used. The exercise intervention significantly decreased sleep problems compared to the relaxation control group (scale: 0-100, with between-group mean differences of -10.2 (p = 0.03) from baseline to the end of radiotherapy and -10.9 (p = 0.005) to the end of the intervention), with sleep problems decreasing in the exercise group and increasing in the control group. At 12 months, differences were still observed but statistically non-significant (mean difference = -5.9, p = 0.20). Further adjustment for potential confounders did not change the results. Several determinants of sleep problems at baseline were identified, e.g., previous chemotherapy and higher body mass index. Our randomized exercise intervention trial confirmed results from earlier but mostly smaller studies that radiotherapy aggravates sleep problems in breast cancer patients and that exercise can ameliorate these effects. Considering that sleep quality can be a major predictor of quality of life, our findings are of substantial importance to many breast cancer patients.

  11. Protocol of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project: formal consensus method for the development of guidelines for standardised time-to-event endpoints' definitions in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellera, Carine A; Pulido, Marina; Gourgou, Sophie; Collette, Laurence; Doussau, Adélaïde; Kramar, Andrew; Dabakuyo, Tienhan Sandrine; Ouali, Monia; Auperin, Anne; Filleron, Thomas; Fortpied, Catherine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Paoletti, Xavier; Mauer, Murielle; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Bonnetain, Franck

    2013-03-01

    In randomised phase III cancer clinical trials, the most objectively defined and only validated time-to-event endpoint is overall survival (OS). The appearance of new types of treatments and the multiplication of lines of treatment have resulted in the use of surrogate endpoints for overall survival such as progression-free survival (PFS), or time-to-treatment failure. Their development is strongly influenced by the necessity of reducing clinical trial duration, cost and number of patients. However, while these endpoints are frequently used, they are often poorly defined and definitions can differ between trials which may limit their use as primary endpoints. Moreover, this variability of definitions can impact on the trial's results by affecting estimation of treatments' effects. The aim of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project is to provide recommendations for standardised definitions of time-to-event endpoints in randomised cancer clinical trials. We will use a formal consensus methodology based on experts' opinions which will be obtained in a systematic manner. Definitions will be independently developed for several cancer sites, including pancreatic, breast, head and neck and colon cancer, as well as sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The DATECAN project should lead to the elaboration of recommendations that can then be used as guidelines by researchers participating in clinical trials. This process should lead to a standardisation of the definitions of commonly used time-to-event endpoints, enabling appropriate comparisons of future trials' results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phase II clinical trial of peptide cocktail therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: VENUS-PC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hazama, Shoichi; Iguchi, Haruo; Uesugi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hirakawa, Kosei; Aruga, Atsushi; Hatori, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Umeda, Yuzo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Hiroto; Sakata, Koichiro; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Matsui, Hiroto; Shindo, Yoshitaro; Iida, Michihisa; Koki, Yasunobu; Arima, Hideki; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Oka, Masaaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We previously conducted a phase I clinical trial combining the HLA-A*2402-restricted KIF20A-derived peptide vaccine with gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) and confirmed its safety and immunogenicity in cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a multicenter, single-armed, phase II trial using two antiangiogenic cancer vaccines targeting VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in addition to the KIF20A peptide. We attempted to evaluate the clinical benefit of the cancer vaccination in combination with gemcitabine. Chemotherapy naïve PC patients were enrolled to evaluate primarily the 1-year survival rate, and secondarily overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), disease control rate (DCR) and the peptide-specific immune responses. All enrolled patients received therapy without the HLA-A information, and the HLA genotypes were used for classification of the patients. Between June 2012 and May 2013, a total of 68 patients were enrolled. No severe systemic adverse effects of Grade 3 or higher related to these three peptides were observed. The 1-year survival rates between the HLA-A*2402-matched and -unmatched groups were not significantly different. In the HLA-A*2402 matched group, patients showing peptide-specific CTL induction for KIF20A or VEGFR1 showed a better prognosis compared to those without such induction (P = 0.023, P = 0.009, respectively). In the HLA-A*2402-matched group, the patients who showed a strong injection site reaction had a better survival rate (P = 0.017) compared to those with a weak or no injection site reaction. This phase II study demonstrated that this therapeutic peptide cocktail might be effective in patients who demonstrate peptide-specific immune reactions although predictive biomarkers are needed for patient selection in its further clinical application. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Characterization of a Test for Invasive Breast Cancer Using X-ray Diffraction of Hair - Results of a Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Corino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the performance of a test for breast cancer utilizing synchrotron x-ray diffraction analysis of scalp hair from women undergoing diagnostic radiology assessment. Design and Setting: A double-blinded clinical trial of women who attended diagnostic radiology clinics in Australia. Patients: 1796 women referred for diagnostic radiology, with no previous history of cancer. Main Outcome Measures: Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the hair test analysis compared to the gold standard of imaging followed by biopsy where indicated. Results: The hair-based assay had an overall accuracy of >77% and a negative predictive value of 99%. For all women, the sensitivity of both mammography and x-ray diffraction alone was 64%, but when used together the sensitivity rose to 86%. The sensitivity of the hair test for women under the age of 70 was 74%. Conclusion: In this large population trial the association between the presence of breast cancer and an altered hair fibre X-ray diffraction pattern previously reported has been confirmed. It appears that mammography and X-ray diffraction of hair detect different populations of breast cancers, and are synergistic when used together.

  14. Sleep quality and its association with fatigue, symptom burden, and mood in patients with advanced cancer in a clinic for early-phase oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Goldy C; Iwuanyanwu, Eucharia C; Anderson, Karen O; Yusuf, Alizeh; Zinner, Ralph G; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Subbiah, Vivek; Cleeland, Charles S; Mendoza, Tito R; Hong, David S

    2016-11-15

    Limited data exist about sleep quality for patients with advanced cancer in phase 1 clinical trials. Poor sleep quality is often not captured as an adverse event, and its association with fatigue, one of the most frequently reported adverse events, is not documented routinely. This article describes sleep quality and its relation with fatigue, symptom burden, and mood in patients recruited from an early-phase clinic for targeted therapy. Sleep, fatigue, symptom burden, and mood were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Brief Fatigue Inventory, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and the Brief Profile of Mood States, respectively; the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) was determined from medical records. The sample (n = 256) was 51.2% female, 90% had an ECOG PS of 0 or 1, and the mean age was 58 ± 0.8 years. Poor sleepers (global PSQI score > 5) constituted 64% of the sample. In separate multiple regression models, poor sleepers had higher levels of fatigue (P associated with greater fatigue, symptom burden, and mood disturbance. Sleep quality should be routinely assessed in patients with advanced cancer who are participating in early-phase clinical trials. Cancer 2016;122:3401-3409. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer ... because of timely detection and treatment of his prostate cancer. He participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. ...

  16. Clinical trial structures

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Most errors in clinical trials are a result of poor planning. Fancy statistical methods cannot rescue design flaws. Thus careful planning with clear foresight is crucial. The selection of a clinical trial design structure requires logic and creativity. Common structural designs are discussed.

  17. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, Lotta; Järvelä, Liisa; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Arola, Mikko; Heinonen, Olli J; Axelin, Anna; Lilius, Johan; Vahlberg, Tero; Salanterä, Sanna

    2014-04-05

    Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children's cancer treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children's perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012).

  18. Examining Differences in Opportunity and Eligibility for Cancer Clinical Trial Participation Based on Sociodemographic and Disease Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rearden, Jessica; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Ulrich, Connie; Brooks-Carthon, Margo; Sommers, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    To examine differences in opportunity and eligibility for cancer clinical trial (CCT) participation based on sociodemographic and disease characteristics.
. A matched cross-sectional study including a prospective oral questionnaire and retrospective electronic medical record (EMR) review.
. A single hospital in a large academic National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
. 44 Black or Hispanic and 44 Non-Hispanic White newly diagnosed individuals matched on cancer type and age (plus or minus five years).
. Participants answered a questionnaire to capture self-reported opportunity for CCT participation, sociodemographic information, and cancer type. With consent, the authors completed a retrospective review of the EMR to assess eligibility and collect cancer stage and performance status.
. Opportunity and eligibility for CCT participation.
. Most participants (78%) had no opportunity for participation and were ineligible for all available trials. No differences were noted in opportunity for participation or eligibility based on race or ethnicity. Participants with late-stage disease were more likely to have opportunity and be eligible for CCT participation (p = 0.001). Those with private insurance were less likely to have opportunity for participation (p = 0.05).
. Limited trial availability and ineligibility negatively influenced opportunity for CCT participation for all populations. Levels of under-representation for CCT participation likely vary within and across sociodemographic and disease characteristics, as well as across healthcare settings.
. The unique roles of nurse navigators and advanced practice nurses can be leveraged to increase opportunities for CCT participation for all populations.

  19. A Bayesian adaptive design for estimating the maximum tolerated dose curve using drug combinations in cancer phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighiouart, Mourad; Li, Quanlin; Rogatko, André

    2017-01-30

    We present a cancer phase I clinical trial design of a combination of two drugs with the goal of estimating the maximum tolerated dose curve in the two-dimensional Cartesian plane. A parametric model is used to describe the relationship between the doses of the two agents and the probability of dose limiting toxicity. The model is re-parameterized in terms of the probabilities of toxicities at dose combinations corresponding to the minimum and maximum doses available in the trial and the interaction parameter. Trial design proceeds using cohorts of two patients receiving doses according to univariate escalation with overdose control (EWOC), where at each stage of the trial, we seek a dose of one agent using the current posterior distribution of the MTD of this agent given the current dose of the other agent. The maximum tolerated dose curve is estimated as a function of Bayes estimates of the model parameters. Performance of the trial is studied by evaluating its design operating characteristics in terms of safety of the trial and percent of dose recommendation at dose combination neighborhoods around the true MTD curve and under model misspecifications for the true dose-toxicity relationship. The method is further extended to accommodate discrete dose combinations and compared with previous approaches under several scenarios. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Developing ethical strategies to assist oncologists in seeking informed consent to cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R F; Butow, P N; Butt, D G; Moore, A R; Tattersall, M H N

    2004-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have come to be regarded as the gold standard in treatment evaluation. However, many doctors see the discussion of a clinical trial as an intrusion into the doctor-patient relationship and find these discussions difficult to initiate. Detailed informed consent is now a requirement of patient participation in trials; however, it is known that patients commonly fail to understand and recall the information conveyed. These difficulties for doctors and patients raise questions about the ethical integrity of the informed consent process. In this study, we have developed a set of communication strategies underpinned by ethical, linguistic and psychological theory, designed to assist doctors in this difficult task. Initially, audiotape transcripts of 26 consultations in which 10 medical oncologists invited patients to participate in clinical trials were analysed by expert ethicists, linguists, oncologists and psychologists, using rigorous qualitative methodology. A subset of seven of these was subjected to detailed linguistic analysis. A strategies document was developed to address themes which emerged from these analyses. This document was presented to relevant expert stakeholders. Their feedback was incorporated into the final document. Four themes emerged from the analysis; (a) shared decision-making, (b) the sequence of moves in the consultation, (c) the type and clarity of the information provided and (d) disclosure of controversial information and coercion. Detailed strategies were developed to assist doctors to communicate in these areas. We have developed a set of ethical strategies which may assist health professionals in this difficult area. A training package based on these strategies is currently being evaluated in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  1. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...... and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase I to phase IV trials. As demonstrated by this summary, biomarkers can provide value at all stages of therapeutics development. When resources permit, we recommend collection of biospecimens in all OA clinical trials for a wide variety...

  2. Naturally Occurring Canine Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Complementary Animal Model to Improve the Success Rate in Human Clinical Trials of New Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Christopher M; Dhawan, Deepika; Ratliff, Timothy L; Hahn, Noah M; Knapp, Deborah W

    2017-01-01

    Genomic analyses are defining numerous new targets for cancer therapy. Therapies aimed at specific genetic and epigenetic targets in cancer cells as well as expanded development of immunotherapies are placing increased demands on animal models. Traditional experimental models do not possess the collective features (cancer heterogeneity, molecular complexity, invasion, metastasis, and immune cell response) critical to predict success or failure of emerging therapies in humans. There is growing evidence, however, that dogs with specific forms of naturally occurring cancer can serve as highly relevant animal models to complement traditional models. Invasive urinary bladder cancer (invasive urothelial carcinoma (InvUC)) in dogs, for example, closely mimics the cancer in humans in pathology, molecular features, biological behavior including sites and frequency of distant metastasis, and response to chemotherapy. Genomic analyses are defining further intriguing similarities between InvUC in dogs and that in humans. Multiple canine clinical trials have been completed, and others are in progress with the aim of translating important findings into humans to increase the success rate of human trials, as well as helping pet dogs. Examples of successful targeted therapy studies and the challenges to be met to fully utilize naturally occurring dog models of cancer will be reviewed.

  3. Naturally Occurring Canine Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Complementary Animal Model to Improve the Success Rate in Human Clinical Trials of New Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Fulkerson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analyses are defining numerous new targets for cancer therapy. Therapies aimed at specific genetic and epigenetic targets in cancer cells as well as expanded development of immunotherapies are placing increased demands on animal models. Traditional experimental models do not possess the collective features (cancer heterogeneity, molecular complexity, invasion, metastasis, and immune cell response critical to predict success or failure of emerging therapies in humans. There is growing evidence, however, that dogs with specific forms of naturally occurring cancer can serve as highly relevant animal models to complement traditional models. Invasive urinary bladder cancer (invasive urothelial carcinoma (InvUC in dogs, for example, closely mimics the cancer in humans in pathology, molecular features, biological behavior including sites and frequency of distant metastasis, and response to chemotherapy. Genomic analyses are defining further intriguing similarities between InvUC in dogs and that in humans. Multiple canine clinical trials have been completed, and others are in progress with the aim of translating important findings into humans to increase the success rate of human trials, as well as helping pet dogs. Examples of successful targeted therapy studies and the challenges to be met to fully utilize naturally occurring dog models of cancer will be reviewed.

  4. Accreditation and quality assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: Multicenter clinical trials using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Robert; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeff; Straube, William; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Martin, Elizabeth; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Swann, Suzanne; Fowler, Jack; Choy, Hak

    2006-01-01

    Starting in 2002, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in North America began the process of developing multicenter prospective trials in lung cancer using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Much of the work was based on the prospective single institution trials from Indiana University that had been presented and published. In late 2004, RTOG 0236 using SBRT for medically inoperable patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was activated for accrual. Prior to activation, representatives from the Lung, Image-Guided Therapy, Physics, and Radiobiology Committees met on regular occasions to design the multicenter study and quality assurance measures. SBRT is not a black box, and the essence of the therapy had to be distilled via guidelines. Issues related to patient selection, method of dosimetry construction, equipment requirements, motion assessments and control, site accreditation, data exchange, and follow-up policies were worked out by compromise and consensus. RTOG 0236 has nearly completed its accrual. The Lung Committee has initiated the development of several other trials, each building on the last, to investigate the therapy in central tumors, in combinations with systemic therapy, in operable patients, and in lung metastases patients. The guidelines developed for RTOG 0236 will be refined to take advantage of more modern innovations including heterogeneity corrections and intensity modulation when appropriate. The development of RTOG 0618 using SBRT in operable patients with early stage NSCLC is a testament to both the enthusiasm from already published works and prospective multicenter clinical testing using SBRT techniques.

  5. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  6. Surrogate marker analysis in cancer clinical trials through time-to-event mediation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Sjouke; Duchateau, Luc; Slaets, Leen; Bogaerts, Jan; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    The meta-analytic approach is the gold standard for validation of surrogate markers, but has the drawback of requiring data from several trials. We refine modern mediation analysis techniques for time-to-event endpoints and apply them to investigate whether pathological complete response can be used as a surrogate marker for disease-free survival in the EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00 randomised phase 3 trial in which locally advanced breast cancer patients were randomised to either taxane or anthracycline based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In the mediation analysis, the treatment effect is decomposed into an indirect effect via pathological complete response and the remaining direct effect. It shows that only 4.2% of the treatment effect on disease-free survival after five years is mediated by the treatment effect on pathological complete response. There is thus no evidence from our analysis that pathological complete response is a valuable surrogate marker to evaluate the effect of taxane versus anthracycline based chemotherapies on progression free survival of locally advanced breast cancer patients. The proposed analysis strategy is broadly applicable to mediation analyses of time-to-event endpoints, is easy to apply and outperforms existing strategies in terms of precision as well as robustness against model misspecification.

  7. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer beyond Biomarkers: The Evolving Landscape of Clinical Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Anastasios; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki

    2014-06-30

    The approval of EGFR and ALK directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors materialized the concept of tailoring therapy on the basis of specific biomarkers for treating patients with NSCLC. Research for other biologics, although demonstrating clinical benefit, has been less successful so far for producing biomarkers that predict response. Blocking angiogenesis is the prototype for the agents that belong in the latter group that target specific molecules, yet they are currently approved for relatively unselected groups of patients. In order to meet the goal of personalizing care in the various settings of NSCLC, a wealth of biologics and compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials in different phases of clinical development. In a subset of the relevant studies, a biomarker perspective is appreciated. This review summarizes the clinical rationale of the major ongoing phase II and III NSCLC studies that employ targeting specific molecules with novel agents, as well as innovative strategies, and includes a comparative discussion of the different designs.

  8. Durable response rate as an endpoint in cancer immunotherapy: insights from oncolytic virus clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Howard L; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Collichio, Frances A; Wolf, Michael; Zhao, Zhongyun; Shilkrut, Mark; Puzanov, Igor; Ross, Merrick

    2017-09-19

    Traditional response criteria may be insufficient to characterize full clinical benefits of anticancer immunotherapies. Consequently, endpoints such as durable response rate (DRR; a continuous response [complete or partial objective response] beginning within 12 months of treatment and lasting ≥6 months) have been employed. There has not, however, been validation that DRR correlates with other more traditional endpoints of clinical benefit such as overall survival. We evaluated whether DRR was associated with clinically meaningful measures of benefit (eg, overall survival [OS], quality of life [QoL], or treatment-free interval [TFI]) in a phase 3 clinical trial of an oncolytic virus for melanoma treatment. To evaluate the association between DRR and OS and to mitigate lead time bias, landmark analyses were used. QoL was evaluated using the FACT-BRM questionnaire (comprising the FACT-BRM Physical, Social/Family, Emotional, and Functional well-being domains, the Additional Concerns, Physical and Mental treatment-specific subscales, and the Trial Outcome Index [TOI]). TFI was defined as time from the last study therapy dose to first subsequent therapy dose (including any systemic anticancer therapy for melanoma after study therapy discontinuation). Four hundred thirty-six patients were included in the intent-to-treat population. Achieving DR was associated with a statistically significant improvement in OS in a landmark analysis at 9 months (HR = 0.07; P = 0.0003), 12 months (HR = 0.05, P < 0.0001), and 18 months (HR = 0.11; P = 0.0002) that persisted after adjusting for disease stage and line of therapy. Achieving a DR was associated with a longer median TFI (HR = 0.33; P = 0.0007) and a higher TOI improvement rate (58.1% versus 30.0%; P = 0.025). Achieving a DR was associated with clinical benefits such as improved OS and QoL and prolonged TFI, thus supporting the usefulness of DR as a meaningful immunotherapy clinical trial

  9. Focal laser ablation for localized prostate cancer: principles, clinical trials, and our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted; Mendhiratta, Neil; Sperling, Dan; Lepor, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Focal therapy of prostate cancer is an evolving treatment strategy that destroys a predefined region of the prostate gland that harbors clinically significant disease. Although long-term oncologic control has yet to be demonstrated, focal therapy is associated with a marked decrease in treatment-related morbidity. Focal laser ablation is an emerging modality that has several advantages, most notably real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility. This review presents the principles of laser ablation, the role of multiparametric MRI for delineating the site of significant prostate cancer, a summary of published clinical studies, and our initial experience with 23 patients, criteria for selecting candidates for focal prostate ablation, and speculation regarding future directions.

  10. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  11. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer: The Danish Palliative Care Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Nielsen, Jan Bjoern; Pedersen, Lise; Sjøgren, Per; Strömgren, Annette Sand; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Fayers, Peter; Higginson, Irene J; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2017-10-01

    Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients with advanced cancer were screened for palliative needs. Patients with scores exceeding a predefined threshold for problems with physical, emotional or role function, or nausea/vomiting, pain, dyspnoea or lack of appetite according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were eligible. The primary outcome was the change in each patient's primary need (the most severe of the seven QLQ-C30 scales) at 3- and 8-week follow-up (0-100 scale). Five sensitivity analyses were conducted. Secondary outcomes were change in the seven QLQ-C30 scales and survival. Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0.14). The sensitivity analyses showed similar results. Analyses of the secondary outcomes, including survival, also showed no differences, maybe with the exception of nausea/vomiting where early specialist palliative care might have had a beneficial effect. We did not observe beneficial or harmful effects of early specialist palliative care, but important beneficial effects cannot be excluded.

  12. Overweight, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Invasive Breast Cancer Risk: A Secondary Analysis of the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhouser, Marian L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Prentice, Ross L; Manson, JoAnn E; Chlebowski, Rowan; Carty, Cara L; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Thomson, Cynthia A; Caan, Bette J; Tinker, Lesley F; Urrutia, Rachel Peragallo; Knudtson, Jennifer; Anderson, Garnet L

    2015-08-01

    More than two-thirds of US women are overweight or obese, placing them at increased risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. To investigate in this secondary analysis the associations of overweight and obesity with risk of postmenopausal invasive breast cancer after extended follow-up in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials. The WHI clinical trial protocol incorporated measured height and weight, baseline and annual or biennial mammography, and adjudicated breast cancer end points in 67 142 postmenopausal women ages 50 to 79 years at 40 US clinical centers. The women were enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with a median of 13 years of follow-up through 2010; 3388 invasive breast cancers were observed. Height and weight were measured at baseline, and weight was measured annually thereafter. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, and personal habits (smoking, physical activity). Women underwent annual or biennial mammograms. Breast cancers were verified by medical records reviewed by physician adjudicators. Women who were overweight and obese had an increased invasive breast cancer risk vs women of normal weight. Risk was greatest for obesity grade 2 plus 3 (body mass index [BMI], calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, >35.0) (hazard ratio [HR] for invasive breast cancer, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.40-1.79). A BMI of 35.0 or higher was strongly associated with risk for estrogen receptor-positive and progesterone receptor-positive breast cancers (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.60-2.17) but was not associated with estrogen receptor-negative cancers. Obesity grade 2 plus 3 was also associated with advanced disease, including larger tumor size (HR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.67-2.69; P = .02), positive lymph nodes (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.46-2.45; P = .06), regional and/or distant stage (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.52-2.47; P = .05), and deaths after breast cancer (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57-2.84; P cancer

  13. Controlled clinical trial of adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG and neuraminidase-treated autologous tumour cells in large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B N; Walker, C; Andrewartha, L; Freeman, S; Bennett, R C

    1989-01-01

    A controlled, randomised clinical trial of immunotherapy was performed in 301 patients with stage B or C colorectal cancer. The immunotherapy treatment consisted of 18 vaccinations over a 2 year period following surgery with a combination of BCG given by scarification plus subcutaneous injection of Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCN)-modified autologous tumour cells. Five year follow-up has now been completed in all patients. The immunotherapy did not alter either the disease-free interval or the overall survival of patients in comparison with a control group of patients not receiving immunotherapy.

  14. A randomized trial of early detection of clinically significant prostate cancer (ProScreen): study design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Anssi; Rannikko, Antti; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Mirtti, Tuomas; Kenttämies, Anu; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Pettersson, Kim; Tammela, Teuvo L

    2017-06-01

    The current evidence of PSA-based prostate cancer screening shows a reduction in cause-specific mortality, but with substantial overdiagnosis. Recently, new developments in detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer include multiple kallikreins as biomarkers besides PSA, and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) for biopsy decision. They offer opportunities for improving the outcomes in screening, particularly reduction in overdiagnosis and higher specificity for potentially lethal cancer. A population-based randomized screening trial will be started, with 67,000 men aged 55-67 years at entry. A quarter of the men will be allocated to the intervention arm, and invited to screening. The control arm will receive no intervention. All men in the screening arm will be offered a serum PSA determination. Those with PSA of 3 ng/ml or higher will have an additional multi-kallikrein panel and those with indications of increased risk of clinically relevant prostate cancer will undergo mpMRI. Men with a malignancy-suspect finding in MRI are referred to targeted biopsies. Screening interval is 6 years for men with baseline PSA  3. The main outcome of the trial is prostate cancer mortality, with analysis at 10 and 15 years. The statistical power is sufficient for detecting a 28% reduction at 10 years and 22% at 15 years. The proposed study has the potential to provide the evidence to justify screening as a public health policy if mortality benefit can be sustained with substantially reduced overdiagnosis.

  15. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  16. Escalation with Overdose Control Using Ordinal Toxicity Grades for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Tighiouart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend a Bayesian adaptive phase I clinical trial design known as escalation with overdose control (EWOC by introducing an intermediate grade 2 toxicity when assessing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Under the proportional odds model assumption of dose-toxicity relationship, we prove that in the absence of DLT, the dose allocated to the next patient given that the previously treated patient had a maximum of grade 2 toxicity is lower than the dose given to the next patient had the previously treated patient exhibited a grade 0 or 1 toxicity at the most. Further, we prove that the coherence properties of EWOC are preserved. Simulation results show that the safety of the trial is not compromised and the efficiency of the estimate of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD is maintained relative to EWOC treating DLT as a binary outcome and that fewer patients are overdosed using this design when the true MTD is close to the minimum dose.

  17. Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee guidelines for tissue microarray construction representing multicenter prospective clinical trial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm, David L; Nielsen, Torsten O; Jewell, Scott D; Rohrer, Daniel C; Broadwater, Gloria; Waldman, Frederic; Mitchell, Kisha A; Singh, Baljit; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Frankel, Wendy L; Magliocco, Anthony M; Lara, Jonathan F; Hsi, Eric D; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Badve, Sunil S; Chen, Beiyun; Ravdin, Peter M; Schilsky, Richard L; Thor, Ann; Berry, Donald A

    2011-06-01

    Practice-changing evidence requires confirmation, preferably in multi-institutional clinical trials. The collection of tissue within such trials has enabled biomarker studies and evaluation of companion diagnostic tests. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have become a standard approach in many cooperative oncology groups. A principal goal is to maximize the number of assays with this precious tissue. However, production strategies for these arrays have not been standardized, possibly decreasing the value of the study. In this article, members of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee relay our experiences as array facility directors and propose guidelines regarding the production of high-quality TMAs for cooperative group studies. We also discuss statistical issues arising from having a proportion of patients available for TMAs and the possibility that patients with TMAs fail to represent the greater study population.

  18. A virtual clinical trial using projection-based nodule insertion to determine radiologist reader performance in lung cancer screening CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Hu, Qiyuan; Koo, Chi Wan; Takahashi, Edwin A.; Levin, David L.; Johnson, Tucker F.; Hora, Megan J.; Dirks, Shane; Chen, Baiyu; McMillan, Kyle; Leng, Shuai; Fletcher, J. G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2017-03-01

    Task-based image quality assessment using model observers is promising to provide an efficient, quantitative, and objective approach to CT dose optimization. Before this approach can be reliably used in practice, its correlation with radiologist performance for the same clinical task needs to be established. Determining human observer performance for a well-defined clinical task, however, has always been a challenge due to the tremendous amount of efforts needed to collect a large number of positive cases. To overcome this challenge, we developed an accurate projection-based insertion technique. In this study, we present a virtual clinical trial using this tool and a low-dose simulation tool to determine radiologist performance on lung-nodule detection as a function of radiation dose, nodule type, nodule size, and reconstruction methods. The lesion insertion and low-dose simulation tools together were demonstrated to provide flexibility to generate realistically-appearing clinical cases under well-defined conditions. The reader performance data obtained in this virtual clinical trial can be used as the basis to develop model observers for lung nodule detection, as well as for dose and protocol optimization in lung cancer screening CT.

  19. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2017-07-31

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Bradley

    2009-06-01

    exercise in this patient population specifically targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. Clinical Trial Registry A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  1. Exercise and nutrition for head and neck cancer patients: a patient oriented, clinic-supported randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capozzi Lauren C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on physical activity and nutrition interventions aimed at positively impacting symptom management, treatment-related recovery and quality of life has largely excluded head and neck (HN cancer populations. This translates into a lack of clinical programming available for these patient populations. HN cancer patients deal with severe weight loss, with more than 70% attributed to lean muscle wasting, leading to extended recovery times, decreased quality of life (QoL, and impaired physical functioning. To date, interventions to address body composition issues have focused solely on diet, despite findings that nutritional therapy alone is insufficient to mitigate changes. A combined physical activity and nutrition intervention, that also incorporates important educational components known to positively impact behaviour change, is warranted for this population. Our pilot work suggests that there is large patient demand and clinic support from the health care professionals for a comprehensive program. Methods/Design Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the impact and timing of a 12-week PA and nutrition intervention (either during or following treatment for HN cancer patients on body composition, recovery, serum inflammatory markers and quality of life. In addition, we will examine the impact of a 12-week maintenance program, delivered immediately following the intervention, on adherence, patient-reported outcomes (i.e., management of both physical and psychosocial treatment-related symptoms and side-effects, as well as return to work. Discussion This research will facilitate advancements in patient wellness, survivorship, and autonomy, and carve the path for a physical-activity and wellness-education model that can be implemented in other cancer centers. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT01681654

  2. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  3. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  <  0.05). For the patient cohort in this study, which is comprised of non-high-grade ER+  tumors, K i outperformed SUV in an ROC analysis of the parameter uncertainty distributions pre- and post-therapy. This methodology can be applied to different scenarios with the ability to inform the design of clinical trials using PET imaging.

  4. Immunoenhanced enteral nutrition formulas in head and neck cancer surgery: a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Rodera, P; Gómez-Candela, C; Benítez, S; Mateo, R; Armero, M; Castillo, R; Culebras, J M

    2008-01-01

    Significant malnutrition exists in a high percentage of patients with head and neck cancer. Malnutrition is associated with defects in immune function that may impair the host response to malignancy. Malnutrition and immunosupression make patients highly susceptible to postoperative infections and complications. Compare two immunoenhanced enteral nutritions with a control diet, and evaluate the effect in postoperative infections, length of stay and inflammatory markers. A population of 44 patients with oral and laryngeal cancer was enrolled in a randomized trial. At surgery, patients were randomly allocated to three groups: (group I); patients receiving an arginine-enhanced formula (group II); patients receiving a standard polymeric formula, and (group III) patients receiving an arginine, RNA and omega-3 fatty acids enhanced formula, in an isonitrogenous way. The duration of enteral nutrition in the three groups was similar with an average duration of 14,5 +/- 8 days. The length of postoperative stay was similar, with an average of 19,8 +/- 8,5 days. Wound infections and general infections were more frequent in the control group. Fistula rates were not improved in the enhanced diet groups. No significant intergroup differences in the trend of the two plasma proteins (albumin, transferrin), lymphocytes, weight, IL-6, CPR and TNFalpha were detected. The control group showed the highest levels of TNFalpha at the fourteenth postoperative day. Gastrointestinal tolerance and diarrhoea rate were similar in all the patients. Immunoenhanced enteral nutrition formulas improved the infection rate in the postoperative of head and neck cancer patients. In the fistula rates, we observed that technical problems and nutritional status might have played an equally important role, and therefore the positive effect of immunonutrition in this parameter might have been overestimated.

  5. Phase 3 clinical trial investigating the effect of selenium supplementation in men at high-risk for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Amit M; Stratton, M Suzanne; Ahmann, Frederick R; Ranger-Moore, James; Nagle, Raymond B; Thompson, Patricia A; Slate, Elizabeth; Hsu, Chiu H; Dalkin, Bruce L; Sindhwani, Puneet; Holmes, Michael A; Tuckey, John A; Graham, David L; Parnes, Howard L; Clark, Lawrence C; Stratton, Steven P

    2013-02-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Se supplementation on prostate cancer incidence in men at high risk for prostate cancer. A Phase 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 699 men at high risk for prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen (PSA) >4 ng/ml and/or suspicious digital rectal examination and/or PSA velocity >0.75 ng/ml/year), but with a negative prostate biopsy. Participants were randomized to receive daily oral placebo (N = 232), 200 µg selenium (N = 234), or 400 µg selenium (N = 233) as selenized yeast. They were followed every 6 months for up to 5 years. The time to diagnosis of prostate cancer was compared between treatment groups using the Cox proportional hazards model. Compared to placebo, the hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals] for risk of developing prostate cancer in the selenium 200 µg/day or the selenium 400 µg/day group were 0.94 [0.52, 1.7] and 0.90 [0.48, 1.7], respectively. PSA velocity in the selenium arms was not significantly different from that observed in the placebo group (P = 0.18 and P = 0.17, respectively). Selenium supplementation appeared to have no effect on the incidence of prostate cancer in men at high risk. In conjunction with results of other studies, these data indicate that selenium supplementation may not have a role in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The design of phase II clinical trials testing cancer therapeutics: consensus recommendations from the clinical trial design task force of the national cancer institute investigational drug steering committee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Sargent, Daniel; Spriggs, David; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Ratain, Mark J; Le Blanc, Michael; Stewart, David; Crowley, John; Groshen, Susan; Humphrey, Jeffrey S; West, Pamela; Berry, Donald

    2010-01-01

    .... The observations that many new therapeutics "fail" in definitive phase III studies, coupled with the numbers of new agents to be tested as well as the increasing costs and complexity of clinical...

  7. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology-Friends of Cancer Research HIV Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S; Ison, Gwynn; Rudek, Michelle A; Noy, Ariela; Schwartz, Karl; Bruinooge, Suanna; Schenkel, Caroline; Miller, Barry; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wang, Judy; Zeldis, Jerome; Little, Richard F

    2017-11-20

    Purpose People with HIV are living longer as a result of effective antiretroviral therapy. Cancer has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. However, studies of novel cancer therapeutics have historically excluded patients with HIV. Critical review of eligibility criteria related to HIV is required to accelerate development of and access to effective therapeutics for HIV-infected patients with cancer and make studies more generalizable to this patient population. Methods From January through April 2016, the HIV Working Group conducted a series of teleconferences; a review of 46 New Drug Applications from registration studies of unique agents studied in adults with cancer that led to the initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of that agent from 2011 to 2015; and a review of HIV-related eligibility criteria from National Cancer Institute-sponsored studies. Results were discussed and refined at a multistakeholder workshop held May 12, 2016. The HIV Working Group developed recommendations for eligibility criteria that focus on pharmacologic and immunologic considerations in this patient population and that balance patient safety, access to appropriate investigational agents, and study integrity. Results Exclusion of patients with HIV remains common in most studies of novel cancer agents. Models for HIV-related eligibility criteria in National Cancer Institute-sponsored studies are instructive. HIV infection itself should no longer be an exclusion criterion for most studies. Eligibility criteria related to HIV infection that address concurrent antiretroviral therapy and immune status should be designed in a manner that is appropriate for a given cancer. Conclusion Expanding clinical trial eligibility to be more inclusive of patients with HIV is justified in most cases and may accelerate the development of effective therapies in this area of unmet clinical need.

  8. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology–Friends of Cancer Research HIV Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Ison, Gwynn; Rudek, Michelle A.; Noy, Ariela; Schwartz, Karl; Bruinooge, Suanna; Schenkel, Caroline; Miller, Barry; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wang, Judy; Zeldis, Jerome; Little, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose People with HIV are living longer as a result of effective antiretroviral therapy. Cancer has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. However, studies of novel cancer therapeutics have historically excluded patients with HIV. Critical review of eligibility criteria related to HIV is required to accelerate development of and access to effective therapeutics for HIV-infected patients with cancer and make studies more generalizable to this patient population. Methods From January through April 2016, the HIV Working Group conducted a series of teleconferences; a review of 46 New Drug Applications from registration studies of unique agents studied in adults with cancer that led to the initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of that agent from 2011 to 2015; and a review of HIV-related eligibility criteria from National Cancer Institute–sponsored studies. Results were discussed and refined at a multistakeholder workshop held May 12, 2016. The HIV Working Group developed recommendations for eligibility criteria that focus on pharmacologic and immunologic considerations in this patient population and that balance patient safety, access to appropriate investigational agents, and study integrity. Results Exclusion of patients with HIV remains common in most studies of novel cancer agents. Models for HIV-related eligibility criteria in National Cancer Institute–sponsored studies are instructive. HIV infection itself should no longer be an exclusion criterion for most studies. Eligibility criteria related to HIV infection that address concurrent antiretroviral therapy and immune status should be designed in a manner that is appropriate for a given cancer. Conclusion Expanding clinical trial eligibility to be more inclusive of patients with HIV is justified in most cases and may accelerate the development of effective therapies in this area of unmet clinical need. PMID:28968173

  9. Prognostic impact of education level of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Massimo; Signoriello, Simona; Morabito, Alessandro; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Piantedosi, Francovito; Bilancia, Domenico; Cigolari, Silvio; Barbera, Santi; Gebbia, Vittorio; Daniele, Bruno; Robbiati, Sergio Federico; Illiano, Alfonso; Ceribelli, Anna; Carrozza, Francesco; Favaretto, Adolfo; Piazza, Elena; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Daniele, Gennaro; Giordano, Pasqualina; Costanzo, Raffaele; Sandomenico, Claudia; Rocco, Gaetano; Gallo, Ciro; Perrone, Francesco; Gridelli, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Socioeconomic status can potentially affect prognosis of cancer patients. Our aim was to describe potential differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, and survival by education level in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) enrolled in clinical trials of first-line treatment. Individual data of Italian patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IV, or IIIB with supraclavicular nodes or malignant pleural effusion), ECOG performance status (PS) 0-2, enrolled in four phase III randomized trials conducted between 1996 and 2005 were pooled. Information about education was available for 1680 of 1709 patients (98.3%). Patients were divided in two groups according to education level: high (patients with at least high school diploma) or low (those with less than high school diploma). Survival analyses were stratified by treatment arm within trial. There were 312 (19%) and 1368 (81%) patients with high and low education, respectively. Education level was significantly different among birth cohorts, with a time-trend toward higher education level. Patients with high education were significantly younger (median age 65 vs. 70), were less frequently unfit at diagnosis (ECOG PS2 5% vs. 16%), and their tumor type was more frequently adenocarcinoma (47% vs. 37%). Number of treatment cycles received was not significantly different between education groups. Median survival was 9.4 and 7.6 months in high and low education, respectively (p=0.012). At multivariable analysis, female sex, better PS and high education level (Hazard Ratio 0.85, 95%CI 0.73-0.99, p=0.03) were independently associated with longer survival. In Italian patients enrolled in four randomized trials of first-line chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC, high education was significantly more frequent among younger patients, and was associated with lower proportion of PS2 patients. Education level did not significantly affect number of chemotherapy cycles received. Overall survival was

  10. Perioperative synbiotics administration decreases postoperative infections in patients with colorectal cancer: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINE TABORDA FLESCH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of perioperative administration of symbiotics on the incidence of surgical wound infection in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a randomized clinical trial with colorectal cancer patients undergoing elective surgery, randomly assigned to receive symbiotics or placebo for five days prior to the surgical procedure and for 14 days after surgery. We studied 91 patients, 49 in the symbiotics group (Lactobacillus acidophilus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 108 to 109 CFU, Lactobacillus casei 108 to 109 CFU, Bifi dobacterium 108 to 109 CFU and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS 6g and 42 in the placebo group. Results: surgical site infection occurred in one (2% patient in the symbiotics group and in nine (21.4% patients in the control group (p=0.002. There were three cases of intraabdominal abscess and four cases of pneumonia in the control group, whereas we observed no infections in patients receiving symbiotics (p=0.001. Conclusion: the perioperative administration of symbiotics significantly reduced postoperative infection rates in patients with colorectal cancer. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of symbiotics in the surgical treatment of colorectal cancer.

  11. Can routine data be used to support cancer clinical trials? A historical baseline on which to build: retrospective linkage of data from the TACT (CRUK 01/001) breast cancer trial and the National Cancer Data Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Lucy Suzanne; Aresu, Maria; Banerji, Jane; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Ellis, Paul; Bliss, Judith Margaret

    2017-11-23

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for evaluating new cancer treatments. They are, however, expensive to conduct, particularly where long-term follow-up of participants is required. Tracking participants via routine datasets could provide a cost-effective alternative for ascertaining follow-up information required to evaluate disease outcomes. This project explores the potential for routine data to inform cancer trials, using, the historical National Cancer Data Repository (NCDR) for English NHS sites and, for validation, mature data available from the TACT trial. Datasets were matched using patients' NHS number, date of birth (dob) and name/initials. Demographics, clinical characteristics and outcomes were assessed for agreement and completeness. Overall survival was compared between NCDR and TACT. A total of 3151 patients underwent linkage; 3047 (96.7%) of which had matched records. Extensive cleaning was required for some registry data fields, e.g. cause of death, whilst others had large amounts of missing data, e.g. tumour size (22.1%). Other data had high levels of matching such as dob (99.6%) and date of death (89.6%). There was no evidence of differential survival rates (8-year survival: TACT = 75% (95% CI 73, 76); NCDR = 76% (95% CI 74, 77)). Data quality and completeness requires improvement before routine data could be used for RCTs. Introduction of new routine datasets, including COSD, is welcomed although reporting of disease-recurrence events remains a concern. Prospective validation of such datasets is required before RCTs can confidently switch patient follow-up to utilise routinely collected NHS-based data. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00033683 , registered on 9 April 2002; ISRCTN79718493 , registered on 1 July 2001.

  12. Strategies for community education prior to clinical trial recruitment for a cervical cancer screening intervention in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheona M Mitchell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community engagement and education can improve acceptability and participation in clinical trials conducted in Kisenyi, Uganda. In preparation for a randomized controlled trial exploring different methods for cervical cancer screening, we explored optimal engagement strategies from the perspective of community members and health professionals.Methods: We conducted key informant interviews followed by serial community forums with purposeful sampling and compared the perspectives of women in Kisenyi (N=26 to healthcare workers (HCW at the local and tertiary care center levels (N=61 in a participatory, iterative process.Results: Key themes identified included format, content, language, message delivery and target population. Women in Kisenyi see demonstration as a key part of an educational intervention and not solely a didactic session whereas health professionals emphasized the biomedical content and natural history of cervical cancer. Using local language and lay leaders with locally accessible terminology was more of a priority for women in Kisenyi than clinicians. Simple language with a clear message was essential for both groups. Localization of language and reciprocal communication using demonstration between community members and HCW was a key theme.Conclusions: Although perceptions of the format are similar between women and HCW, the content, language and messaging that should be incorporated in a health education strategy differ markedly. The call for lay leaders to participate in health promotion is a clear step towards transforming this cervical cancer screening project to be a fully participatory process. This is important in scaling-up cervical cancer screening programs in Kisenyi and will be central in developing health education interventions for this purpose.

  13. Effect of a Scalp Cooling Device on Alopecia in Women Undergoing Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: The SCALP Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Julie; Wang, Tao; Osborne, Cynthia; Niravath, Polly; Otte, Kristen; Papish, Steven; Holmes, Frankie; Abraham, Jame; Lacouture, Mario; Courtright, Jay; Paxman, Richard; Rude, Mari; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Osborne, C Kent; Rimawi, Mothaffar

    2017-02-14

    Chemotherapy may induce alopecia. Although scalp cooling devices have been used to prevent this alopecia, efficacy has not been assessed in a randomized clinical trial. To assess whether a scalp cooling device is effective at reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia and to assess adverse treatment effects. Multicenter randomized clinical trial of women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Patients were enrolled from December 9, 2013, to September 30, 2016. One interim analysis was planned to allow the study to stop early for efficacy. Data reported are from the interim analysis. This study was conducted at 7 sites in the United States, and 182 women with breast cancer requiring chemotherapy were enrolled and randomized. Participants were randomized to scalp cooling (n = 119) or control (n = 63). Scalp cooling was done using a scalp cooling device. The primary efficacy end points were successful hair preservation assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scale (grade 0 [no hair loss] or grade 1 [scalp cooling and control groups. Only adverse events related to device use were collected; 54 adverse events were reported in the cooling group, all grades 1 and 2. There were no serious adverse device events. Among women with stage I to II breast cancer receiving chemotherapy with a taxane, anthracycline, or both, those who underwent scalp cooling were significantly more likely to have less than 50% hair loss after the fourth chemotherapy cycle compared with those who received no scalp cooling. Further research is needed to assess longer-term efficacy and adverse effects. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01986140.

  14. Effects of music therapy on anxiety of patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, Kai-Na; Yan, Hong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2012-05-01

      This paper is a report of a clinical trial of the effects of music therapy on anxiety of female breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy.   There is insufficient evidence on the effects of music therapy on state anxiety of breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy.   A Hall's Core, Care, and Cure Model-based clinical trial was conducted in 120 female breast cancer patients from March to November 2009. A randomized controlled design was utilized. The patients were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n = 60) received music therapy in addition to routine nursing care, and the control group (n = 60) only received routine nursing care. A standardized questionnaire and the State Anxiety Inventory were applied. The primary endpoint was the state anxiety score measured at pretest (on the day before radical mastectomy) and at three post-tests (on the day before patients were discharged from hospital, the second and third time of admission to hospital for chemotherapy respectively).   The pretest score revealed that the majority of the patients had a moderate level (77·5%) and 15% had severe level of state anxiety. The repeated-measure ancova model analysis indicated that the mean state anxiety score was significantly lower in the experimental group than those in the control group at each of the three post-test measurements. The mean difference between the experimental and control group together with 95% confidence intervals were -4·57 (-6·33, -2·82), -8·91 (-10·75, -7·08) and -9·69 (-11·52, -7·85) at the 1st post-test, 2nd post-test and 3rd post-test respectively.   Music therapy is found to have positive effects on decreasing state anxiety score. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Development of Strategies to Increase Enrollment in Clinical Trials for Children With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-12

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Leukemia; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Sarcoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. The association of financial difficulties with clinical outcomes in cancer patients: secondary analysis of 16 academic prospective clinical trials conducted in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, F; Jommi, C; Di Maio, M; Gimigliano, A; Gridelli, C; Pignata, S; Ciardiello, F; Nuzzo, F; de Matteis, A; Del Mastro, L; Bryce, J; Daniele, G; Morabito, A; Piccirillo, M C; Rocco, G; Guizzaro, L; Gallo, C

    2016-12-01

    Cancer may cause financial difficulties, but its impact in countries with public health systems is unknown. We evaluated the association of financial difficulties with clinical outcomes of cancer patients enrolled in academic clinical trials performed within the Italian public health system. Data were pooled from 16 prospective multicentre trials in lung, breast or ovarian cancer, using the EORTC quality of life (QOL) C30 questionnaire. Question 28 scores financial difficulties related to disease or treatment in four categories from 'not at all' to 'very much'. We defined financial burden (FB) as any financial difficulty reported at baseline questionnaire, and financial toxicity (FT) as score worsening in a subsequent questionnaire. We investigated (i) the association of FB with clinical outcomes (survival, global QOL response [questions 29/30] and severe toxicity), and (ii) the association of FT with survival. Multivariable analyses were performed using logistic regression models or the Cox model adjusting for trial, gender, age, region and period of enrolment, baseline global QOL and, where appropriate, FB and global QOL response. Results are reported as odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). At baseline 26% of the 3670 study patients reported FB, significantly correlated with worse baseline global QOL. FB was not associated with risks of death (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85-1.04, P = 0.23) and severe toxicity (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.76-1.06, P = 0.19) but was predictive of a higher chance of worse global QOL response (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.70, P = 0.009). During treatment, 2735 (74.5%) patients filled in subsequent questionnaires and 616 (22.5%) developed FT that was significantly associated with an increased risk of death (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.05-1.37, P = 0.007). Several sensitivity analyses confirmed these findings. Even in a public health system, financial difficulties are associated with relevant cancer patients outcomes like QOL and

  17. Further data on beta-blockers and cancer risk: observational study and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monami, Matteo; Filippi, Luca; Ungar, Andrea; Sgrilli, Federica; Antenore, Alessandro; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Paola; Marchionni, Niccolò; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present paper is to provide some further data on the relationship between β-blocker treatment and the incidence of cancer, using two different approaches (epidemiological study and meta-analysis of clinical trials). In a consecutive series of 1340 diabetic patients starting insulin therapy, 112 cases of cancer during a mean follow-up of 75.9 months were identified as first hospital admission or death. For each case, the controls were chosen randomly from those members of the cohort matched for age, sex and BMI. The main predefined analysis was the comparison of cases and controls for length of exposure to β-blockers and proportion of patients exposed using a conditional logistic regression which takes into account the matching structure. For the meta-analytic sub-study, an extensive search of Medline and the Cochrane Library (any date up to December 31st, 2011) was performed for all trials in which a β-blocker was used. Mantel-Haenszel Odds Ratios (MH-OR) with 95% confidence intervals for incident malignancies were calculated using a random effect model. After adjusting for mean daily dose of glargine and metformin, and ischemic heart disease, exposure to β-blockers was associated with a reduced overall risk of cancer (HR 0.33 [0.13; 0.83], p = 0.019; HR for each month of exposure 0.87 [0.77; 0.98], p = 0.025). In the meta-analysis sub-study, performed on nine trials, β-blockers were associated with a non-significant trend toward lower risk of cancer (MH-OR 0.93 [0.86; 1.01], p = 0.070). Limitations of the observational study are the small sample size that limits the statistical power of analyses, that it was performed on diabetic patients only, and that diagnoses of malignancies were derived from administrative data. In conclusion, this research seem to confirm a possible beneficial effect of β-blockers against the risk of cancer development.

  18. Quality of life with cediranib in relapsed ovarian cancer: The ICON6 phase 3 randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Dan P; Cook, Adrian; Brown, Julia M; Brundage, Michael D; Embleton, Andrew C; Kaplan, Richard S; Raja, Fharat A; Swart, Ann Marie W; Velikova, Galina; Qian, Wendi; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2017-07-15

    The ICON6 trial showed that cediranib, an oral inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, improved clinical outcomes for patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer when it was used with chemotherapy and was continued as maintenance therapy. This study describes health-related quality of life (QOL) during the first year of treatment. Four hundred fifty-six women were randomly allocated to receive standard chemotherapy only, chemotherapy with concurrent cediranib, or chemotherapy with cediranib administered concurrently and continued as maintenance. Patients completed QOL questionnaires until disease progression every 3 weeks during chemotherapy and then every 6 weeks to 1 year. Patients alive with disease progression completed a QOL form 1 year after randomization. The primary QOL endpoint was the global score from the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) at 1 year, with the standard chemotherapy group compared with the concurrent-maintenance cediranib group. The rate of questionnaire compliance was 90% at the baseline and 76% at 1 year and was similar across the 3 groups. The mean global QOL score at 1 year was 62.6 points for the standard chemotherapy group and 68.7 points for the concurrent-maintenance group (+4.5; 95% confidence interval, -2.0 to 11.0; P = .18). Sensitivity analyses suggested that this finding was robust to the effect of missing data, and the improvement became statistically significant after adjustments for self-reported diarrhea. The 6th study by the International Collaboration in Ovarian Neoplasm (ICON6) showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival with cediranib as concurrent and maintenance therapy. No QOL detriment with cediranib was found 1 year after treatment was commenced. The maintenance of QOL along with prolonged cancer control suggests that cediranib has a valuable role in the treatment of relapsed ovarian

  19. Supportive and Palliative Care Research Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Stepped care targeting psychological distress in head and neck and lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebber Anne-Marie H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress is common in cancer survivors. Although there is some evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial care in distressed cancer patients, referral rate is low. Lack of adequate screening instruments in oncology settings and insufficient availability of traditional models of psychosocial care are the main barriers. A stepped care approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of psychosocial care. The aim of the study described herein is to evaluate efficacy of a stepped care strategy targeting psychological distress in cancer survivors. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomized clinical trial with 2 treatment arms: a stepped care intervention programme versus care as usual. Patients treated for head and neck cancer (HNC or lung cancer (LC are screened for distress using OncoQuest, a computerized touchscreen system. After stratification for tumour (HNC vs. LC and stage (stage I/II vs. III/IV, 176 distressed patients are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group will follow a stepped care model with 4 evidence based steps: 1. Watchful waiting, 2. Guided self-help via Internet or a booklet, 3. Problem Solving Treatment administered by a specialized nurse, and 4. Specialized psychological intervention or antidepressant medication. In the control group, patients receive care as usual which most often is a single interview or referral to specialized intervention. Primary outcome is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcome measures are a clinical level of depression or anxiety (CIDI, quality of life (EQ-5D, EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-HN35, QLQ-LC13, patient satisfaction with care (EORTC QLQ-PATSAT, and costs (health care utilization and work loss (TIC-P and PRODISQ modules. Outcomes are evaluated before and after intervention and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after intervention. Discussion Stepped care is a system of delivering and

  1. [Controlled randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    It is generally agreed that the first comparative clinical trial in history was done by James Lind in 1747, in the treatment of scurvy. The general bases of modern experimental medicine were published by Claude Bernard in 1865. However, it is the development of new drugs and the evolution of methodological concepts that led to the first randomized controlled clinical trial, in 1948, which showed that the effects of streptomycin on pulmonary tuberculosis were significantly different from those of a placebo. Today, "evidence-based" medicine aims to rationalize the medical decision-making process by taking into account, first and foremost, the results of controlled randomized clinical trials, which provide the highest level of evidence. In the second half of the 20th century it became clear that different kinds of clinical trials might not provide the same level of evidence. Practitioners' intimate convictions must be challenged by the results of controlled clinical trials. Take the CAST trial for example, which, in 1989, tested antiarrhythmic drugs versus placebo in patients with myocardial infarction. It was well known that ventricular arrhythmias were a factor of poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, and it was therefore considered self-evident that drug suppression of these ventricular arrhythmias would reduce the mortality rate. In the event, the CAST trial showed the exact opposite, with an almost 3-fold increase in total mortality among patients with coronary heart disease who were treated with antiarrhythmic drugs. These results had a profound impact on the use of antiarrythmic drugs, which became contraindicated after myocardial infarction. A clinical trial has to fulfill certain methodological standards to be accepted as evidence-based medicine. First, a working hypothesis has to be formulated, and then the primary outcome measure must be chosen before beginning the study. An appropriate major endpoint for efficacy must be selected, in keeping with the

  2. Optimizing patient derived mesenchymal stem cells as virus carriers for a Phase I clinical trial in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mader Emily K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can serve as carriers to deliver oncolytic measles virus (MV to ovarian tumors. In preparation for a clinical trial to use MSC as MV carriers, we obtained cells from ovarian cancer patients and evaluated feasibility and safety of this approach. Methods MSC from adipose tissues of healthy donors (hMSC and nine ovarian cancer patients (ovMSC were characterized for susceptibility to virus infection and tumor homing abilities. Results Adipose tissue (range 0.16-3.96 grams from newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer patients yielded about 7.41×106 cells at passage 1 (range 4–9 days. Phenotype and doubling times of MSC were similar between ovarian patients and healthy controls. The time to harvest of 3.0×108 cells (clinical dose could be achieved by day 14 (range, 9–17 days. Two of nine samples tested had an abnormal karyotype represented by trisomy 20. Despite receiving up to 1.6×109 MSC/kg, no tumors were seen in SCID beige mice and MSC did not promote the growth of SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells in mice. The ovMSC migrated towards primary ovarian cancer samples in chemotaxis assays and to ovarian tumors in athymic mice. Using non-invasive SPECT-CT imaging, we saw rapid co-localization, within 5–8 minutes of intraperitoneal administration of MV infected MSC to the ovarian tumors. Importantly, MSC can be pre-infected with MV, stored in liquid nitrogen and thawed on the day of infusion into mice without loss of activity. MV infected MSC, but not virus alone, significantly prolonged the survival of measles immune ovarian cancer bearing animals. Conclusions These studies confirmed the feasibility of using patient derived MSC as carriers for oncolytic MV therapy. We propose an approach where MSC from ovarian cancer patients will be expanded, frozen and validated to ensure compliance with the release criteria. On the treatment day, the cells will be thawed, washed, mixed with virus, briefly

  3. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    in a 12-week individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation program initiated shortly after a diagnosis of advanced cancer. METHODS: This single center, randomized, controlled trial will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer recruited from the Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital...... initiated shortly after an advanced cancer diagnosis. The study will contribute with evidence on the effectiveness of implementing early palliative care in standard oncology treatment and hopefully offer new knowledge and future directions as to the content of palliative rehabilitation programs. TRIAL......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation...

  4. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L John Hoffer

    Full Text Available Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail.We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement.Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type

  5. Risk of gastrointestinal toxicities with PD-1 inhibitors in cancer patients: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Luo, Zhibin

    2017-12-01

    Anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) antibodies have demonstrated significant clinical activity in many cancer entities. Gastrointestinal toxicities are one of its major side effects, but the overall risks have not been systematically evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and risk of gastrointestinal toxicities with PD-1 inhibitors in cancer patients through a meta-analysis. Eligible studies were searched for in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. We included randomized controlled trials with cancer patients treated with PD-1 inhibitors with adequate data on gastrointestinal adverse events. A total of 14 randomized controlled trials involving 7508 patients met eligibility criteria for this meta-analysis. The relative risk of all-grade diarrhea and colitis was 0.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): [0.50, 0.87]; P = .003) and 3.36 (95% CI: [1.25, 9.04]; P = .02), respectively. The relative risk of high-grade diarrhea and colitis was 0.58 (95% CI: [0.30, 1.11]; P = .10) and 4.31 (95% CI: [1.11, 16.79]; P = .04), respectively. Compared with ipilimumab alone, the nivolumab/ipilimumab combination was associated with a higher risk of developing all-grade diarrhea. Additionally, PD-1 inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a lower risk of developing gastrointestinal adverse events compared with ipilimumab alone. Our meta-analysis has demonstrated that the use of PD-1 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of colitis compared with chemotherapy or everolimus.

  6. Comparison of treatment outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients included in a clinical trial versus daily practice in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Koopman, M.; Gils, C.W. van; Ottevanger, P.B.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The external validity of trial results is a matter of debate, and no strong evidence is available to support whether a trial may have a positive or a negative effect on the outcome of patients. Methods. We compared the results of stage IV colorectal cancer patients treated within a large

  7. The challenge of molecular testing for clinical trials in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients: Analysis of a prospective database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, Anniek; Lepers, Stefanie; Peeters, Liesbet; Oyen, Christel; Dooms, Christophe; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Verbeken, Eric; Wauters, Isabelle; Weynand, Birgit; Vansteenkiste, Johan

    2016-12-01

    Molecular testing has become important in the biomarker program of clinical trials for advanced non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). These tissue samples often have to be analyzed in a central laboratory. We evaluated the turnaround time and possible delay in start of therapy in this process and how often testing resulted in inclusion in a clinical trial. We reviewed our prospective database on all molecular testing cases for clinical trial suitability in patients with advanced NSCLC between March 1, 2011 and October 31, 2014. 250 patients were considered for biomarker-driven trials. Twenty-three cases did not have further analysis and 20 patients had failure of central biomarker analysis. Results were obtained for 207 (83%) patients. In 91 of 227 (40%) samples sent, a biomarker of interest was documented. This led to 34 (15%) clinical trial inclusions. The mean waiting time between informed consent and request for tissue sections from the pathology lab and receipt of biomarker result from central lab was 24.4 (SD 13.7) calendar days. While molecular biomarker testing is crucial in many NSCLC trials, our results show that waiting times for central laboratory analysis can cause an important delay in treatment initiation, and even ineligibility for the trial(s) under consideration. Start of therapy based on properly validated local testing, with a posteriori central biomarker testing to guarantee the integrity of the trial, would be more rewarding for quite some patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Amiodarone: clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarelli, G V; Wolbrette, D L; Patel, H M; Luck, J C

    2000-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent commonly used in the treatment of supraventricular and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. This article reviews the results and clinical implications of primary and secondary prevention trials in which amiodarone was used in one of the treatment arms. Key post-myocardial infarction primary prevention trials include the European Myocardial Infarct Amiodarone Trial (EMIAT) and the Canadian Amiodarone Myocardial Infarction Trial (CAMIAT), both of which demonstrated that amiodarone reduced arrhythmic but not overall mortality. In congestive heart failure patients, amiodarone was studied as a primary prevention strategy in two pivotal trials: Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiac en Argentina (GESICA) and Amiodarone in Patients With Congestive Heart Failure and Asymptomatic Ventricular Arrhythmia (CHF-STAT). Amiodarone was associated with a neutral overall survival and a trend toward improved survival in nonischemic cardiomyopathy patients in CHF/STAT and improved survival in GESICA. In post-myocardial infarction patients with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia and a depressed ejection fraction, the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT) demonstrated that implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) statistically improved survival compared to the antiarrhythmic drug arm, most of whose patients were taking amiodarone. In patients with histories of sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, the Cardiac Arrest Study in Seattle: Conventional Versus Amiodarone Drug Evaluation (CASCADE) trial demonstrated that empiric amiodarone lowered arrhythmic recurrence rates compared to other drugs guided by serial Holter or electrophysiologic studies. However, arrhythmic death rates were high in both treatment arms of the study. Several secondary prevention trials, including the Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibrillators Study (AVID), the Canadian Implantable Defibrillator Study

  9. Identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures of clinical trials on breast cancer using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, Thomas; Duddeck, Katharina; Geyh, Szilvia; Schwarzkopf, Susanne; Weigl, Martin; Franke, Thomas; Brach, Mirjam

    2004-07-01

    To systematically identify and quantify the concepts contained in outcome measures of clinical breast cancer trials using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference. Randomized controlled trials between 1991 and 2000 were located in MEDLINE and selected according predefined criteria. The outcome measures were extracted and the concepts contained in the outcome measures were linked to the ICF. A total of 640 trials were included. Ninety-four different health status questionnaires were extracted. Three questionnaires were breast cancer-specific and 12 cancer-specific. Of 19,692 extracted concepts, 88% could be linked to the ICF. The most used ICF categories within the components body structures, body functions, and activities and participation were structure of the reproductive system (s630), sensations associated with the digestive system (b535), and looking after one's health (d570) with frequencies of 64%, 46% and 14%, respectively. No category of the environmental factors component reached a frequency of 10%. The ICF provides a useful reference to identify and quantify the concepts contained in outcome assessment used in clinical breast cancer trials. There seems to be a lack of health concepts evaluating specific aspects of disability and participation in breast cancer. Similarly, environmental factors with an impact on individual life of breast cancer survivors seem to be poorly represented.

  10. Challenges to accrual predictions to phase III cancer clinical trials: a survey of study chairs and lead statisticians of 248 NCI-sponsored trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Petroni, Gina R; Wang, Hongkun; Thielen, Monika J; Sargent, Daniel; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Cronin, Walter M; Wickerham, Donald L; Wang, Xiaofei F; Gray, Robert; Cohn, Wendy F; Slingluff, Craig L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Research on barriers to accrual has typically emphasized factors influencing participation after trial activation. We sought to identify factors influencing trial design and accrual predictions prior to trial activation associated with sufficient accrual. A 30-question web-based survey was sent to the study chair and lead statistician for all 248 phase III trials open in 1993-2002 by five Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups. Questions addressed prior trial experience, trial design elements, accrual predictions, and perceived accrual influences. Accrual sufficiency categorization was derived from Clinical Trials Cooperative Group records: sufficient accrual included trials closed with complete accrual or at interim analysis, insufficient accrual included trials closed with inadequate accrual. Responses were analyzed by respondent role (study chair/lead statistician) and accrual sufficiency. Three hundred and nine eligible responses were included (response rate, 63%; lead statisticians, 81%; and study chairs, 45%), representing trials with sufficient (63%) and insufficient accruals (37%). Study chair seniority or lead statistician experience was not linked to accrual sufficiency. Literature review, study chair's personal experience, and expert opinion within Clinical Trials Cooperative Group most commonly influenced control arm selection. Clinical Trials Cooperative Group experience most influenced accrual predictions. These influences were not associated with accrual sufficiency. Among respondents citing accrual difficulties (41%), factors negatively influencing accrual were not consistently identified. Respondents credited three factors with positively influencing accrual: clinical relevance of study, lack of competing trials, and protocol paralleling normal practice. Perceptions of lead statisticians and study chairs may not accurately reflect accrual barriers encountered by participating physicians or patients. Survey responses may be subject to recall bias

  11. Effectiveness of Core Stability Exercises and Recovery Myofascial Release Massage on Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Cantarero-Villanueva; Carolina Fernández-Lao; Rosario del Moral-Avila; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas; María Belén Feriche-Fernández-Castanys; Manuel Arroyo-Morales

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n = 78) breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release) and control (usual health care) groups. The interven...

  12. Refining the definition of mandibular osteoradionecrosis in clinical trials: The cancer research UK HOPON trial (Hyperbaric Oxygen for the Prevention of Osteoradionecrosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Richard; Tesfaye, Binyam; Bickerstaff, Matt; Silcocks, Paul; Butterworth, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a common and serious complication of head and neck radiotherapy for which there is little reliable evidence for prevention or treatment. The diagnosis and classification of ORN have been inconsistently and imprecisely defined, even in clinical trials. A systematic review of diagnosis and classifications of ORN with specific focus on clinical trials is presented. The most suitable classification was evaluated for consistency using blinded independent review of outcome data (clinical photographs and radiographs) in the HOPON trial. Of 16 ORN classifications found, only one (Notani) appeared suitable as an endpoint in clinical trials. Clinical records of 217 timepoints were analysed amongst 94 randomised patients in the HOPON trial. The only inconsistency in classification arose where minor bone spicules (MBS) were apparent, which occurred in 19% of patients. Some trial investigators judged MBS as clinically unimportant and not reflecting ORN, others classified as ORN based on rigid definitions in common clinical use. When MBS was added as a distinct category to the Notani classification this ambiguity was resolved and agreement between observers was achieved. Most definitions and clinical classifications are based on retrospective case series and may be unsuitable for prospective interventional trials of ORN prevention or treatment. When ORN is used as a primary or secondary outcome in prospective clinical trials, the use of Notani classification with the additional category of MBS is recommended as it avoids subjectivity and enhances reliability and consistency of reporting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient-reported Outcomes in Randomised Controlled Trials of Prostate Cancer: Methodological Quality and Impact on Clinical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficace, Fabio; Feuerstein, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cafaro, Valentina; Eastham, James; Pusic, Andrea; Blazeby, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to inform patient-centred care as well as clinical and health policy decisions. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the methodological quality of PRO assessment in RCTs of prostate cancer (PCa) and to estimate the likely impact of these studies on clinical decision making. Evidence acquisition A systematic literature search of studies was undertaken on main electronic databases to retrieve articles published between January 2004 and March 2012. RCTs were evaluated on a predetermined extraction form, including (1) basic trial demographics and clinical and PRO characteristics; (2) level of PRO reporting based on the recently published recommendations by the International Society for Quality of Life Research; and (3) bias, assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Studies were systematically analysed to evaluate their relevance for supporting clinical decision making. Evidence synthesis Sixty-five RCTs enrolling a total of 22 071 patients were evaluated, with 31 (48%) in patients with nonmetastatic disease. When a PRO difference between treatments was found, it related in most cases to symptoms only (n = 29, 58%). Although the extent of missing data was generally documented (72% of RCTs), few reported details on statistical handling of this data (18%) and reasons for dropout (35%). Improvements in key methodological aspects over time were found. Thirteen (20%) RCTs were judged as likely to be robust in informing clinical decision making. Higher-quality PRO studies were generally associated with those RCTs that had higher internal validity. Conclusions Including PRO in RCTs of PCa patients is critical for better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches. Marked improvements in PRO quality reporting over time were found, and it is estimated that at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs have provided sufficient

  14. An integrated digital/clinical approach to smoking cessation in lung cancer screening: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Amanda L; Burke, Michael V; Jacobs, Megan A; Cha, Sarah; Croghan, Ivana T; Schroeder, Darrell R; Moriarty, James P; Borah, Bijan J; Rasmussen, Donna F; Brookover, M Jody; Suesse, Dale B; Midthun, David E; Hays, J Taylor

    2017-11-28

    Delivering effective tobacco dependence treatment that is feasible within lung cancer screening (LCS) programs is crucial for realizing the health benefits and cost savings of screening. Large-scale trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated that digital cessation interventions (i.e. web-based and text message) are effective, sustainable over the long-term, scalable, and cost-efficient. Use of digital technologies is commonplace among older adults, making this a feasible approach within LCS programs. Use of cessation treatment has been improved with models that proactively connect smokers to treatment rather than passive referrals. Proactive referral to cessation treatment has been advanced through healthcare systems changes such as modifying the electronic health record to automatically link smokers to treatment. This study evaluates the impact of a proactive enrollment strategy that links LCS-eligible smokers with an evidence-based intervention comprised of a web-based (WEB) program and integrated text messaging (TXT) in a three-arm randomized trial with repeated measures at one, three, six, and 12 months post randomization. The primary outcome is biochemically confirmed abstinence at 12 months post randomization. We will randomize 1650 smokers who present for a clinical LCS to: (1) a usual care control condition (UC) which consists of Ask-Advise-Refer; (2) a digital (WEB + TXT) cessation intervention; or (3) a digital cessation intervention combined with tobacco treatment specialist (TTS) counseling (WEB + TXT + TTS). The scalability and sustainability of a digital intervention may represent the most cost-effective and feasible approach for LCS programs to proactively engage large numbers of smokers in effective cessation treatment. We will also evaluate the impact and cost-effectiveness of adding proven clinical intervention provided by a TTS. We expect that a combined digital/clinical intervention will yield higher quit rates than digital

  15. Clinical Trials with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Pisano; Sabrina Chiara Cecere; Marilena Di Napoli; Carla Cavaliere; Rosa Tambaro; Gaetano Facchini; Cono Scaffa; Simona Losito; Antonio Pizzolorusso; Sandro Pignata

    2013-01-01

    Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, increasing attention has been progressively focused on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), whose unique formulation prolongs the persistence of the drug in the circulation and potentiates intratumor accumulation. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has become a major component in the routine management of epithelial ovarian cancer. In 1999 it was first approved for platinum-refractory ovarian cancer and then rece...

  16. Fundamentals of clinical trial design

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Most errors in clinical trials are a result of poor planning. Fancy statistical methods cannot rescue design flaws. Thus careful planning with clear foresight is crucial. Issues in trial conduct and analyses should be anticipated during trial design and thoughtfully addressed. Fundamental clinical trial design issues are discussed.

  17. Prophylactic tracheotomy and lung cancer resection in patient with low predictive pulmonary function: a randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Marc; Tardy, Marie M; Richard, Ruddy; Naamee, Adel; Chadeyras, Jean Baptiste; Da Costa, Valence; Bailly, Patrick; Eisenmann, Nathanaël; Pereira, Bruno; Merle, Patrick; Galvaing, Géraud

    2015-12-01

    Whether prophylactic tracheotomy can shorten the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) in high risk patients eligible for lung cancer resection. The objective was to compare duration of MV and outcome in 39 patients randomly assigned to prophylactic tracheotomy or control. Prospective randomized controlled, single-center trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01053624). The primary outcome measure was the cumulative number of MV days after operation until discharge. The secondary outcome measures were the 60 days mortality rate, the ICU and the hospital length of stay, the incidence of postoperative respiratory, cardiac and general complications, the reventilation rate, the need of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), the need of a tracheotomy in control group and the tracheal complications. The duration of MV was not significantly different between the tracheotomy group (3.5±6 days) and the control group (4.7±9.3 days) (P=0.54). Among patients needing prolonged MV >4 days, tracheotomy patients had a shortened duration of MV than control patients (respectively 11.4±7.1 and 20.4±9.6 days, P=0.04). The rate of respiratory complications were significantly lower in the tracheotomy group than in the control group (28% vs. 51%, P=0.03). Six patients (15%) needed a postoperative tracheotomy in the control group because of a prolonged MV >7 days. Tracheotomy was associated with a reduced need of NIV (P=0.04). There was no difference in 60-day mortality rate, cardiac complications, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. No death was related with the tracheotomy. Prophylactic tracheotomy in patients with ppo FEV1 <50% who underwent thoracotomy for lung cancer resection provided benefits in terms of duration of prolonged MV and respiratory complications but was not associated with a decreased mortality rate, ICU and hospital length of stay and non-respiratory complications.

  18. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  19. Prospective clinical trial of magnetic-anchor-guided endoscopic submucosal dissection for large early gastric cancer (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Takuji; Oda, Ichiro; Tamakawa, Katsunori; Ueda, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Kakizoe, Tadao

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been rapidly gaining popularity in Japan. However, the procedure needs a high quality of skill. To facilitate complicated ESD by using a single working-channel gastroscope ("one-hand surgery method"), the magnetic-anchor-guided ESD (MAG-ESD) controlled by an extracorporeal electromagnet was reported to be successful in a porcine model. The purpose of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the feasibility of MAG-ESD for large EGC located on the gastric body in human beings. Prospective clinical trial at a single center. National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. From January 2005 to May 2006, 25 patients with EGC >20 mm in diameter, located in the gastric body, and intestinal-type histology were enrolled. Patients with a cardiac pacemaker, advanced malignancy in other organs, severe cardiac and/or pulmonary diseases, and uncontrolled hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus were excluded from this study. Similar to a standard ESD, the MAG-ESD procedure was performed with the patient under conscious sedation by intravenous injection of midazolam (3-5 mg) and pentazocine (15 mg). Unfavorable events and other intraoperative complications caused by the magnetic anchor or the magnetic force were recorded and evaluated. Two GI endoscopists (T.G., I.O.) assessed whether the magnetic anchor facilitated gastric ESD according to 2 criteria: "supportive" and "not supportive." The en bloc resection rate, complications, total operation time, bleeding, perforation, and recurrence rate were also evaluated. The total operation time was measured from insertion to withdrawal of the endoscope, including the retrieving of the magnetic anchor or anchors. All tumors were resected en bloc, without any perforations or severe uncontrollable bleeding. All magnetic anchors were safely retrieved. Two endoscopists assessed that the MAG system was supportive in 23 patients. None of the patients

  20. Clinical trials of medicinal cannabis for appetite-related symptoms from advanced cancer: a survey of preferences, attitudes and beliefs among patients willing to consider participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, T; Phillips, J; Lintzeris, N; Allsop, D; Lee, J; Solowij, N; Martin, J; Lam, L; Aggarwal, R; McCaffrey, N; Currow, D; Chye, R; Lovell, M; McGregor, I; Agar, M

    2016-11-01

    Australian clinical trials are planned to evaluate medicinal cannabis in a range of clinical contexts. To explore the preferences, attitudes and beliefs of patients eligible and willing to consider participation in a clinical trial of medicinal cannabis for poor appetite and appetite-related symptoms from advanced cancer. A cross-sectional anonymous survey was administered from July to December 2015 online and in eight adult outpatient palliative care and/or cancer services. Respondents were eligible if they were ≥18 years, had advanced cancer and poor appetite/taste problems/weight loss and might consider participating in a medicinal cannabis trial. Survey items focused on medicinal rather than recreational cannabis use and did not specify botanical or pharmaceutical products. Items asked about previous medicinal cannabis use and preferences for delivery route and invited comments and concerns. There were 204 survey respondents, of whom 26 (13%) reported prior medicinal cannabis use. Tablets/capsules were the preferred delivery mode (n = 144, 71%), followed by mouth spray (n = 84, 42%) and vaporiser (n = 83, 41%). Explanations for preferences (n = 134) most commonly cited convenience (n = 66; 49%). A total of 82% (n = 168) of respondents indicated that they had no trial-related concerns, but a small number volunteered concerns about adverse effects (n = 14) or wanted more information/advice (n = 8). Six respondents volunteered a belief that cannabis might cure cancer, while two wanted assurance of efficacy before participating in a trial. Justification of modes other than tablets/capsules and variable understanding about cannabis and trials will need addressing in trial-related information to optimise recruitment and ensure that consent is properly informed. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. The evaluation of the risks and benefits of phase II cancer clinical trials by institutional review board (IRB) members: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijn, H E M; Aaronson, N K; Keus, R B; Musschenga, A W

    2006-03-01

    There are indications that institutional review board (IRB) members do not find it easy to assess the risks and benefits in medical experiments, although this is their principal duty. This study examined how IRB members assessed the risk/benefit ratio (RBR) of a specific phase II breast cancer clinical trial. The trial was evaluated by means of a questionnaire administered to 43 members of IRBs at six academic hospitals and specialised cancer centres in the Netherlands. The questionnaire addressed: identification and estimation of inconvenience, toxicity, psychosocial distress, and benefits of trial participation to patients; identification and estimation of benefits to future patients and medical science; assessment of the trial's RBR; and assessment of its ethical acceptability. Most IRB members expected trial participation to involve fairly or very serious inconvenience, fairly severe to sometimes life-threatening toxicity, and serious psychological and social consequences. Conversely, the perceived likelihood of benefits to patients was modest. Most regarded the study as important, and the balance between risks and benefits to be favourable, and believed that the protocol should be approved. The IRB members' final judgement on the trial's ethical acceptability was significantly correlated with their RBR assessment of the protocol. Because most patients who participate in clinical trials hope this will prolong their lives, it is suggested that patient information should better describe the anticipated benefits-for example, the likelihood of prolonging life. This would allow patients to make decisions regarding participation based on realistic expectations.

  2. Body Mass Index at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival Prognosis in Clinical Trial Populations from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-30, B-31, B-34, and B-38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Reena S; Swain, Sandra M; Costantino, Joseph P; Rastogi, Priya; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Anderson, Stewart J; Tang, Gong; Geyer, Charles E; Lembersky, Barry C; Romond, Edward H; Paterson, Alexander H G; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with breast cancer outcomes. However, few studies used clinical trial settings where treatments and outcomes are consistently evaluated and documented. There are also limited data assessing how patient/disease characteristics and treatment may alter the BMI-breast cancer association. We evaluated 15,538 breast cancer participants from four NSABP protocols. B-34 studied early-stage breast cancer patients (N = 3,311); B-30 and B-38 included node-positive breast cancer patients (N = 5,265 and 4,860); and B-31 studied node-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer patients (N = 2,102). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazards ratios (HR) for risk of death and recurrence, and conducted separate analyses by estrogen receptor (ER) status and treatment group. In B-30, increased BMI was significantly related to survival. Compared with BMI cancers (P = 0.001). Recurrence was also significant among ER-positive disease in B-38 (P = 0.03). In our investigation, we did not find a consistent relationship between BMI at diagnosis and breast cancer recurrence or death. This work demonstrates that the heterogeneity of breast cancer between different breast cancer populations and the different therapies used to treat them may modify any association that exists between BMI and breast cancer outcome. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Age-related cataract in men in the selenium and vitamin e cancer prevention trial eye endpoints study: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, William G; Glynn, Robert J; Gaziano, J Michael; Darke, Amy K; Crowley, John J; Goodman, Phyllis J; Lippman, Scott M; Lad, Thomas E; Bearden, James D; Goodman, Gary E; Minasian, Lori M; Thompson, Ian M; Blanke, Charles D; Klein, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies suggest a role for dietary nutrients such as vitamin E and selenium in cataract prevention. However, the results of randomized clinical trials of vitamin E supplements and cataract have been disappointing and are not yet available for selenium. To test whether long-term supplementation with selenium and vitamin E affects the incidence of cataract in a large cohort of men. The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) Eye Endpoints Study was an ancillary study of the Southwest Oncology Group-coordinated SELECT, a randomized placebo-controlled 4-arm trial of selenium and vitamin E conducted among 35,533 men, 50 years and older for African American participants and 55 years and older for all other men, at 427 participating sites in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. A total of 11,267 SELECT participants from 128 SELECT sites participated in the SELECT Eye Endpoints ancillary study. Individual supplements of selenium (200 μg per day from L-selenomethionine) and vitamin E (400 IU per day of all rac-α-tocopheryl acetate). Incident cataract was defined as a lens opacity, age related in origin, and responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity to 20/30 or worse based on self-reports confirmed by medical record review. Cataract extraction was defined as the surgical removal of an incident cataract. During a mean (SD) of 5.6 (1.2) years of treatment and follow-up, 389 cases of cataract were documented. There were 185 cataracts in the selenium group and 204 in the no selenium group (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95 % CI, 0.75-1.11; P = .37). For vitamin E, there were 197 cases in the treated group and 192 in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95 % CI, 0.84-1.25; P = .81). Similar results were observed for cataract extraction. These data from a large cohort of apparently healthy men indicate that long-term daily supplementation with selenium and/or vitamin E is unlikely to have a large beneficial effect on age

  4. Joint Adolescent - Adult Early Phase Clinical Trials to Improve Access to New Drugs for Adolescents with Cancer Proposals from the Multi-stakeholder Platform - ACCELERATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, N; Marshall, L V; Binner, D; Herold, R; Rousseau, R; Blanc, P; Capdeville, R; Carleer, J; Copland, C; Kerloeguen, Y; Norga, K; Pacaud, L; Sevaux, M-A; Spadoni, C; Sterba, J; Ligas, F; Taube, T; Uttenreuther-Fischer, M; Chioato, S; O'Connell, M A; Geoerger, B; Blay, J-Y; Soria, J C; Kaye, S; Wulff, B; Brugières, L; Vassal, G; Pearson, A D J

    2018-01-16

    The impressive progress recently observed in adult cancers through the introduction of new drugs has not yet been translated to adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age. Currently adolescents are grouped with children, so their access to new, effective drugs already available for adults is delayed because paediatric drug development starts late relative to adult programmes. Moreover, specific early phase trials designed exclusively for adolescents in rare diseases recruit poorly, even if conducted internationally. Evidence has shown that adolescents demonstrate similar toxicity profiles, maximum tolerated doses and pharmacokinetic parameters to adults. Although they may have specific vulnerabilities and their interests should be protected, they are, in many countries in Europe, entitled to provide informed consent themselves. There are no insurmountable scientific, medical, or regulatory barriers to their participation in Phase-I to III adult trials. Based on a review of the literature, the multi-stakeholder platform ACCELERATE, with representatives from academia, patient/parent advocacy groups, regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies, proposes the inclusion of adolescents in adult Phase-I to III trials of cancer drugs targeting a relevant disease or mechanism of action, without requiring preceding specific paediatric trials. The trials, however, should be delivered in age-appropriate clinical care settings by clinicians with adolescent trial expertise. Joint adolescent-adult trials will not exclude adolescents from participating in paediatric trials, as these approaches are complementary. This strategy is considered to be safe, rational, efficient and would provide more clinical trial options and accelerate drug development for adolescents with cancer. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology.

  5. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T; O'Brien, Ricky T

    2015-01-01

    collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction......PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Multileaf...

  6. Optimization of cancer chemotherapy on the basis of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: from patients enrolled in clinical trials to those in the 'real world'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2014-01-01

      Cytotoxic anticancer drugs are the most challenging therapeutic agents among all medicines with relatively narrow efficacy profiles. Therefore, medical oncologists have to practically manage the risk of severe toxic effects to optimize treatment outcomes. Dose and treatment-schedule recommendations for cytotoxic anticancer agents are determined on the basis of clinical trials. Patients enrolled in clinical trials are those likely to receive the drug in clinical practice, excluding those with conditions such as organ dysfunction, obesity, advanced age, or comorbidity. On the other hand, the 'real world' includes large numbers of such patients who do not meet the eligibility criteria of clinical trials. However, there is a paucity of data from sufficiently powered pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to support dosage recommendations in such patients. Consequently, dose levels and treatment schedules for chemotherapy in these subjects are somewhat arbitrary and not evidence-based. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of patients in the 'real world' are needed to address this issue. In this review article, we describe general aspects of clinical pharmacology in cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials and those in the 'real world,' and introduce recent findings regarding the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of irinotecan and S-1 in 'real world' cancer patients.

  7. Patient participation in cancer clinical trials: A pilot test of lay navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B. Cartmell

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: In this formative single-arm pilot project, initial evidence was found for the potential effect of a lay navigation intervention on CT understanding and enrollment. A randomized controlled trial is needed to examine the efficacy of the intervention for improving CT education and enrollment.

  8. Methods for implementing patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures of symptomatic adverse events in cancer clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Rogak, Lauren J.; Dueck, Amylou C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is increasing interest to use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to evaluate symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer treatment trials. However, there are currently no standard recommended approaches for integrating patient-reported AE measures into trials. Methods Approaches are identified from prior trials for selecting AEs for solicited patient-reporting; administering patient-reported AE measures; and analyzing and reporting results. Findings Approaches for integrating patient-reported AE measures into cancer trials generally combine current standard methods for clinician-reported AEs as well as established best practices for employing PRO measures. Specific AEs can be selected for a PRO questionnaire based on common and expected reactions in a given trial context, derived from literature review and qualitative/mixed methods evaluations and should be the same set administered across all arms of a trial. A mechanism for collecting unsolicited patient-reported AEs will also ideally be included. Patients will preferably report at baseline and end of active treatment as well as on a frequent standardized schedule during active treatment, such as weekly from home, with a recall period corresponding to the frequency of reporting (e.g., past 7 days). Less frequent reporting may be considered after an initial intensive monitoring period for trials of prolonged treatments and during long-term follow up. Electronic PRO data collection is preferred. Backup data collection for missed PRO reports is advisable to boost response rates. Analysis can employ a combination of approaches to AE and PRO data. If a high proportion of patients is experiencing baseline symptoms, systematic subtraction of these from on-study AEs should be considered to improve reporting of symptoms related to treatment. More granular longitudinal analyses of individual symptoms can also be useful. Implications Methods are evolving for integrating patient-reported symptomatic AEs

  9. Animal experiments and clinical trials of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan for various cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; Kim, E. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Park, S. Y.; Son, Y. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, C. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    {sup 166}Ho is a good therapeutic radionuclide because of its suitable half-life (26.8 hours), high beta energy and 6% gamma ray for imaging. Chitosan is a kind of N-glucosamine with 400 to 500 kD MW, which chelates metal ions and degrades slowly in vivo. As a preclinical studies, we performed cytotoxic effect of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in a variety of cancer cell lines derived from stomach or ovarian cancer based on MTT assay and HTCA method. To evaluated the absorbed dose to the cavitary wall from {sup 166}Ho-chitosan, intraperitoneal administration of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in the rat and simulation of energy transfer from the beta particles to the cavity wall using the Monte Carlo code EGS4 was done, and used as a standard for the planning therapy. Intracavitary {sup 166}Ho-chitosan therapy were tried in peritoneal metastatic ovarian and stomach cancers and cystic brain tumors. Intraarterial injection in inoperable primary liver cancer was also tried. As a radiation synovectomy agent, biocompatibility study in the knee joints of rabbits were performed. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan showed synergistic effects with 5-FU or cisplatin in vitro. 97-99% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was localized within the peritoneal cavity, and more than 90% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was attached to the peritoneal wall. Partial response were observed in 4 among 5 patients with ovarian cancer without severe toxicity. In the cystic brain tumor, 5 of 8 cysts were shrunken in size with thinning of the wall, 2 out of 8 showed growth retardation. In the primary liver cancer, radioactivity was distributed in the teritory of selected hepatic arterial branch, and partial responses were observed in 2 cases. In the knee joints of the rabbits, more than 98% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan remained in the joint cavity and was stable upto 1 week. 49 refs., 22 tabs. (author)

  10. The effect of weekly specialist palliative care teleconsultations in patients with advanced cancer -a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Patrick D; Schers, Henk J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Vissers, Kris C P; Hasselaar, Jeroen G J

    2017-06-19

    Teleconsultation seems to be a promising intervention for providing palliative care to home-dwelling patients; however, its effect on clinically relevant outcome measures remains largely unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether weekly teleconsultations from a hospital-based specialist palliative care consultation team (SPCT) improved patient-experienced symptom burden compared to "care as usual". Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of these teleconsultations on unmet palliative care needs, continuity of care, hospital admissions, satisfaction with teleconsultations, and the burden experienced by informal caregivers. Seventy-four home-dwelling patients diagnosed with advanced cancer were recruited from outpatient clinics of a tertiary university hospital and from regional home care organizations between May 2011 and January 2015. Participants were randomized to receive weekly, prescheduled teleconsultations with an SPCT-member (intervention group), or to receive "care as usual" (control group), for a period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome of this study was: patient-experienced symptom burden indicated by the following: (1) Total Distress Score (defined as the sum of all nine subscales of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System) and (2) the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Mixed models were used to test for differences between the two groups. The Total Distress Score became significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group, reaching significance at week 12 (adjusted difference at week 12: 6.90 points, 95% CI, 0.17 to 13.63; P = 0.04). The adjusted anxiety scores were higher in the intervention group than in the control group (estimate effect: 1.40; 95% CI, 0.14 to 2.55; P = 0.03). No difference was found between the groups in adjusted depression scores (estimate effect: 0.30; 95% CI, -1.39 to 1.99; P = 0.73) or in secondary outcome measures. Adding weekly teleconsultations to

  11. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    the members voted we calculated the median score among the nine members of the working group who completed the score. The document includes 25 recommendations regarding randomization, blocking and stratification, blinding, enhancing accuracy of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), selecting a study population......The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...

  12. Development of Pain End Point Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials and Drug Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    6) IN PROGRESS 2a. Develop IVRS platform (Months 1 – 3) Completed 2b. Develop study databases on secure, password-protected server (Months 3...mode of administration.31 To optimally represent patients’ experiences at a given time point of interest during a trial, pain and analge- sic ...the improvement. Pain intensity and analge- sic use are assessed at baseline and at each preselected follow-up time point to calculate the percentage of

  13. Randomized phase II clinical trial of chemo-immunotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lasalvia-Prisco

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Lasalvia-Prisco1,4, Emilio Garcia-Giralt2, Jesús Vázquez2,4, Marta Aghazarian4, Eduardo Lasalvia-Galante3,4, Joshemaria Larrañaga3,4, Gonzalo Spera31Interdoctors Medical Procedures, North Miami Beach, FL, USA; 2Centre De Cancérologie Hartmann, Neuilly Sur Seine, France; 3Interdoctors Medical Procedures, Montevideo, Uruguay; 4National Institute of Oncology, Montevideo, Uruguay (initial dataAbstract: The purpose of this study was to compare chemotherapy-naive patients with stage IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy. We tested doxetacel plus cisplatinum as chemotherapy protocol. An immunomodulatory adjuvant system was added as chemoimmunotherapy to the previously mentioned protocol. This system contains three well-known and complementary conditioners of protective immune-responses: cyclophosphamide low-dose, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulant factor and magnesium silicate granuloma. Eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive every 3-weeks one of the treatments under comparison. Patients received four cycles of treatment unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity was documented. The maximum follow-up was one year. In each arm, tumor response (rate, duration, median survival time, 1-year overall survival, safety, and immunity modifications were assessed. Immunity was evaluated by submitting peripheral blood mononuclear cells to laboratory tests for nonspecific immunity: a phytohemaglutinin-induced lymphocyte proliferation, b prevalence of T-Regulatory (CD4+CD25+ cells and for specific immunity: a lymphocyte proliferation induced by tumor-associated antigens (TAA contained in a previously described autologous thermostable hemoderivative. The difference (chemotherapy vs. chemoimmunotherapy in response rate induced by the two treatments (39.0% and 35.0% was not statistically significant. However, the response duration (22 and 31 weeks, the median survival time (32

  14. Genomic and clinical predictors for improving estimator precision in randomized trials of breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Patil

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Adjusting only for clinical variables led to substantial precision gains (at least 5% in three of the four data sets, with a 1% precision loss in the remaining data set. These gains were unchanged or increased when sample sizes were doubled in our simulations. The precision gains due to incorporating genomic information, beyond the gains from adjusting for clinical variables, were not substantial.

  15. Which Obstacles Prevent Us from Recruiting into Clinical Trials: A Survey about the Environment for Clinical Studies at a German University Hospital in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProspective clinical studies are the most important tool in modern medicine. The standard in good clinical practice in clinical trials has constantly improved leading to more sophisticated protocols. Moreover, translational questions are increasingly addressed in clinical trials. Such trials must follow elaborate rules and regulations. This is accompanied by a significant increase in documentation issues which require substantial manpower. Furthermore, university-based clinical centers are interested in increasing the amount of patients treated within clinical trials, and this number has evolved to be a key quality criterion. The present study was initiated to elucidate the obstacles that limit clinical scientists in screening and recruiting for clinical trials.MethodsA specific questionnaire with 28 questions was developed focusing on all aspects of clinical trial design as well as trial management. This included questions on organizational issues, medical topics as well as potential patients’ preferences and physician’s goals. The questionnaire was established to collect data anonymously on a web-based platform. The survey was conducted within the Klinikum rechts der Isar, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich; physicians of all levels (Department Chairs, attending physicians, residents, as well as study nurses, and other study-related staff were addressed. The answers were analyzed using the Survio analyzing tool (http://www.survio.com/de/.ResultsWe collected 42 complete sets of answers; in total 28 physicians, 11 study nurses, and 3 persons with positions in administration answered our survey. The study centers reported to participate in a range of 3–160 clinical trials with a recruitment rate of 1–80%. Main obstacles were determined: 31/42 (74% complained about limited human resources and 22/42 (52% reported to have a lack on technical resources, too. 30/42 (71% consented to the answer, that the documentation

  16. Physical exercise in cancer patients during and after medical treatment: a systematic review of randomized and controlled clinical trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knols, R.H.; Aaronson, N.K.; Uebelhart, D.; Fransen, J.; Aufdemkampe, G.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To systematically review the methodologic quality of, and summarize the evidence from trials examining the effectiveness of physical exercise in improving the level of physical functioning and psychological well-being of cancer patients during and after medical treatment. METHODS:

  17. Life Skills Training Effectiveness on Non- Metastatic Breast Cancer Mental Health: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Shabani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with breast cancer are predisposed to some psychiatric symptoms and mental disorders as a result of their diagnosis or lifestyle. These problems cause patients to have daily stress, feelings of guilt, anxiety, a dysphoric mood, and impaired social relations. Such problems will lead to serious mental disorders.Therefore, life skills training may enable patients to cope better with these problems and improve their mental health.Methods: In an experimental study 50 breast cancer patients were randomly selected and assigned to two groups, experimental and control. The experimental group attended life skills training classes continuously for ten weeks. The duration of each class was two hours. Participants in both groups completed a General Health Questionnaire-28 form before the commencement of classes, after two weeks of training, and again at two months after course completion. The statistical method used in this study was the t-test.Results: In the life skills training group, patients' depressive and anxiety symptoms, somatization disorders, sleep disorders, and disorders of social functioning significantly decreased (P<0.0001. There was no change in the control group.Conclusion: The results show that life skills training can be considered a supportive method for symptoms of depression, anxiety, sleep, and somatic disorders in patients with breast cancer.

  18. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials: a start in setting international standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff; Basch, Ethan; Bonnetain, Franck; Calvert, Melanie; Campbell, Alicyn; Cleeland, Charles; Cocks, Kim; Collette, Laurence; Dueck, Amylou C; Devlin, Nancy; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Gotay, Carolyn; Greimel, Eva; Griebsch, Ingolf; Groenvold, Mogens; Hamel, Jean-Francois; King, Madeleine; Kluetz, Paul G; Koller, Michael; Malone, Daniel C; Martinelli, Francesca; Mitchell, Sandra A; Moinpour, Carol M; Musoro, Jammbe; O'Connor, Daniel; Oliver, Kathy; Piault-Louis, Elisabeth; Piccart, Martine; Pimentel, Francisco L; Quinten, Chantal; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Schürmann, Christoph; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Soltys, Katherine M; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Velikova, Galina; Coens, Corneel

    2016-11-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are analysed and interpreted make it difficult to compare results across trials, and hinders the application of research findings to inform publications, product labelling, clinical guidelines, and health policy. To address these problems, the Setting International Standards in Analyzing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Slow release tramadol in the initial treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain: Open, multicentric clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošnjak Snežana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The analgesic efficacy of slow release tramadol in the titration phase of treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain has been demonstrated in clinical trials. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate this treatment strategy in routine daily practice. Method This was a prospective, non-randomized, open, multicentric, phase IV two-week study. Each patient received 100 mg slow release tramadol orally, twice a day. Patients were allowed to take 20 drops (50 mg of tramadol as needed for breakthrough pain. The pain intensity and tramadol tolerability were recorded every day for the previous 24 hours, in the first week and at the end of the study. Pain relief and the impact of pain on sleep were evaluated on the 8th and 15th day. Results The study included 46 patients with metastatic malignant disease. The total of 46 patients completed the first week of treatment, and 33 patients completed the whole study. At the end of study, the intensity of pain was significantly reduced from 6.75 to 3.03 on numerical scale (NS 0-10 (p<0.001. At the end of study, 60.6% of patients graded the severity of pain as maximally mild on a verbal scale. The pain relief significantly improved from 25.75 to 71.81 on a numerical scale (NS 0-100 (p<0.001. The impact of pain on sleep was significantly reduced from 51.51% to 10.61% on a numerical scale (NS 0-100 (p<0.001. There were no differences in the drowsiness/confusion, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, loss of appetite and constipation, from the beginning to the end of treatment. Conclusion Tramadol slow release was effective in the titration phase of treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain with good tolerability.

  20. Intermediate neoadjuvant radiotherapy for T3 low/middle rectal cancer: postoperative outcomes of a non-controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglia, Giovanni; Mastrodonato, Nicola; Tardio, Berardino; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Corsa, Pietro; Troiano, Michele; Parisi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma are well known. However, there is still considerable uncertainty about the optimal radiation treatment. There is an ongoing debate about the choice between very short treatments immediately followed by surgical resection and prolonged treatments with delayed surgery. In this paper, we describe an interim analysis of a non-controlled clinical trial in which radiotherapy delivered with intermediate dose/duration was followed by surgery after about 2 weeks to improve local control and survival after curative radiosurgery for cT3 low/middle rectal cancer. Methods Preoperative radiotherapy (36 Gy in 3 weeks) was delivered in 248 consecutive patients with cT3NxM0 rectal adenocarcinoma within 10 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery within the third week after treatment completion. Results 166 patients (66.94%) underwent anterior resection, 80 patients (32.26%) the Miles' procedure and 2 patients (0.8%) the Hartmann's procedure. Local resectability rate was 99.6%, with 226 curative-intent resections. The overall rate of complications was 27.4%. 5-year oncologic outcomes were evaluated on 223 patients. The median follow-up time was 8.9 years (range 5-17.4 years); local recurrence (LR) rate and distal recurrence (DR) rate after 5 years were 6.28% and 21.97%, respectively. Overall survival was 74.2%; disease free survival was 73.5%; local control was 93.4 % and metastasis-free survival was 82.1%. Conclusions preoperative radiotherapy with intermediate dose/duration and interval between radiotherapy and surgery achieves high local control in patients with cT3NxM0 rectal cancer, and high DR rate seems to be the major limitation to improved survival. PMID:25373926

  1. Safety and efficacy of nivolumab in the treatment of cancers: A meta-analysis of 27 prospective clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Yan; Ma, Xuelei; Zhu, Chenjing; Mao, Ye; Shen, Kai; Wei, Xiawei; Chen, Yan; Zheng, Heng

    2017-02-15

    Immune checkpoint inhibition therapy has benefited people and shown powerful anti-tumor activity during the past several years. Nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 monoclonal antibody against PD-1, is a widely studied immune checkpoint inhibitor for the treatment of cancers. To assess the safety and efficacy of nivolumab, 27 clinical trials on nivolumab were analyzed. Results showed that the summary risks of all grade adverse effects (AEs) and grade ≥3 AEs were 0.65 and 0.12. The rate of nivolumab-related death was 0.25%. The most common any grade AEs were fatigue (25.1%), rush (13.0%), pruritus (12.5%), diarrhea (12.1%), nausea (11.8%) and asthenia (10.4%). The most common grade ≥3 AEs were hypophosphatemia (only 2.3%) and lymphopenia (only 2.1%). The pooled objective response rate (ORR), 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate and 1-year overall survival (OS) rate were 0.26, 0.40 and 0.52, respectively. The odds ratio of ORR between PD-L1 positive and negative was 2.34 (95% CI 1.77-3.10, p nivolumab and chemotherapeutics were 2.77 (95% CI 1.69-4.56, p nivolumab has durable outcomes with tolerable AEs and drug-related deaths in cancer patients. Nivolumab monotherapy has better treatment response compared with chemotherapy, whereas chemotherapeutics have significantly higher risk of adverse effects than nivolumab. © 2016 UICC.

  2. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  3. Effect of Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation on Cancer Incidence in Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Joan; Watson, Patrice; Travers-Gustafson, Dianne; Recker, Robert; Garland, Cedric; Gorham, Edward; Baggerly, Keith; McDonnell, Sharon L

    2017-03-28

    Evidence suggests that low vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer. To determine if dietary supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium reduces the risk of cancer among older women. A 4-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, population-based randomized clinical trial in 31 rural counties (June 24, 2009, to August 26, 2015-the final date of follow-up). A total of 2303 healthy postmenopausal women 55 years or older were randomized, 1156 to the treatment group and 1147 to the placebo group. Duration of treatment was 4 years. The treatment group (vitamin D3 + calcium group) received 2000 IU/d of vitamin D3 and 1500 mg/d of calcium; the placebo group received identical placebos. The primary outcome was the incidence of all-type cancer (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers), which was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards modeling. Among 2303 randomized women (mean age, 65.2 years [SD, 7.0]; mean baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, 32.8 ng/mL [SD, 10.5]), 2064 (90%) completed the study. At year 1, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were 43.9 ng/mL in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 31.6 ng/mL in the placebo group. A new diagnosis of cancer was confirmed in 109 participants, 45 (3.89%) in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 64 (5.58%) in the placebo group (difference, 1.69% [95% CI, -0.06% to 3.46%]; P = .06). Kaplan-Meier incidence over 4 years was 0.042 (95% CI, 0.032 to 0.056) in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 0.060 (95% CI, 0.048 to 0.076) in the placebo group; P = .06. In unadjusted Cox proportional hazards regression, the hazard ratio was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.47 to 1.02). Adverse events potentially related to the study included renal calculi (16 participants in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 10 in the placebo group), and elevated serum calcium levels (6 in the vitamin D3 + calcium group and 2 in the placebo group). Among healthy postmenopausal older women with a mean baseline serum 25

  4. Potentiation of Opioid-Induced Analgesia by L-Type Calcium Channel Blockers: Need for Clinical Trial in Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Basu Ray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports indicate that the analgesic effect of opioids is due to both closure of specific voltage-gated calcium channels (N- and P/Q-types and opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs in neurons concerned with transmission of pain. However, administration of opioids leads to unacceptable levels of side effects, particularly at high doses. Thus, current research is directed towards simultaneously targeting other voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs like the L-type VGCCs or even other cell signaling mechanisms, which would aug-ment opioid-mediated analgesic effect without a concurrent increase in the side effects. Unfortunately, the results of these studies are often conflicting considering the different experimental paradigms (variable drug selection and their doses and also the specific pain test used for studying analgesia adopted by researchers. The present review focuses on some of the interesting findings regarding the analgesic effect of Opioids + L-VGCC blockers and suggests that time has come for a clinical trial of this combination of drugs in the treatment of cancer pain.

  5. SU-F-303-12: Implementation of MR-Only Simulation for Brain Cancer: A Virtual Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glide-Hurst, C; Zheng, W; Kim, J; Wen, N; Chetty, I J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective virtual clinical trial using an MR-only workflow for a variety of brain cancer cases by incorporating novel imaging sequences, tissue segmentation using phase images, and an innovative synthetic CT (synCT) solution. Methods: Ten patients (16 lesions) were evaluated using a 1.0T MR-SIM including UTE-DIXON imaging (TE = 0.144/3.4/6.9ms). Bone-enhanced images were generated from DIXON-water/fat and inverted UTE. Automated air segmentation was performed using unwrapped UTE phase maps. Segmentation accuracy was assessed by calculating intersection and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) using CT-SIM as ground truth. SynCTs were generated using voxel-based weighted summation incorporating T2, FLAIR, UTE1, and bone-enhanced images. Mean absolute error (MAE) characterized HU differences between synCT and CT-SIM. Dose was recalculated on synCTs; differences were quantified using planar gamma analysis (2%/2 mm dose difference/distance to agreement) at isocenter. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were compared. Results: On average, air maps intersected 80.8 ±5.5% (range: 71.8–88.8%) between MR-SIM and CT-SIM yielding DSCs of 0.78 ± 0.04 (range: 0.70–0.83). Whole-brain MAE between synCT and CT-SIM was 160.7±8.8 HU, with the largest uncertainty arising from bone (MAE = 423.3±33.2 HU). Gamma analysis revealed pass rates of 99.4 ± 0.04% between synCT and CT-SIM for the cohort. Dose volume histogram analysis revealed that synCT tended to yield slightly higher doses. Organs at risk such as the chiasm and optic nerves were most sensitive due to their proximities to air/bone interfaces. DRRs generated via synCT and CT-SIM were within clinical tolerances. Conclusion: Our approach for MR-only simulation for brain cancer treatment planning yielded clinically acceptable results relative to the CT-based benchmark. While slight dose differences were observed, reoptimization of treatment plans and improved image registration can address

  6. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  7. Life skills training effectiveness on non-metastatic breast cancer mental health: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Mina; Moghimi, Minoosh; Eghdam Zamiri, Reza; Nazari, Fatemeh; Mousavinasab, Nouraddin; Shajari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer are predisposed to some psychiatric symptoms and mental disorders due to their life styles or disease conditions. These problems cause patients to deal with daily stress, feeling guilty, anxiety, dysphoric mood, and impaired social relations. Such problems would lead to serious mental disorders. Therefore, life skills training may help patients to cope better with their condition, and improve their mental health. In an experimental study, 50 patients with breast cancer were selected randomly and assigned to 2 experimental and control groups. The experimental group attended life skills training classes for 10 weeks continuously (each class lasting 2 hours). Participants in both the experimental and control groups completed a GHQ-28 questionnaire form before the commencement of classes, and again after 2 weeks to 2 months of the course completion. T-test was used as the statistical method. In life skills training group, depressive and anxiety symptoms, somatization disorders, sleep disorders and disorders of social functioning were significantly decreased (plife skills training is an effective method in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety, sleep and somatic disorders. Also, it would be useful in reducing problems of social dysfunction.

  8. Improved Endpoints for Cancer Immunotherapy Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Janetzki, Sylvia; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ibrahim, Ramy; Anderson, Aparna; Humphrey, Rachel; Blumenstein, Brent; Wolchok, Jedd

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluation of some immunotherapy clinical trials require a new development paradigm that includes reconsideration of established endpoints. Between 2004 and 2009, several initiatives facilitated by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute and partner organizations systematically evaluated an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and created the principles for redefining trial endpoints. On this basis, a body of clinical and laboratory data was generated that supports three novel endpoint recommendations. First, cellular immune response assays generate highly variable results. Assay harmonization in multicenter trials may minimize variability and help to establish cellular immune response as a reproducible biomarker, thus allowing investigation of its relationship with clinical outcomes. Second, immunotherapy may induce novel patterns of antitumor response not captured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or World Health Organization criteria. New immune-related response criteria were defined to more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Third, delayed separation of Kaplan–Meier curves in randomized immunotherapy trials can affect results. Altered statistical models describing hazard ratios as a function of time and recognizing differences before and after separation of curves may allow improved planning of phase III trials. These recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy trials and may offer a more realistic and useful model for clinical investigation. PMID:20826737

  9. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    on the commercial use of the molecular diagnostics. What was the impact on society beyond science and technology ? Successful execution of this...clinical practice to predict aggressive disease. The accuracy of each biomarker for predicting short- and long-term progression will be characterized...multiple established and analytically validated quantitative molecular biomarkers to predict PCa progression in a multi- center active surveillance

  10. Clinical trial of thalidomide combined with radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Ping; Sun, Su-Ping; Sun, Zhi-Qiang; Ni, Xin-Chu; Wang, Jian; Li, Yi; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Dong-Qing

    2014-05-07

    To investigate the short-term efficacy and tolerability of radiotherapy plus thalidomide in patients with esophageal cancer (EC). Serum samples from 86 EC patients were collected before, during, and after radiotherapy, and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level was examined by ELISA. According to the change in serum VEGF level during radiotherapy, the patients were divided into two groups: in the drug group, VEGF level was increased or remained unchanged, and thalidomide was administered up to the end of radiotherapy; in the non-drug group, VEGF level was decreased and radiotherapy was given alone. Thirty healthy volunteers served as controls. The efficacy and safety of radiotherapy plus thalidomide therapy were investigated. The 86 EC patients had a significantly higher level of VEGF compared with the 30 healthy controls before radiotherapy (P Thalidomide can down-regulate serum VEGF level in EC patients, and combined with radiotherapy may improve treatment outcome. Thalidomide was well tolerated by EC patients.

  11. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  12. Metaphor use and health literacy: a pilot study of strategies to explain randomization in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Janice L; Parrott, Roxanne L; Nussbaum, Jon F

    2011-01-01

    Patients often have difficulty understanding what randomization is and why it is needed in Phase III clinical trials. Physicians commonly report using metaphorical language to convey the role of chance in being assignment to treatment; however, the effectiveness of this strategy as an educational tool has not been explored. Guided by W. McGuire's (1972) information-processing model, the purpose of this pilot study was to explore effects of metaphors to explain randomization on message acceptance and behavioral intention to participate in a Phase III clinical trial among a sample of low-income, rural women (N = 64). Participants were randomly assigned to watch a video that explained randomization using 1 of 3 message strategies: a low-literacy definition, standard metaphor (i.e., flip of a coin), or a culturally derived metaphor (i.e., sex of a baby). The influence of attention on behavioral intentions to participate in clinical trials was partially moderated by message strategy. Under conditions of low attention, participants in the culturally derived metaphor condition experienced significantly higher intentions to participate in clinical trials compared with participants in the standard metaphor condition. However, as attention increased, differences in intentions among the conditions diminished. Having a positive affective response to the randomization message was a strong, positive predictor of behavioral intentions to participate in clinical trials. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  13. Surgical-site infections and postoperative complications: agreement between the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database and a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Lundvall, Lene

    2011-01-01

    -operation, urinary tract infection, pneumonia and sepsis. RESULTS: Surgical-site infection was found in 21 of 222 patients (9.5%) in the PROXI trial versus 6 of 222 patients (2.7%) in the DGCD (p infections were...... registered in the PROXI trial, but not in the DGCD. Agreements between secondary outcomes were very varying (kappa-value 0.77 for re-operation, 0.37 for urinary tract infections, 0.19 for sepsis and 0.18 for pneumonia). CONCLUSIONS: The randomized trial reported significantly more surgical-site infections......OBJECTIVE: Surgical-site infections are serious complications and thorough follow-up is important for accurate surveillance. We aimed to compare the frequency of complications recorded in a clinical quality database with those noted in a randomized clinical trial with follow-up visits. DESIGN...

  14. Racial/ethnic differences in clinical trial enrollment, refusal rates, ineligibility, and reasons for decline among patients at sites in the National Cancer Institute's Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Aisha T; Resnicow, Ken; Dimond, Eileen P; Denicoff, Andrea M; Germain, Diane St; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Enos, Rebecca A; Carrigan, Angela; Wilkinson, Kathy; Go, Ronald S

    2014-03-15

    This study examined racial/ethnic differences among patients in clinical trial (CT) enrollment, refusal rates, ineligibility, and desire to participate in research within the National Cancer Institute's Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) Clinical Trial Screening and Accrual Log. Data from 4509 log entries were evaluated in this study. Four logistic regression models were run using physical/medical conditions, enrollment into a CT, patient eligible but declined a CT, and no desire to participate in research as dependent variables. Age ≥ 65 years (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.28-1.79), males (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.92-2.71), and non-Hispanic black race (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.2-1.96) were significantly associated with more physical/medical conditions. Age ≥ 65 years was significantly associated with lower CT enrollment (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.7-0.98). Males (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.65-0.94) and a higher grade level score for consent form readability (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.83-0.97) were significantly associated with lower refusal rates. Consent page length ≥ 20 was significantly associated with lower odds of "no desire to participate in research" among CT decliners (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.58-0.98). There were no racial/ethnic differences in CT enrollment, refusal rates, or "no desire to participate in research" as the reason given for CT refusal. Higher odds of physical/medical conditions were associated with older age, males, and non-Hispanic blacks. Better management of physical/medical conditions before and during treatment may increase the pool of eligible patients for CTs. Future work should examine the role of comorbidities, sex, age, and consent form characteristics on CT participation. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  15. Mediterranean Diet and Invasive Breast Cancer Risk Among Women at High Cardiovascular Risk in the PREDIMED Trial: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Estefanía; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Donat-Vargas, Carolina; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emilio; Corella, Dolores; Fitó, Montserrat; Hu, Frank B; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Romaguera, Dora; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Schröder, Helmut; Basora, Josep; Sorlí, José Vicente; Bulló, Mònica; Serra-Mir, Merce; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of female cancer burden, and its incidence has increased by more than 20% worldwide since 2008. Some observational studies have suggested that the Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of breast cancer. To evaluate the effect of 2 interventions with Mediterranean diet vs the advice to follow a low-fat diet (control) on breast cancer incidence. The PREDIMED study is a 1:1:1 randomized, single-blind, controlled field trial conducted at primary health care centers in Spain. From 2003 to 2009, 4282 women aged 60 to 80 years and at high cardiovascular disease risk were recruited after invitation by their primary care physicians. Participants were randomly allocated to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat). Breast cancer incidence was a prespecified secondary outcome of the trial for women without a prior history of breast cancer (n = 4152). After a median follow-up of 4.8 years, we identified 35 confirmed incident cases of breast cancer. Observed rates (per 1000 person-years) were 1.1 for the Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil group, 1.8 for the Mediterranean diet with nuts group, and 2.9 for the control group. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios vs the control group were 0.32 (95% CI, 0.13-0.79) for the Mediterranean diet with extra-virgin olive oil group and 0.59 (95% CI, 0.26-1.35) for the Mediterranean diet with nuts group. In analyses with yearly cumulative updated dietary exposures, the hazard ratio for each additional 5% of calories from extra-virgin olive oil was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.57-0.90). This is the first randomized trial finding an effect of a long-term dietary intervention on breast cancer incidence. Our results suggest a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil in the primary prevention of breast cancer. These results come from a secondary

  16. Effect of Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy vs Total Abdominal Hysterectomy on Disease-Free Survival Among Women With Stage I Endometrial Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Monika; Gebski, Val; Davies, Lucy C; Forder, Peta; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Jobling, Thomas W; Land, Russell; Manolitsas, Tom; Nascimento, Marcelo; Neesham, Deborah; Nicklin, James L; Oehler, Martin K; Otton, Geoff; Perrin, Lewis; Salfinger, Stuart; Hammond, Ian; Leung, Yee; Sykes, Peter; Ngan, Hextan; Garrett, Andrea; Laney, Michael; Ng, Tong Yow; Tam, Karfai; Chan, Karen; Wrede, C David; Pather, Selvan; Simcock, Bryony; Farrell, Rhonda; Robertson, Gregory; Walker, Graeme; Armfield, Nigel R; Graves, Nick; McCartney, Anthony J; Obermair, Andreas

    2017-03-28

    with stage I endometrial cancer, the use of total abdominal hysterectomy compared with total laparoscopic hysterectomy resulted in equivalent disease-free survival at 4.5 years and no difference in overall survival. These findings support the use of laparoscopic hysterectomy for women with stage I endometrial cancer. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00096408; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: CTRN12606000261516.

  17. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    is the primary outcome measure of the study. Secondary outcome measures include survival and economic consequences. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge the Pal-Rehab study is the first randomized, controlled, phase III trial to evaluate individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation in standard oncology care......BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation....... The patients are randomized to a specialized palliative rehabilitation intervention integrated in standard oncology care or to standard oncology care alone. The intervention consists of a multidisciplinary group program, individual consultations, or a combination of both. At baseline and after six and 12 weeks...

  18. Adverse event development in clinical oncology trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, I.; Aaronson, N.; Sonke, J.-J.; Verheij, M.; Belderbos, J.

    Gita Thanarajasingam and colleagues' Article1 in The Lancet Oncology reports on a novel longitudinal approach for adverse event analysis and reporting. Comprehensive adverse event reporting in clinical oncology trials is essential to monitor tolerability of new cancer treatments. In view of the

  19. Clinical trials of homoeopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.; Knipschild, P.; ter Riet, G.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN: Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using

  20. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials in Vision Research Booklet for Nook, iPad and iPhone (EPUB - 1.6MB) Download the Clinical ... NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website can be addressed ...

  1. Real-World Evidence: A Comparison of the Australian Herceptin Program and Clinical Trials of Trastuzumab for HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bonny; Viney, Rosalie; Haas, Marion; Goodall, Stephen; Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2016-10-01

    Estimating the real-world cost-effectiveness of a new drug relies on understanding the differences between clinical trial data (pre-reimbursement) and clinical practice (post-reimbursement). This is important for decision makers when reviewing reimbursement decisions, prices, and considering other drugs for the same condition. Differences can arise from differences in patient characteristics, but also from the availability of new evidence and evolving treatment practices. This paper examines these issues using a case study. In 2001, the Australian Government funded trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2+ metastatic breast cancer through the Herceptin Program. The administrative arrangements of the Program resulted in rich observational data that captured information about patients treated with trastuzumab between 2001 and 2010 (n = 3830). The dataset included patient characteristics, dispensed medicines, medical service use and date of death. Compared to participants in the clinical trials, patients were older, received more prior chemotherapies and a broader range of co-administered chemotherapies. Treatment practices differed from the clinical trials, but also changed over time. For example, in situ hybridization testing, rather than immunohistochemistry testing, and a three weekly administration schedule, rather than one weekly, were increasingly used. Compared to the clinical trials, patients administered trastuzumab with a concomitant chemotherapy generally experienced longer overall survival (151.3 weeks, 95 % CI: 142.6, 163.4), while those who received trastuzumab as a monotherapy experienced shorter overall survival (94.4 weeks, 95%CI: 86.4, 102.9). These findings may be due to a differing relative treatment effect in clinical practice, but may also be due to a range of other factors. This analysis demonstrates the challenges for decision makers that arise because new evidence and evolving treatment practices create a gap between clinical trial data and

  2. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  3. Bladder cancer--the neglected tumor: a descriptive analysis of publications referenced in MEDLINE and data from the register ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Krause, Steffen F; Wullich, Bernd; Goebell, Peter J; Engehausen, Dirk G; Burger, Maximilian; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Keck, Bastian

    2013-10-24

    Uro-oncological neoplasms have both a high incidence and mortality rate and are therefore a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate research activity in uro-oncology over the last decade. We searched MEDLINE and ClinicalTrials.gov systematically for studies on prostatic, urinary bladder, kidney, and testicular neoplasms. The increase in newly published reports per year was analyzed using linear regression. The results are presented with 95% confidence intervals, and a p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The number of new publications per year increased significantly for prostatic, kidney and urinary bladder neoplasms (all <0.0001). We identified 1,885 randomized controlled trials (RCTs); also for RCTs, the number of newly published reports increased significantly for prostatic (p = 0.001) and kidney cancer (p = 0.005), but not for bladder (p = 0.09) or testicular (p = 0.44) neoplasms. We identified 3,114 registered uro-oncological studies in ClinicalTrials.gov. However, 85% of these studies are focusing on prostatic (45%) and kidney neoplasms (40%), whereas only 11% were registered for bladder cancers. While the number of publications on uro-oncologic research rises yearly for prostatic and kidney neoplasms, urothelial carcinomas of the bladder seem to be neglected despite their important clinical role. Clinical research on neoplasms of the urothelial bladder must be explicitly addressed and supported.

  4. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsen Lene

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Methods/design Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a muscle fiber size b regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy and c regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes

  5. The Clinical Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Reducing Pain for the Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Hao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Aromatherapy massage is an alternative treatment in reducing the pain of the cancer patients. This study was to investigate whether aromatherapy massage could improve the pain of the cancer patients. Methods. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for relevant randomized controlled trials without language limitations between 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2015 with a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The search terms included aromatherapy, essential oil, pain, ache, cancer, tumor, and carcinoma. There were 7 studies which met the selection criteria and 3 studies were eventually included among 63 eligible publications. Results. This meta-analysis included three randomized controlled trials with a total of 278 participants (135 participants in the massage with essential oil group and 143 participants in the control (usual care group. Compared with the control group, the massage with essential oil group had nonsignificant effect on reducing the pain (standardized mean difference = 0.01; 95% CI [-0.23,0.24]. Conclusion. Aromatherapy massage does not appear to reduce pain of the cancer patients. Further rigorous studies should be conducted with more objective measures.

  6. Advance care planning in patients with cancer referred to a phase I clinical trials program: the MD Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Siqing; Barber, F Diane; Naing, Aung; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Falchook, Gerald; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia; Howard, Adrienne; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-08-10

    Patients with advanced malignancies referred for early clinical trials have a short life expectancy. We designed this survey to ascertain the status of advance care planning in this population. Patients who were seen in a phase I clinic were asked to anonymously complete an investigator-designed survey. Of 435 individuals approached, 215 (49%) returned completed or partially completed surveys, whereas many others stated that they wanted to avoid the topic, because they had come to the phase I clinic for cancer therapy. Most patients (n = 149; 69%) were still hopeful about their future. Approximately 42% of patients (n = 90) reported having a living will, 46% had a medical power of attorney (n = 98), and 19% had a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order (n = 40). Approximately 20% of participants (n = 43) had not discussed advance care planning. Fifty-nine percent of patients wanted to discuss advance care planning with their physician. Having a DNR order in place was significantly more common in individuals who had a living will and/or a medical power of attorney. Although most patients referred to a phase I clinic remained optimistic, many had discussed a living will, medical power of attorney, and/or DNR order with their physician, family, and/or attorney. However, a significant minority had not addressed this issue with anyone, and many refused to take a survey on the topic. More than half of the patients wanted to discuss these matters with their physician. These observations suggest that extra effort to address advance care planning is needed for these patients.

  7. Cancer clinical research in Latin America: current situation and opportunities. Expert opinion from the first ESMO workshop on clinical trials, Lima, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfo, Christian; Caglevic, Christian; Bretel, Denisse; Hong, David; Raez, Luis E; Cardona, Andres F; Oton, Ana B; Gomez, Henry; Dafni, Urania; Vallejos, Carlos; Zielinski, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Latin America and the Caribbean have not yet developed strong clinical cancer research programmes. In order to improve this situation two international cancer organisations, the Latin American Society of Clinical Oncology (SLACOM) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) worked closely with the Peruvian Cooperative Oncology Group (GECOPERU) and organised a clinical cancer research workshop held in Lima, Peru, in October 2015. Many oncologists from different Latin American countries participated in this gathering. The opportunities for and strengths of clinical oncology research in Latin American and Caribbean countries were identified as the widespread use of the Spanish language, the high cancer burden, growing access to information, improving patient education, access to new drugs for research centres, regional networks and human resources. However, there are still many weaknesses and problems including the long timeline for regulatory approval, lack of economic investment, lack of training and lack of personnel participating in clinical research, lack of cancer registries, insufficient technology and insufficient supplies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, few cancer specialists, low general levels of education and the negative attitude of government authorities towards clinical research.

  8. Prediction of overall survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: development of a prognostic model through a crowdsourced challenge with open clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinney, Justin; Wang, Tao; Laajala, Teemu D; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Bare, J Christopher; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Khan, Suleiman A; Peddinti, Gopal; Airola, Antti; Pahikkala, Tapio; Mirtti, Tuomas; Yu, Thomas; Bot, Brian M; Shen, Liji; Abdallah, Kald; Norman, Thea; Friend, Stephen; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Soule, Howard; Sweeney, Christopher J; Ryan, Charles J; Scher, Howard I; Sartor, Oliver; Xie, Yang; Aittokallio, Tero; Zhou, Fang Liz; Costello, James C

    2017-01-01

    Improvements to prognostic models in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have the potential to augment clinical trial design and guide treatment strategies. In partnership with Project Data Sphere, a not-for-profit initiative allowing data from cancer clinical trials to be shared broadly with researchers, we designed an open-data, crowdsourced, DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) challenge to not only identify a better prognostic model for prediction of survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer but also engage a community of international data scientists to study this disease. Data from the comparator arms of four phase 3 clinical trials in first-line metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were obtained from Project Data Sphere, comprising 476 patients treated with docetaxel and prednisone from the ASCENT2 trial, 526 patients treated with docetaxel, prednisone, and placebo in the MAINSAIL trial, 598 patients treated with docetaxel, prednisone or prednisolone, and placebo in the VENICE trial, and 470 patients treated with docetaxel and placebo in the ENTHUSE 33 trial. Datasets consisting of more than 150 clinical variables were curated centrally, including demographics, laboratory values, medical history, lesion sites, and previous treatments. Data from ASCENT2, MAINSAIL, and VENICE were released publicly to be used as training data to predict the outcome of interest-namely, overall survival. Clinical data were also released for ENTHUSE 33, but data for outcome variables (overall survival and event status) were hidden from the challenge participants so that ENTHUSE 33 could be used for independent validation. Methods were evaluated using the integrated time-dependent area under the curve (iAUC). The reference model, based on eight clinical variables and a penalised Cox proportional-hazards model, was used to compare method performance. Further validation was done using data from a

  9. Funding oncology clinical trials: are cooperative group trials sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Hsien-Yeang; Whelan, Patrick; Levine, Mark N; Cowan, Kathryn; Lysakowski, Barbara; Kowaleski, Brenda; Snider, Anne; Xu, Rebecca Y; Arnold, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Many oncology clinical trials departments (CTDs) are in serious fiscal deficit and their sustainability is in jeopardy. This study investigates whether the payment models used to fund industry versus cooperative group trials contribute to the fiscal deficit of a CTD. We examined the lifetime costs of all cooperative group and industry trials activated in the CTD of a cancer center between 2007 and 2011. A trial's lifetime is defined as being from the date the first patient was accrued until the last patient's actual or projected final follow-up visit. For each trial, we calculated the lifetime monthly net income, which was defined as monthly revenue minus monthly costs. Data sources included study protocols, trial budgets, and accrual data. Of the 97 trials analyzed, 64 (66%) were cooperative group trials. The pattern of lifetime net income for cooperative group trials has a positive peak during patient accrual followed by a negative trough during follow-up. In contrast, the pattern for industry trials resembled an "l" shape. The patterns reflect the differing payment models: upfront lump-sum payments (cooperative group) versus milestone payments (industry). The negative trough in the lifetime net income of a cooperative group trial occurs because follow-up costs are typically not funded or are underfunded. CTDs accrue more patients in new trials to offset that deficit. The CTD uses revenue from accrual to existing trials to cross-subsidize past trials in follow-up. As the number of patients on follow-up increases, the fiscal deficit grows larger each year, perpetuating the cycle.

  10. Effect of folic acid supplementation on cancer risk among adults with hypertension in China: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xianhui; Shen, Lin; Zhang, Rong; Li, Youbao; Wang, Xiaobin; Wang, Binyan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Hua; Lei, Yu; Hou, Fan Fan; Gu, Jin; Huo, Yong

    2017-08-15

    The relationship of folic acid supplementation with the risk of cancer remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the effects of folic acid supplementation on cancer incidence among adults with hypertension without history of stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) in the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT). A total of 20,702 hypertensive adults without history of stroke or MI, stratified by MTHFR C677T genotypes(CC, CT and TT), were randomly assigned to receive double-blind daily treatment with a single pill containing 10 mg enalapril and 0.8 mg folic acid(n = 10,348) or a pill containing 10 mg enalapril alone(n = 10,354). During a median treatment duration of 4.5 years, cancer occurred in 116 participants(1.12%) in the enalapril-folic acid group versus 116 participants(1.12%) in the enalapril group (HR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.77-1.29). There was also no significant difference in the HRs for specific types of cancer(esophageal, gastric, breast, lung, colorectal, head and neck, liver and gynecologic cancer or lymphoma) or cancer mortality(HR, 1.05; 95%CI, 0.69-1.58). For participants not receiving folic acid treatment (enalapril only group), MTHFR 677 TT genotype was an independent predictor of total cancer risk compared to CC genotype (HR, 1.86; 95%CI, 1.07-3.22). Consistently, a beneficial effect was observed in participants with MTHFR TT genotype and low folate levels (folic acid supplementation can increase the risk of cancer incidence among adults with hypertension without history of stroke or MI in China. Our data suggest a protective effect in participants with MTHFR TT genotype and low folate levels. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Placebo and nocebo effects in randomized double-blind clinical trials of agents for the therapy for fatigue in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Maxine; Hui, David; Parsons, Henrique A; Bruera, Eduardo

    2010-02-01

    A significant response to placebo in randomized controlled trials of treatments for cancer-related fatigue (CRF) had been reported. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the frequency and predictors of response to placebo effect and nocebo effects in patients with CRF treated in those trials. The records of 105 patients who received placebo in 2 previous randomized clinical trials conducted by this group were reviewed. The proportion of patients who demonstrated clinical response to fatigue, defined as an increase in Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue score of > or = 7 from baseline to Day 8, and the proportion of patients with a nocebo effect, defined as those reporting >2 side effects, were determined. Baseline patient characteristics and symptoms recorded using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) were analyzed to determine their association with placebo and nocebo effects. Fifty-nine (56%) patients had a placebo response. Worse baseline anxiety and well-being subscale score (univariate) and well-being (multivariate) were significantly associated with placebo response. Commonly reported side effects were insomnia (79%), anorexia (53%), nausea (38%), and restlessness (34%). Multivariate analysis indicated that worse baseline (ESAS) sleep, appetite, and nausea were associated with increased reporting of the corresponding side effects. Greater than half of advanced cancer patients enrolled in CRF trials had a placebo response. Worse baseline physical well-being score was associated with placebo response. Patients experiencing specific symptoms at baseline were more likely to report these as side effects of the medication. These findings should be considered in the design of future CRF trials. Copyright 2009 American Cancer Society.

  12. Vitamin D supplementation and breast cancer prevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sperati

    Full Text Available In recent years, the scientific evidence linking vitamin D status or supplementation to breast cancer has grown notably. To investigate the role of vitamin D supplementation on breast cancer incidence, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing vitamin D with placebo or no treatment. We used OVID to search MEDLINE (R, EMBASE and CENTRAL until April 2012. We screened the reference lists of included studies and used the "Related Article" feature in PubMed to identify additional articles. No language restrictions were applied. Two reviewers independently extracted data on methodological quality, participants, intervention, comparison and outcomes. Risk Ratios and 95% Confident Intervals for breast cancer were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2 test. In sensitivity analysis, we assessed the impact of vitamin D dosage and mode of administration on treatment effects. Only two randomized controlled trials fulfilled the pre-set inclusion criteria. The pooled analysis included 5372 postmenopausal women. Overall, Risk Ratios and 95% Confident Intervals were 1.11 and 0.74-1.68. We found no evidence of heterogeneity. Neither vitamin D dosage nor mode of administration significantly affected breast cancer risk. However, treatment efficacy was somewhat greater when vitamin D was administered at the highest dosage and in combination with calcium (Risk Ratio 0.58, 95% Confident Interval 0.23-1.47 and Risk Ratio 0.93, 95% Confident Interval 0.54-1.60, respectively. In conclusions, vitamin D use seems not to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. However, the available evidence is still limited and inadequate to draw firm conclusions. Study protocol code: FARM8L2B5L.

  13. Impact of preoperative information on anxiety and disease-related knowledge in women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, W M; Mituś, J; Komorowski, A L; Karolewski, K

    2012-01-01

    Despite the large number of clinical trials on breast cancer, patient-related factors such as perioperative anxiety and level of knowledge about the disease and treatment have not been included in mainstream research efforts. This randomized trial was performed to evaluate the impact of information, provided preoperatively, on anxiety and knowledge of women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer. Sixty consecutive patients with breast cancer, admitted for a mastectomy, as primary treatment for breast cancer, with no previous cancer history, were randomized to receive structured information (short video about practical aspects of the hospital stay, surgical and adjuvant treatment) in addition to the routine informed consent procedure for surgery or the routine informed consent only. Anxiety and subjective knowledge levels were measured with the visual analogue scales; in addition, knowledge was assessed with a questionnaire. There was no significant effect of the additional information on perioperative anxiety or knowledge (subjective). Significantly more patients in the additional information group correctly listed all major available treatment options compared to the patients that received routine information (preoperatively 54% vs. 19%; p = 0.0101; 7 days postoperatively 50% vs.19%; p = 0.0367). Use of an informational video, preoperatively, did not significantly affect perioperative anxiety or subjective knowledge. Additional research is needed on effective delivery of disease- and treatment-specific information perioperatively.

  14. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    starting enrolment before 2010 to 63.2% after 2010 (24/38, P clinical trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov. CONCLUSION: Many published randomized controlled trials from Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica were not adequately registered but the requirement of trial registration has...... the proportion of correctly registered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in Acta from 2009 to 2014. METHODS: We manually searched all Acta issues from 2009 to 2014 for RCTs. Information about timing of data collection and registration in trial registries was extracted. We classified RCTs as correctly...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  15. Cross-trial analysis of immunologic and clinical data resulting from phase I and II trials of MVA-5T4 (TroVax) in colorectal, renal, and prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Richard; Shingler, William; Kelleher, Michelle; de Belin, Jackie; Treasure, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus MVA has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (MVA-5T4; TroVax), a surface glycoprotein expressed by most solid tumors. MVA-5T4 has been tested in 2 phase I/II and 7 phase II clinical trials in colorectal (4 trials), renal (4 trials), and prostate (1 trial) advanced cancer patients. Data have been collated from all 9 studies and used to investigate the magnitude and kinetics of 5T4-specific antibody responses after vaccination and to identify potential associations between the immune response and patient survival. Antibody responses specific for the 5T4 tumor antigen and the MVA viral vector were quantified in plasma samples taken from cancer patients before and after the treatment with MVA-5T4. Immunologic and survival data were analyzed using proportional hazards regression adjusting for age and gender. Both survival and immunologic response data were available for 189 patients with colorectal (n=73), renal (n=89), and prostate (n=27) cancer. Before the treatment with MVA-5T4, 5T4-specific antibody levels were significantly elevated in cancer patients compared with healthy donors. After MVA-5T4 administration, 5T4-specific antibody responses increased significantly and peaked after 3 to 4 vaccinations. Exploratory analyses showed significant associations between 5T4 antibody responses and overall survival across all 9 trials and in patients with colorectal cancer. The 5T4-specific antibodies were present at higher levels in cancer patients compared with healthy donors and increased significantly after treatment with MVA-5T4. Although the studies were uncontrolled, there were encouraging signs of activity which is associated with the magnitude of 5T4-specific antibody responses.

  16. Definitions for response and progression in ovarian cancer clinical trials incorporating RECIST 1.1 and CA 125 agreed by the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rustin, Gordon John Sampson; Vergote, Ignace; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    communication, 2010). The GCIG requests that data from all clinical trials using these definitions are made available to GCIG trial centers so that continual validation and improvement can be accomplished. These definitions were developed from analyzing patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy and have not yet...... the serum marker CA 125 and has specified the situations where these criteria should be used. However, the publications did not include detailed definitions, nor were they written to accommodate the new version of Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria (version 1.1) now available....... Thus, we recommend that the definitions described later in detail are incorporated into clinical trial protocols to maintain consistency. The criteria for defining progression are now acceptable in clinical trials of recurrent disease as they have since been validated (Pujade-Lauraine, personal...

  17. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Presley, Carolyn J; Wildes, Tanya M; Klepin, Heidi D; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A Systemic Review of Resistance Mechanisms and Ongoing Clinical Trials in ALK-rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khashayar eEsfahani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of oncogenic driver driver mutations in non-small cell lung cancer has led to a paradigm shift and the development of specific molecular treatments. Tumors harboring a rearranged EML4-ALK fusion oncogene are highly sensitive to therapy with ALK-targeted inhibitors. Crizotinib is the first approved treatment for advanced lung tumors containing this genetic abnormality. In this mini review, we discuss the existing data on crizotinib as well as ongoing trials involving this medication. A brief overview of the known resistance mechanisms to criztotinib will also be presented followed by a summary of the ongoing trials involving next-generation ALK inhibitors or other targeted therapies in patients with ALK+ NSCLC.

  19. Encapsulated Cells Expressing a Chemotherapeutic Activating Enzyme Allow the Targeting of Subtoxic Chemotherapy and Are Safe and Efficacious: Data from Two Clinical Trials in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matthias Löhr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, there is still a need for improved therapies. In this manuscript, we report clinical experience with a new therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer involving the implantation of encapsulated cells over-expressing a cytochrome P450 enzyme followed by subsequent low-dose ifosfamide administrations as a means to target activated ifosfamide to the tumor. The safety and efficacy of the angiographic instillation of encapsulated allogeneic cells overexpressing cytochrome P450 in combination with low-dose systemic ifosfamide administration has now been evaluated in 27 patients in total. These patients were successfully treated in four centers by three different interventional radiologists, arguing strongly that the treatment can be successfully used in different centers. The safety of the intra-arterial delivery of the capsules and the lack of evidence that the patients developed an inflammatory or immune response to the encapsulated cells or encapsulation material was shown in all 27 patients. The ifosfamide dose of 1 g/m2/day used in the first trial was well tolerated by all patients. In contrast, the ifosfamide dose of 2 g/m2/day used in the second trial was poorly tolerated in most patients. Since the median survival in the first trial was 40 weeks and only 33 weeks in the second trial, this strongly suggests that there is no survival benefit to increasing the dose of ifosfamide, and indeed, a lower dose is beneficial for quality of life and the lack of side effects. This is supported by the one-year survival rate in the first trial being 38%, whilst that in the second trial was only 23%. However, taking the data from both trials together, a total of nine of the 27 patients were alive after one year, and two of these nine patients were alive for two years or more.

  20. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For each...... relating to obsolescence, fidelity of intervention delivery, and adherence and crossover. Assessment and analysis raise questions regarding blinding and clustering of observations. This paper describes methodological problems in the design and conduct of surgical randomized trials and proposes strategies...

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Lowes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs and cell-free DNA (cfDNA as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes.

  3. Low free and bioavailable testosterone levels may predict pathologically-proven high-risk prostate cancer: a prospective, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, Göksel; Şirin, Hakan; Aydın, Mustafa; Özağarı, Ayşim; Tanrıverdi, Orhan; Kadıhasanoğlu, Mustafa; Kendirci, Muammer

    2017-09-01

    To determine the predictive value of free and bioavailable testosterone levels on the detection of high-grade prostate cancer proven by histopathological examination of transrectal prostate biopsy specimens. A total of 405 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy due to high prostatic specific antigen (PSA) (>2.5 ng/mL) and/or abnormal findings at digital rectal examination were included in this study. Blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels were calculated by the formula recommended by International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM). The patients were stratified according to the D'Amico classification based on PSA levels and histological outcomes of prostate biopsies as benign, low, intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Patients were also divided into five groups according to the percentage of cancerous cores. Prostate cancer was detected in 160 of 405 (39.5%) patients. Total, free and bioavailable testosterone levels did not differ significantly between the patients with benign or malign histology. However, mean free (6.2 vs. 5.2 ng/dL, p=0.02) and bioavailable (151 vs. 125 ng/dL, p=0.001) testosterone levels were found to be significantly different in men with low-intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between free, and bioavailable testosterone levels and percentage of cores with cancer (p=0.002 for free and p=0.016 for bioavailable testosterone, respectively). This prospective clinical study demonstrates that reduced levels of calculated blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Based on these findings blood free and bioavailable testosterone levels may be be thought to be an adjunctive factor in the prediction of high-risk prostate cancer.

  4. Genomic predictors of chemotherapy efficacy in advanced or recurrent gastric cancer in the GC0301/TOP002 phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli; Taguri, Masataka; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Tan, Patrick; Tsuburaya, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Recent gastric cancer clinical trials have aimed to establish the efficacy of combination therapy over monotherapy, however, the role for genomic biomarkers in these trials has remained largely unexplored. Here, using the NanoString expression platform, we analyzed 105 gastric tumors from a randomized phase III Japanese clinical trial (GC0301/TOP002) testing the efficacy of irinotecan plus S-1(IRI-S) versus S-1 therapy. We found that previously established proliferative subtype signatures, were associated with older patients (>65 years) and liver metastasis while mesenchymal subtype signatures were associated with younger patients (≤65 years) and peritoneal metastasis. Genes associated with tumor microenvironment (CD4, CD14, ADAMTS1, CCL5, CXCL12, CCL19), therapeutic implications (DPYD) and oncogenic signaling (Wnt5A, PTRF) were significantly associated with patient age, histology, tumor status, measurable lesions and metastasis. We identified Wnt5A downregulation as a candidate predictor of improved progression free survival (>8 weeks) in S-1 but not in IRI-S treatment. Although statistical significance was not achieved, mesenchymal subtype showed a trend for treatment interaction with IRI-S for efficacy. These findings highlight promising genomic markers that could be useful predictors of chemotherapy efficacy for better prognosis and survival outcome in gastric cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A feasibility dosimetric study on prostate cancer. Are we ready for a multicenter clinical trial on SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Carmelo; Bonanno, Elisa [Humanitas C.C.O., Catania (Italy); Villaggi, Elena [AUSL, Piacenza (Italy); Maggi, Giulia; Mancosu, Pietro [IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Research Center, Milan (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria Firenze (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy). Lab. of Medical Physics and Expert Systems; Borzi, Giusi R. [REM Radioterapia, Catania (Italy); Carbonini, Claudia [A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Consorti, Rita [ACO S. Filippo Neri, Rome (Italy); Fedele, David [Casa di Cura Privata San Rossore s.r.l., Pisa (Italy); Fiandra, Christian [Torino Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Unit; Ielo, Isidora [A.O.U. Policlinico G. Martino, Messina (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [' ' S. Giovanni Calibita' ' Fatebenefratelli, Rome (Italy); Malisan, Maria Rosa [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Udine (Italy); Martinotti, Anna [Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan (Italy); Moretti, Renzo [Az. Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia (Italy); Nardiello, Barbara [UPMC San Pietro FBF, Rome (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina; Clemente, Stefania [IRCCS CROB Rieonero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) started a working group dedicated to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment. In this work, we performed a multicenter planning study on patients who were candidates for SBRT in the treatment of prostate cancer with the aim of evaluating the dosimetric consistency among the different hospitals. Fourteen centers were provided the contours of 5 patients. Plans were performed following the dose prescription and constraints for organs at risk (OARs) of a reference paper. The dose prescription was 35 Gy in five fractions for the planning target volume (PTV). Different techniques were used (3D-CRT, fixed-Field IMRT, VMAT, CyberKnife). Plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Furthermore, the median DVH was calculated and one patient was re-planned. A total of 70 plans were compared. The maximum dose to the body was 107.9 ± 4.5 % (range 101.5-116.3 %). Dose at 98 % (D{sub 98} {sub %}) and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) were 102.0 ± 0.9 % (global range 101.1-102.9 %) and 105.1 ± 0.6 % (range 98.6-124.6 %). Similar trends were found for D{sub 95} {sub %} and mean dose to the PTV. Important differences were found in terms of the homogeneity index. Doses to OARs were heterogeneous. The subgroups with the same treatment planning system showed differences comparable to the differences of the whole group. In the re-optimized plans, DVH differences among institutes were reduced and OAR sparing improved. Important dosimetric differences with possible clinical implications, in particular related to OARs, were found. Replanning allowed a reduction in the OAR dose and decreased standard deviations. Multicenter clinical trials on SBRT should require a preplanning study to standardize the optimization procedure. (orig.) [German] Der italienische Verband der Medizinphysiker (AIFM) hat eine Arbeitsgruppe gegruendet, die sich mit der Koerperstammstereotaxie (SBRT) befasst. Im Rahmen

  6. Topics in clinical trial management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Kirwan (Bridget Anne)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to show how clinical trial conduct can be managed while respecting the underlying scientific principles. Chapter 2 describes the main results of PICO (PImobendan in COngestive heart failure), a trial which investigated a positive inotropic agent in patients

  7. Management of adverse events in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with everolimus: observations from a phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mary E

    2013-08-01

    Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex, renal angiomyolipoma and tuberous sclerosis complex, and, in combination with exemestane, for hormone receptor-positive HER2-negative advanced breast cancer after failure of treatment with letrozole or anastrozole. Results from the phase III BOLERO-2 trial demonstrated that everolimus in combination with exemestane provided significant clinical benefit to patients with advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Although everolimus is generally well tolerated, as with most therapies administered in an advanced cancer setting, drug-related adverse events (AEs) inevitably occur. Most common AEs observed in the everolimus studies include stomatitis, rash, infection, noninfectious pneumonitis, and hyperglycemia. Clinical awareness and early identification of such AEs by oncology nurses are essential to dosing (interruptions, reduction, and treatment discontinuation); quality of life; and, ultimately, patient outcomes. Because everolimus has already been shown to significantly improve clinical efficacy in patients with advanced breast cancer, a proactive approach to the practical management of AEs associated with this mTOR inhibitor as well as other most common AEs observed in this patient population has been reviewed and outlined here.

  8. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hyun Yang [Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Hae [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin, E-mail: heejincmd@yahoo.com [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  9. Randomized Clinical Trials With Biomarkers: Design Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Lisa M.; Korn, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical biomarker tests that aid in making treatment decisions will play an important role in achieving personalized medicine for cancer patients. Definitive evaluation of the clinical utility of these biomarkers requires conducting large randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Efficient RCT design is therefore crucial for timely introduction of these medical advances into clinical practice, and a variety of designs have been proposed for this purpose. To guide design and interpretation of RCTs evaluating biomarkers, we present an in-depth comparison of advantages and disadvantages of the commonly used designs. Key aspects of the discussion include efficiency comparisons and special interim monitoring issues that arise because of the complexity of these RCTs. Important ongoing and completed trials are used as examples. We conclude that, in most settings, randomized biomarker-stratified designs (ie, designs that use the biomarker to guide analysis but not treatment assignment) should be used to obtain a rigorous assessment of biomarker clinical utility. PMID:20075367

  10. Clinical Profile of Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors in Treating Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Nine Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Evidence on the benefits of combining cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (COX-2 in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still controversial. We investigated the efficacy and safety profile of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in treating NSCLC.The first meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed to assess the effect of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC on the overall response rate (ORR, overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, one-year survival, and toxicities. The fixed-effects model was used to calculate the pooled RR and HR and between-study heterogeneity was assessed. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the type of COX-2 inhibitors, treatment pattern, and treatment line.Nine randomized clinical trials, comprising 1679 patents with NSCLC, were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled ORR of patients who have NSCLC with COX-2 inhibitors was significantly higher than that without COX-2 inhibitors. In subgroup analysis, significantly increased ORR results were found on celecoxib (RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.51, rofecoxib (RR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.28, chemotherapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.20, 1.63, and first-line treatment (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.63. However, COX-2 inhibitors had no effect on the one-year survival, OS, and PFS. Increased RR of leucopenia (RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.45 and thrombocytopenia (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.76 suggested that COX-2 inhibitors increased hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3 of chemotherapy.COX-2 inhibitors increased ORR of advanced NSCLC and had no impact on survival indices, but it may increase the risk of hematologic toxicities associated with chemotherapy.

  11. The role of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jean-Marie; Alzghari, Saeed; Ahn, Chul; Trantham, Holly; La-Beck, Ninh M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that carboplatin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (C+PLD) is as efficacious as carboplatin with paclitaxel (C+P) and possibly is more tolerable for ovarian cancer therapy. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) may also be efficacious and tolerable as monotherapy in recurrent or platinum-resistant disease. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials in order to elucidate the role of PLD in ovarian cancer. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Knowledge for studies comparing C+PLD with C+P and comparing PLD with another monotherapy. Summary hazard ratios (HRs) and relative risks with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Three trials were included in the doublet regimen analysis, and five trials were included in the monotherapy regimen analysis. C+PLD provided superior progression-free survival (PFS) (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96) and similar overall survival (OS; HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.84-1.07) compared with C+P. There was no evidence of improved tolerability: C+PLD had more gastrointestinal toxicity, anemia, thrombocytopenia, cutaneous toxicity, and mucositis/stomatitis, although there was less neutropenia, neuropathy, and alopecia. PLD monotherapy had similar PFS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89-1.11) and OS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.88-1.11) to other monotherapies, but it was more tolerable. There was less neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and gastrointestinal toxicity, although cutaneous toxicity was increased. C+PLD had better PFS and similar OS compared with C+P and had a very different toxicity profile. Therapy selection could be based on patient risks for side effects. PLD is as efficacious as other monotherapies and is more tolerable.

  12. Analysis of Clinical End Points of Randomised Trials Including Bevacizumab and Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy as First-line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, G; Venturino, A; Guarneri, D

    2016-10-01

    Progression-free survival is recognised as an appropriate end point for randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, although it is not clear if it is reliable after chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. A literature search of randomised trials of systemic treatment including chemotherapy plus bevacizumab versus chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer was undertaken. For each trial the differences in overall survival and in either time-to-event or response-related end points were calculated. A Spearman test was carried out between the difference in each end point and the difference in survival. For the end points with the higher relationships with overall survival a regression analysis was carried out and R(2) (proportion of variability explained) was reported. Progression-free survival is closely related to overall survival (r=0.817; R(2)=0.706) and this relationship does not seem to be changed by the discontinuation of bevacizumab. The response-related end points have a better overall performance than the other time-to-event end points, even when only phase III trials are considered. In phase III trials, the disease control rate seems to be strongly related to overall survival (r=0.975; R(2)=0.889) and the overall response rate reports a good performance (r=0.866; R(2)=0.484). An open-label design and the timing of disease radiological evaluation do not seem to interfere with the correlation of differences of progression-free survival and overall survival. A validation of the disease control rate and the overall response rate as a surrogate end point of survival at a patient level and a standardised definition of the timing for their measurement are strongly recommended in trials of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  14. The Role of End-of-Life Issues in the Design and Reporting of Cancer Clinical Trials: A Structured Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Stefan; Hausner, Elke; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Simon, Steffen T.; Voltz, Raymond; Becker, Gerhild; Schmacke, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    assessed in 36/100 RCTs. The implications of treatment-related harms for the patients were discussed in 22/100 appraisals. Terminology referring to the patients’ EoL situation (e.g. “terminal”) was scarce, whereas terms suggesting control of the disease (e.g. “cancer control“) were common. Conclusions The EoL situation of patients with advanced cancer should be more carefully considered in clinical trials. Although the investigation and robust reporting of PROs is a prerequisite for informed decision-making in healthcare, they are rarely defined as endpoints and HRQoL is rarely mentioned as a therapeutic goal. Suggestions for improving standards for study design and reporting are presented. PMID:26327232

  15. The Role of End-of-Life Issues in the Design and Reporting of Cancer Clinical Trials: A Structured Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Weingärtner, Vera; Lange, Stefan; Hausner, Elke; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Simon, Steffen T; Voltz, Raymond; Becker, Gerhild; Schmacke, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    implications of treatment-related harms for the patients were discussed in 22/100 appraisals. Terminology referring to the patients' EoL situation (e.g. "terminal") was scarce, whereas terms suggesting control of the disease (e.g. "cancer control") were common. The EoL situation of patients with advanced cancer should be more carefully considered in clinical trials. Although the investigation and robust reporting of PROs is a prerequisite for informed decision-making in healthcare, they are rarely defined as endpoints and HRQoL is rarely mentioned as a therapeutic goal. Suggestions for improving standards for study design and reporting are presented.

  16. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...

  17. Ontario protocol assessment level: clinical trial complexity rating tool for workload planning in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuck, Bobbi; Bettello, Phyllis; Berghout, Koralee; Hanna, Tracie; Kowaleski, Brenda; Phippard, Lynda; Au, Diana; Friel, Kay

    2011-03-01

    The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research supported the creation of a working group with the objective of developing a standard rating scale to evaluate clinical trial complexity and applying the scale to facilitate workload measurement for Ontario cancer research sites. The lack of a mechanism to measure the workload involved in a clinical trials protocol was identified and confirmed by a literature review. To collect information on how Ontario sites were assessing workload, a survey was distributed and evaluated. As a result, the working group developed the Ontario Protocol Assessment Level (OPAL), a protocol complexity rating scale designed to capture the workload involved in a clinical trial. After a training workshop on the application, OPAL was evaluated by 17 Ontario cancer centers to demonstrate its reliability and consistency during a 3-month pilot study. Twenty-seven protocols were reviewed by multiple sites, and the majority of the sites reported OPAL score differences between 0 and 1.5. OPAL provides clinical trials departments with an objective method of quantifying clinical trials activity on the basis of study protocol complexity. With consistent application of OPAL, sites can manage staffing objectively. The working group is continuing to monitor the application of OPAL in Ontario.

  18. Raloxifene, an oestrogen-receptor-beta-targeted therapy, inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth: results from preclinical studies and a pilot phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazer, Ronald L; Jain, Anjali; Galkin, Anna V; Cinman, Nadya; Nguyen, Koo N; Natale, Ronald B; Gross, Mitchell; Green, Leland; Bender, Leon I; Holden, Stuart; Kaplan, Leslie; Agus, David B

    2006-04-01

    To determine, in preclinical in vivo animal and in clinical studies, whether raloxifene (a selective oestrogen-receptor (ER) modulator that targets ER-beta and induces apoptosis in vitro in androgen-independent prostate cancer, AIPC cells) affects prostate cell differentiation, proliferation and carcinogenesis, and in the pilot phase II clinical trial, the response rate and duration of patients with AIPC treated with a daily oral dose of raloxifene. Tumour proliferation rate in response to raloxifene treatment, and molecular markers of cell cycle and apoptosis, were evaluated in established ER-beta-positive androgen-dependent (AD) CWR22 and AI CWRSA9 human xenograft prostate cancer models. Twenty-one patients with AIPC and evidence of disease progression were enrolled into the clinical trial and given daily oral raloxifene. There was significant growth inhibition by raloxifene in the ADPC and AIPC xenograft models (CWR22 68%, P < 0.010; CWRSA9 64%, P < 0.001), with no tumour regression. There was evidence of G1 arrest by increased p27kip1 expression in the raloxifene-treated group. Eighteen patients comprised the efficacy analysis, as three withdrew before the first evaluation. At the first evaluation, five men had stable disease and continued on the study for a median of five cycles. The longest response was 17 cycles. Drug related toxicity was minimal. Raloxifene has activity in xenograft models, slowing disease progression. This translated to possible disease stabilization in patients with AIPC. Further studies are warranted.

  19. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    Evidence shows that the quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) affects estimates of intervention efficacy, which is significantly exaggerated in low-quality trials. The present study examines the quality of all 235 RCTs published in HEPATOLOGY from the initiation in 1981 through August 1998......-blinding. The median quality score of all trials was 3 points (range, 1-5 points). Multiple logistic regression analysis explored the association between quality and therapeutic areas, number of centers, external funding, year of publication, and country of origin. High-quality trials were most likely to investigate......, single-center trials, and trials with no external funding. Quality did not improve with time and was not associated with country of origin. The main conclusions are that the quality of RCTs in HEPATOLOGY needs improvement and that the probability of high quality increased with the number of centers...

  20. Exploring Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials by Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariera, Katrina L; Murphy, Sheila T; Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2017-08-01

    African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer, yet underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Because of this, it is important to understand how attitudes and beliefs about clinical trials vary by ethnicity. A national, random sample of 860 adults was given an online survey about attitudes toward clinical trials. We examined willingness to participate in clinical trials, attitudes toward clinical trials, trust in doctors, attitudes toward alternative and complementary medicine, and preferred information channels. Results indicate that African-American and Hispanic-American participants have more negative attitudes about clinical trials, more distrust toward doctors, more interest in complementary and alternative medicine, and less willingness to participate in clinical trials than white/non-Hispanics, although specific factors affecting willingness to participate vary. The channels people turn to for information on clinical trials also varied by ethnicity. These results help explain the ethnic disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment by highlighting some potential underlying causes and drawing attention to areas of importance to these groups.

  1. Complying with the European Clinical Trials directive while surviving the administrative pressure - an alternative approach to toxicity registration in a cancer trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Heyman, Mats; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Vettenranta, Kim; Åsberg, Ann; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Pruunsild, Kaie; Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Hallböök, Helena; Quist-Paulsen, Petter; Griškevičius, Laimonas; Helt, Louise; Hansen, Birgitte Vilsbøll; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The European Clinical Trials Directive of 2004 has increased the amount of paper work and reduced the number of initiated clinical trials. Particularly multinational trials have been delayed. To meet this challenge we developed a novel, simplified, fast and easy strategy for on-line toxicity registration for patients treated according to the Nordic/Baltic acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocol, NOPHO ALL 2008, for children and young adults, including three randomisations. We used a risk-assessment based approach, avoiding reporting of expected adverse events and instead concentrating on 20 well-known serious, but rarer events with focus on changes in therapy introduced in the treatment protocol. This toxicity registration strategy was approved by the relevant regulatory authorities in all seven countries involved, as compliant within the EU directive of 2004. The centre compliance to registration was excellent with 98.9% of all patients being registered within 5weeks from the requested quarterly registration. Currently, four toxicities (thrombosis, fungal infections, pancreatitis and allergic reactions) have been chosen for further detailed exploration due to the cumulative fraction of patients with positive registrations exceeding 5%. This toxicity registration offers real-time toxicity profiles of the total study cohort and provides early warnings of specific toxicities that require further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A need to simplify informed consent documents in cancer clinical trials. A position paper of the ARCAD Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiberg, H; Decoster, G; de Gramont, A; Rougier, P; Sobrero, A; Benson, A; Chibaudel, B; Douillard, J Y; Eng, C; Fuchs, C; Fujii, M; Labianca, R; Larsen, A K; Mitchell, E; Schmoll, H J; Sprumont, D; Zalcberg, J

    2017-05-01

    In respect of the principle of autonomy and the right of self-determination, obtaining an informed consent of potential participants before their inclusion in a study is a fundamental ethical obligation. The variations in national laws, regulations, and cultures contribute to complex informed consent documents for patients participating in clinical trials. Currently, only few ethics committees seem willing to address the complexity and the length of these documents and to request investigators and sponsors to revise them in a way to make them understandable for potential participants. The purpose of this work is to focus on the written information in the informed consent documentation for drug development clinical trials and suggests (i) to distinguish between necessary and not essential information, (ii) to define the optimal format allowing the best legibility of those documents. The Aide et Recherche en Cancérologie Digestive (ARCAD) Group, an international scientific committee involving oncologists from all over the world, addressed these issues and developed and uniformly accepted a simplified informed consent documentation for future clinical research. A simplified form of informed consent with the leading part of 1200-1800 words containing all of the key information necessary to meet ethical and regulatory requirements and 'relevant supportive information appendix' of 2000-3000 words is provided. This position paper, on the basis of the ARCAD Group experts discussions, proposes our informed consent model and the rationale for its content.

  3. A need to simplify informed consent documents in cancer clinical trials. A position paper of the ARCAD Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoster, G.; de Gramont, A.; Rougier, P.; Sobrero, A.; Benson, A.; Chibaudel, B.; Douillard, J. Y.; Eng, C.; Fuchs, C.; Fujii, M.; Labianca, R.; Larsen, A. K.; Mitchell, E.; Schmoll, H. J.; Sprumont, D.; Zalcberg, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background In respect of the principle of autonomy and the right of self-determination, obtaining an informed consent of potential participants before their inclusion in a study is a fundamental ethical obligation. The variations in national laws, regulations, and cultures contribute to complex informed consent documents for patients participating in clinical trials. Currently, only few ethics committees seem willing to address the complexity and the length of these documents and to request investigators and sponsors to revise them in a way to make them understandable for potential participants. The purpose of this work is to focus on the written information in the informed consent documentation for drug development clinical trials and suggests (i) to distinguish between necessary and not essential information, (ii) to define the optimal format allowing the best legibility of those documents. Methods The Aide et Recherche en Cancérologie Digestive (ARCAD) Group, an international scientific committee involving oncologists from all over the world, addressed these issues and developed and uniformly accepted a simplified informed consent documentation for future clinical research. Results A simplified form of informed consent with the leading part of 1200–1800 words containing all of the key information necessary to meet ethical and regulatory requirements and ‘relevant supportive information appendix’ of 2000–3000 words is provided. Conclusions This position paper, on the basis of the ARCAD Group experts discussions, proposes our informed consent model and the rationale for its content. PMID:28453700

  4. A randomized double-blind clinical trial with two different doses of arginine enhanced enteral nutrition in postsurgical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luis, D A; Izaola, O; Cuellar, L; Terroba, M C; Martin, T; Ventosa, M

    2010-11-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery have a high incidence of postoperative complications. The aim of our study was to investigate whether postoperative nutrition of head and neck cancer patients, using an enteral high dose of arginine (20 g per day) vs a medium dose (12.3 g per day) could improve nutritional variables as well as clinical outcome. A population of 115 patients with oral and laryngeal cancer was enrolled. At surgery patients were randomly allocated to two groups: group I (58 patients) received an enteral diet supplements with a high dose of arginine (20 g per day) and group II (57 patients) received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous enteral formula with a medium dose of arginine (12.3 g per day). Gastrointestinal tolerance (diarrhea) of both formulas was good (3.44% group I and 3.51% group II: ns). The postoperative infections complications were similar in both groups (8.6% group I and 12.2% group II: ns). Fistula was less frequent in enriched nutrition group (3.4% group I and 10.5% group II: p = 0.006). The length of postoperative stay was similar in both groups (27.2 +/- 17.8 days in group I vs 25.7 +/- 18.8 days in group II: ns). Enriched arginine formula improves fistula wound complications in postoperative head and neck cancer patients. Our results suggest that these patients could benefit from a high dose of arginine enhanced enteral formula.

  5. Effect of Lorazepam With Haloperidol vs Haloperidol Alone on Agitated Delirium in Patients With Advanced Cancer Receiving Palliative Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Frisbee-Hume, Susan; Wilson, Annie; Dibaj, Seyedeh S; Nguyen, Thuc; De La Cruz, Maxine; Walker, Paul; Zhukovsky, Donna S; Delgado-Guay, Marvin; Vidal, Marieberta; Epner, Daniel; Reddy, Akhila; Tanco, Kimerson; Williams, Janet; Hall, Stacy; Liu, Diane; Hess, Kenneth; Amin, Sapna; Breitbart, William; Bruera, Eduardo

    2017-09-19

    The use of benzodiazepines to control agitation in delirium in the last days of life is controversial. To compare the effect of lorazepam vs placebo as an adjuvant to haloperidol for persistent agitation in patients with delirium in the setting of advanced cancer. Single-center, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial conducted at an acute palliative care unit at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas, enrolling 93 patients with advanced cancer and agitated delirium despite scheduled haloperidol from February 11, 2014, to June 30, 2016, with data collection completed in October 2016. Lorazepam (3 mg) intravenously (n = 47) or placebo (n = 43) in addition to haloperidol (2 mg) intravenously upon the onset of an agitation episode. The primary outcome was change in Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS) score (range, -5 [unarousable] to 4 [very agitated or combative]) from baseline to 8 hours after treatment administration. Secondary end points were rescue neuroleptic use, delirium recall, comfort (perceived by caregivers and nurses), communication capacity, delirium severity, adverse effects, discharge outcomes, and overall survival. Among 90 randomized patients (mean age, 62 years; women, 42 [47%]), 58 (64%) received the study medication and 52 (90%) completed the trial. Lorazepam + haloperidol resulted in a significantly greater reduction of RASS score at 8 hours (-4.1 points) than placebo + haloperidol (-2.3 points) (mean difference, -1.9 points [95% CI, -2.8 to -0.9]; P delirium-related distress and survival. The most common adverse effect was hypokinesia (3 patients in the lorazepam + haloperidol group [19%] and 4 patients in the placebo + haloperidol group [27%]). In this preliminary trial of hospitalized patients with agitated delirium in the setting of advanced cancer, the addition of lorazepam to haloperidol compared with haloperidol alone resulted in a significantly greater reduction in agitation at 8 hours. Further

  6. Planning an Academic Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Kim M; Jones, Gemma R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are performed to discover or verify the efficacy and safety of one or more investigational medicinal product (IMP). Biological medicinal products, including gene therapies, offer groundbreaking new opportunities for the treatment of disease and injury, but they are also highly regulated and trials with these products can be logistically challenging to set up and execute. To ensure a compliant and successful trial, it is important to know and understand the regulatory framework, and to be aware of available guidance documents published to advise the different stakeholders on how to develop, manufacture, handle, administer, or destroy these products safely and legally. This chapter summarizes the standard requirements and considerations applicable for clinical trials with IMPs and also describes additional requirements for trials with gene therapies or genetically modified microorganisms (GMM).This chapter has been written from the perspective of a UK noncommercial (academic) sponsor. As such, the discussion and guidance has its basis in gene therapy research as governed by UK law. Nevertheless, European legislation and guidance documents are also referenced; most of the following recommendations will be applicable to clinical trials with a gene therapy medicinal product in any European Member State, and the overriding principles would be applicable to any trial.

  7. Effectiveness of core stability exercises and recovery myofascial release massage on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Del Moral-Avila, Rosario; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, María Belén; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n = 78) breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release) and control (usual health care) groups. The intervention period was 8 weeks. Mood state, fatigue, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength were determined at baseline, after the last treatment session, and at 6 months of followup. Immediately after treatment and at 6 months, fatigue, mood state, trunk curl endurance, and leg strength exhibited greater improvement within the experimental group compared to placebo group. This paper showed that a multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and massage reduced fatigue, tension, depression, and improved vigor and muscle strength after intervention and 6 months after discharge.

  8. Effectiveness of a patient self-management programme for breast cancer as a chronic illness: a non-randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Siew Yim; Packer, Tanya; Chinna, Karuthan; Quek, Kia Fatt

    2013-09-01

    Patient self-management enables living with a chronic disease effectively. This study examines the effectiveness of a 4-week self-management programme to enable self-management of the numerous after-effects and with breast cancer as a chronic disease. Upon ethical approval, 147 multiethnic survivors (stages I-III breast cancer) received either a 4-week self-management intervention (n = 68) or usual care (n = 78) on a controlled clinical trial in a medical centre. The facilitator-led group intervention provides self-management support and skills for managing the medical, emotional and role tasks. Survivors completed the pre- and post-intervention measures on quality of life, distress and participation inventory. Multiple analyses of covariance (adjusted for baseline measures) showed significant differences between groups [F(6, 129) = 2.26, p = 0.04 at post-test and F(6, 129) = 4.090, p management intervention enhance the QOL of women with breast cancer, by enabling them to better self-manage the numerous medical, emotional and role tasks. Further randomised trials are warranted. Survivors receiving self-management programme report improved HRQL compared with those on usual care. Although time can attenuate the participation limitation and distress of survivors, self-management programmes could help to increase patients' self-efficacy for better self-management.

  9. International Partnerships for Clinical Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH co-sponsors the 2015 International Symposium on Cancer Clinical Trials and related meetings held in partnership with the Japanese National Cancer Center (JNCC) and Embassies of France, Korea, United Kingdom (UK), and United States (US) in Tokyo on May 14 - 15, 2015.

  10. Clinical Trial Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who will be in charge of my care? Personal issues How could being in this study affect ... iStock Only through clinical research can we gain insights and answers about the safety and effectiveness of ...

  11. Stress Management and Resilience Training (SMART) program to decrease stress and enhance resilience among breast cancer survivors: a pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Caitlin E; Prasad, Kavita; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sood, Amit

    2011-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial assessed the effect of a SMART (Stress Management and Resiliency Training) program among 25 women diagnosed with breast cancer. Resilience, perceived stress, anxiety, and quality of life improved at 12 weeks in the active but not the control arm. A brief training in the SMART program can enhance resilience and quality of life and decrease stress and anxiety. Patients with breast cancer experience stress and anxiety related to their diagnosis, with resulting lower quality of life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a SMART (Stress Management and Resiliency Training) program for increasing resiliency and for decreasing stress and anxiety among mentors who themselves were previously diagnosed with breast cancer. The program consisted of two 90-minute group training sessions, a brief individual session, and 3 follow-up telephone calls. Twenty-four mentors at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, were randomized in a single-blind, wait-list controlled clinical trial to either the SMART intervention or a control group for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures assessed at baseline and at week 12 included the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, Smith Anxiety Scale, and Linear Analog Self Assessment Scale. Twenty patients completed the study. A statistically significant improvement in resilience, perceived stress, anxiety, and overall quality of life at 12 weeks, compared with baseline was observed in the study arm. No significant difference in any of these measures was noted in the control group. This study demonstrates that a brief, predominantly group-based resilience training intervention is feasible in patients with previous breast cancer; also, it may be efficacious. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A generalized partially linear mean-covariance regression model for longitudinal proportional data, with applications to the analysis of quality of life data from cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueying; Qin, Guoyou; Tu, Dongsheng

    2017-05-30

    Motivated by the analysis of quality of life data from a clinical trial on early breast cancer, we propose in this paper a generalized partially linear mean-covariance regression model for longitudinal proportional data, which are bounded in a closed interval. Cholesky decomposition of the covariance matrix for within-subject responses and generalized estimation equations are used to estimate unknown parameters and the nonlinear function in the model. Simulation studies are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed estimation procedures. Our new model is also applied to analyze the data from the cancer clinical trial that motivated this research. In comparison with available models in the literature, the proposed model does not require specific parametric assumptions on the density function of the longitudinal responses and the probability function of the boundary values and can capture dynamic changes of time or other interested variables on both mean and covariance of the correlated proportional responses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Protocol for enhanced recovery after surgery improves short-term outcomes for patients with gastric cancer: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryo; Lee, Sang-Woong; Kawai, Masaru; Tashiro, Keitaro; Kawashima, Satoshi; Kagota, Syuji; Honda, Kotaro; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of the use of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol in patients with gastric cancer remains unclear. This study was a single-center, prospective randomized trial involving patients with gastric cancer undergoing curative gastrectomy. The primary end point was the length of postoperative hospital stay. Secondary end points were the postoperative complication rate, admission costs, weight loss, and amount of physical activity. From July 2013 to June 2015, we randomized 148 patients into an ERAS protocol group (n = 73) and a conventional protocol group (n = 69); six patients withdrew from the study. The hospital stay was significantly shorter in the ERAS protocol group than in the conventional protocol group (9 days vs 10 days; P = 0.037). The ERAS protocol group had a significantly lower rate of postoperative complications of grade III or higher (4.1% vs 15.4%; P = 0.042) and reduced costs of hospitalization (JPY 1,462,766 vs JPY 1,493,930; P = 0.045). The ratio of body weight to preoperative weight at 1 week and 1 month after the operation was higher in the ERAS protocol group (0.962 vs 0.957, P = 0.020, and 0.951 vs 0.937, P = 0.021, respectively). The ERAS protocol group recorded more physical activity in the first week after surgery. The ERAS protocol is safe and efficient, and seems to improve the postoperative course of patients with gastric cancer.

  14. A Clinical Feasibility Trial for Identification of Exceptional Responders in Whom Breast Cancer Surgery Can Be Eliminated Following Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerer, Henry M; Rauch, Gaiane M; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Adrada, Beatriz E; Caudle, Abigail S; DeSnyder, Sarah M; Black, Dalliah M; Santiago, Lumarie; Hobbs, Brian P; Lucci, Anthony; Gilcrease, Michael; Hwang, Rosa F; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Smith, Benjamin D; Arribas, Elsa; Moseley, Tanya; Teshome, Mediget; Miggins, Makesha V; Valero, Vicente; Hunt, Kelly K; Yang, Wei T

    2017-05-25

    To determine the accuracy of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and vacuum-assisted core biopsy (VACB) in assessing the presence of residual cancer in the breast after neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST). Pathologic complete response (pCR) rates after NST have improved dramatically, suggesting that surgery might be avoided in some patients. Safe avoidance of surgery would require accurate confirmation of no residual invasive/in situ carcinoma. Forty patients with T1-3N0-3 triple-negative or HER2-positive cancer receiving NST were enrolled in this single-center prospective trial. Patients underwent ultrasound-guided or mammography-guided FNA and VACB of the initial breast tumor region before surgery. Findings were compared with findings on pathologic evaluation of surgical specimens to determine the performance of biopsy in predicting residual breast disease after NST. Median initial clinical tumor size was 3.3 cm (range, 1.2-7.0 cm); 16 patients (40%) had biopsy-proven nodal metastases. After NST, median clinical tumor size was 1.1 cm (range, 0-4.2 cm). Nineteen patients (47.5%) had a breast pCR and were concordant with pathologic nodal status in 97.5%. Combined FNA/VACB demonstrated an accuracy of 98% (95% CI, 87%-100%), false-negative rate of 5% (95% CI, 0%-24%), and negative predictive value of 95% (95% CI, 75%-100%) in predicting residual breast cancer. VACB alone was more accurate than FNA alone (P = 0.011). After NST, image-guided FNA/VACB can accurately identify patients with a breast pCR. Based on these results, a prospective clinical trial has commenced in which breast surgery is omitted in patients with a breast pCR after NST according to image-guided biopsy.

  15. Randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Theede, Klaus; Mertz-Nielsen, Anette

    2016-01-01

    remission rates and lower incidence of adverse events. AIM: To compare the rates of clinical remission and the rates of adverse events in IBD patients treated with either standard treatment with azathioprine or low-dose azathioprine in combination with allopurinol. METHODS: A prospective, open-label study...... to treat analysis and found a significant (69.6%) proportion of the patients treated with low-dose azathioprine in combination with allopurinol was in clinical remission without the need for steroid or biologic treatment at week 24 compared to 34.7% of the patients treated with azathioprine monotherapy (RR...

  16. The effect of direct referral for fast CT scan in early lung cancer detection in general practice. A clinical, cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldbrandt, Louise Mahncke

    2015-03-01

    This PhD thesis is based on the project "The effect of direct referral for fast CT scan in early lung cancer detection in general practice. A clinical, cluster-randomised trial", performed in Denmark in 2010-2013. The thesis includes four papers and focuses on early lung cancer diagnostics in general practice. A total of 4200 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed in Denmark annually. The stage of the disease is an important prognostic factor; thus, the opportunity for curative treatment declines with more advanced tumour stage. Lung cancer patients in Denmark (like in the UK) have a poorer prognosis than lung cancer patients in other European countries. One explanation could be delayed diagnosis. A fast-track pathway was therefore introduced in an attempt to expedite the diagnosis of cancer. However, it seems that not all patients can be diagnosed through this pathway. In order to ensure fast and early lung cancer diagnosis, it is crucial to examine the initial diagnostic process in general and the role general practice plays in lung cancer diagnostics in particular. The specific areas of investigation include the pathways to diagnosis, the characteristics of patients who are at special risk of delayed diagnosis and the level of prediagnostic activity in general practice. A chest radiograph is often the first choice in the investigation of lung cancer. Unfortunately, radiographs are less suitable for central and small tumours. Low-dose computer tomography (LDCT), however, has a high sensitivity for lung cancer which implies that it can be used to detect patients with localised, potentially curable disease. The aim of this thesis was to increase our knowledge of the initial stages of lung cancer diagnostics in general practice. The thesis also examined the effect of a direct referral from general practice to an additional diagnostic test, the LDCT. The aims of this thesis were: 1) To describe Danish patients' pathways to the diagnosis of lung cancer in general and

  17. [Pharmacy standards for clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkola, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The procurement, transport, storage, manufacturing or compounding, the application, disposal, documentation, and the quality assurance of investigational medicinal products (IMPs) have to be done according to the pharmaceutical sciences. Medicines related to clinical trials in the European Union are regulated in volume 10 of the EudraLex. The rules for commercially manufactured medicines for human use are not valid for medicines which are individually compounded for a certain patient in the pharmacy. They are also not valid for medicines dedicated for experiments in research and development. The present article describes standards concerning the participation of the pharmacy in clinical trials, the pathway of the drug including the role of the study personnel, and its qualification and training. The issue of stability and compatibility of IMPs is an important topic which may influence the outcome of clinical trials. To avoid quality shifts Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) have to be established. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Benefits of dental implants installed during ablative tumour surgery in oral cancer patients: a prospective 5-year clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, Anke; Schoen, Pieter J; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Vissink, Arjan; Reintsema, Harry

    2010-09-01

    This prospective study assessed treatment outcome and patient satisfaction of oral cancer patients with a mandibular overdenture on implants up to 5 years after treatment. At baseline, 50 consecutive edentulous oral cancer patients, in whom prosthetic problems were expected after oncological treatment, were evaluated by standardized questionnaires and clinical assessments. All implants were installed during ablative tumour surgery in native bone in the interforaminal area. About two-thirds of the patients (n=31) had radiotherapy post-surgery (dose >40 Gy in the interforaminal area). At the 5-year evaluation, 26 patients had passed away and four patients had to be excluded from the analyses, because superstructures were not present, due to persistent local irritation (n=2), loss of three implants (n=1) and the impossibility of making an overdenture related to tumour and oncological surgery-driven anatomical limitations (n=1). In the remaining 20 patients, the prosthesis was still in function (76 implants). During the 5-year follow-up, total 14 implants were lost, 13 in irradiated bone (survival rate 89.4%, dose >40 Gy) and one in non-irradiated bone (survival rate 98.6%). Peri-implant tissues had a healthy appearance and remained healthy over time. Patients were satisfied with their dentures. It was concluded that oral cancer patients can benefit from implants installed during ablative surgery, with a high survival rate of the implants, a high percentage of rehabilitated patients and a high denture satisfaction up to 5 years after treatment.

  19. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials regis...

  20. Effect of Agaricus sylvaticus supplementation on nutritional status and adverse events of chemotherapy of breast cancer: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, Fabiana; Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho; Cañete, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) represents the highest incidence of malignancy in women throughout the world. Medicinal fungi can stimulate the body, reduce side-effects associated with chemotherapy and improve the quality of life in patients with cancer. To evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of Agaricus sylvaticus on clinical and nutritional parameters in BC patients undergoing chemotherapy. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial was carried out at the Oncology Clinic, Hospital of the Federal District-Brazil from September 2007 to July 2009. Forty six patients with BC, Stage II and III, were randomly assigned to receive either nutritional supplement with A. sylvaticus (2.1 g/day) or placebo. Patients were evaluated during treatment period. Patient supplemented with A. sylvaticus improved in clinical parameters and gastrointestinal functions. Poor appetite decreased by 20% with no changes in bowel functions (92.8%), nausea and vomiting (80%). Dietary supplementation with A. sylvaticus improved nutritional status and reduced abnormal bowel functions, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia in patients with BC receiving chemotherapy.

  1. Effect of Agaricus sylvaticus supplementation on nutritional status and adverse events of chemotherapy of breast cancer: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, Fabiana; Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho; Cañete, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC) represents the highest incidence of malignancy in women throughout the world. Medicinal fungi can stimulate the body, reduce side-effects associated with chemotherapy and improve the quality of life in patients with cancer. Aim: To evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of Agaricus sylvaticus on clinical and nutritional parameters in BC patients undergoing chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial was carried out at the Oncology Clinic, Hospital of the Federal District-Brazil from September 2007 to July 2009. Forty six patients with BC, Stage II and III, were randomly assigned to receive either nutritional supplement with A. sylvaticus (2.1 g/day) or placebo. Patients were evaluated during treatment period. Results: Patient supplemented with A. sylvaticus improved in clinical parameters and gastrointestinal functions. Poor appetite decreased by 20% with no changes in bowel functions (92.8%), nausea and vomiting (80%). Conclusion: Dietary supplementation with A. sylvaticus improved nutritional status and reduced abnormal bowel functions, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia in patients with BC receiving chemotherapy. PMID:23833361

  2. Globalization of clinical trials - where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melvin; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; S, Suresh-Kumar; Dkhar, Steven A; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2013-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed a greater transparency in clinical research with the advent of clinical trial registries. The aim of the study was to describe the trends in the globalization of clinical trials in the last five years. We performed an internet search using the WHO International clinical trials registry platform (WHO ICTRP) to identify the clinical trials conducted from January 2007 to December 31, 2011 among 25 countries. Among the 25 countries, the United States, Japan and Germany occupy the top positions in the total number of clinical trials conducted. Clinical trials in the US (36312) constituted 31.5% of the total number of trials performed during this period. However over a period of five years both US and Western Europe appear to show a decline, while the emerging countries show a rise in clinical trials registered. Among the emerging countries China, India and Republic of Korea are most active regions involved in clinical trials. Cancer, diabetes and respiratory diseases were most widely researched areas overall. Although the study confirms the transition in the clinical trials research towards emerging countries, the developed regions of the world still contribute to more than 70% of the trials registered worldwide.

  3. Prognostic factors from a randomized phase III trial of paclitaxel and carboplatin versus paclitaxel and cisplatin in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) trial: JCOG0505-S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shin; Kitagawa, Ryo; Shibata, Taro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Ikuo; Ushijima, Kimio; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    The Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) trial JCOG0505 demonstrated the statistically significant non-inferiority of paclitaxel plus carboplatin (TC) to paclitaxel plus cisplatin (TP) in terms of overall survival (OS) in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. In that trial, patients were randomly assigned, adjusting for institution and known prognostic factors. The objective of this ancillary study was to evaluate the appropriateness of the adjustment factors used to have randomly assigned treatments and to investigate new potentially useful prognostic factors of paclitaxel plus platinum for future randomized trials in metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. The study subjects comprised 244 eligible patients in the JCOG0505 who were merged to have received either TC or TP. The effects of the following factors on OS were investigated using a Cox regression model taking into consideration the adjustment factors used in randomization in this trial (e.g., performance status [PS]) and other baseline factors, including platinum-free interval (PFI), pretreatment hemoglobin levels (PHLs), and pretreatment platelet counts (PPCs). The median follow-up was 17.6 months, and median OS was 18.0 months. The hazard ratio was 1.83 in patients with a PS of 1 or 2 (vs. 0; P = 0.0004; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.31-2.55), 2.92 in patients with a PFI of cervical cancer. These new prognostic factors should be validated in future prospective trials. UMIN-CTR[ http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ] ID: C000000335.

  4. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  5. TELEHEALTH ALLOWS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL PARTICIPATION AND MULTIMODALITY THERAPY IN A RURAL PATIENT WITH STAGE 4 NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James M; Heifetz, Laurence J; Palmer, Daphne; Brown, Lisa M; Cooke, David T; David, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has a poor prognosis for rural patients with traditional therapies. Implementation of multi-modality systemic therapy in conjunction with surgical resection can dramatically improve overall survival, leading to clinical complete remission. The currently accepted indications for resection in oligometastatic NSCLC include brain and adrenal metastases. Rural populations are known to have disparities in care of complex malignancies and the use of telehealth has been shown to improve outcomes. We present a case of a rural patient with stage IV NSCLC, who was able to participate in two clinical trials, undergo trimodality therapy, and remain disease-free for 18 months, whose care was facilitated via telehealth video conferencing with a tertiary care center.

  6. Integral strategy to supportive care in breast cancer survivors through occupational therapy and a m-health system: design of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Lozano, Mario; Martín-Martín, Lydia; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Álvarez-Salvago, Francisco; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Sánchez-Salado, Carmen; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2016-11-25

    ); accelerometry and lymphedema. This study has been designed to seek to address the new needs for support and treatment of breast cancer survivors, reflecting the emerging need to merge new low cost treatment options with much-needed involvement of health professionals in this type of patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02817724 (date of registration: 22/06/2016).

  7. Clinical trial insurance in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žagar Zlatko A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior the commencement of the clinical trial in Serbia the Sponsor is obliged to provide the insurance policy covering the patient's bodily injury and damaged health caused by the clinical trial. According to provisions of Serbian Insurance law insurance polices have to be issued by the insurance companies established in Serbia. Every insurance policy not issued by the insurance company established in Serbia shall be deemed as null and void. The only expectance, is when the foreign clinical trial liability policy is stipulated that the insurance contract acknowledges the jurisdiction of Serbian domestic courts and other Serbian authorities to decide on damage claims (that never happened in Serbian practice. The Sponsor will fulfill this obligation stipulated in Serbian law when provides the Clinical Trial Liability policy issued by the Serbian insurance company. Nowadays, few of Serbian insurance companies are issuing such polices. Under the clinical trial liability insurance cover the insured's are: Sponsor, Medical Centers in Serbia performing or controlling the clinical trial, Principal Investigators and their assistant staff performing or controlling the clinical trial. The beneficiaries of the insurance cover are patients and/or members of their families - inheritresses. The insurance company will indemnify the beneficiary mentioned in the policy when the insured event occurred i.e. when occurred bodily injury, psychic disease and alienation, psychic damages, illnesses and deaths caused by the clinical trial. The amount of indemnity by the insurance company to the beneficiaries is limited by the amount of sum insured per occurrence and/or by the total amount of the sum insured for the total period of the insurance cover. According to case-law in Serbia the total sum insured between EUR 500.000 and EUR 1.000.000 is considered as sufficient so far to indemnify the patients in case of the insured event. If an insurance event occurs the

  8. Innovations in clinical trials informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ron; Vyas, Hiten; Dudhal, Nilesh; Doherty, Neil F; Coombs, Crispin R; Hepworth, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business strand of the work undertaken. Following the description of the development of this information management system, the semantic web is postulated as a possible solution to tame the complexity related to information management issues found within clinical trials support systems.

  9. Effects of Fresh Yellow Onion Consumption on CEA, CA125 and Hepatic Enzymes in Breast Cancer Patients: A Double- Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Mesgari, Mehran; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) consumption has been remarked in folk medicine which has not been noted to be administered so far as an adjunct to conventional doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study aimed to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on hepatic enzymes and cancer specific antigens compared with a low-onion containing diet among breast cancer (BC) participants treated with doxorubicin. This parallel design randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 BC patients whose malignancy was confirmed with histopathological examination. Subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation into either group received body mass index dependent 100-160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n=28) or 30-40 g/d small onion in low onion group (LO; n=28) for eight weeks intervention. Participants, care givers and laboratory assessor were blinded to the assignments (IRCT registry no: IRCT2012103111335N1). The compliance of participants in the analysis was appropriate (87.9%). Comparing changes throughout pre- and post-dose treatments indicated significant controls on carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen-125 and alkaline phosphatase levels in the HO group (Ponion administration could be effective for hepatic enzyme conveying adjuvant chemotherapy relevant toxicity and reducing the tumor markers in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy.

  10. 7-year follow-up after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Results of a phase 2 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Brooks, Eric D; Komaki, Ritsuko U; Liao, Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda D; McAleer, Mary F; Allen, Pamela K; Balter, Peter A; Welsh, James D; O'Reilly, Michael S; Gomez, Daniel; Hahn, Stephen M; Roth, Jack A; Mehran, Reza J; Heymach, John V; Chang, Joe Y

    2017-08-15

    The authors evaluated the efficacy, patterns of failure, and toxicity of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for patients with medically inoperable, clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a prospective clinical trial with 7 years of follow-up. Clinical staging was performed according to the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system. Eligible patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC of clinical stage I as determined using positron emission tomography staging were treated with SABR (50 grays in 4 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Patients were followed with computed tomography and/or positron emission tomography/computed tomography every 3 months for the first 2 years, every 6 months for the next 3 years, and then annually thereafter. A total of 65 patients were eligible for analysis. The median age of the patients was 71 years, and the median follow-up was 7.2 years. A total of 18 patients (27.7%) developed disease recurrence at a median of 14.5 months (range, 4.3-71.5 months) after SABR. Estimated incidences of local, regional, and distant disease recurrence using competing risk analysis were 8.1%, 10.9%, and 11.0%, respectively, at 5 years and 8.1%, 13.6%, and 13.8%, respectively, at 7 years. A second primary lung carcinoma developed in 12 patients (18.5%) at a median of 35 months (range, 5-67 months) after SABR. Estimated 5-year and 7-year progression-free survival rates were 49.5% and 38.2%, respectively; the corresponding overall survival rates were 55.7% and 47.5%, respectively. Three patients (4.6%) experienced grade 3 treatment-related adverse events. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 adverse events (toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 3.0]). With long-term follow-up, the results of the current prospective study demonstrated outstanding local control and low toxicity after SABR in

  11. Adaptive designs in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Bowalekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the expensive and lengthy process of developing a new medicine, the attrition rate in clinical research was on the rise, resulting in stagnation in the development of new compounds. As a consequence to this, the US Food and Drug Administration released a critical path initiative document in 2004, highlighting the need for developing innovative trial designs. One of the innovations suggested the use of adaptive designs for clinical trials. Thus, post critical path initiative, there is a growing interest in using adaptive designs for the development of pharmaceutical products. Adaptive designs are expected to have great potential to reduce the number of patients and duration of trial and to have relatively less exposure to new drug. Adaptive designs are not new in the sense that the task of interim analysis (IA/review of the accumulated data used in adaptive designs existed in the past too. However, such reviews/analyses of accumulated data were not necessarily planned at the stage of planning clinical trial and the methods used were not necessarily compliant with clinical trial process. The Bayesian approach commonly used in adaptive designs was developed by Thomas Bayes in the 18th century, about hundred years prior to the development of modern statistical methods by the father of modern statistics, Sir Ronald A. Fisher, but the complexity involved in Bayesian approach prevented its use in real life practice. The advances in the field of computer and information technology over the last three to four decades has changed the scenario and the Bayesian techniques are being used in adaptive designs in addition to other sequential methods used in IA. This paper attempts to describe the various adaptive designs in clinical trial and views of stakeholders about feasibility of using them, without going into mathematical complexities.

  12. Adaptive designs in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowalekar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the expensive and lengthy process of developing a new medicine, the attrition rate in clinical research was on the rise, resulting in stagnation in the development of new compounds. As a consequence to this, the US Food and Drug Administration released a critical path initiative document in 2004, highlighting the need for developing innovative trial designs. One of the innovations suggested the use of adaptive designs for clinical trials. Thus, post critical path initiative, there is a growing interest in using adaptive designs for the development of pharmaceutical products. Adaptive designs are expected to have great potential to reduce the number of patients and duration of trial and to have relatively less exposure to new drug. Adaptive designs are not new in the sense that the task of interim analysis (IA)/review of the accumulated data used in adaptive designs existed in the past too. However, such reviews/analyses of accumulated data were not necessarily planned at the stage of planning clinical trial and the methods used were not necessarily compliant with clinical trial process. The Bayesian approach commonly used in adaptive designs was developed by Thomas Bayes in the 18th century, about hundred years prior to the development of modern statistical methods by the father of modern statistics, Sir Ronald A. Fisher, but the complexity involved in Bayesian approach prevented its use in real life practice. The advances in the field of computer and information technology over the last three to four decades has changed the scenario and the Bayesian techniques are being used in adaptive designs in addition to other sequential methods used in IA. This paper attempts to describe the various adaptive designs in clinical trial and views of stakeholders about feasibility of using them, without going into mathematical complexities.

  13. A Novel Biomarker Panel Examining Response to Gemcitabine with or without Erlotinib for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy in NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Shultz

    Full Text Available NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3 was a randomized control trial that demonstrated improved overall survival (OS in patients receiving erlotinib in addition to gemcitabine for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Prior to therapy, patients had plasma samples drawn for future study. We sought to identify biomarkers within these samples.Using the proximity ligation assay (PLA, a probe panel was built from commercially available antibodies for 35 key proteins selected from a global genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers, and used to quantify protein levels in 20 uL of patient plasma. To determine if any of these proteins levels independently associated with OS, univariate and mulitbaraible Cox models were used. In addition, we examined the associations between biomarker expression and disease stage at diagnosis using Fisher's exact test. The correlation between Erlotinib sensitivity and each biomarkers was assessed using a test of interaction between treatment and biomarker.Of the 569 eligible patients, 480 had samples available for study. Samples were randomly allocated into training (251 and validation sets (229. Among all patients, elevated levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 were independently associated with lower OS, while IL-8, CEA, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and mucin-1 were associated with metastatic disease. Patients with elevated levels of receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2 expression had improved OS when treated with erlotinib compared to placebo. In conclusion, PLA is a powerful tool for identifying biomarkers from archived, small volume serum samples. These data may be useful to stratify patient outcomes regardless of therapeutic intervention.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00040183.

  14. Expression profiling of blood samples from an SU5416 Phase III metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial: a novel strategy for biomarker identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolich Beverly D

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a powerful approach for the identification of molecular biomarkers of disease, particularly in human cancers. Utility of this approach to measure responses to therapy is less well established, in part due to challenges in obtaining serial biopsies. Identification of suitable surrogate tissues will help minimize limitations imposed by those challenges. This study describes an approach used to identify gene expression changes that might serve as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity. Methods Expression profiling using microarrays was applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples obtained from patients with advanced colorectal cancer participating in a Phase III clinical trial. The PBMC samples were harvested pre-treatment and at the end of the first 6-week cycle from patients receiving standard of care chemotherapy or standard of care plus SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor. Results from matched pairs of PBMC samples from 23 patients were queried for expression changes that consistently correlated with SU5416 administration. Results Thirteen transcripts met this selection criterion; six were further tested by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 62 additional samples from this trial and a second SU5416 Phase III trial of similar design. This method confirmed four of these transcripts (CD24, lactoferrin, lipocalin 2, and MMP-9 as potential biomarkers of drug treatment. Discriminant analysis showed that expression profiles of these 4 transcripts could be used to classify patients by treatment arm in a predictive fashion. Conclusions These results establish a foundation for the further exploration of peripheral blood cells as a surrogate system for biomarker analyses in clinical oncology studies.

  15. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus Encoding Tyrosinase/MART-1/MAGEA6-transduced Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus encoding tyrosinase/mart-1/magea6-transduced autologous dendritic cell vaccine.

  16. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus/Cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr Virus-specific Allogeneic Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus/cytomegalovirus/epstein-barr virus-specific allogeneic cytotoxic t lymphocytes.

  17. Tafazzin protein expression is associated with tumorigenesis and radiation response in rectal cancer: a study of Swedish clinical trial on preoperative radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tafazzin (TAZ, a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. METHODS: 140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins. RESULTS: TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063-35.704. In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3. CONCLUSIONS: Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT.

  18. Design of a multicentre randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a tailored clinical support intervention to enhance return to work for gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, AnneClaire G N M; Tytgat, Kristien M A J; Klinkenbijl, Jean H G; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2016-05-10

    occupational care in a clinical setting, early in the cancer treatment process. METC protocol number NL51444.018.14/Netherlands Trial Register number NTR5022 . Registered 6 March 2015.

  19. An inflammation based score can optimize the selection of patients with advanced cancer considered for early phase clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Pinato

    Full Text Available Adequate organ function and good performance status (PS are common eligibility criteria for phase I trials. As inflammation is pathogenic and prognostic in cancer we investigated the prognostic performance of inflammation-based indices including the neutrophil (NLR and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR.We studied inflammatory scores in 118 unselected referrals. NLR normalization was recalculated at disease reassessment. Each variable was assessed for progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS on uni- and multivariate analyses and tested for 90 days survival (90DS prediction using receiving operator curves (ROC.We included 118 patients with median OS 4.4 months, 23% PS>1. LDH≥450 and NLR≥5 were multivariate predictors of OS (p<0.001. NLR normalization predicted for longer OS (p<0.001 and PFS (p<0.05. PS and NLR ranked as most accurate predictors of both 90DS with area under ROC values of 0.66 and 0.64, and OS with c-score of 0.69 and 0.60. The combination of NLR+PS increased prognostic accuracy to 0.72. The NLR was externally validated in a cohort of 126 subjects.We identified the NLR as a validated and objective index to improve patient selection for experimental therapies, with its normalization following treatment predicting for a survival benefit of 7 months. Prospective validation of the NLR is warranted.

  20. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lips, Irene M., E-mail: i.m.lips@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kotte, Alexis N.T.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leerdam, Monique E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  1. informed consent in clinical trials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-27

    Aug 27, 2009 ... ondersteuning ontvang en dat daar beter oor hulle toesig gehou word. INFORMED CONSENT IN CLINICAL TRIALS: PERCEPTIONS AND. EXPERIENCES OF A SAMPLE OF SOUTH AFRICAN RESEARCHERS. INTRODUCTION. First articulated in the Nuremberg Code in 1947, informed consent (IC) has ...

  2. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are research ... during a clinical trial? Clinical trials that test mood disorder treatments are usually conducted on an outpatient basis, ...

  3. Trial Yields Positive Data on Pembrolizumab for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from an early phase clinical trial may point to a biomarker that identifies patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer most likely to respond to the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda®).

  4. A clinical trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) for treating intermediate and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Alejandro; Inman, Brant A; Piñeiro, Idelfonso; Monserrat, Victor; Pérez, Alberto; Aparici, Vincente; Gómez, Isabel; Neira, Pilar; Uribarri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Ths paper reports a pilot/feasibility trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) prior to transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). A pilot/feasibility clinical trial was performed and 15 patients with intermediate to high-risk NMIBC received HIVEC prior to TURBT. HIVEC consisting of eight weekly instillations of intravesical MMC (80 mg in 50 mL) delivered with the novel Combat BRS® system at a temperature of 43 °C for 60 min. Treatment-related adverse effects were measured and patients were followed for 2 years for disease recurrence. A total of 119 HIVEC treatments occurred. Grade 1 adverse events consisted of irritative bladder symptoms (33%), bladder spasms (27%), pain (27%), haematuria (20%) and urinary tract infection (UTI; 14%). Grade 2 adverse events were bladder calcification (7%) and reduced bladder capacity (7%). No grade 3 or higher toxicity was observed. At TURBT, eight patients (53%) were complete responders (pT0) while seven (47%) were partial responders. With a median follow-up of 29 months, the 3-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was 15%. The Combat BRS® system achieved target bladder temperatures and delivered HIVEC with a favourable side-effect profile. Our pilot trial also provides preliminary evidence of treatment efficacy.

  5. What constitutes a "clinical trial"?: A survey of oncology professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowaleski Brenda

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What constitutes a "clinical trial" is inconsistently defined in the medical literature. With an initiative by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO to report institutional clinical trials activity across the province of Ontario, Canada, we sought to investigate the variability in the interpretation of the term by local oncology professionals. Methods A survey amongst the physicians and nurses at the Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences, Ontario was conducted. The survey included 12 summaries of local clinical research studies, and respondents were asked which they believed represented a clinical trial. Subsequently, they were asked which of the same 12 studies they believed should be labeled as clinical trials when considering separate definitions provided by CCO and by the Ontario Cancer Research Network (OCRN. Results A total of 66 (54% of 123 surveys were completed; 32/46 (70% by physicians, 21/59 (36% by primary care nurses, and 13/18 (72% by clinical trial nurses. Without a standardized definition, all studies, 12/12, were considered to be clinical trials by at least 50% of respondents. When provided with the CCO definition only 6/12 studies were considered to be clinical trials by the majority of respondents, while with the OCRN definition it was 9/12 studies. Studies evaluating natural health products, non-traditional medical interventions, and non-randomized studies with standard interventions consistently ranked the lowest, regardless of the definition used. Conclusion Oncology professionals appear to have a broadly inclusive baseline definition of what constitutes a clinical trial. Establishing rigor and consistency in the definition of a clinical trial is important for any program, institutional or jurisdictional based comparisons of clinical trials activity, especially when used as a quality indicator of patient care.

  6. What constitutes a "clinical trial"?: a survey of oncology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Kowaleski, Brenda; Sussman, Jonathan

    2008-03-03

    What constitutes a "clinical trial" is inconsistently defined in the medical literature. With an initiative by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) to report institutional clinical trials activity across the province of Ontario, Canada, we sought to investigate the variability in the interpretation of the term by local oncology professionals. A survey amongst the physicians and nurses at the Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Health Sciences, Ontario was conducted. The survey included 12 summaries of local clinical research studies, and respondents were asked which they believed represented a clinical trial. Subsequently, they were asked which of the same 12 studies they believed should be labeled as clinical trials when considering separate definitions provided by CCO and by the Ontario Cancer Research Network (OCRN). A total of 66 (54%) of 123 surveys were completed; 32/46 (70%) by physicians, 21/59 (36%) by primary care nurses, and 13/18 (72%) by clinical trial nurses. Without a standardized definition, all studies, 12/12, were considered to be clinical trials by at least 50% of respondents. When provided with the CCO definition only 6/12 studies were considered to be clinical trials by the majority of respondents, while with the OCRN definition it was 9/12 studies. Studies evaluating natural health products, non-traditional medical interventions, and non-randomized studies with standard interventions consistently ranked the lowest, regardless of the definition used. Oncology professionals appear to have a broadly inclusive baseline definition of what constitutes a clinical trial. Establishing rigor and consistency in the definition of a clinical trial is important for any program, institutional or jurisdictional based comparisons of clinical trials activity, especially when used as a quality indicator of patient care.

  7. Effects of a palliative care intervention on clinical outcomes in patients with advanced cancer: the Project ENABLE II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor D; Byock, Ira R; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-08-19

    There are few randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of palliative care interventions to improve the care of patients with advanced cancer. To determine the effect of a nursing-led intervention on quality of life, symptom intensity, mood, and resource use in patients with advanced cancer. Randomized controlled trial conducted from November 2003 through May 2008 of 322 patients with advanced cancer in a rural, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in New Hampshire and affiliated outreach clinics and a VA medical center in Vermont. A multicomponent, psychoeducational intervention (Project ENABLE [Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends]) conducted by advanced practice nurses consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up sessions until death or study completion (n = 161) vs usual care (n = 161). Quality of life was measured by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy for Palliative Care (score range, 0-184). Symptom intensity was measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (score range, 0-900). Mood was measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (range, 0-60). These measures were assessed at baseline, 1 month, and every 3 months until death or study co