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Sample records for cancer clinical stages

  1. Lung Cancer Staging: Clinical and Radiologic Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chheang, Sophie; Brown, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Published in 2009, the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is the culmination of an extensive worldwide initiative to standardize and validate lung cancer staging. Unlike prior editions, the new staging system is now inclusive of small cell carcinoma and carcinoid tumors. In addition, significant changes were made to the T and M descriptors, resulting in improved prognostic stratification of disease. This review article highlights these changes, the ration...

  2. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  3. Clinical and surgical-pathological staging in early non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Koukis; Ioannis Gkiozos; Ioannis Ntanos; Elias Kainis; Konstantinos N. Syrigos

    2013-01-01

    Staging is of the utmost importance in the evaluation of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because it defines the actual extent of the disease. Accurate staging allows multidisciplinary oncology teams to plan the best surgical or medical treatment and to predict patient prognosis. Based on the recommendation of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), a tumor, node, and metastases (TNM) staging system is currently used for NSCLC. Clinical staging (c-...

  4. Lymph node metastasis in grossly apparent clinical stage Ia epithelial ovarian cancer: Hacettepe experience and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Yuce Kunter; Usubutun Alp; Gultekin Murat; Desteli Guldeniz; Ayhan Ali

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymphadenectomy is an integral part of the staging system of epithelial ovarian cancer. However, the extent of lymphadenectomy in the early stages of ovarian cancer is controversial. The objective of this study was to identify the lymph node involvement in unilateral epithelial ovarian cancer apparently confined to the one ovary (clinical stage Ia). Methods A prospective study of clinical stage I ovarian cancer patients is presented. Patient's characteristics and tumor his...

  5. Nomograms for the Prediction of Pathologic Stage of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Korean Men

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    Song, Cheryn; Kang, Taejin; Ro, Jae Y.; Lee, Moo-Song; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the prostate cancer data of 317 Korean men with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy at Asan Medical Center between June 1990 and November 2003 to construct nomograms predicting the pathologic stage of these tumors, and compared the outcome with preexisting nomograms. Multinomial log-linear regression was performed for the simultaneous prediction of organ-confined disease (OCD), extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) and l...

  6. Clinical and surgical-pathological staging in early non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Koukis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Staging is of the utmost importance in the evaluation of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC because it defines the actual extent of the disease. Accurate staging allows multidisciplinary oncology teams to plan the best surgical or medical treatment and to predict patient prognosis. Based on the recommendation of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC, a tumor, node, and metastases (TNM staging system is currently used for NSCLC. Clinical staging (c-TNM is achieved via non-invasive modalities such as examination of case history, clinical assessment and radiological tests. Pathological staging (p-TNM is based on histological examination of tissue specimens obtained with the aid of invasive techniques, either non-surgical or during the intervention. This review is a critical evaluation of the roles of current pre-operative staging modalities, both invasive and non-invasive. In particular, it focuses on new techniques and their role in providing accurate confirmation of patient TNM status. It also evaluates the surgical-pathological staging modalities used to obtain the true-pathological staging for NSCLC.

  7. The value of mediastinoscopy in the staging of lung cancer with clinical N2 disease

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    Hui ZHAO

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective To determine the value of mediastinoscopy in the mediastinal staging of lung cancer with clinical N2 disease. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 87 patients received mediastinoscopy for known or suspected lung cancer, including 83 cervical mediastinoscopies and 4 parasternal mediastinoscopies. All patients were staged clinical N2 for enlarged ipsilateral mediastinal and/or subcarinal lymph nodes (short axis > 1.0 cmon computed tomography scan. Results Of the 87 patients, 61 cases proved N2 disease on mediastinoscopy. The other 26 mediastinoscopy-negative patients underwent thoracotomy for lung resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection in the same operative session. Final pathologic N staging were consistent for mediastinoscopic sampling and surgical dissection in 24 patients. N2 disease was found in 2 patients (false-negative of mediastinoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of mediastinoscopy were 96.8%, 100%, and 97.7%, respectively. There was no mortality and only 1 complication(1.1% for all 87 mediastinoscopic procedures. Conclusion Mediastinoscopy is a highly effective and safe procedure for the mediastinal staging of lung cancer with clinical N2 disease.

  8. Comparative characterization of oxidative stress in cervical cancer at different clinical stages of disease

    OpenAIRE

    I. I. Antoneeva; T.P. Gening; D. R. Arslanova; E. G. Sidorenko

    2014-01-01

    Parameters of oxidative stress on the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), activity of glutathione-reductase, glutathione-transferase, superoxide- dismutase (SOD) and catalase in tumor tissue, plasma and red blood cells of patients with cervical cancer (CC) w as evaluated a t various clinical stages of the disease. It is revealed that an increase in tumor tissue MD A and glutathione enzymes while reducing SOD and catalase, which may indicate the development of oxidative stress in the dynamics of t...

  9. Clinical Significance of IGFBP-3 Methylation in Patients with Early Stage Gastric Cancer

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    Seung Tae Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional protein that inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Hypermethylation of the promoter represses expression of the IGFBP-3 gene. We undertook this study to assess the impact of IGFBP-3 methylation on survival of early stage gastric cancer patients. METHODS: Of the 482 tissue samples from gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery, IGFBP-3 methylation was tested in 138 patients with stage IB/II gastric cancer. We also analyzed IGFBP-3 methylation in 26 gastric cancer cell lines. IGFBP-3 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. Statistical analyses, all two-sided, were performed to investigate the prognostic effects of methylation status of the IGFBP-3 promoter on various clinical parameters. RESULTS: Hypermethylation of IGFBP-3 was observed in 26 (19% of the 138 stage IB/II gastric cancer patients. Clinicopathological factors such as age, Lauren classification, sex, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, and histologic grade did not show a statistically significant association with the methylation status of the IGFBP-3 promoter. Patients with a hypermethylated IGFBP-3 promoter had similar 8-year disease-free survival compared with those without a hypermethylated IGFBP-3 promoter (73% vs 75%, P = .78. In subgroup analyses, females, but not males, seemed to have poorer prognosis for DFS and OS in the subset of patients with IGFBP-3 methylation as compared with those without IGFBP-3 methylation (8-year DFS: 55.6% vs 71.6%, P = .3694 and 8-year overall survival: 55.6% vs 68.4%, P = .491, respectively even with no statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The status of IGFBP-3 methylation as measured by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction proposed the modest role for predicting survival in specific subgroups of patients with early-stage gastric cancer who undergo curative surgery. However, this needs further investigation.

  10. Esophageal Cancer Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate staging of esophageal cancer is very important to achieving optimal treatment outcomes. The AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) first published TNM esophageal cancer staging recommendations in the first edition of their staging manual in 1977. Thereafter, the staging of esophageal cancer was changed many times over the years. This article reviews the current status of staging of esophageal cancer.

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

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    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  12. Staging of Lung Cancer

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    ... which therapy (or therapies) should be used. Second, lung cancer staging tells how much your cancer has spread. Knowing ... your body. How good are these tests at staging lung cancer? If your biopsy finds cancer cells, this is ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute ...

  14. Clinical results for stage III{center_dot}IV cancer of the tongue

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    Mitani, Hiroki; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Nigauri, Tomohiko; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2003-04-01

    Our department has been treating patients with tongue cancer since 1946. Until the early 1980s, treatment for primary lesions consisted mainly of a small dose of radium irradiation, regardless of the clinical stage. The approximate 5-year survival rate for progressive tongue cancer with a staging of greater than T 3 was as low as 20.3% (N=137) between 1946 and 1970. Irradiation methods have since improved, and the resection-reconstruction method using a deltopectral skin flap had been introduced. In addition, a trend has emerged towards performing surgical treatment and reconstructions using a greater pectoral muscle skin flap. As a result, the approximate 5-year survival rate for T 3+T 4 tongue cancer improved to 37.0% (N=40) for the period between 1971 and 1980. In 1982, a reconstruction technique using a free skin flap with the goal of reconciling the preservation of function and an improvement in the clinical results was established. Treatment protocols have changed drastically since then, making it possible to perform an extended resection while maintaining the swallowing function. As a result, the approximate 5-year survival rate for T 3+T 4 tongue cancer has improved to 51.6% (N=126). This paper describes the clinical outcome for stage III and IV progressive tongue cancerstreated mainly by surgery over the past twenty years. The subjects included 192 cases of stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue; all of the subjects underwent radical operations between January 1981 and December 1999. The approximate 5-year survival rate (disease-specific survival rate) for stage III cancers was 65.3% (71.8%) (N=123), while that for stage IV cancers was 38.2% (40.0%) (N=69). The 5-year primary lesion control rate according to T classification was as follows: T 1, 100%, T 2, 83.8%, T 3, 81.7%; and T 4, 77.4%. The 5-year neck control rate was 77.1%. Our department, in principle, usually administers external irradiation at a dosage of 40 Gy. We histologically

  15. The clinical usefulness of F-18-FDG CoDe PET in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to assess clinical usefulness of D-18-FDG CoDe PET in nodal staging of lung cancer by comparing with computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We performed prospective study comparing CoDe PET and CT of thorax in the presurgical assessment of mediastinum in 24 patients with NSCLC and 1 patient with bronchoaveolar cell ca (BAC). CoDe PET was performed using a dual-head gamma camera (Varicam, Elscint) equipped with 5/8 inch thick NaI(Tl) crystals. Data was acquired at about 1 hour after IV injection of 111-370 MBq of F-18-FDG. An areal scan of the thorax was performed using a slip ring gantry for 30 min. After rebinning, routine tomographic slices were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The images were analyzed visually and compared with CT and pathologic results. CoDe PET detected all surgically proven malignant lesions (12 adenocarcinoma, 11 squamous cell ca of, 1 adenosquamous cell ca, 1 BAC). Hilar and mediastinal lymph node involvement was present in 20%. In nodal staging, 19 CoDe PET studies agreed with pathologic findings, whereas 14 of 25 patients CT agreed with pathologic results. The accuracy of CoDe PET in nodal staging was better than that of CT in a limited number of patients studied thus far. FDG CoDe PET appears to be a supplementary modality in prompt diagnosis, staging and successful management of lung cancer

  16. Elevation of serum l-lactate dehydrogenase B correlated with the clinical stage of lung cancer.

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    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Anjian; Li, Na; Liu, Jifu; Liu, Chuanjun; Lv, Dongxia; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Lingyun; Yang, Shuanying; He, Dacheng; Xiao, Xueyuan

    2006-10-01

    To identify potential biomarkers related with lung cancer metastasis, conditional media (CM) proteins collected from a primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line NCI-H226 and its brain metastatic subline H226Br were analyzed by one-dimensional electrophoresis (1-D PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Twelve biomarkers were identified, of which l-lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) chain was significantly up-regulated in the CM of H226Br cell and was further validated in 105 lung cancer, 93 non-lung cancer, 41 benign lung disease, as well as 65 healthy individuals sera using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It was found that the levels of LDHB were specifically elevated in NSCLC sera compared with other groups and were progressively increased with the clinical stage. At the cutoff point 0.260 (OD value) on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, LDHB could comparatively discriminate lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy control groups with sensitivity 81%, specificity 70% and total accuracy 76%. These findings demonstrated that secretome could open up a possibility to find, identify, and characterize novel biomarkers related with invasion and metastasis. PMID:16890323

  17. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab

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    Gollamudi J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jahnavi Gollamudi,1,* Jenny G Parvani,2,* William P Schiemann,3 Shaveta Vinayak3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, 4Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2, a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2+ breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2+ breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2+ breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients. Keywords: breast cancer

  18. Clinical Significance of IGFBP-3 Methylation in Patients with Early Stage Gastric Cancer 1

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Tae Kim; Hye-Lim Jang; Jeeyun Lee; Se Hoon Park; Young Suk Park; Ho Yeong Lim; Min Gew Choi; Jae Moon Bae; Tae Sung Sohn; Jae Hyung Noh; Sung Kim; Kyoung-Mee Kim; Won Ki Kang; Joon Oh Park

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional protein that inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Hypermethylation of the promoter represses expression of the IGFBP-3 gene. We undertook this study to assess the impact of IGFBP-3 methylation on survival of early stage gastric cancer patients. METHODS: Of the 482 tissue samples from gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery, IGFBP-3 methylation was tested in 138 patients with stage IB/II gastric cancer. We also analyzed ...

  19. The preliminary clinical application of PET/CT on the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of PET/CT on the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Methods: 46 lung cancer patients including 35 pre-treatment and 11 post-treatment cases. PET/CT fusion images, PET images and CT images of the same patient were analyzed frame by frame. Results: 1) The sensitivity of PET/CT in 35 pre-treated cases reached 100%. Except one case of alveolar carcinoma showed a diffuse uptake in both lungs, the other patients displayed as hypermetabolic nodular or mass lesions with the size around 0.8-9.4 cm and the standardized uptake value (SUV) 4.6 ± 1.94. The position of hypermetabolic lesion of PET finding were all concordant to CT. PET/CT was superior to PET and CT in final diagnosis, delineating the border, detecting tumor invasion and in differentiating lung cancer from atelectasis, obstructive pneumonitis and pleural effusion. Among 11 post-treated cases, no malignancy was seen in 9 cases and in two cases with metastases in both lungs, the lesions were detected definitely by PET/CT. 2)For the staging, PET/CT was also superior to PET and CT alone with the sensitivity of 95.2%(PET/CT), 90.4%(PET), 73.8%(CT) respectively. PET and CT were complemental each other in the detection of the lesions. Obviously, PET was superior to CT in detection of small lymph node metastases, pleura, bone and adrenal metastases. CT was better than PET in detection of small lung metastases. Conclusions: PET/CT is superior to PET and CT alone in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. PET and CT can complement each other. (authors)

  20. Clinical Stages in Patients with Primary and Subsequent Cancers Based on the Czech Cancer Registry 1976–2005

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    Štampach, Radim; Dítě, Petr; Kozel, Jiří; Horváth, Teodor; Kubíček, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Of 1,486,984 new cancers registered in the Czech Cancer Registry in 1976-2005, 290,312 (19.5%) were multiple malignant neoplasms (MMNs), of which there were 65,292 primary and 89,796 subsequent cases in men and 59,970 primary and 75,254 subsequent cases in women. The duplicities were higher in women, and the triplicities and others (3–6 MMNs) were higher in men. The most frequent diagnoses were the primary cancers of skin, gastrointestinal and urinary tract, male genital organs, respiratory tract in men, and cancers of skin, breast, female genital organs, and gastrointestinal tract in women. The analysis of the early and advanced clinical stages shows that the number of subsequent advanced stages increased after primary advanced stages. Their time-age-space distributions visualized maps of MMNs in 14 Czech regions. These results support the improvement of algorithms of dispensary care for the early detection of the subsequent neoplasms. PMID:23936674

  1. Prostate cancer staging

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  2. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

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    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC View/Download: Small: 734x648 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC ...

  3. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

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    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Ovarian Cancer Stage IV View/Download: Small: 576x641 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV ...

  4. The clinical significance of axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy in different clinical stages breast cancer patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Xu; Xinhong Wu; Yaojun Feng; Feng Yuan; Wei Fan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:We aimed to study the success and false negative rate of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in dif-ferent clinical stages breast cancer patients being carried out with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and the clinical signifi-cance of SLNB, we conducting this trial. Methods:One hunderd and thirty-seven cases were enrol ed in this clinical research from March 2003 to March 2007. Al of the patients’ sentinel lymph nodes were detected with 99mTc-Dx and methylene blue. There were 61 patients with stage T1-2N0M0 carried SLNB without NAC (group A), 76 cases were carried out NAC 3-4 cycles before SLNB, including 39 T2-4N0-1M0 cases (group B) and 27 T2-4N2-3M0 cases (group C). The success and false negative rate of SLNB were analysed with chi-square test. Results:In group A, the successful and false negative rate of SLNB were 92.31%(36/39), 8.57%(3/35), and in group B and C were 92.31%(36/39), 8.57%(3/35) and 74.07%(20/27), 18.52%(5/27), respectively. The successful rate of group C decreased and false negative rate increased significantly compared with group A and B (P0.05). Conclusion:The SLNB can accurately predict lymph node status of axil ary lymph node in N0-1 stage patients with NAC, but in N2-3 stage patients the success rate decreased and false rate increased negative significantly.

  5. Breast cancer staging

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

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    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  7. Prostate cancer staging

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    ... effects of treatment The chance that treatment can cure your cancer or help you in other ways With stage ... III prostate cancer, the main goal is to cure the cancer by treating it and keeping it from coming ...

  8. Evaluation of ultrasound application in diagnosis and clinical staging of thyroid cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The usage of Ultrasonography (US in the diagnosis and management of patients with thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer is increasing. This method is also advocated for the pre-operative and post-operative diagnosis of cervical lymph node (LN metastases. This article is trying to figure out the correlation between ultrasound features and pathological classification of thyroid carcinoma (TC. Materials and Methods: A total of 407 cases of patients with TC were selected from records between 2000 and 2006, which were used to analyze and compare the ultrasound features in different pathologic classification of TC. We grouped the US typing of TC according to the ultrasound features. Then, we implemented pre-surgery evaluation of TC by ultrasound assessment. Results: We classified these patients into six groups by ultrasound: (1 classical, (2 non-typical, (3 microminiaturize, (4 diffuse sclerosing, (5 medullary, and (6 undifferentiated. Ultrasonographic types of papillary TC: (1 classical, (2 microminiaturize, (3 diffuse, (4 cystic, (5 peripheral, (6 multi-nodules, (7 invasive, and (8 complicated Hashimoto. Grouping of the ultrasonic type of cervical LN metastasis: (1 cystic, (2 micro calcification, (3 macro-lymph, (4 microminiaturize, and (5 invasive. The ultrasound assessment of clinical staging had a higher sensitivity rate and specificity, and the accuracy rate of T stage was 93.9%. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation, characterization, quantification, and location of TC and cervical LN metastasis.

  9. Adjuvant sorafenib after heptectomy for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma patients

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    Xia, Feng; Wu, Li-Li; Lau, Wan-Yee; Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Ma, Kuan-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Wu; Bie, Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant sorafenib after curative resection for patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC)-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Thirty-four HCC patients, classified as BCLC-stage C, received adjuvant sorafenib for high-risk of tumor recurrence after curative hepatectomy at a tertiary care university hospital. The study group was compared with a case-matched control group of 68 patients who received curative hepatectomy for HCC during the study period in a 1:2 ratio. RESULTS: The tumor recurrence rate was markedly lower in the sorafenib group (15/34, 44.1%) than in the control group (51/68, 75%, P = 0.002). The median disease-free survival was 12 mo in the study group and 10 mo in the control group. Tumor number more than 3, macrovascular invasion, hilar lymph nodes metastasis, and treatment with sorafenib were significant factors of disease-free survival by univariate analysis. Tumor number more than 3 and treatment with sorafenib were significant risk factors of disease-free survival by multivariate analysis in the Cox proportional hazards model. The disease-free survival and cumulative overall survival in the study group were significantly better than in the control group (P = 0.034 and 0.016, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study verifies the potential benefit and safety of adjuvant sorafenib for both decreasing HCC recurrence and extending disease-free and overall survival rates for patients with BCLC-stage C HCC after curative resection. PMID:27340354

  10. A two-stage algorithm for designing phase I cancer clinical trials for two new molecular entities.

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    Su, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    The continual reassessment method (CRM) and subsequent developments of the Bayesian approach provide important tools for the design of Phase I cancer clinical trials for a new molecular entity. In recent years the idea of developing a treatment composed of two molecular entities has been proposed. For example, for some tumor types there may be two signaling pathways, both of which need to be blocked simultaneously using two molecules to achieve therapeutic benefit. A two-stage Bayesian and likelihood based algorithm is introduced herein for designing Phase I cancer clinical trials for two new molecular entities. It starts with a modified CRM approach in the first stage and makes use of the accumulated data from the first stage to provide likelihood estimates of model parameters for use in the second stage. PMID:19879974

  11. Increased circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells correlate with clinical cancer stage, metastatic tumor burden, and doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Montero, C Marcela; Salem, Mohamed Labib; Nishimura, Michael I.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is an important mechanism of tumor immune evasion. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) has also been shown in non-tumor bearing animals to cause transient surges in MDSC. Knowledge of MDSC is primarily based on preclinical work, and to date only few published studies have involved cancer patients. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that circulating MDSC levels correlate with clinical cancer stage, CTX-based chemotherapy, and m...

  12. Breast cancer in kurdish women of northern Iraq: incidence, clinical stage, and case control analysis of parity and family risk

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    Safar Banaz M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in the Middle-East occurs in relatively young women and frequently presents as advanced disease. A protective effect of multiparity is not apparent, and high familial risk is reported in some countries. This study investigates breast cancer rates and clinical stage related to age in the Kurdish region of Iraq and evaluates risk associated with parity and family history. Findings are compared with nearby countries and the West. Methods Sulaimaniyah Directorate of Health records identified 539 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 2006-2008. Clinical survey forms were completed on 296 patients and on 254 age-matched controls. Age specific incidence rates were calculated from Directorate of Health population estimates. Results Average patient age was 47.4 ± 11 years and 59.5% were pre-menopausal. Diagnosis was at clinical stage 1 for 4.1%, stage 2 for 43.5%, stage 3 for 26.0%, and stage 4 for 8.1% of patients. For 18.2%, stage was unknown. Annual breast cancer incidence rates per 100,000 women peaked at 168.9 at age 55 to 59 and declined to 57.3 at 60 and above. Patients had an average of 5.0 ± 3.3 children compared to 5.4 ± 3.5 for controls, P = 0.16. A first degree family member had breast cancer among 11.1% of patients and 2.1% of controls (P 50% of these patients and controls being ≥50 years old. No statistically significant relationship was found between tumor stage and age, P = 0.59. Conclusions In Kurdish Iraq, breast cancer is predominantly a disease of pre-menopausal women having multiple pregnancies. For younger patients, breast cancer incidence was similar to the West and possibly higher than many Middle-Eastern countries, but unlike the West, the estimated rates declined markedly in the elderly. The familial breast cancer risk for both older and younger women was within the general population risk of Western countries. Clinical stages were advanced and indicated delays in diagnosis that were

  13. Assessment of quality of life for the patients with cervical cancer at different clinical stages

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    Chun-Xia Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With improved overall survival of cervical cancer patients, the importance of the quality of life (QOL is increasingly recognized. This study was conducted to compare the QOL of women with different stage cervical cancer before and after treatment to facilitate improved cervical cancer prevention and treatment. We used the generic Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36 to collect QOL information. Based on SF-36, we interviewed cervical cancer patients at West China Second Affiliated Hospital and Sichuan Cancer Hospital between May 2010 and January 2011. A total of 92 patients with precancerous lesions, 93 with early cancer, and 35 with advanced cancer responded to our survey. Average physical component summary (PCS scores were significantly different between the three groups at every time point (P < 0.05. Average mental component summary (MCS scores were significantly different between the three groups after treatment (P < 0.05. Average PCS and MCS scores increased gradually from the pretreatment to posttreatment period for patients with precancerous lesions. However, they reached the lowest at 1 month after treatment for patients with early and advanced cancers and rebounded between 1 and 6 months after treatment. Our results indicate that patients with precancerous lesions and early cervical cancer show better overall QOL than do those with advanced cervical cancer. Additionally, patients with early cancer recover more quickly than do those with advanced cancer in terms of both physical and mental functions. Thus, early detection and treatment initiatives may improve the QOL for patients with precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.

  14. Assessment of quality of life for the patients with cervical cancer at different clinical stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Xie; Fang-Hui Zhao; Si-Han Lu; He Huang; Xiong-Fei Pan; Chun-Xia Yang; You-Lin Qiao

    2013-01-01

    With improved overall survival of cervical cancer patients,the importance of the quality of life (QOL)is increasingly recognized.This study was conducted to compare the QOL of women with different stage cervical cancer before and after treatment to facilitate improved cervical cancer prevention and treatment.We used the generic Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (MOS SF-36) to collect QOL information.Based on SF-36,we interviewed cervical cancer patients at West China Second Affiliated Hospital and Sichuan Cancer Hospital between May 2010 and January 2011.A total of 92 patients with precancerous lesions,93 with early cancer,and 35 with advanced cancer responded to our survey.Average physical component summary (PCS) scores were significantly different between the three groups at every time point (P < 0.05).Average mental component summary (MCS) scores were significantly different between the three groups after treatment (P < 0.05).Average PCS and MCS scores increased gradually from the pretreatment to posttreatment period for patients with precancerous lesions.However,they reached the lowest at 1 month after treatment for patients with early and advanced cancers and rebounded between 1and 6 months after treatment.Our results indicate that patients with precancerous lesions and early cervical cancer show better overall QOL than do those with advanced cervical cancer.Additionally,patients with early cancer recover more quickly than do those with advanced cancer in terms of both physical and mental functions.Thus,early detection and treatment initiatives may improve the QOL for patients with precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.

  15. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass;

    2014-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material to el...

  16. Prognostic value of breast cancer subtypes on breast cancer specific survival, distant metastases and local relapse rates in conservatively managed early stage breast cancer: a retrospective clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Sanpaolo, Pietro; Barbieri, Viviana; Genovesi, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    International audience To ascertain if breast cancer subtypes had prognostic effect on breast cancer specific survival, distant metastases and local relapse rates in women affected by early stage breast cancer.

  17. Clinical outcome of partial glossectomy or brachytherapy in early-stage tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial glossectomy and low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy are both effective in early-stage tongue cancer without lymph node metastasis, although head and neck surgeons and radiation oncologists disagree on which treatment is superior. Because our subjects select the treatment modality, we compared treatment results between 39 subjects undergoing partial glossectomy and 107 undergoing brachytherapy for stage I/II tongue cancer. Local recurrence was observed in 10% and cervical lymph node recurrence in 23% following partial glossectomy, versus local recurrence in 13% and cervical lymph node recurrence in 24% following brachytherapy. Disease-free 5-year survival was 87.0% following partial glossectomy and 90.7% following brachytherapy. Because incidence of local recurrence, nodal metastasis, and prognosis were the same regardless of treatment modality, treatment should be based on the age, performance status, and quality of life among subjects. (author)

  18. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation therapy . Mohs microsurgery . A clinical trial of laser therapy . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer clinical ... nodes in the groin ). External or internal radiation therapy followed by ... clinical trial of laser surgery . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer ...

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  20. Prognostic influence of clinical stage for distant failure in conservation treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-hundred twelve patients with clinical stage I-II mammary carcinoma treated with radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery from 1975 through 1985 were evaluated. Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-80 months). This study demonstrates the importance of evaluating patients on the basis of tumor and axillary node findings rather than by clinical stage alone. In the authors' series, all T1 patients with positive axillary lymph nodes achieved the same excellent local and distant control as node-negative T1 and T2 patients. Distant failure occurred in 70% of T2 N1 patients despite systemic chemotherapy given to the majority of patients. The significance of these data regarding future trials are discussed

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  3. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication

  4. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Hyoung Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Uiversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication.

  5. Evaluation of Clinical and MRI Staging for Prostate Cancer before Radical Prostatectomy%磁共振成像(MRI)对前列腺癌分期的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟晨阳; ZHONG Chenyang; 邹恩泽; ZOU Enze; 陈敏; CHEN Min; WANG Wenchao; ZHAO Weifeng; WAN Ben; DENG Shuming; WANG Jianye

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of clinical staging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging for prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy. Methods: Thirty-two patients with organ confined prostate cancer were reviewed to assess the accuracy of clinical staging and MRI staging to correlate with pathological staging results after radical prostatectomy. Results: 33.3% (10/30) prostate cancer patients with staging C and 3.3% (1/30) prostate cancer patients with staging D were diagnosed by pathology after radical prostatectomy in 30 patients with prostate cancer with clinical staging B, and 36.7% (11/30) under staging; Only one patient was over staging in clinical staging C. 19.1% (4/21) prostate cancer patients with staging C were diagnosed in 21 patients with prostate cancer and under staging with MRI staging B; 11.1% (1/9) was over staging with MRI staging C. The clinical staging and MRI staging had more correlation with pathological staging results (P=0.002), and PPV of the organ confined prostate cancer by clinical staging and MRI staging were 63.3% and 80.9% respectively, and NPV of nonorgan confined prostate cancer by clinical staging and MRI staging were 50% and 88.9% respectively. MRI staging was more specificity and accuracy than that of clinical staging to predict pathological staging results before radical prostatectomy (P=0.023). Conclusion: The MRI staging was more accuracy than that of clinical staging to predict pathological staging results in organ confined and nonorgan confined prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy.

  6. Clinical significance of combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA in classification and staging of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore clinical value of combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA in classification and staging of patients with lung cancer, the CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion in 330 patients with lung cancer and in 43 patients with benign were detected by the electrochemiluminescence. The results showed that CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion in patients with lung cancer group were significantly higher than that of in benign group (P<0.01). The positive rate of tumor markers in different pathological type lung cancer were different,which CYFRA21-1 positive rate in squamous cell cancer group was highest with 65.5%; CEA positive rate in glands cancer group was supreme with 65.0%; the NSE positive rate in differentiation cancer group was highest with 79.5%. The positive rate in three markers combined detection was higher than that in one item detection. The tumor marker levels in lung cancer were positively related with clinical staging. The higher of tumor marker levels and the more late of clinical staging, and the clinical III∼IV period was obviously higher than that I∼II period (P<0.05). The combined detection of CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA may enhance the positive rate in lung cancer detection, and may have significant clinical value in the classification and staging of patients with lung cancer. (authors)

  7. Impact of initial PET/CT staging in terms of clinical stage, management plan, and prognosis in 592 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Rohren, Eric M.; Macapinlac, Homer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Unit 1483, Houston, TX (United States); Khiewvan, Benjapa [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Unit 1483, Houston, TX (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, 2 Prannok Road Siriraj, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok (Thailand); Fox, Patricia S.; Bassett, Roland L. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Unit 1411, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Unit 1489, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Our objective was to determine the impact of initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) staging on clinical stage and the management plan and the prognostic value of PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 592 patients with NSCLC who were referred to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during 2002/2011 and had both PET/CT and conventional CT for initial staging. Clinical stages and management plans were compared between PET/CT and CT. The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered medium/high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent. PET/CT and CT stages were compared with all-cause mortality and survival rates. We also assessed potential prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PET/CT changed the stage in 170 patients (28.7 %; 16.4 % upstaged, 12.3 % downstaged). PET/CT had a medium/high impact on the management plan in 220 patients (37.2 %). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with upstaged disease than in patients with no change in stage (median PFS 29.0 vs. 53.8 months, P < 0.001; median OS:64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P = 0.006). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with medium/high impact of PET/CT than in patients with no/low impact of PET/CT (median PFS 24.7 vs. 60.6 months, P < 0.001; median OS 64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a medium/high impact of PET/CT was an independent predictor of worse PFS (hazard ratio, HR, 1.73; 95 % CI 1.30 - 2.29; P = 0.0002) and OS (HR 1.84; 95 % CI 1.26 - 2.69; P = 0.002). Initial PET/CT staging not only impacts stage and management plan but also has prognostic value. (orig.)

  8. Impact of initial PET/CT staging in terms of clinical stage, management plan, and prognosis in 592 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to determine the impact of initial 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) staging on clinical stage and the management plan and the prognostic value of PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 592 patients with NSCLC who were referred to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during 2002/2011 and had both PET/CT and conventional CT for initial staging. Clinical stages and management plans were compared between PET/CT and CT. The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered medium/high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent. PET/CT and CT stages were compared with all-cause mortality and survival rates. We also assessed potential prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PET/CT changed the stage in 170 patients (28.7 %; 16.4 % upstaged, 12.3 % downstaged). PET/CT had a medium/high impact on the management plan in 220 patients (37.2 %). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with upstaged disease than in patients with no change in stage (median PFS 29.0 vs. 53.8 months, P < 0.001; median OS:64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P = 0.006). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with medium/high impact of PET/CT than in patients with no/low impact of PET/CT (median PFS 24.7 vs. 60.6 months, P < 0.001; median OS 64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a medium/high impact of PET/CT was an independent predictor of worse PFS (hazard ratio, HR, 1.73; 95 % CI 1.30 - 2.29; P = 0.0002) and OS (HR 1.84; 95 % CI 1.26 - 2.69; P = 0.002). Initial PET/CT staging not only impacts stage and management plan but also has prognostic value. (orig.)

  9. Long-term outcomes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy versus lobectomy via open thoracotomy for clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, Mitsunori; Yaginuma, Hiroshi; Yonechi, Atsushi; Kanno, Ryuzo; Ohishi, Akio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is a standard treatment for lung cancer. This study retrospectively compared long-term outcomes after VATS lobectomy versus lobectomy via open thoracotomy for clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods From July 2002 to June 2012, 160 patients were diagnosed with clinical stage IA NSCLC and underwent lobectomy. Of these, 114 underwent VATS lobectomy and 46 underwent lobectomy via open thoracotomy. Results The 5-yea...

  10. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  11. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  12. PET in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary clinical application of FDG-PET is in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer and includes diagnosis, staging and restaging of non-small cell lung cancer. PET has a very high accuracy (sensitivity=97%, specificity=78%) for characterizing nodules that are indeterminate by chest radiograph and computed tomography. The major utility of PET in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer is the staging of the entire body. PET is more accurate than the conventional imaging modalities of CT and bone scans in the detection of metastatic disease. PET is accurate in the staging of the mediastinum, adrenal glands, and the skeletal system. PET is not as accurate in the detection of brain metastases because of their small size and the normal cortical accumulation

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Prostate Cancer in Advanced Stage and Its Treatment by Chinese and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚强; 宋竖旗

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in male seniors,with the higher rates in the Europe and America.There has been obvious increase in the incidence of prostate cancer in China recently.It has been reported that the incidence of prostate cancer was only

  14. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  15. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Classification, staging and prognosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer has increased in incidence throughout the twentieth century and is now the most common cancer in the Western World. It has a poor prognosis, only 10-15% of patients survive 5 years or longer. Outcome is dependent on clinical stage and cancer cell type. Lung cancer is broadly subclassified on the basis of histological features into squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The histopathological type of lung cancer correlates with tumour behaviour and prognosis. Staging based on prognosis is essential in clinical trials comparing different management strategies, and enables universal communication regarding the efficacy of different treatments in specific patient groups. The anatomic extent of disease determined either preoperatively using imaging supplemented by invasive procedures such as mediastinoscopy, and anterior mediastinotomy or following resection are described according to the T-primary tumour, N-regional lymph nodes, M-distant metastasis classification. The International System for Staging Lung Cancer attempts to group together patients with similar prognosis and treatment options. Various combinations of T, N, and M define different clinical or surgical-pathological stages (IA-IV) characterised by different survival characteristics. Refinements in staging based on imaging findings have enabled clinical staging to more accurately reflect the surgical-pathological stage and therefore more accurately predict prognosis. Recent advances including the use of positron emission tomography in combination with conventional staging promises to increase the accuracy of staging and therefore to reduce the number of invasive staging procedures and inappropriate thoracotomies

  17. Expression of thioredoxin system and related peroxiredoxin proteins is associated with clinical outcome in radiotherapy treated early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Deregulated redox systems provide cancer cells protection from increased oxidative stress, such as that induced by ionizing radiation. Expression of the thioredoxin system proteins (thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin interacting protein) and downstream peroxiredoxins (I-VI), was examined in tumor specimens from early stage breast cancer patients, subsequently treated by breast conserving surgery and locoregional radiotherapy, to determine if redox protein expression is associated with clinical outcome. Material and methods: Nuclear and cytoplasmic expression was assessed using conventional immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 224 tumors. Results: High expression of cytoplasmic peroxiredoxin-I correlated with a greater risk of local recurrence (p = 0.009). When nuclear and cytoplasmic expression patterns were combined, patients with low nuclear but high cytoplasmic expression of peroxiredoxin-I increased significance (p = 0.005). Both were independent factors (p = 0.006 and 0.003) from multivariate analysis. Associations were obtained between tumor grade and nuclear thioredoxin interacting protein (p = 0.01) and with cytoplasmic expression of peroxiredoxin-V (p = 0.007) but not with peroxiredoxin-I suggesting that the latter may exert influence via regulation of oxidative stress rather than via altering the tumor phenotype. Conclusions: Results highlight the potential of using redox protein expression, namely peroxiredoxin-I, to predict clinical outcome and support further studies to validate its usefulness as an independent prognostic, and potentially predictive, marker.

  18. Clinical outcome of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcome of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). Methods: From Jan. 1997 to Dec. 2006, 214 patients with pathologically or cytologically proven stage IV NSCLC were included in this analysis. Of those patients, 98 received radiotherapy concurrently with 3-week cycle chemotherapy (group A), 18 received radiotherapy concurrently with weekly chemotherapy( group B), 44 received chemotherapy alone, 37 received radiotherapy alone and 13 received sequential chemo-radiotherapy. The primary tumor was treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3DCRT) or conventional radiotherapy with conventional fractionation or late-course accelerated hyperfraction (LAHRT). Group A received 21-28 days cycle cisplatin-based chemotherapy (cisplatin combined with PTX, DTY, NVB or Vp-16), and group B received weekly DDP combined with PTX or toptecon for 4-6 weeks. Results: The follow-up rate was 99%. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates of group A, group B, chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone and sequential chemo-radiotherapy were 41% and 11%, 16% and 0, 31% and 7%, 34% and 10%, 26% and 3%, respectively(χ2=11.18, P=0.025). The patients with concurrent 3DCRT, LAHRT and radiotherapy dose ≥70 Gy had better survival in group A than those in chemotherapy alone group. Patients who received ≥2 cycles chemotherapy with concurrent radio-therapy had longer survival time than those who had ≥2 cycles chemotherapy alone. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and 3 DCRT, LAHRT with the dose ≥70 Gy can improve the overall survival of patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  19. Cancer of the Liver Italian Program score helps identify potential candidates for transarterial chemoembolization in patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Chun-Yan Gou; Jing-Ying Li; Rehmatullah Achakzai; Xiu-Hui Li

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recommends transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) as the ifrst line therapy for stage B patients and sorafenib treatment for stage C patients. However, stage C patients exhibit variations in terms of tumor burden, liver function, and extrahepatic metastasis, which could potentially affect disease outcome. Here, we assessed whether the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) scores can help identify stage C patients likely to beneift from TACE. METHODS: Out of 295 BCLC stage C HCC patients enrolled between January 2009 and December 2011, those with platelet counts >30×109 cells/L, total bilirubin RESULTS: The median overall survival (OS) was 6 months [95% conifdence interval (CI): 4.64-7.36]. The OS was 9 months for the TACE group and 4 months for the BSC group. The TACE group had a longer OS than the BSC subgroup for CLIP scores 0-2 [13 months (95% CI: 8.55-17.45) vs 4 months (95% CI:0.00-10.96),P=0.001]. No signiifcant differences were found be-tween the TACE and BSC groups for CLIP scores 3-5. The CLIP score and treatment methods were found to be independent prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: BCLC stage C HCC patients exhibit deifnite disease heterogeneity and can be reclassiifed by using the CLIP scoring system. Moreover, patients with CLIP scores 0-2 are likely to beneift from TACE. However, additional studies with long-term follow-up will be required to validate these ifndings.

  20. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant radiation therapy and prognostic factors in early stage uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and to analyze prognostic factors of survival in the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IB-IIA uterine cervical cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 148 patients with FIGO IB-IIA uterine cervical cancer who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at the Yonsei Cancer Center between June 1997 and December 2011. Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis or an extended field with or without brachytherapy. Among all patients, 57 (38.5%) received adjuvant chemotherapy either concurrently or sequentially. To analyze prognostic factors, we assessed clinicopathologic variables and metabolic parameters measured on preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). To evaluate the predictive performance of metabolic parameters, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up period was 63.2 months (range, 2.7 to 206.8 months). Locoregional recurrence alone occurred in 6 patients, while distant metastasis was present in 16 patients, including 2 patients with simultaneous regional failure. The 5-year and 10-year OSs were 87.0% and 85.4%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year DFSs were 83.8% and 82.5%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, pathologic type and tumor size were shown to be significant prognostic factors associated with both DFS and OS. In subset analysis of 40 patients who underwent preoperative PET/CT, total lesion glycolysis was shown to be the most significant prognostic factor among the clinicopathologic variables and metabolic parameters for DFS. Our results demonstrated that adjuvant RT following hysterectomy effectively improves local control. From the subset analysis of preoperative PET/CT, we can consider that metabolic parameters may hold prognostic significance

  1. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  2. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant radiation therapy and prognostic factors in early stage uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Rhee, Woo Joong; Choi, Seo Hee; Kim, Gwi Eon; Kim, Yong Bae [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, EunJi; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and to analyze prognostic factors of survival in the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IB-IIA uterine cervical cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 148 patients with FIGO IB-IIA uterine cervical cancer who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at the Yonsei Cancer Center between June 1997 and December 2011. Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis or an extended field with or without brachytherapy. Among all patients, 57 (38.5%) received adjuvant chemotherapy either concurrently or sequentially. To analyze prognostic factors, we assessed clinicopathologic variables and metabolic parameters measured on preoperative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). To evaluate the predictive performance of metabolic parameters, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up period was 63.2 months (range, 2.7 to 206.8 months). Locoregional recurrence alone occurred in 6 patients, while distant metastasis was present in 16 patients, including 2 patients with simultaneous regional failure. The 5-year and 10-year OSs were 87.0% and 85.4%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year DFSs were 83.8% and 82.5%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, pathologic type and tumor size were shown to be significant prognostic factors associated with both DFS and OS. In subset analysis of 40 patients who underwent preoperative PET/CT, total lesion glycolysis was shown to be the most significant prognostic factor among the clinicopathologic variables and metabolic parameters for DFS. Our results demonstrated that adjuvant RT following hysterectomy effectively improves local control. From the subset analysis of preoperative PET/CT, we can consider that metabolic parameters may hold prognostic

  3. Clinical outcome and cosmetic results of conservative surgery plus radiation therapy in early stage breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome and cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery plus radiation therapy. Methods: From May 1995 to December 2002, 109 such patients were so treated. The post-operative radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast 6 MV linear accelerator irradiation with two tangential half-fields to a total dose of 45-52 Gy (mean 48.6 Gy), followed by a boost irradiation to the tumor bed. Among them, 79 patients received 10-12 Gy (DB) boost by interstitial implantation brachytherapy (192Ir HDR, Nucletron), with single plane implantation for T1 and double plane implantation for T2 tumor. Thirty patients received 15 Gy boost by electron beam. Adjuvant/concurrent chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy were also used according to the patients' clinical characteristics. The cosmetic results were scored by both the doctor and the patients. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 93.8%, with local recurrence of 6.5%. No radiation-induced ulcer was observed in the breast except for acute inflammation at skin pinholes in 5 patients treated by interstitial implant brachytherapy. Among the 75 patients who had had breast examination, cosmetic result scored as good by patient and doctor were 81% and 87%, respectively. The good rate assessed by doctor in brachytherapy boost group and electron beam boost group were 81.2% (39/48) and 85.2% (23/27), There was no significant difference between these two boost techniques (P>0.05). Conclusions: Tumor bed boost irradiation by either brachytherapy or electron beam technique can provide satisfactory local control in early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery plus radiotherapy without increasing the side effects. There is no significant difference in cosmetic result between these two boost techniques. (authors)

  4. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  5. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BODY DIFFUSION WEIGHTED MR IMAGING IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREOPERATIVE N STAGING OF CERVICAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-dan Xue; Shuo Li; Fei Sun; Hong-yi Sun; Zheng-yu Jin; Jia-xin Yang; Mei Yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical impact of body diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) on the diagnosis and preoperative N staging of cervical cancer. Methods Twenty-four patients (mean age 37.9 years old) with proved cervical cancer by cervical biopsy and 24 female patients with other suspected pelvic abnormalities received preoperative body DWI scan. Results of body DWI were compared with pathological findings. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal cervix and different pathological types of cervical cancer were compared. ADC value of normal or inflammatory lymph nodes was also compared with that of metastatic ones. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Results There were 5 adenocarcinomas and 19 epitheliomas showed with biopsy results, and DWI showed 21 cervical lesions out of them (87.5%). ADC values of the normal cervix (n = 24), epithelioma (n = 19), and adenocar-cinoma (n = 5)were (1.73 ± 0.31) ×10-3, (0.88 ± 0.22)×1O-3, and (1.08 ± 0.12)×10-3 mm2/s, respectively. Statistical analysis showed significant difference in ADC value between normal cervical tissue and either tumor tissues (both P < 0.01). In patients had lymphadenectomy (n = 24), totally 67 lymph nodes including 16 metastatic lymph nodes were pathologically analyzed, and DWI showed 66 (98.5%) out of them. ADC values of normal/inflammatory and metastatic lymph nodes were (1.07 ± 0.16) ×10-3 and (0.77 ± 0.13)×10-3 mm2/s (P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of ADC value of metastatic lymph node showed that area under curve was 0.961. Conclusions ADC value in cervical carcinoma is lower than that in normal cervix, and ADC may have predictive value in subtype discrimination. ADC value may improve the preoperative characterization of lymph node metastasis. And at least abdominal and pelvic DWI scan is suggested for N staging evaluation in such patients.

  6. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  7. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An inset shows cancer cells in the pelvic peritoneum. Also shown are the fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, ... c) cancer cells are found in the pelvic peritoneum. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Ovarian Cancer ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primary peritoneal cancer) shows cancer in the pelvic peritoneum. Also shown are the cervix and vagina. In ... peritoneal cancer, cancer is found in the pelvic peritoneum and has not spread there from another part ...

  9. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  10. How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs away from the uterus, such as the lungs or bones. The cancer can be any size and it may or may not have spread to ... and Staging Treating Endometrial Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After ...

  11. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography–Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)–positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9–80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses (≥55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  12. Radiofrequency ablation versus resection for Barcelona clinic liver cancer very early/early stage hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He ZX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zhen-Xin He,1 Pu Xiang,2 Jian-Ping Gong,1 Nan-Sheng Cheng,3 Wei Zhang4 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, 3Department of Bile Duct Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 4Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Yue Bei People’s Hospital, Shaoguan, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Aim: To compare the long-term survival outcomes of radiofrequency ablation and liver resection for single very early/early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods: The Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2015, Embase (1974 to March 15, 2015, PubMed (1950 to March 15, 2015, Web of Science (1900 to March 15, 2015, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (1978 to March 15, 2015 were searched to identify relevant trials. Only trials that compared radiofrequency ablation and liver resection for single very early stage (≤2 cm or early stage (≤3 cm HCC according to the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC staging system were considered for inclusion in this review. The primary outcomes that we analyzed were the 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS rates, and the secondary outcomes that we analyzed were the 3-year and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS rates. Review Manager 5.3 was used to perform a cumulative meta-analysis. Possible publication bias was examined using a funnel plot. A random-effects model was applied to summarize the various outcomes. Results: Six studies involving 947 patients were identified that compared radiofrequency ablation (n=528 to liver resection (n=419 for single BCLC very early HCC. In these six studies, the rates of 3-year OS, 5-year OS, 3-year DFS, and 5-year DFS were significantly lower in the radiofrequency ablation group than in the liver resection group (risk ratio [RR] =0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83–0.98, P=0.01; RR =0.84, 95% CI: 0.75–0.95, P=0.004; RR =0.77, 95% CI

  13. Stages of Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body. Cancer can spread through tissue , the lymph system , and the blood : Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas. Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by ...

  14. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  15. Staging in oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plukker, J. Th. M.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate staging defines groups for stage-specific treatment, minimising inappropriate treatment. Application of dedicated staging methods - including 16-64 multidetector computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and positron emission tomography (PET)

  16. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history can affect the risk of developing colon cancer. ... through. This procedure is called a colostomy. A bag is placed around the stoma to collect the ...

  17. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  18. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells than in normal cells. For skin cancer, laser light is shined onto the skin and the drug becomes active and kills the cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy causes little damage to healthy tissue. Biologic therapy ...

  19. The role of radiation therapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Impact of clinical nodal stage on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1976 through 1989, 46 patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without malignant effusion were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV x-rays using antero posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose; 66 Gy) with once daily standard fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 22% and 10% respectively with a median survival time (MST) of 10 months. The survival of 18 patients with stage N0-2 disease was significantly better than the 28 patients with stage N3 disease (MST 21 versus 9 months; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival based on age and sex. However, there was a borderline difference in survival rates between patients with a performance status of 0-1 and those with status of 2-3 (p=0.06). Three patients with squamous cell carcinoma were alive after 5 years and were without disease progression. No patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma were free of disease after 5 years. These results provide support for the use of definitive RT to manage those patients with limited stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma not extending to N3 stage. (author)

  20. Association between in vivo iododeoxyuridine labeling, MIB-1 expression, malignancy grade and clinical stage in human prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M; Høyer, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    1998-01-01

    proliferation rates measured by in vivo IdUrd labeling and MIB-1 expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors. Good correlations were also found between S-phase fraction, MIB-1 expression, clinical stage and malignancy grade. These results make larger retrospective studies on archival tissue meaningful....

  1. B3GNT3 Expression Is a Novel Marker Correlated with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Clinical Outcome in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijing Zhang

    Full Text Available The β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-3 gene (B3GNT3 encodes a member of the B3GNT family that functions as the backbone structure of dimeric sialyl-Lewis A and is involved in L-selectin ligand biosynthesis, lymphocyte homing and lymphocyte trafficking. B3GNT3 has been implicated as an important element in the development of certain cancers. However, the characteristics of B3GNT3 in the development and progression of cancer remain largely unknown. Thus, our study aimed to investigate the expression pattern and the prognostic value of B3GNT3 in patients with early-stage cervical cancer.The mRNA and protein levels of B3GNT3 expression were examined in eight cervical cancer cell lines and ten paired cervical cancer tumors, using real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was used to analyze B3GNT3 protein expression in paraffin-embedded tissues from 196 early-stage cervical cancer patients. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the association between B3GNT3 expression scores and clinical parameters, as well as patient survival.B3GNT3 expression was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines and lesions compared with normal cells and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues. In the 196 cases of tested early-stage cervical cancer samples, the B3GNT3 protein level was positively correlated with high risk TYPES of human papillomavirus (HPV infection (P = 0.026, FIGO stage (P < 0.001, tumor size (P = 0.025, tumor recurrence (P = 0.004, vital status (P < 0.001, concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (P = 0.016, lymphovascular space involvement (P = 0.003 and most importantly, lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003. Patients with high B3GNT3 expression had a shorter overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS compared with those with low expression of this protein. Multivariate analysis suggested that B3GNT3 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for cervical cancer patients.Our study

  2. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red in color). Frequent urination. Pain during urination. Lower back pain. Tests that examine the urine and bladder are used to help detect (find) and diagnose bladder cancer. The following tests and ... left. Treatment given after surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, ...

  3. Mediastinal Staging for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Gelberg; Sean Grondin; Alain Tremblay

    2014-01-01

    Staging of the mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes plays a crucial role in identifying the best treatment option for patients with confirmed or suspected lung cancer and, in many cases, can simultaneously confirm a diagnosis of cancer. Noninvasive modalities, such as computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-CT, are an important first step in this assessment. Ultimately, invasive staging is frequently required to confirm or rule out the presence of metastatic disease ...

  4. Clinical outcomes of concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and chemotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate therapeutic effects and complications of concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and chemotherapy in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods: From June 2000 to August 2005, 93 histologically proved LSCLC patients were randomized into two groups:3DCRT group (n =46) and conventional group (n =47). In both groups, patients received one cycle chemotherapy, followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and then received consolidate chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was four to six cycles of PE regimen. Conventional irradiation field was setup in conventional group, while in 3 DCRT group clinical target volume (CTV) only involved visible tumor and adjacent lymphatic region. Radiotherapy was delivered at 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week to a median total dose of 60 -64 Gy.Those who achieved a complete response were treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) with 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: The follow-up rate was 100% in both groups. The number of patients completed 1-, 2-and 3-year follow-up were 36, 34 and 16 in 3DCRT group, 14, 7 and 8 in conventional group, respectively. The complete and overall response rate were 52% and 89% in 3DCRT group, while 47% and 85% in conventional group, respectively. The 1-, 2-and 3-year survival rates were 78%, 35% and 15% in 3DCRT group, 72%, 30% and 17% in conventional group, respectively. The median survival time was 23.2 and 22.8 months, respectively. There was no statistical difference in short-term (χ2 = 0.34, P = O.759) and long-term outcomes (χ2 = 0.18, P = 0.92). In 3DCRT group, the incidence of grade 1 + 2 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis, grade 1 +2 and grade 3 chronic radiation pneumonitis were lower than those in conventional group. There was no grade 3 or 4 acute radiation pneumonitis or esophagitis, or grade 4 chronic radiation pneumonitis in both groups. There was no difference in grade 1 + 2, grade 3 or grade 4 acute

  5. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarriage (premature birth of a fetus that cannot survive). Women who were exposed to DES before birth ... to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life . Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs ...

  6. Stages of Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the outer layers as it grows. Being female can increase the risk of developing gallbladder cancer. Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor . Having a risk factor does not mean that ...

  7. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and ...

  8. Stages of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  9. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  10. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  11. Clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer using different doses depending on tumor size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment schedules for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer vary from institution to institution. Several reports have indicated that stage IB patients had worse outcomes than stage IA patients when the same dose was used. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of SBRT for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with different doses depending on tumor diameter. Between February 2004 and November 2008, 124 patients with stage I NSCLC underwent SBRT. Total doses of 44, 48, and 52 Gy were administered for tumors with a longest diameter of less than 1.5 cm, 1.5-3 cm, and larger than 3 cm, respectively. All doses were given in 4 fractions. For all 124 patients, overall survival was 71%, cause-specific survival was 87%, progression-free survival was 60%, and local control was 80%, at 3 years. The 3-year overall survival was 79% for 85 stage IA patients treated with 48 Gy and 56% for 37 stage IB patients treated with 52 Gy (p = 0.05). At 3 years, cause-specific survival was 91% for the former group and 79% for the latter (p = 0.18), and progression-free survival was 62% versus 54% (p = 0.30). The 3-year local control rate was 81% versus 74% (p = 0.35). The cumulative incidence of grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis was 11% in stage IA patients and 30% in stage IB patients (p = 0.02). There was no difference in local control between stage IA and IB tumors despite the difference in tumor size. The benefit of increasing the SBRT dose for larger tumors should be investigated further

  12. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0) non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient's advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer

  13. Stages of Urethral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The surgeon may use part of the small intestine to make a tube that passes urine through an opening ( stoma ). This is called an ostomy or urostomy . If ... surgeon may also use part of the small intestine to make a new storage pouch ( continent ... the urine through a stoma. Even if the doctor removes all the cancer ...

  14. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around it. Sometimes lymph nodes , half of the thyroid gland on the same side of the body as the cancer, and muscles, tissues , and a nerve in the neck are also removed. Tumor debulking : A surgical procedure in which as much ...

  15. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  16. Clinical outcome of whole body gamma knife therapy inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Forty-three such patients were treated with home-manufactored stereotaetic gamma-ray whole-body therapeutic system (whole body gamma-knife radiotherapy, QGD; OUR International Technology and Science Co., LTD, Shenzhen, China) with 30 rotary, conical-surface 60Co sources on the target volume. For whole body γ-knife treatment, a stereotactic body frame for exact tumor localization, reproducible vacuum fixation, low-speed computed tomography simulation were conducted, which was followed by three-dimensional conformal radio-therapy planning. A total dose of 50 Gy was delivered at 5 Gy/fraction to the 50% isodose line covering the planned target volume, with a total dose of 70 Gy delivered at 7 Gy/fraction to the gross target volume. The median follow-up duration was 27 months. Results: Three to six months after treatment, the complete response rate for whole body-gamma knife radiotherapy was 63%, and the overall response rate was 95%. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were all 95 %. In stage I patients, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rate was 100%, 91% and 91% respectively. In patients with stage II, it was 73%, 64% and 64%, respectively. In patients with stage I + II, it was 88%, 78%, and 78%. Only 2% (1/43) of the patients had grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Our highly focused stereotactic body radiotherapy method has resulted in promising local control and survival with minimal toxicity. (authors)

  17. Clinical outcome analysis of 98 elderly women with early-stage breast cancer undergoing modified radical mastectomy or simple mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhilong Jia; Baoxia Su

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical results and prognosis for early elderly patients after surgery and to explore the rational treatment. Methods: Between January 1992 and December 2008, 98 early elderly breast cancer patients aged ≥ 65 years were treated with surgery, of which 52 patients received modified radical mastectomy and 46 patients received simple mastectomy. Results: Sixty-four (65.3%) patients had comorbidities including coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, etc. After a median follow up of 56 months (21 to 280 months), the 5-year cumulative survival rate of breast modified radical mastectomy group and mastectomy group were 84.0% and 82.7%, separately (P = 0.653). The 5-year recurrence rate were 3.8% and 8.1%, separately (P = 0.504). Conclusion: The simple mastectomy is suitable for the treatment of early elderly breast cancer patients for its lower complication and recurrence rate. Early old women with breast cancer may be safely treated by simple mastectomy. Our findings suggest that modified radical mastectomy does not significantly increase the overall survival.

  18. In Vitro Adenosine Triphosphate-Based Chemotherapy Response Assay as a Predictor of Clinical Response to Fluorouracil-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hye Youn; Kim, Im-kyung; Kang, Jeonghyun; Sohn, Seung-Kook; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the usefulness of the in vitro adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) for prediction of clinical response to fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods Tumor specimens of 86 patients with pathologically confirmed stage II colorectal adenocarcinoma were tested for chemosensitivity to fluorouracil. Chemosensitivity was determined by cell death rate (CDR) of drug-exposed cells, calculated by comparing the intracellular ATP level with that of untreated controls. Results Among the 86 enrolled patients who underwent radical surgery followed by fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy, recurrence was found in 11 patients (12.7%). The CDR ≥ 20% group was associated with better disease-free survival than the CDR < 20% group (89.4% vs. 70.1%, p=0.027). Multivariate analysis showed that CDR < 20% and T4 stage were poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival after fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion In stage II colorectal cancer, the in vitro ATP-CRA may be useful in identifying patients likely to benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26511802

  19. Prognostic Role of BRAF Mutation in Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer Receiving Curative Resection and Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Meta-Analysis Based on Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhong, Chenhan; Li, Dan; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Studies examining the prognostic value of the BRAF mutation on relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy so far showed discrepant results. Therefore, a meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed for clarification. Methods Randomized trials of stage II/III colorectal cancer treated with curative resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy were selected to conduct a meta-analysis. The necessary descriptive and statistical information such as hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from published survival data. Results Seven phase III randomized clinical trials (RCTs) including 1,035 BRAF mutation stage II/III CRC patients receiving curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. Overall, BRAF mutation resulted in poorer OS (HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.25–1.60; P < 0.00001), and poorer DFS (HR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.07–1.48, P = 0.006) compared with BRAF wild-type CRC. The prognostic role on RFS could not be elucidated in the meta-analysis because of limited data. Conclusions BRAF mutation was significantly related with shorter DFS and OS among stage II/III CRC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection. Its prognostic role for RFS needs to be further analyzed when more data is available. PMID:27138801

  20. Clinical efficacy of CT-guided 125I radioactive seeds implantation for stage Ⅲ of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of CT-guided 125I radioactive seed implantation in treatment of stage Ⅲ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the influential factors of prognosis. Methods: 247 patients of stage Ⅲa/Ⅲb NSCLC underwent CT-guided 125I radioactive seed implantation. The clinical effects and the factors affecting prognosis were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5- year overall survival rates were 82.8%, 23.8%, and 11.5 %, respectively. The median survival time was 24.8 months, and the local control rate was 92.2 %, 63.8%, and 25.7%, respectively. The 5- year overall survival rate was 14.7%, and the median survival time was 29.7 months of the stage Ⅲ, patients. And the 5- year overall survival rate was 11.2%, and the median survival time was 24.0 months at the stage Ⅲb. Univariate analysis showed that age, course of disease, hemoglobin before treatment, clinical stage, maximum diameter of tumor, prescribed dose (PD), post-operational mean dose,post-operational dose covering 100% volume (D100), remedial model were the main prognostic factors; however, multivariate analysis revealed that hemoglobin ≥ 120 g/L before treatment, post-operational dose covering 100% volume (D100) and maximum diameter of tumor were the independent risk factors for predicting the survival. Aerothorax was observed in 37 patients with an incidence rate of 14.9%, and hemothorax was observed in 22 patients with an incidence rate of 9%. Conclusions: 125I radioactive seed implantation therapy is effective in the treatment of stage Ⅲ NSCLC. Hemoglobin level before treatment, post-operational dose covering 100% volume (D100), and maximum diameter of tumor are the main prognostic factors for the NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy for NSCLC. (authors)

  1. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inage T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinoscopy is known to be a highly sensitive procedure for mediastinal staging and has been performed worldwide, but is invasive. Because of this, clinicians have sought a less invasive modality for nodal staging. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive modality for diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. EBUS-TBNA is a needle biopsy procedure that has accessibility compatible with the reach of the convex-probe EBUS scope, so N1 nodes are also assessable. The diagnostic yield is similar to that of mediastinoscopy, and the core obtained by the dedicated needle biopsy can be used for histological assessment to determine the subtypes of lung cancer. The samples can also be used to test for various biomarkers using immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction for DNA/complementary DNA, and in situ hybridization, and the technique is useful for selecting candidates for specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents. According to the newly published American College of Chest Physicians guideline, EBUS-TBNA is now considered "the best first test" for nodal staging in patients with radiologically suspicious nodes. Appropriate training and thorough clinical experience is required to be able to perform correct nodal staging using this procedure. Keywords: lung cancer, staging, endobronchial ultrasound, transbronchial biopsy

  2. Clinical application of PET/CT in diagnosis and staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: comparison with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography(PET/CT) in diagnosis and Staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and to compare the diagnostic and Staging accuracy with PET alone. Methods: PET/CT was performed in 42 patients (6 women, 36 men; mean age ±SD, 57.9 ±12.7 y) with proven or suspected non-small-cell lung cancer. All studies were retrospectively reviewed by two moderately experienced physicians unaware of the clinical information. PET/CT and PET images were evaluated independently and separately. Focal fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on attenuation-corrected PET images was scored on a 5-point scale (0 = definitely benign, 1 = probably benign, 2 = equivocal, 3 = probably malignant, 4 = definitely malignant). PET/CT images were then reviewed. Comparison was performed on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Accuracy was evaluated on the basis of follow-up, histopathologic findings or at least one other imaging method. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage was assigned on the basis of image analysis. Results: A total of 201 foci with abnormal FDG uptake were noted, two of which were seen only on PET/CT images. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of primary cancer were 94, 100, and 95% with PET/CT. PET/CT provided additional information over the separate interpretation of PET and CT in 24 patients (57%) with 57 sites (28%). In comparison with PET, the frequency of equivocal and probable lesion characterization was reduced by 57% (63 to 27) with PET/CT The frequency of definite lesion characterization was increased by 23% (141 to 174) with PET/CT Overall correct staging increased from 81% to 89% with PET/CT on a patient-by-patient analysis. Conclusions: Compare to PET alone, PET/CT improves the accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of non-small-cell lung cancer. More definitely normal and definitely abnormal lesions were identified with PET/CT than with PET alone. (authors)

  3. Prognostic value of response to external radiation in stage IIIB cancer cervix in predicting clinical outcomes: A retrospective analysis of 556 patients from India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of response to external beam radiation (EBRT) in predicting the clinical outcomes in stage IIIB cancer cervix and to find out factors affecting response to EBRT. Patients and methods: This retrospective study included 556 patients of cancer cervix stage IIIB treated between 1996 and 2001 with EBRT (46 Gy/23fx/4.5 weeks) followed by intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT). At the end of EBRT, response to EBRT was grouped as 'no gross residual tumor'(NRT) or 'gross residual tumor'(GRT). Results: Follow up ranged from 2 to 93 months with a median of 36 months. Median dose to point A was 81 Gy. At the end of EBRT, 393 patients (70.7%) attained NRT response. NRT responders had significantly better 5 year pelvic control, disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) than those who had a GRT response (75.6 vs. 54.6%; 60.6 vs. 31.9% and 62.6 vs. 33.7%, respectively; all P values <0.0001). Apart from response to EBRT, overall treatment time also has emerged as an independent factor to affect all clinical outcomes in multivariate analysis but age had significant impact on pelvic control only. Age was the only factor, which significantly influenced the response to EBRT in univariate as well as multivariate analysis (P=<0.001, OR=1.973, 95% C.I. 1.357-2.868). Patients with age more than 50 years had more NRT response (77%) than patients with age less than 50 years (63.8%). Conclusions: Patients who attain NRT response to EBRT will have an impressive long term pelvic control, DFS and OS in stage IIIB cancer cervix. Older patients (≥50 years) attain significantly higher NRT rates than younger patients

  4. Clinical application of FDG PET to lung and esophageal cancer. The use of FDG PET for nodal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Hee Jong

    1998-12-01

    Positron tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 deoxyglucose (FDG), showing increased FDG uptake and retention in malignancy cells, has been proven useful to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We undertook the prospective study to compare the accuracy of whole-bocy FDG PET with that of conventional chest computed tomography (CT) for the nodal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). FDG PET and contrast enhanced CT were performed in 36 patients with potentially resectable NSCLC. Each imaging study was evaluated independently, and nodal stations were localized according to American Thoracic Society mapping system. Extensive lymph node dissection (1101 nodes) of ipsi- and contralateral mediastinal nodal stations was performed at thoracotomy and /or mediastinoscopy. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic staging results and analyzed with McNema test (p) and Kappa value(k). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for ipsilatreal mediastinal nodal staging were 38 % , 68 % , 25%, 79%, 61% and those of PET were 88%, 71%, 47%, 95%, 75% (p>0.05, K=0.29). When analyzed by individual nodal group (superior, aortopulmonary window, and inferior), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of CT were 27%, 82%, 22%, 85%, 73% and those of PET were 60%, 87%, 92%, 82% (p<0.05, k=0.27). FDG PET in addition to CT appears to be superior to CT alone for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Clinical trial of post-chemotherapy consolidation thoracic radiotherapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To define the rate of development of symptomatic chest failures in extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) after undergoing post-chemotherapy chest radiotherapy (RT). Materials and methods: Patients had ES-SCLC, attained an objective response to chemotherapy and signed study consent. Target accrual was 33 patients. Patients were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) as per department policy. PCI (25 Gy/10 fractions) and chest RT (40 Gy/15 fractions) were given simultaneously 4–8 weeks after chemotherapy completion. Thoracic target volume was the post-chemotherapy residual chest disease plus margin. Patients were evaluated for RT toxicities, local control, disease-free and overall survival. Results: Thirty-two patients were evaluable. Twenty-nine patients completed RT without delay. There were 4 complete responses and 28 partial responses to chemotherapy. All study patients received PCI. Maximal acute RT toxicity was grade 2 esophagitis (18 patients). There were no RT-related deaths. Median time to disease progression and overall survival were 4.2 and 8.3 months, respectively (median follow-up = 21.8 months). Of 16 chest recurrences, 7 were in the irradiated region and 5 were symptomatic. Conclusions: Post-chemotherapy consolidation chest RT for ES-SCLC patients on this trial was well tolerated and associated with symptomatic chest recurrences in only 5/32 treated patients.

  6. [Present status of preoperative staging and contemplation on preoperative precision staging for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-02-25

    The aim of the preoperative staging of gastric cancer was to evaluate the depth of tumor infiltration (T-stage), the extent or number of metastasized lymph nodes (N-stage), and distant metastasis (M-stage) before surgery, to develop an optimal therapeutic scheme for the patients with gastric cancer. Traditional methods of preoperative staging for gastric cancer are usually imaging diagnostic techniques, such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and laparoscopic exploration. At present, the accuracy of preoperative TNM staging of gastric cancer can generally reach 70% to 85% with significant clinical benefit. The accurate preoperative staging for cancer patients can have a major role in determining the final clinical outcome and in predicting the prognosis. According to the concept of "precision medicine", to achieve "preoperative precision staging of gastric cancer", the application of imaging diagnostic techniques must be combined with the analysis of individual genetic information or tumor molecular pathological classification, which should be based on research of the disease genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. In this article, we provide a review of results on preoperative staging of gastric cancer in recent years, and we also discuss how to think about the "preoperative precision staging of gastric cancer", with special emphasis on the potential of molecular imaging techniques, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), molecular targets for tumor targeting therapy and molecular pathological classification, etc. in judging bio-molecular behavior of gastric cancer before surgery. PMID:26831874

  7. Stage-specific analysis of plasma protein profiles in ovarian cancer: Difference in-gel electrophoresis analysis of pooled clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. Non-specific symptoms early in disease and the lack of specific biomarkers hinder early diagnosis. Multi-marker blood screening tests have shown promise for improving identification of early stage disease; however, available tests lack sensitivity, and specificity. Materials and Methods: In this study, pooled deeply-depleted plasma from women with Stage 1, 2 or 3 ovarian cancer and healthy controls were used to compare the 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE protein profiles and identify potential novel markers of ovarian cancer progression. Results/Discussion: Stage-specific variation in biomarker expression was observed. For example, apolipoprotein A1 expression is relatively low in control and Stage 1, but shows a substantial increase in Stage 2 and 3, thus, potential of utility for disease confirmation rather than early detection. A better marker for early stage disease was tropomyosin 4 (TPM4. The expression of TPM4 increased by 2-fold in Stage 2 before returning to "normal" levels in Stage 3 disease. Multiple isoforms were also identified for some proteins and in some cases, displayed stage-specific expression. An interesting example was fibrinogen alpha, for which 8 isoforms were identified. Four displayed a moderate increase at Stage 1 and a substantial increase for Stages 2 and 3 while the other 4 showed only moderate increases. Conclusion: Herein is provided an improved summary of blood protein profiles for women with ovarian cancer stratified by stage.

  8. A randomised phase II trial of preoperative chemotherapy of cisplatin–docetaxel or docetaxel alone for clinical stage IB/II non-small-cell lung cancer: results of a Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG 0204)

    OpenAIRE

    Kunitoh, H; Kato, H.; Tsuboi, M; Asamura, H.; Tada, H.; Nagai, K; Mitsudomi, T.; Koike, T.; Nakagawa, K.; Ichinose, Y; Okada, M.; Shibata, T.; Saijo, N.

    2008-01-01

    Preoperative chemotherapy is a promising strategy in patients with early-stage resectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); optimal chemotherapy remains unclear. Clinical (c-) stage IB/II NSCLC patients were randomised to receive either two cycles of docetaxel (D)–cisplatin (P) combination chemotherapy (D 60 mg m−2 and P 80 mg m−2 on day 1) every 3–4 weeks or three cycles of D monotherapy (70 mg m−2) every 3weeks. Thoracotomy was performed 4–5 weeks (DP) or 3–4 weeks (D) after chemotherapy....

  9. Role of prophylactic brain irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer: clinical, neuropsychologic, and CT sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety-four patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer treated between 1981 and 1985 with a regimen including prophylactic brain irradiation (PBI) after combination chemotherapy were assessed for compliance with PBI, brain relapse, and neurologic morbidity. Seventy-seven percent of patients had PBI and of these, 22% developed brain metastases after a median time of 11 months post treatment. The brain was the apparent unique initial site of relapse in 10% of PBI cases but more commonly brain relapse was preceded or accompanied by failure at other sites, especially the chest. Brain metastases were the greatest cause of morbidity in 50% of PBI failures. Twelve of 14 PBI patients alive 2 years after treatment had oncologic, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, and brain CT. All long-term survivors were capable of self care and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dementia, with three borderline cases. One third had pretreatment neurologic dysfunction and two thirds post treatment neurologic symptoms, most commonly recent memory loss. Fifty percent had subtle motor findings. Intellectual functioning was at the 38th percentile with most patients having an unskilled occupational history. Neuropsychologic impairment ratings were borderline in three cases and definitely impaired in seven cases. CT scans showed brain atrophy in all cases with mild progression in those having a pre-treatment baseline. Periventricular and subcortical low density lesions identical to the CT appearance of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy were seen in 82% of posttreatment CT studies, and lacunar infarcts in 54%. Neuropsychologic impairment scores and the extent of CT periventricular low density lesions were strongly associated

  10. Effectiveness of surgery and individualized high-dose hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy on survival in clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A propensity score matched analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with poor pulmonary function or other comorbidities are treated with radiotherapy. The objective of this investigation is to compare the 3-year survival of two early-stage NSCLC populations treated in two different hospitals, either by surgical resection (lobectomy) or by individualized high-dose accelerated radiotherapy, after matching patients by propensity scoring analysis. Methods: A retrospective comparative study has been performed on two series of consecutive patients with cytohistological diagnosis of NSCLC, clinically staged IA by means of PET-scan (radiotherapy group) and pathologically staged IA (surgery group). Results: A total of 157 cases were initially selected for the analysis (110 operated and 47 treated by radiotherapy). Patients in the radiotherapy group were older, with higher comorbidity and lower FEV1% with 3-years probability of survival for operated patients higher than that found for patients treated by radiotherapy. After matching by propensity scoring (using age and FEV1%), differences disappear and 3-years probability of survival had no statistical differences. Conclusions: Although this is a non-randomized retrospective analysis, we have not found 3-years survival differences after matching cases between surgery and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, data presented here support the continuous investigation for non-surgical alternatives in this disease.

  11. The correlation between clinical factors and radiation pneumonitis in advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate clinical factors as predictors of radiation pneumonitis (RP)in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent radio chemotherapy when gross tumor volume is 70 Gy. Methods: Data of 84 patients with histologically proved NSCLC treated with 3DCRT or IMRT were collected. To evaluate the correlation between clinical parameters and radiation pneumonitis (RP). The clinical parameters were considered: pathological type, therapy agents, age,gender, stage, karnofsky performance status (KPS), smoking status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results: The occurrence of grade 1, 2 RP was 63%, 33%, respectively. In univariate analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with RP of ≥ grade 1(χ2 =4.03, P = 0.045)and ≥grade 2(χ2 = 15.59, P =0.000). KPS was significantly associated with RP of ≥grade 1(χ2 =3.98, P = 0.046)and ≥grade 2(χ2 = 5.21, P = 0.023). In logistic multivariate analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with RP of ≥grade 1(χ2 =5.50, P =0.019)and ≥grade 2(χ2 = 12.92, P =0.000). KPS was significantly associated with RP of ≥ grade 1(χ2 = 6.29, P = 0.012)and ≥ grade 2(χ2 = 6.61, P =0.010). Conclusion: The definite statistical significant risk factors of RP are diabetes and KPS. (authors)

  12. Long-term clinical outcome in patients with stage-i nonseminomatous germ cell cancer: a critical review of own treatment modalities in a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Seseke

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The optimal management of patients with clinical stage I non-seminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT I was considered controversial until the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group determined unambiguous treatment strategies. In order to assess the long-term outcome we evaluated the data of patients with NSGCT I. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective evaluation, we included 52 patients with a mean age of 26 years (range 15-58 who were treated with different modalities at our department between 1989 and 2003. Mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range 2-14 years. After orchiectomy, 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, 7 patients underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and 6 men were managed using a surveillance strategy. Survival, recurrence rate and time of recurrence were evaluated. The histological staging and treatment modality was related to the relapse. RESULTS: Tumor specific overall mortality was 3.8%. The mortality and relapse rate of the surveillance strategy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and chemotherapy was 16.7% / 50%, 14.3% / 14.3% and 0% / 2.5% respectively. All relapsed patients in the surveillance group as well as in the RPLND group had at least one risk factor for developing metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Following the European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer in patients with NSGCT Stage I any treatment decision must be individually related to the patient according to prognostic factors and care capacity of the treating centre. In case of doubt, adjuvant chemotherapy should be the treatment of choice, as it provides the lowest risk of relapse or tumor related death.

  13. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John; Coleman, Michel P; Hacker, Neville; Hanna, Louise; Mosgaard, Berit J; Nordin, Andy; Rosen, Barry; Engholm, Gerda; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Hatcher, Juanita; Johannesen, Tom B; McGahan, Colleen E; Meechan, David; Middleton, Richard; Tracey, Elizabeth; Turner, Donna; Richards, Michael A; Rachet, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  15. Clinical outcome, role of BRAFV600E, and molecular pathways in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma: is it an indolent cancer or an early stage of papillary thyroid cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarmeloNucera

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Most human thyroid cancers are differentiated papillary carcinomas (PTC. Papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC are tumors that measure 1 cm or less. This class of small tumors, recognized fairly recently, has proven to be a very common clinical entity in endocrine diseases. PTMC may be present in 30-40% of human autopsies and is often identified incidentally in a thyroid removed for benign clinical nodules. Although PTMC usually has an excellent long-term prognosis, it can metastasize to neck lymph nodes; however deaths related to this type of thyroid tumor are very rare. Few data exist on molecular pathways that play a role in PTMC development; however, two molecules have been shown to be associated with aggressive PTMC. S100A4 (calcium-binding protein, which plays a role in angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and tumor microenvironment, is over-expressed in metastatic PTMC. In addition, the BRAFV600E mutation, the most common genetic alteration in PTC, is present in many PTMC with extra thyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis. Importantly, recently developed selective (e.g. PLX4720, PLX4032 (Vemurafenib, also called RG7204 or non-selective (e.g. Sorafenib inhibitors of BRAFV600E may be an effective treatment for patients with BRAFV600E-expressing PTMCs with aggressive clinical-pathologic features. Here, we summarize the clinical outcome, cancer genetics, and molecular mechanisms of PTMC.

  16. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  17. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients

  18. Images of gastric cancer stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work has the objective to review the importance of the images in the preoperating stage of the gastric cancer. It has been emphasized in the modalities of transabdominal ultrasound as much as endoscopic and TAC since they are most valuable in the stage. Certainly the importance of conventional radiology (gastroduodenal series) is also valuable in the stage of the tumor, specially in considering the depth of the same one. In order to make this overhaul, the recent bibliography was consulted but, specially the published one by Japaneses since they follow a classification and methodology different from the used one in most of the countries that belong to the World-wide Organization of the Health. They made an overhaul of approximately 200 cases of patients who have been diagnosed and treated in the Center of Detection of Gastric Cancer of Cartago. In each case review the file, radiological, sonographic and pathological studies, and the cases were chosen that better illustrated the exposed subjects. (Author)

  19. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Versus Thoracotomy Lymph Node Dissection in Clinical Stage I Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis and System Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxiong; Wei, Yiping; Jiang, Han; Xu, Jianjun; Yu, Dongliang

    2016-06-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is the preferred surgical procedure, causing fewer injuries compared with thoracotomy, but whether VATS can achieve the same lymph node (LN) dissection efficacy is controversial. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies comparing VATS and thoracotomy in LN dissection for clinical stage I lung cancer. Twenty articles met the inclusion criteria and involved 2,190 patients in the VATS group and 3,000 patients in the open group. Meta-analysis showed that fewer total LNs were dissected in the VATS group, although VATS harvested more left-side LNs. The same number of total LN stations, N2 LNs, N2 LN stations, N1 LNs, and right-side LNs was harvested in both groups. Our findings require further validation in more high-quality, large-scale randomized controlled trials. PMID:27063613

  20. Prostate cancer:diagnosis and staging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nigel Borley; Mark R.Feneley

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents an increasing health burden.The past 20 years,with the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA),has seen prostate cancer move increasingly from a condition that presented with locally advanced disease or metastases to one that is found upon screening.More is also known about the pathology of pre-malignant lesions.Diagnosis relies on trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) to obtain biopsies from throughout the prostate,but TRUS is not useful for staging.Imaging for staging,such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography,still has a low accuracy compared with pathological specimens.Current techniques are also inaccurate in identifying lymph node and bony metastases.Nomograms have been developed from the PSA,Gleason score and clinical grading to help quantify the risk of extra-capsular extension in radical prostatectomy specimens.Improved clinical staging modalities are required for more reliable prediction of pathological stage and for monitoring of response to treatments.

  1. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment

  2. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deshields, Teresa L. [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  3. Clinical survey of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment trends and outcomes for prostate cancer in our hospital were reported. A total of 482 patients with prostate cancer treated in our hospital between January, 1990 and December, 2004. The age distribution was from 51 to 99 years-old, with the mean age of 72.9 years-old at onset. The number of prostate cancer patients, especially asymptomatic patients with prostatic specific antigen (PSA) elevation, have increased recently. As for the clinical stage, 92 cases (19.1%), 238 cases (49.4%), 48 cases (10.0%) and 104 cases (21.6%) were stage A, B, C and D, respectively. 425 cases (88.2%) received some form of endocrine therapy. Retropubic prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy was performed in 77 and 57 cases, respectively all cases. The cause-specific 5-year survival rate of the 482 cases was 79.7%, comprising 100% for stage A1, 96.8% for stage A2, 89.4% for stage B, 79.9% for stage C and 42.9% for stage D. The cause-specific 5-year survival was significantly better in the latter patients (1997-2004) than the former patients (1990-1996) in stage C (p=0.0226), D (p=0.0448). In stage C patients, the retropubic prostatectomy (with endocrine therapy) group, increased in the latter period and showed longer cause-specific 5-year survival than the endocrine therapy group (p=0.0027). In stage D2 patients, chemo-endocrine therapy with etoposide (VP-16), adriamycin (ADM) and cisplatin (CDDP) refractory and cause-specific 5-year survival was longer than endocrine therapy alone (p=0.0467, P=0.0381). Our results suggest that retropubic prostatectomy with endocrine therapy and chemo-endocrine therapy are useful for stage C and D prostate cancer patients, respectively. (author)

  4. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  5. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA

  6. A retrospective cohort study on combined modality therapy with or without surgery for clinical stage I and II small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effects of surgery plus chemotherapy (± radio- therapy) compared with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for clinical staged I and II small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods: Out of 358 patients with limited small cell lung cancer, proved cyto-pathologicaily, 89 patients with clinical stage I or II disease made up the material of this paper. Fifty-five patients received surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy ( surgery group). Thirty-four patients were treated by non-surgery method: ie combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (non-surgery group). The chemotherapy regimen included PE (or CE), CAP or CAV for 4-6 cycles. Irradiation treatment covering the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilar nodes and mediastinum was delivered once-daily with 6 megavoltage X-ray beam to a median irradiation dose of 58 Gy (56-60 Gy) was given in 5-6 weeks. Results: The overall median survival time (MST) was 48 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 95%, 71%, 57%, and 48%. In the surgery group, the median survival time (MST) was 50 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 96%, 70%, 58%, and 52%. Failure in the surgical group included local recurrence (4%), distant metastasis (31%), both local and distant failure (9%), and brain metastasis (18%). In the non-surgery group, the MST was 40 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 94%, 74%, 55%, and 40%. Failure included local recurrence (12%), distant metastasis (44%), both local and distant failure (6%), and brain metastasis (29%). There was no significant difference in the overall survival rates between the two groups (χ2=0.70, P=0.404). Cox regression analysis showed that brain metastasis was an influential factor of prognosis (P=0.001 ). Conclusions: For clinical stage I and II SCLC, both surgery plus chemotherapy (or radiotherapy) or combined chemotherapy and radiotgherapy without surgery could achieve a satisfactory

  7. The clinical research of microRNA let-7e expression level in human esophageal sguamous cell cancer in different clinical stages%MicroRNA let-7e与食管鳞癌临床分期研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许一鸣; 仲崇俊; 田婷; 肖平

    2014-01-01

    目的:检测食管鳞癌患者不同临床分期癌组织及癌旁组织中MicroRNA let-7e表达水平的差异。方法:应用实时荧光定量RT-PCR Taqman MGB探针法,检测60例食管癌癌组织及癌旁组织中MicroRNA let-7e表达水平。以U6 snRNA为内参,进行荧光定量PCR,统计分析表达水平的差异。结果:MicroRNA let-7e的表达水平在癌组织比癌旁组织高,病理分期I期与III期相比,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:MicroRNA let-7e在食管鳞癌中表达水平明显高于癌旁组织,可能用于食管鳞癌临床分期诊断的重要标记。%Purpose: To investigate the expression levels of MicroRNA let-7e in esophageal squamous cell cancer patients and to compare cancer tissues with adjacent normal lung tissues in different clinical stages. Method: The MicroR-NA let-7e expression levels in cancer tissues and adjacent normal lung tissues were detected by quantitative real-time re-verse transcription-PCR from 60 esophageal squamous cell cancer patients who were divided into three groups, with U6 RNA as an actin. Results: The expression levels of MicroRNA let-7e in cancer tissues were significantly higher than in adjacent normal esophageal tissues, and had statistical significance in different stages of the tumors: characteristics, lymph metastasis, differentiation, and the stage of the tumors. Conclusions: The study suggested that microRNA let-7e was sig-nificantly up-expressed in esophageal squmaos cell cancer and should be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of clinical stages of esophageal cancer patients.

  8. The New Lung Cancer Staging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank C. Detterbeck,MD, FCCP; Daniel J. Boffa, MD; Lynn T, Tanoue, MD, FCCP

    2009-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) has conducted an extensive initiative to inform the revision of the lung cancer staging system. This involved development of an international database along with extensive analysis of a large population of patients and their prognoses. This article reviews the recommendations of the IASLC International Staging Committee for the definitions for the TNM descriptors and the stage grouping in the new non-small cell lung cancer staging system.

  9. Collection of Cancer Stage Data by Classifying Free-text Medical Reports

    OpenAIRE

    McCowan, Iain A.; Moore, Darren C.; Nguyen, Anthony N.; Bowman, Rayleen V; Clarke, Belinda E.; Duhig, Edwina E.; Fry, Mary-Jane

    2007-01-01

    Cancer staging provides a basis for planning clinical management, but also allows for meaningful analysis of cancer outcomes and evaluation of cancer care services. Despite this, stage data in cancer registries is often incomplete, inaccurate, or simply not collected. This article describes a prototype software system (Cancer Stage Interpretation System, CSIS) that automatically extracts cancer staging information from medical reports. The system uses text classification techniques to train s...

  10. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  11. Influence of clinical characteristics on radiation therapy effect in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer at non-standard fractionation modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative analysis of different modes of radiotherapy fractionation with modification using etoposide and cisplatin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer is given. The general condition of the patient, the form of the macroscopic tumor growth, the degree of tumor regression are prognostically significant for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

  12. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. Clinical value of surgical staging with preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation for mediastinal lymph nodes in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT for surgical staging by evaluating mediastinal lymphadenopathy in lung cancer. Methods: Sixty-eight patients with lung cancer underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT and chest CT. The results of PET/CT and CT were compared with pathological results. χ2 and t tests were used for data analysis. Results: A total of 222 mediastinal lymph nodes were resected in 68 patients and 84 (37.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for PET/CT and CT were 71.4% (60/84) vs 48.8% (41/84), 66.7% (92/138) vs 49.3% (68/138), 68.5% (152/222) vs 49.1%(109/222), 56.6% (60/106) vs 36.9% (41/111), 79.3% (92/116) vs 61.3 % (68/111), respectively (χ2=8.96, 8.57, 17.19, 8.43, 8.88, all P<0.05). The staging consistency of PET/CT with pathology was 73.5% (50/68), which was significantly higher than that of CT with pathology (41.2% (28/68); χ2=14.55, P<0.01). The identification of N1 and N2 disease was, respectively, 66.7%(10/15) and 79.2% (19/24) by PET/CT, 13.3%(2/15) and 45.8% (11/24) by CT (χ2=8.89 and 5.69, both P<0.05). The SUVmax of lymph nodes greater than and equal to 10 mm in short diameter was significantly higher than those with short diameters less than 10 mm (5.5±2.8 vs 2.2±0.9, t=5.17, P<0.05). Conclusion: Preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT is more accurate for evaluating mediastinal lymphadenopathy and staging in patients with lung cancer than CT, and therefore is more valuable for optimizing the best treatment strategies. (authors)

  14. Systemic review of the patterns of failure following stereotactic body radiation therapy in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer: Clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the patterns of failure, the toxicity profile, and the factors influencing efficacy of stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and materials: A search was based on PubMed electronic databases. All searches were conducted in May, 2009. Results: The local control ranged from 80% to 100% in most studies with adequate isocentric or peripheral biologically effective dose (BED). Recurrences were associated with increased tumor size. The main pattern of failure after SBRT was distant metastasis. Grades 3-5 toxicity occurred mostly in centrally located tumors, and adjuvant chemotherapy may further decrease all recurrences; possibly translating to a survival benefit in large or centrally located tumors where high BED cannot be safely reached. Conclusion: SBRT is an excellent treatment option for early-stage, and mostly medically inoperable, NSCLC. BED at both the isocenter and the tumor periphery is very important for optimal tumor control; higher doses are required for large (≥T2) lesions; SBRT for centrally located tumors can be feasible with a much less aggressive dose regimen than 60-66 Gy/3 fractions and adjacent critical structures excluded from the target volume; chemotherapy may optimize the clinical outcome in large or centrally located lesions.

  15. Higher expression levels of SOCS 1,3,4,7 are associated with earlier tumour stage and better clinical outcome in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are important negative feedback regulators of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, and have been recently investigated for their role in the development of different cancers. In this study, we examined the expression of SOCS1-7 genes in normal and breast cancer tissue and correlated this with several clinico-pathological and prognostic factors. SOCS1-7 mRNA extraction and reverse transcription were performed on fresh frozen breast cancer tissue samples (n = 127) and normal background breast tissue (n = 31). Transcript levels of expression were determined using real-time PCR and analyzed against TNM stage, tumour grade and clinical outcome over a 10 year follow-up period. SOCS1,4,5,6 and 7 expression decreased with increased TNM stage (TNM1 vs. TNM3 p = 0.039, TNM1 vs. TNM4 p = 0.016, TNM2 vs. TNM4 p = 0.025, TNM1 vs. TNM3 p = 0.012, and TNM1 vs. TNM3 p = 0.044 respectively). SOCS2 and 3 expression decreased with increased Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) (NPI1 vs. NPI3 p = 0.033, and NPI2 vs. NPI3 p = 0.041 respectively). SOCS7 expression decreased with higher tumour grade (Grade 3 vs. Grade 2 p = 0.037). After a median follow up period of 10 years, we found higher levels of SOCS1,2 and 7 expression among those patients who remained disease-free compared to those who developed local recurrence (p = 0.0073, p = 0.021, and p = 0.039 respectively). Similarly, we found higher levels of SOCS 2,4, and 7 expression in those who remained disease-free compared to those who developed distant recurrence (p = 0.022, p = 0.024, and p = 0.033 respectively). Patients who remained disease-free had higher levels of SOCS1 and 2 expression compared to those who died from breast cancer (p = 0.02 and p = 0.033 respectively). The disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) curves showed that higher levels of SOCS1, 3 and 7 were significant predictors of higher DFS (p = 0.015, p = 0.024 and 0.03 respectively) and OS (p = 0.005, p = 0.013 and

  16. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  17. Bilateral breast cancer : mammographic and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Jun, Hwang Yoon; Lee, Byung Chan; Lee, Kyong Sik; Lee, Yong Hee [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and clinical features of bilateral breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records(n=23) and mammograms (n=15) of 23 patients with bilateral breast cancer. Patients' age, location of the tumor and pathologic staging were determined from clinical records. Mammographic features were classified as spiculated mass, nonspiculated mass, mass with microcalcification, microcalcification only, asymmetric density, and normal. Of the 23 cases of bilateral breast cancer, 8(34.8%) were synchronous and 15(65.2%) were metachronous. Age at diagnosis of cancer in the first breast was between 27 and 59(mean 43) years ; there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between patients with synchronous and metachronous cancer. The mean interval between the diagnosis of each lesion of the metachronous pairs was 9.1 years. In 11 of 23 cases(48%), tumors were locaated in the same quadrant, and in the other 12 cases(52%), they were in different quadrant. At mammography, five of 15 metachronous cancers(33%) were similar in appearance and 10 pairs(67%) were different. In 4 of 23 cases(17%), cancer in the first breast was at stage 0 and stage 1, and in 13 of 23(57%), cancer in the second breast was at this same stage. In bilateral breast cancer, the two breasts frequently show different mammographic features. Cancer of the second breast was at an early stage; this suggest that regular examination and mammography are important and can allow early detection of contralateral breast cancer.

  18. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2–4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2–4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2–4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2–4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  19. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doornaert, Patricia A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bijl, Hendrik P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ende, Piet van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Chin, Alim [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  20. Initial clinical experience with the MammoSite breast brachytherapy applicator in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the results of the initial clinical testing of the MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy applicator in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy patients were enrolled in a multicenter prospective trial testing the applicator for safety and performance. Fifty-four patients were implanted, and 43 patients were ultimately eligible for and received brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy. Patients were staged T1N0M0 with negative pathologic margins and age >45 years. A dose of 34 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions over 5 days prescribed to 1 cm from the applicator surface using 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. A minimum skin-to-balloon surface distance of 5 mm was required for treatment. Device performance, complications, and cosmesis were assessed. Results: Computed tomography imaging post-balloon inflation showed 8, 14, and 21 patients with 5-6 mm, 7-9 mm, and >10 mm of skin spacing, respectively. Two patients were explanted because of inadequate skin spacing and 7 because of suboptimal conformance of the surgical cavity to the applicator balloon. One patient was explanted because of positive nodal status and another because of age. The most common side effects related to device placement included mild erythema, drainage, pain, and echymosis. No severe side effects related to implantation, brachytherapy, or explantation occurred. Side effects related to radiation therapy were generally mild with erythema, pain, and dry desquamation being the most common. At 1 month, 88% of patients were evaluated as having good-to-excellent cosmetic results. Conclusions: The MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy applicator performed well clinically. All eligible patients completed treatment. Side effects were mild to moderate and self-limiting. Skin-balloon surface distance and balloon-cavity conformance were the main factors limiting the initial use of the device

  1. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival

  2. Effectiveness of a thoracic multidisciplinary clinic in the treatment of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman EL; Kruklitis RJ; Patson BJ; Sopka DM; Weiss MJ

    2016-01-01

    Eliot L Friedman,1 Robert J Kruklitis,2 Brian J Patson,1 Dennis M Sopka,3 Michael J Weiss4 1Division of Hematology-Medical Oncology, 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Health Systems Research and Innovation, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA, USAIntroduction: The Institute of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the European Society of Medical Oncology promote a multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of ca...

  3. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common treatment for all stages of lip and oral cavity cancer. Surgery may include the following: Wide local excision : Removal ... cancer may have spread from the lip and oral cavity. Plastic surgery : An operation that restores or improves the appearance ...

  4. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials. PMID:17957502

  5. Routine use of dual time 18F-FDG PET for staging of preoperative lung cancer. Does it affect clinical management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to single-time-point 18F-FDG PET for staging of preoperative lung cancer. Between November 2008 and December 2009, 107 patients who were diagnosed as having lung cancer or strongly suspected of having lung cancer were enrolled. They underwent dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET following conventional imaging. Dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET imaging (whole body) was performed at 1-h (early) post-FDG injection and repeated (2 h delayed) after injection. The diagnostic accuracy of pre-PET staging and post-PET staging was retrospectively evaluated, and the diagnostic accuracy of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET was compared to that of single-time-point 18F-FDG PET. In 100 patients, the early 18F-FDG PET scan resulted in upstaging of the tumor in ten (10%) and down-staging of the tumor in five (5%) compared to the conventional scan. The delayed phase of 18F-FDG PET provided no additional information on staging for lung cancer patients. The remaining seven patients were diagnosed as not having lung cancer. This study confirmed that dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET is useful for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant lesions, but has no major impact on staging and therapeutic management of patients with pathologically proven lung cancer. (author)

  6. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  7. Contribution of SLN investigation with 99mTc-nanocolloid in clinical staging of thyroid cancer: technical feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a matter of controversy whether prophylactic lymph node dissection improves prognosis and survival in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients without suspicion of lymph node metastases either clinically or on ultrasonography. It is possible that in such patients the use of lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, as are employed for other tumours, will be of assistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of preoperative 99mTc-nanocolloid lymphoscintigraphy and an intra-operative SLN procedure in the management of PTC patients. Twenty-five consecutive patients were entered in the study between April 2005 and October 2005. All had a preoperative diagnosis of malignancy obtained by fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), without clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of loco-regional lymph node involvement. Patients underwent preoperative lymphoscintigraphy after the injection of 99mTc-nanocolloid [median 6 MBq (range 4-9 MBq) in 0.1-0.2 ml saline injected intratumorally under ultrasound guidance] and an intra-operative SLN procedure using a hand-held gamma probe. Surgery was performed by the same surgeon in all patients. Preoperative lymphoscintigraphy identified at least one SLN in all patients. During surgery, using the gamma probe, the surgeon was able to find at least one SLN in all cases. A good correlation was found between preoperative imaging and probe results. Metastasis was found in at least one SLN in 12 (48%) patients. In seven (28%) patients the involved SLN was the most radioactive SLN, while in five (20%) patients a less radioactive SLN was involved by malignancy. Ten of these 12 patients had only micrometastases (<2 mm). Micrometastases were found in the most radioactive SLN in six cases and in less radioactive SLNs in four cases, while in two patients more lymph nodes visualised at lymphoscintigraphy ipsilateral to the primary tumour were sites of metastasis. The rate of nodal involvement was very high in our

  8. Clinical efficacy of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and toxicities of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in the treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 40 patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC who were admitted from January 2010 to August 2012. The prescribed dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the primary gross tumor volume and was 54 Gy in 30 fractions to the planning target volume. All patients received induction chemotherapy,31 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and 22 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy; the platinum-based chemotherapy combined with etoposide or teniposide was adopted. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (25 Gy in 10 fractions) was administered to 17 patients. The short-term tumor response was evaluated by RECIST 1.0, and radiation-related toxicities were assessed by CTCAE 4.0. Overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The short-term tumor response rate was 98%. The follow-up rate was 100%. Twenty-two patients were followed up for at least 2 years. The 1-and 2-year OS rates were 84% and 48%, respectively; the LRFS rates were 89% and 85%, respectively; the PFS rates were 61% and 41%, respectively. Grade 0-1 radiation-related pneumonia was observed in 65% (26/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 25% (10/40),grade 3 in 5% (2/40), and grade 5 in 5% (2/40). Grade 0-1 radiation-related esophagitis was observed in 53% (21/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 43% (17/40), and grade 3 in 5 % (2/40). Conclusions: Preliminary results from this study suggested that IMRT combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation is safe and effective in patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC and is worth further evaluation in a large, prospective, randomized study. (authors)

  9. Clinical efficacy and safety of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for Stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lu; Guo, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Cai, Jing; Xiong, Zhoufang; Dong, Weihong; Min, Jie; Wang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods: We reviewed patients with cervical cancer of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IIB who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) with paclitaxel plus carboplatin followed by radical hysterectomy (NACT group) or on...

  10. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J.

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine. PMID:26776196

  11. Low RBM3 Protein Expression Correlates with Clinical Stage, Prognostic Classification and Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Testicular Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Sven-Erik; Nodin, Björn; Gaber, Alexander; Eberhard, Jakob; Uhlén, Mathias; Jirström, Karin; Jerkeman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate with favourable clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in several cancer diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and prognostic ability of RBM3 in patients with testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT). Patients and Methods Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 206 patients. Chi-square test was applied to analyze associations between RBM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the impact of RBM3 expression on cancer-specific survival (CSS) and failure-free survival (FFS). Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relative risk for failure. Results In the entire cohort, there was a significant association between clinical stage (p=0.044) and RBM3 expression. Weak RBM3 expression correlated with a significantly reduced FFS [79.3% versus 90.4% (p=0.019)] and CSS [87.5% versus 97.3% (p=0.047)]. For patients with metastatic disease (n = 88), significant associations were found between RBM3 expression and IGCCC group (p=0.007). The FFS was significantly inferior for patients with low tumour-specific RBM3 expression [59.3% versus 79.0% (p=0.013)], and this association remained significant in a multivariable model for patients with metastatic disease (HR=3.67; 95% CI 1.14, 11.89). Conclusion Low RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of treatment failure in metastatic NSGCT, in relation to the prognostic factors included in the International Germ Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC). These findings suggest that RBM3 may be a potential biomarker for treatment stratification in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours, and therefore merit further validation. PMID:25811459

  12. Transesophageal ultrasonography for lung cancer staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging are...

  13. Feasibility of perfusion CT technique integrated into conventional {sup 18}FDG/PET-CT studies in lung cancer patients: clinical staging and functional information in a single study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Davide; Capraro, Cristina; Sironi, Sandro [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H.S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 11, Monza, Milan (Italy); Guerra, Luca [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Unit - Molecular Bioimaging Centre, Monza (Italy); De Ponti, Elena [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Messa, Cristina [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Unit - Molecular Bioimaging Centre, Monza (Italy); Tecnomed Foundation, University of Milano-Bicocca, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, National Research Council, Milan (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    To assess the additional functional vascular information and the relationship between perfusion measurements and glucose metabolism (SUVmax) obtained by including a perfusion CT study in a whole-body contrast-enhanced PET/CT protocol in primary lung cancer lesions. Enrolled in this prospective study were 34 consecutive patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of lung cancer who were referred for contrast-enhanced PET/CT staging. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Perfusion CT was performed with the following parameters: 80 kV, 200 mAs, 30 scans during intravenous injection of 50 ml contrast agent, flow rate 5 ml/s. Another bolus of contrast medium (3.5 ml/s, 80 ml, 60-s delay) was administered to ensure a full diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT scan for clinical staging. The perfusion CT data were used to calculate a range of tumour vascularity parameters (blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time), and tumour FDG uptake (SUVmax) was used as a metabolic indicator. Quantitative and functional parameters were compared and in relation to location, histology and tumour size. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was used for statistical analysis. A cut-off value of 3 cm was used according to the TNM classification to discriminate between T1 and T2 tumours (i.e. T1b vs. T2a). There were significant perfusion differences (lower blood volumes and higher mean transit time) between tumours with diameter >30 mm and tumours with diameter <30 mm (p < 0.05; blood volume 5.6 vs. 7.1 ml/100 g, mean transit time 8.6 vs. 3.9 s, respectively). Also there was a trend for blood flow to be lower in larger lesions (p < 0.053; blood flow 153.1 vs. 98.3 ml/100 g tissue/min). Significant inverse correlations (linear regression) were found between blood volume and SUVmax in tumours with diameter >30 mm in diameter. Perfusion CT combined with PET/CT is feasible technique that may provide

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Stage IV lung cancer: Is cure possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Thippeswamy; Vanita Noronha; Vamshi Krishna; Amit Joshi; Munita Meenu Bal; Nilendu Purandare; Rangarajan, V.; Pramesh, C. S.; Sabita Jiwnani; Kumar Prabhash

    2013-01-01

    Reporting a case, 53 years old male with stage IV Nonsamall cell lung cancer in view of cytologically proven malignant pleural effusion. Usually the management of stage IV lung cancer is with palliative intent where the patient receives palliative chemotherapy along with palliative radiotherapy and surgery if required. Most of the data on curative management of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer includes patient with adrenal metastasis and some reports with brain metastasis. There is ...

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation therapy . Mohs microsurgery . A clinical trial of laser therapy . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer clinical ... nodes in the groin ). External or internal radiation therapy followed by ... clinical trial of laser surgery . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer ...

  17. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... oncology nurse and a registered dietitian. Read More "Screening For Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer ...

  18. The staging and classification of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary theme of this chapter is to place in perspective the process and purpose of tumor staging for both the oncologist and the radiologist. The foundation used for this discussion will be the Manual for Staging of Cancer-1983, published by the American Joint Committee for Cancer. Because the specifics of staging and classification by body site will be the province of the chapters that follow, only a broad discussion of the principles and applications of this system is given

  19. The classification and staging of cancerous growths of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter authors give information about frequency of cancerous growths of the anal canal, general analysis of observations the classification and staging of cancerous growths of the anal canal, clinical-anatomy classification of cancerous growths of the anal canal and staging of cancerous growths of anal canal

  20. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  1. 早期宫颈癌(Ⅰb-Ⅱa期)预后相关因素的回顾性分析%Clinical outcome following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for early-stage cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Wang; Suhui Wu; Zehua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the impact of parametrial infiltration and lymph node metastasis on clinical outcome in women with early-stage cervical cancer following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods: Clinical re-cords and pathologic slides of 532 patients with early-stage cervical cancer (330 Ib and 202 Ila) treated with radical hyster-ectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were reviewed. The study group comprised 520 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 12 patients with adenocarcinoma of the cervix. Median follow-up time was 67 months. The association among the various histopathologic predictors of outcome was determined with analysis. The influence of the predictors on outcome was exam-ined with log rank survival methods and the Cox regression model. Results: FIGO stage, histologic type, tumor size, depth of invasion, parametrial infiltration, lymph node metastasis, and remote metastasis were identified as significantly biologically relevant and therefore were included as candidate predictors in multivariate analysis. In particular, parametrial infiltration and lymph node metastasis were found to be simultaneous predictors of death on multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). After controlling for these two factors, the other variables considered were not statistically significant up to a two-way interaction. Conclusion: Presence of parametrial infiltration and/or lymph node metastasis in women with early-stage cervical cancer is an indepen-dent poor prognostic factor. In addition, the relatively poor survival of women with more than one lymph nodes identified with cancer cells.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Franchin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88% of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67, the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4 resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; P=0.04, while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx was not significant (P=0.35. Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Combined with Chemotherapy in Stages III-IV Hypopharynx-Larynx Cancer: Treatment Compliance and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. Retrospective review of our experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) combined with chemotherapy as the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced larynx and hypopharynx cancers. Materials and Methods. Between September 2008 and June 2012, 60 patients (26 with larynx and 34 hypopharynx cancers) were treated. Our policy was to offer SIB-IMRT plus concurrent cisplatin to patients affected by larynx cancer stage T3N0-N1 and NCT with TPF (docetaxel/cisplatin/fluorouracil) followed by SIB-IMRT to patients with larynx cancer stage T2-4N2-3 or hypopharynx cancer T2-4N0-3. SIB-IMRT consisted in a total dose of 70.95 Gy (2.15 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the gross primary and nodal disease and differentiated dosages for high risk and low risk nodal regions. Results. Complete remission was achieved in 53/60 (88%) of patients. At a median follow up of 31 months (range 9–67), the rate of overall survival and locoregional control with functional larynx at 3 years were 68% and 60%, respectively. T stage (T1–3 versus T4) resulted in being significant for predicting 3-year freedom from relapse (it was 69% and 35%, resp., for T1–T3 and T4 tumors; (Ρ =0.35),while site of primary disease (larynx versus hypopharynx) was not significant (Ρ =0.35). Conclusion. Our results indicated that combining SIB-IMRT with induction chemotherapy or concurrent chemotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for organ preservation in advanced larynx/hypopharynx cancer.

  4. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer follow-up of patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00459628

  5. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  6. “EXHALE”: exercise as a strategy for rehabilitation in advanced stage lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of 12 weeks supervised exercise intervention versus usual care for advanced stage lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Quist, Morten; Langer, Seppo W.; Rørth, Mikael; Christensen, Karl Bang; Adamsen, Lis

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physical training can address these issues. However, there is a lack of decisive evidence regarding the effect of physical exercise in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluat...

  7. [Current MRI staging of rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietek, B M; Kratt, T

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the second most prevalent cause for cancer, and has very variable outcomes. Advancements in surgery, the change from adjuvant to neo-adjuvant radio-chemo-therapies as well as in clinical diagnostics have improved the prognosis for patients in a multi-modal therapy concept. An accurate primary staging including a reliable prediction of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has established MR Imaging (MRI) beside intraluminal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). MRI facilitates the selection of patients likely to benefit from a preoperative therapy, especially in cases of unfavorable factors. Currently the relationship of the tumor to the mesorectal fascia has become a more important prognostic factor than the T-staging, particularly for surgical therapy. In addition further prognostic factors like the depth of infiltration into the perirectal fat and the extramural venous infiltration (EMVI) have important impact on therapy and prognosis. High resolution MRI has proved useful in clarifying the relationship between the tumor and the mesorectal fascia, which represents the CRM at the total mesorectal excision (TME) especially in the upper and middle third. Preoperative evaluation of the other prognostic factors as well as the nodal status is still difficult. It is used increasingly not only for primary staging but also progressively for the monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. The addition of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an interesting option for the improvement of response evaluation. The following overview provides an introduction of MRI diagnosis as well as its importance for the evaluation of the clinically relevant prognostic factors leading to an improvement of therapy and prognosis of patients with rectal carcinoma. PMID:22893486

  8. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  9. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  10. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods and ... toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , wires, or catheters ...

  11. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure, high levels of estrogen, and a family history of breast cancer can increase a man’s risk ... also show the dimpled appearance called peau d’orange (like the skin of an orange). There may ...

  12. Stages of Childhood Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... β-hCG) or a protein called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Other cancers and certain noncancer conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatitis , can also increase AFP levels. Complete blood count (CBC) : A procedure in ...

  13. Radiological staging of bronchogenic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staging of the bronchogenic carcinoma is based on the TNM code; radiological imaging and radionuclide scanning account for most of the preoperative assessment of the tumor stage. A series of 206 patients was evaluated by chest radiography, mediastinal and hilar tomography, CT of the thorax, upper abdomen and brain. The pathological correlations performed after surgery showed that CT provided a correct T in 175 patients out of 206 (= 84.9%), while conventional radiology gave only 120 correct diagnoses (58.2%). In assessment of N1, sensitivity was 53%, specificity 85.3%, diagnostic accuracy 77.7%. Pertinent figures for N2 were 81.8 - 88.3 - 86.9%. The reliability of CT in staging for M is difficult to assess, because tha majority of patients who showed distant metastases were not operated upon. The main problems concerning evaluation criteria for staging are discussed. (Author)

  14. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Inage T; Nakajima T; Yoshino I

    2014-01-01

    Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinoscopy is k...

  15. Staging lung cancer: role of endobronchial ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Terunaga Inage, Takahiro Nakajima, Ichiro Yoshino Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Accurate staging is the first step in the management of lung cancer. Nodal staging is quite important for physicians to be able to judge the primary operability of patients harboring no distant metastasis. For many years, mediastinoscopy has been considered a “gold standard” modality for nodal staging. Mediastinosc...

  16. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joe Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Methods Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. Results At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3. Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUVmax on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034. Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005. Conclusions OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively.

  17. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS) time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3). Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUV)max on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034). Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005). OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively

  18. Current Controversies in Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brett W; Godoy, Myrna C B; Wu, Carol C; Erasmus, Jeremy J; Truong, Mylene T

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, and accurate staging of disease plays an important role in the formulation of treatment strategies and optimization of patient outcomes. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has recently proposed changes to the upcoming eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM-8) staging system used for lung cancer. This revised classification is based on significant differences in patient survival identified on analysis of a new large international database of lung cancer cases. Key changes include: further modifications to the T descriptors based on 1 cm increments in tumor size; grouping of tumors resulting in partial or complete lung atelectasis/pneumonitis; grouping of tumors involving a main bronchus with respect to distance from the carina; reassignment of diaphragmatic invasion; elimination of mediastinal pleural invasion as a descriptor; and further subdivision of metastatic disease into distinct descriptors based on the number of extrathoracic metastases and involved organs. Because of these changes, several new stage groups have been developed, and others have shifted. Although TNM-8 represents continued improvement upon modifications previously made to the staging system, reflecting an evolving understanding of tumor behavior and patient management, several limitations and unaddressed issues persist. Understanding the proposed revisions to TNM-8 and awareness of key limitations and potential controversial issues still unaddressed will allow radiologists to accurately stage patients with lung cancer and optimize treatment decisions. PMID:27306388

  19. Genomic aberrations relate early and advanced stage ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zaal; W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); M.E.L. van der Burg (Maria); J.H.W. Veerbeek (Jan ); J.B. Trimbos; I. Cadron (Isabelle); P.J. van Diest (Paul); W.N. Wieringen (Wessel); O. Krijgsman (Oscar); G.A. Meijer (Gerrit); J.M.J. Piek (Jurgen ); P.J. Timmers (Petra); I. Vergote (Ignace); R.H.M. Verheijen (René); B. Ylstra (Bauke); R.P. Zweemer (Ronald )

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Because of the distinct clinical presentation of early and advanced stage ovarian cancer, we aim to clarify whether these disease entities are solely separated by time of diagnosis or whether they arise from distinct molecular events. Methods Sixteen early and sixteen advanced

  20. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 ± 4.82 Gy (51.53 ± 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia

  1. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  2. [Staging Based Strategies and Practice for Prostate Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Shu-sheng; Bai, Zun-guang; Wang, Zhao-hui; Lv, Li-guo; Gu, Chi-ming; Xiang, Song-tao; Dai, Rui-xin; Zhu, Shou-lun

    2016-06-01

    Authors raised that staging based strategies and practice of integrative medicine (IM) by combining syndrome typing and disease identification, and choosing suitable measures in accordance with different persons and seasonal conditions after more than ten years' clinical practice and researches. Radical operation as prior (as evil eliminating) and strengthening vital qi in perioerative period are best strategy for promoting rapid rehabilitation of early stage prostate cancer patients. Strengthening body resistance to eliminate evil was used in treating advanced prostate cancer patients. For example, a comprehensive treatment program for hormone-dependent patients was combined with endocrinotherapy and Chinese herbs for synergisic efficacy-enhancing actions. In this way, these patients' quality of life (QOL) were improved and time to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) was delayed, even some patients were clinically cured. There are lack of effective medicines and methods for CRPC patients. Greatly tonifying original qi is mainly used for improving their clinical symptoms and prolonging survivals. Practice has proved staging based strategies and practice of IM has favorable advantages in treating prostate cancer, especially showing prospect in prolonging survival and postponing progression of advanced prostate cancer patients. Besides, it also could provide beneficial considerations and inspiration for combination of syndrome typing and disease identification. PMID:27491237

  3. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by stage How are nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers staged? Staging is a process that tells ... cavity or ethmoid sinuses. T categories for maxillary sinus cancer TX: Primary (main) tumor cannot be assessed. ...

  4. Staging Lung Cancer: Current Controversies and Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Riyad Karmy-Jones; Hyland, Robert H.; Lewis, Joseph W; Paul Kvale

    1997-01-01

    A consistent approach to staging is required for the rational management of lung cancer. This paper was prepared at the request of the Standards Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and reviews and discusses the relative merits of the available methods of staging. Whichever methods are chosen by a particular institution, the following points must be stressed. No patient can be considered automatically "unresectable" when chest radiography and/ or computed tomography demonstrate adenopa...

  5. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com [Carle Cancer Center and University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, Robert B. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  6. Dosimetric and clinical comparison between MammoSite and interstitial HDR brachytherapy in treatment of early stage breast cancer after conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To comparatively study dosimetric evaluation, side effects in early and late stage, and cosmetic outcome between MammoSite and interstitial using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early stage breast cancer patient after conserving surgery. Methods: From January 2004 to December 2004, 10 breast cancer cases were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after Lumpectomy surgery, 6 cases with interstitial brachytherapy, 4 cases with MammoSite. Sources were placed during the operation in all patients, distance from cavity to skin > 5-7 mm in interstitial brachytherapy group, one case is 6.5 mm, 3 cases > 10 mm in MammoSite group. Treatment Target area is 20 mm away from cavity in interstitial brachytherapy group with DHI 0.77, 10 mm away from Balloon margin in MammoSite with DHI 0.73. Results: Follow up 12-24 months while median follow-up was 18 months for the whole group (100%). During the treatment, grade III acute reactions were not seen in both group, grade I or II were seen including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection. More late toxicity reaction including skin fibrosis, breast tenderness and fat necrosis were observed in interstitial brachytherapy group than that of MammoSite group. Cosmetic outcome evaluation were excellent in 12 months 100% (patient) and 83% (doctor) in interstitial brachytherapy, 100% in MammoSite group, respectively, none recurrence. Conclusions: Interstitial brachytherapy shows more uniformity in dose distribution as well as larger treatment volume, while MammoSite tends to be stable in repeatability and easy in use. Both groups show excellent cosmetic results, with same acute and late reactions. (authors)

  7. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT

  8. Mediastinal Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In the absence of distant metastases, lung cancer treatment is determined by the results of mediastinal lymph node staging. Occult mediastinal lymph node metastases can be missed by radiologic and needle-based staging methods. Aggressive staging of mediastinal lymph nodes improves staging accuracy. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging results in more appropriate lung cancer treatment. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging can improve stage-specific survival from lung cancer. PMID:27261911

  9. Surveillance in stage I testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Rørth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Treatment results on 695 stage I testicular cancer patients followed with surveillance are described. Seminoma (SGCT) was present in 394 patients and nonseminoma (NSGCT) in 301 patients. Relapses were detected in 155 patients (22%), in 69 patients with SGCT (17%) and 86 with NSGCT (29%). In...

  10. Clinical efficacy and safety of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for Stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Guo, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Cai, Jing; Xiong, Zhoufang; Dong, Weihong; Min, Jie; Wang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods: We reviewed patients with cervical cancer of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IIB who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) with paclitaxel plus carboplatin followed by radical hysterectomy (NACT group) or only received primary radical surgery (PRS group) in our hospital between Jan 2007 and Jan 2012. Toxicity, NACT response, surgery pathological factors and survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: In the NACT group, the overall response rate was 71.3% (82/115). Eighteen (15.7%) patients achieved complete remission. Well differentiated tumors showed a more favorable response to NACT (P=0.011). Myelosuppression was the most common adverse effect (51.7%) and serious adverse effects were rare (3.4%). The median follow-up period was 44 months (range, 6-75). The NACT responders had significantly longer OS and PFS when compared to the non-NACT responders and patients in the PRS group. Conclusion: Patients with LACC can benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel plus carboplatin when they have response to the chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26550314

  11. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  12. Radical radiotherapy for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer in clinical stage I: a retrospective analysis of 149 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In order to obtain the standard treatment results of medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Stage I in the post-CT scan era, a retrospective analysis of patients who were treated by radical radiotherapy was performed. Methods and materials: 149 cases treated between 1980 and 1989 were accumulated from ten large hospitals in Japan. All patients received a total dose of 55-75 Gy (mean 64.7 Gy) with conventional fractionation. For evaluation of treatment results, complete response (CR) rate, median survival period and long-termed survival rates were used. Results: The median survival of the all cases was 27.2 months and the actuarial 3- and 5-year survival rates were 34.2% and 22.2%, respectively. CR was obtained in 57 cases (38%). The CR rate was strongly correlated with the long-term survival (5-year survival rate in CR group: 35.1% compared with PR + NC group: 14.1% (P<0.0001)). The size of tumor was also of prognostic importance. In 116 patients who died within 5 years after treatment, 66 patients (57%) died of local tumor regrowth. Conclusion: Although the medically inoperable NSCLC patients in Stage I should be offered curative radiation therapy, development of some new steps to increase the CR rate and local control rate is urgently needed

  13. ESUR guidelines: ovarian cancer staging and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Sala, Evis [University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kinkel, Karen [Geneva University Hospital, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland); Spencer, John A. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Guidelines for ovarian cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 12 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. Computed tomography (CT) with coverage of the base of the lungs to the inguinal region is regarded as the imaging technique of choice for preoperative staging. Critical diagnostic criteria are presented and the basis for a structured report for preoperative staging is outlined. Following primary treatment for ovarian cancer, clinical assessment and CA-125 are routinely used to monitor patients. For suspected recurrence, CT remains the imaging modality of choice, with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT emerging as the optimal imaging technique for suspected recurrence, particularly in patients with negative CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and detection of recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  14. Dual modality CT/PET imaging in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic capability of PET-HCT image fusion and helical computed tomography (HCT) for nodal and distant metastases detection in patients with lung cancer. Material and methods: Between February, 2003 and March, 2004 sixty-six consecutive lung cancer patients (45 men and 21 women, mean ages: 63 years old, range: 38 to 96 years old) who underwent HCT and PET-HCT fusion imaging were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had histological confirmation of lung cancer and a definitive diagnosis established on the basis of pathology results and/or clinical follow-up. Results: For global nodal staging (hilar and mediastinal) HCT showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 72%, 47%, 62% and 58% respectively, versus 94%, 77%, 83% and 92% corresponding to PET-HCT examination. For assessment of advanced nodal stage (N3) PET-HCT showed values of 92%, 100%, 100% and 98% respectively. For detection of distant metastasis, HCT alone had values of 67%, 93%, 84% and 83% respectively versus 100%, 98%, 96% and 100% for the PET-HCT fusion imaging. In 20 (30%) patients under-staged or over-staged on the basis of HCT results, PET-HCT allowed accurate staging. Conclusions: PET-HCT fusion imaging was more effective than HCT alone for nodal and distant metastasis detection and oncology staging. (author)

  15. Clinical Perspective of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nilesh; Gaitonde, Krishnanath

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men today. It largely affects men in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Screening for prostate cancer, though controversial, is still the only way to detect early prostate cancer. Multiple newer options such as blood tests and genetic markers are being used in the clinical domain today to improve cancer detection and avoid unnecessary biopsies. To date, biopsy of the prostate remains the only modality to stratify the grade of cancer. Significant improvements in the imaging technology have improved localizing and detecting the disease. Treatment of prostate cancer is stratified on the basis of the grade and volume of the disease. There are multiple treatment options involved in the management of prostate cancer. Treatment of localized prostate cancer still continues to have very high cure rates and long-term cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:27187167

  16. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. A comparison of tumor motion characteristics between early stage and locally advanced stage lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With the increasing use of conformal radiation therapy methods for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is necessary to accurately determine respiratory-induced tumor motion. The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the motion characteristics of early and locally advanced stage NSCLC tumors in a large population and correlate tumor motion with position, volume, and diaphragm motion. Methods and materials: A total of 191 (94 early stage, 97 locally advanced) non-small cell lung tumors were analyzed for this study. Each patient received a four-dimensional CT scan prior to receiving radiation treatment. A soft-tissue-based rigid registration algorithm was used to track the tumor motion. Tumor volumes were determined based on the gross tumor volume delineated by physicians in the end of expiration phase. Tumor motion characteristics were correlated with their standardized tumor locations, lobe location, and clinical staging. Diaphragm motion was calculated by subtracting the diaphragm location between the expiration and the inspiration phases. Results: Median, max, and 95th percentile of tumor motion for early stage tumors were 5.9 mm, 31.0 mm, and 20.0 mm, which were 1.2 mm, 12 mm, and 7 mm more than those in locally advanced NSCLC, respectively. The range of motion at 95th percentile is more than 50% larger in early stage lung cancer group than in the locally advanced lung cancer group. Early stage tumors in the lower lobe showed the largest motion with a median motion of 9.2 mm, while upper/mid-lobe tumors exhibited a median motion of 3.3 mm. Tumor volumes were not correlated with motion. Conclusion: The range of tumor motion differs depending on tumor location and staging of NSCLC. Early stage tumors are more mobile than locally advanced stage NSCLC. These factors should be considered for general motion management strategies when 4D simulation is not performed on individual basis.

  18. Study on the relationship between spiral CT Imaging findings and the clinical stages of stomach cancer%胃癌螺旋CT影像学表现与临床分期关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞殿中

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship beween the imaging futures and the clinical stage in patients with gastric cancer so as to assess the prcoperauve staging and to facilitate the treatment. Methods: 45 patients with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer patients underwent the preoperative low tension of water filling phase enhanced helical CT scan. The CT maximal diameter and thickness, strengthening side, and the thickness of peritumoral low density zone on three-dimensional image were compared with the intraoperative and postoperative pathological findings. Results;The thickness of lesionsi strengthened degree, and tumor low density zone thickness of the stomach cancer are closely related to the clinical stage. Conclusion: Enhanced spiral CT examination for gastric cancer can precisely assess the preoperative staging of gastric cancer and benefit to surgical selection and evaluation of prognosis.%目的:探讨胃癌患者CT影像学表现与胃癌临床分期关系的研究,做好胃癌患者术前分期评估,以利治疗.方法:采用西门子6层螺旋CT.对45例经病理证实为胃癌患者,术前行低张力水充盈螺旋CT三期增强扫描,将CT三维图像上肿瘤最大直径与厚度、强化方程度、肿瘤瘤周低密度区厚度.与术中大体病理及术后病理进行对照.结果:成像后病灶厚度、强化程度及瘤周低密度区厚度与胃癌临床分期密切相关(P<0.05).结论:增强螺旋CT对胃癌检查,可以为明确胃癌术前分期、选择术式及评估预后作出选择.

  19. Positron emission tomography with selected mediastinoscopy compared to routine mediastinoscopy offers cost and clinical outcome benefits for pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is an important staging procedure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to demonstrate, through a decision tree model and the incorporation of real costs of each component, that routine FDG-PET imaging as a prelude to curative surgery will reduce requirements for routine mediastinoscopy and overall hospital costs. A decision tree model comparing routine whole-body FDG-PET imaging to routine staging mediastinoscopy was used, with baseline variables of sensitivity, specificity and prevalence of non-operable and metastatic disease obtained from institutional data and a literature review. Costings for hospital admissions for mediastinoscopy and thoracotomy of actual patients with NSCLC were determined. The overall and average cost of managing patients was then calculated over a range of FDG-PET costs to derive projected cost savings to the community. The prevalence of histologically proven mediastinal involvement in patients with NSCLC presenting for surgical assessment at our institution is 20%, and the prevalence of distant metastatic disease is 6%. Based on literature review, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for detection of mediastinal spread are 84% and 89% respectively, and for mediastinoscopy, 81% and 100%. The average cost of mediastinoscopy for NSCLC in our institution is AUD$4,160, while that of thoracotomy is AUD$15,642. The cost of an FDG-PET scan is estimated to be AUD$1,500. Using these figures and the decision tree model, the average cost saving is AUD$2,128 per patient. Routine FDG-PET scanning with selective mediastinoscopy will save AUD$2,128 per patient and will potentially reduce inappropriate surgery. These cost savings remain robust over a wide range of disease prevalence and FDG-PET costs. (orig.)

  20. Survival Advantage Associated with Decrease in Stage at Detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    John Hoff; Lauren Baldwin; Jason Lefringhouse; Edward Pavlik; Rachel Miller; Christopher DeSimone; Frederick Ueland; Thomas Tucker; Richard Kryscio; van Nagell, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to document the survival advantage of lowering stage at detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Treatment outcomes and survival were evaluated in patients with Stage IIIA and Stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer treated from 2000 to 2009 at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (UKMCC) and SEER institutions. Results. Cytoreduction to no visible disease (P < 0.0001) and complete response to platinum-based chemot...

  1. Five-year follow-up of treatment outcomes in patients with early-stage breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes treated with no lymph node dissection or axillary clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Daigo Yamamoto,1 Kanji Tanaka,2 Yu T subota,1 Noriko Sueoka,1 Tetsuji Shoji,3 Kayoko Kuwana,1 A-Hon Kwon11Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, 2Ribon-Rose Tanaka Kanji Breast Clinic, 3Shoji Clinic, Osaka, JapanBackground: Sentinel lymph node biopsy has steadily replaced axillary lymph node dissection (ALND for staging clinically node-negative breast cancer. However, ALND remains standard management of the axilla when a tumor-positive sentinel lymph node is identified.Methods: We identified 460 patients with breast cancer (clinically T1/T2N0M0 from the database for 1999–2004. Patient age ranged from 26 to 81 (median 50 years. Patients who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery with or without ALND were compared for regional recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival.Results: Patients with ALND (n = 308 were compared with the no ALND group (n = 152. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival were not significantly different between the two groups, while there was a significant difference between them for regional recurrence. Of the 152 patients who did not undergo axillary dissection, four developed ipsilateral axillary disease, most of whom were rescued by delayed axillary dissection. Further, the criterion for identifying lymphedema was used, ie, a 2 cm circumferential change at any measured location. As a result, the incidence of lymphedema in the ALND group was 12.7%, while it was not seen in the non ALND group.Conclusion: There is a possibility that ALND may be omitted for cT1/T2N0M0 breast cancer through a combination of hormone therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy.Keywords: breast cancer, axillary lymph node dissection

  2. Cost-effectiveness of a 21-gene recurrence score assay versus Canadian clinical practice in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axillary lymph-node negative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay may inform adjuvant systematic treatment decisions in women with early stage breast cancer. We sought to investigate the cost effectiveness of using the RS-assay versus current clinical practice (CCP) in women with early-stage estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-positive, axilliary lymph-node negative breast cancer (ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC) from the perspective of the Canadian public healthcare system. We developed a Markov model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of ESBC. We evaluated adjuvant therapy separately in post- and pre-menopausal women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. We assumed that the RS-assay would reclassify pre- and post-menopausal women among risk levels (low, intermediate and high) and guide adjuvant systematic treatment decisions. The model was parameterized using 7 year follow up data from the Manitoba Cancer Registry, cost data from Manitoba administrative databases, and secondary sources. Costs are presented in 2010 CAD. Future costs and benefits were discounted at 5%. The RS-assay compared to CCP generated cost-savings in pre-menopausal women and had an ICER of $60,000 per QALY gained in post-menopausal women. The cost effectiveness was most sensitive to the proportion of women classified as intermediate risk by the RS-assay who receive adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of relapse in the RS-assay model. The RS-assay is likely to be cost effective in the Canadian healthcare system and should be considered for adoption in women with ER+/ PR + LN- ESBC. However, ongoing assessment and validation of the assay in real-world clinical practice is warranted

  3. Staging colorectal cancer with the TNM 7(th)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puppa, Giacomo; Poston, Graeme; Jess, Per; Nash, Guy F; Coenegrachts, Kenneth; Stang, Axel

    2013-01-01

    distant metastasis) or M1 (presence of distant metastasis), having access to the completeness of data resulting from clinical examination, imaging workup and pathology report. However this important change doesn't take into account the diagnostic value and the challenge of small indeterminate visceral...... lesions encountered, in particular, during radiological staging of patients with colorectal cancer. In this article the diagnosis of these lesions with multiple imaging modalities, their frequency, significance and relevance to staging and disease management are described in a multidisciplinary way. In...... particular the interplay between clinical, radiological and pathological staging, which are usually conducted independently, is discussed. The integrated approach shows that there are both advantages and disadvantages to abandoning the MX category. To avoid ambiguity arising both by applying and interpreting...

  4. Bicalutamide monotherapy for early stage prostate cancer: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter

    The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer.......The current evidence is considered to support 150 mg of the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide for early stage prostate cancer....

  5. MRI in staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging of lung cancer. Currently available methods of imaging lung cancer, lymph node and distant metastases by MRI are explained. At present, MRI is mainly used in the detection of cerebral metastases and assessment of infiltration of the thoracic wall and of the mediastinum. The capabilities of T2-weighted single-shot TSE (HASTE) and T1-weighted 3D gradient echo techniques (VIBE) are demonstrated. With the advent of new fast sequences like HASTE and VIBE the spatial resolution comes close to that of computed tomography but with an outstanding soft tissue contrast and without radiation exposure. The introduction of lymph node specific contrast media will improve sensitivity and specificity in N staging. Additionally, whole-body MRI is capable of detecting distant metastases, in particular in the organs at risk, i.e. brain, upper abdomen and musculoskeletal system. MRI is gaining importance as part of a multimodal imaging approach for staging of lung cancer. (orig.)

  6. A modified hypoxia-based TCP model to investigate the clinical outcome of stereotactic hypofractionated regimes for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, L.; Benassi, M.; Sarnelli, A.; Polico, R.; D' Andrea, M. [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, National Cancer Institute Regina Elena, 00144 Rome (Italy); Medical Physics Department, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei tumori, 47014 Meldola (Italy); Radiotherapy Department, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei tumori, 47014 Meldola (Italy); Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, National Cancer Institute Regina Elena, 00144 Rome (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been applied to lung tumors at different stages and sizes with good local tumor control (LC) rates. The linear quadratic model (LQM), in its basic formulation, does not seem to be appropriate to describe the response to radiotherapy for clinical trials, based on a few fractions. Thus, the main aim of this work was to develop a model, which takes into account the hypoxic cells and their reoxygenation. Methods: A parameter named B has been introduced in a modified tumor control probability (TCP) from LQM and linear-quadratic-linear model (LQLM), and represents the fraction of hypoxic cells that survive and become oxygenated after each irradiation. Based on published trials evaluating LC at 3 yr (LC3), values of B were obtained by maximum likelihood minimization between predicted TCP and clinical LC3. Two oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) parameter sets (1 and 2) from literature have been adopted to calculate the B-factors. Initial hypoxic cell fractions ({eta}{sub h}) from 0.05 to 0.50 were assumed. Log-likelihood (L) and Akaike information criterion (AIC) were determined in an independent clinical validation dataset. Results: The B-values of modified TCPs spanned the whole interval from 0 to 1, depending on the fractionation scheme (number of fractions and dose/fraction), showing a maximum (close to 1) at doses/fraction of 8-12 Gy. The B-values calculated using the OER parameter set 1 exhibited a smoother falloff than set 2. An analytical expression was derived to describe the B-value's dependence on the fractionation scheme. The R{sup 2}-adjusted values varied from 0.63 to 0.67 for LQ models and OER set 1 and from 0.75 to 0.78 for LQ model and OER set 2. Lower values of R{sup 2}-adjusted were found for LQLM and both OER sets. L and AIC, calculated using a fraction of {eta}{sub h} = 0.15 and the B-value from the authors analytical expression were higher than for other {eta}{sub h}-values, irrespective of model or

  7. A method to predict breast cancer stage using Medicare claims

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Grace L.; Shih, Ya-Chen T.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Background In epidemiologic studies, cancer stage is an important predictor of outcomes. However, cancer stage is typically unavailable in medical insurance claims datasets, thus limiting the usefulness of such data for epidemiologic studies. Therefore, we sought to develop an algorithm to predict cancer stage based on covariates available from claims-based data. Methods We identified a cohort of 77,306 women age ≥ 66 years with stage I-IV breast cancer, using the Surveillence Epidemiology an...

  8. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m2, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  9. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. Clinical presentation and staging of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallamini, Andrea; Hutchings, Martin; Ramadan, Safaa

    2016-07-01

    In the present chapter the authors present a brief overview of the diagnostic methods proposed over time for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) spread detection, moving from surgical procedures, through standard radiological and functional imaging techniques to the present state of the art for HL staging. The main body of the review will be dedicated to the recently published guidelines for lymphoma staging (including HL) agreed by the experts during the 12th International Congress for Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano. The recommendations of the panel on how to integrate flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan in the armamentarium of staging procedures will be presented and commented, with a special emphasis on the utility of special procedures, such as bone marrow trephine biopsy, which is deemed no longer needed in the PET era. While the HL diagnosis is straightforward in most cases, sometimes HL is a subtle disease, difficult to diagnose for the paucity of symptoms, the absence of physical findings, or for concomitant immunologic disorders: a compete overview of the common and rare patterns of HL clinical presentation will be also offered. The future perspective of PET scan use will be based on a operator-independent, quantitative readings of the scan thanks to a plethora of sophisticated dedicated software, which are now available, able to quantify every voxel captured by the tumor to display the metabolically active tumor volume. Moreover, new tracers are now available able to track the new pathways of cellular metabolism beside glycolysis such as amino acids or purine-analogues or specific oncoproteins; the preliminary, promising results will be reported. Preliminary results from other imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI) will be also reported. PMID:27496305

  11. SPECT imaging for breast cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate staging in breast cancer, including tumour sizing and the assessment of nodal and distant metastases, is required in order to plan surgery and post-operative therapy. Medical imaging techniques have made an important contribution to the diagnosis of carcinoma of the breast and the evaluation of local, regional and distant metastases. The study is aimed at establishing certain aspects of the diagnostic importance and priority of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in breast cancer. SPECT was carried out just after planar scintigraphy and then after intravenous injection of different radiopharmaceuticals in 45 women with histologically confirmed post-operation breast cancer. In 21 patients under loco-regional control of the disease before and/or after surgery, planar mammoscintigraphy and SPECT were conducted after intravenous injection of 99Tcm-MIBI (methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) or 99Tcm-anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) monoclonal antibody (MoAb). Bone SPECT was carried out in 24 patients when whole body scintigraphy was unable to determine the exact localization of bone metastatic lesions in the skull, thorax and pelvis. The results suggest that SPECT with 99Tcm-MIBI and 99Tcm-anti-CEA MoAb has high sensitivity and improves the results of conventional planar scintigraphy for breast cancer detection. Breast SPECT is a preferable method for tumour and lymph node imaging because of the excellent separation of the deep breast structures from the myocardium in the left breast and of the right breast from the liver, thus improving the resolution of small, deep seated lesions. SPECT improves breast cancer staging, and determines the tumour, nodule and metastasis categories, which are important for the treatment strategy and prognosis of the disease. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Lung cancer staging: a physiological update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poullis, Michael; McShane, James; Shaw, Mathew; Woolley, Steven; Shackcloth, Michael; Page, Richard; Mediratta, Neeraj

    2012-06-01

    The tumour-node metastasis (TNM) classification system is anatomically based. We investigated whether the addition of simple physiological variables, age and body mass index (BMI), would affect survival curves, i.e. a composite anatomical and physiological staging system. We retrospectively analysed a prospectively validated thoracic surgery database (n = 1981). Cox multivariate analysis was performed to determine possible significant factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed with combined anatomical and physiological factors. Cox multivariate analysis revealed age (P survival. Receiver operating curve analysis determined cut-off levels for age of 67 and BMI of 27.6. A composite anatomical and physiological survival curve based on TNM for BMI > 27.6 and age survival curves, for stage I (P Neural network analysis confirmed the importance of BMI and age above cancer stage with regard to long-term survival. Combining age 27.6 and TNM anatomical classification results in very different estimated survival curves from the usual TNM system. Patients from stages I, II and III may have survival equivalent to a stage higher or lower depending on their age and BMI. PMID:22419795

  13. Patterns of Local-Regional Failure in Completely Resected Stage IIIA(N2) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cases: Implications for Postoperative Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of local-regional failure (LRF) for completely resected stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated in our hospital and to propose a clinical target volume (CTV) for postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, consecutive patients with pT1-3N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection in our hospital but who did not receive PORT were identified. The patterns of first LRF were assessed and evaluated as to whether these areas would be encompassed by our proposed PORT CTV. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 173 of 250 patients (69.2%) experienced disease recurrence. Of the 54 patients with LRF as the first event, 48 (89%) had recurrence within the proposed PORT CTV, and 6 (11%) had failures occurring both within and outside the proposed CTV (all of which occurred in patients with right-lung cancer). Ninety-three percent of failure sites (104 of 112) would have been contained within the proposed PORT CTV. For left-sided lung cancer, the most common lymph node station failure site was 4R, followed by 7, 4L, 6, 10L, and 5. For right-sided lung cancer, the most common site was station 2R, followed by 10R, 4R, and 7. Conclusions: LRF following complete surgery was an important and potentially preventable pattern of failure in stage IIIA(N2) patients. Ipsilateral superior mediastinal recurrences dominated for right-sided tumors, whereas left-sided tumors frequently involved the bilateral superior mediastinum. Most of the LRF sites would have been covered by the proposed PORT CTV. A prospective investigation of patterns of failure after PORT (following our proposed CTV delineation guideline) is presently underway and will be reported in a separate analysis

  14. Stage 3 recommendations - the early recognition of breast cancer in Germany. Abridged version forr medical practioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aim of this level 3 good clinical practice guideline is to help physicians, women and patients in decision making about the appropriate health care for early detection of breast cancer. The principle of early detection of breast cancer comprise the detection and diagnosis of premalignant breast tumors (stage 0, Carcinoma in situ), risk reduction of cancer development as well as the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer at an early stage (stage I), with a 90% chance of cure as shown by a large number of clinical trials. To establish a nation wide, comprehensive quality assuring program for the early detection of breast cancer the guideline summarized in the following paper offers the basis for a timely mortality reduction of breast cancer. The cure of early stage disease will be additionally possible by less invasive treatment allowing patients to maintain quality of life. The guideline leads to a major improvement of women's health care. (orig.)

  15. Clinical outcomes of prospectively treated 140 women with early stage breast cancer using accelerated partial breast irradiation with 3 dimensional computerized tomography based brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the clinical outcomes of women with early breast cancer (EBC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) using 3 dimensional computerized tomography (3DCT) based planning. Materials and methods: During August 2005 to January 2013, 140 women with EBC were treated prospectively with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) MIB. After 3DCT based planning patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 #/1 week with bid regimen. Results: Median age was 57 years and tumor size 2 cm (range: 0.6–3.2 cm). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (IDC) was the most common histology; grade III tumors were seen in 82%. Median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.76 (range: 0.49–0.85). The median coverage index (CI) of the cavity was 90% (61.4–100) and 80.5% (53.6–97.4) for planning target volume (PTV). Median follow up was 60 months (1–102 months). The 5 and 7 year local control rates (LC) were 97% and 92% respectively. Her2 positivity was the only prognostic factor which had an adverse impact on LC (p = 0.01). Five and 7 year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OAS) were 93%, 84%, 97.5% and 89% respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes at last follow up were seen in 87 (77%) women. Conclusions: 3DCT based MIB results in excellent long term outcomes and good to excellent cosmesis. Her2 positivity has an adverse impact on LC rates

  16. Contemporary Clinical Management of Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkelspiel, Helen E.; Wright, Jason D.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Herzog, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the contemporary management of endometrial cancer is straightforward in many ways, novel data has emerged over the past decade that has altered the clinical standards of care while generating new controversies that will require further investigation. Fortunately most cases are diagnosed at early stages, but high-risk histologies and poorly differentiated tumors have high metastatic potential with a significantly worse prognosis. Initial management typically requires surgery, but the ...

  17. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Georgina Cosma; Giovanni Acampora; David Brown; Rees, Robert C.; Masood Khan; Graham Pockley, A.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the...

  18. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  19. Are prostate carcinoma clinical stages T1C and T2 similar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A recent study has found that PSA recurrence rate for clinical T1c tumors is similar to T2 tumors, indicating a need for further refinement of clinical staging system. To test this finding we compared clinicopathologic characteristics and the time to PSA progression following radical retropubic prostatectomy of patients with clinical stage T1c tumors to those with stage T2, T2a or T2b tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a total of 186 consecutive patients submitted to prostatectomy, 33.52% had clinical stage T1c tumors, 45.45% stage T2a tumors and 21.02% stage T2b tumors. The variables studied were age, preoperative PSA, prostate weight, Gleason score, tumor extent, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension (pT3a, seminal vesicle invasion (pT3b, and time to PSA progression. Tumor extent was evaluated by a point-count method. RESULTS: Patients with clinical stage T1c were younger and had the lowest mean preoperative PSA. In the surgical specimen, they had higher frequency of Gleason score < 7 and more organ confined cancer. In 40.54% of the patients with clinical stage T2b tumors, there was extraprostatic extension (pT3a. During the study period, 54 patients (30.68% developed a biochemical progression. Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis revealed no significant difference in the time to PSA progression between men with clinical stage T1c versus clinical stage T2 (p = 0.7959, T2a (p = 0.6060 or T2b (p = 0.2941 as well as between men with clinical stage T2a versus stage T2b (p = 0.0994. CONCLUSION: Clinicopathological features are not similar considering clinical stage T1c versus clinical stages T2, T2a or T2b.

  20. Survival Advantage Associated with Decrease in Stage at Detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to document the survival advantage of lowering stage at detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Treatment outcomes and survival were evaluated in patients with Stage IIIA and Stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer treated from 2000 to 2009 at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (UKMCC and SEER institutions. Results. Cytoreduction to no visible disease (P<0.0001 and complete response to platinum-based chemotherapy (P<0.025 occurred more frequently in Stage IIIA than in Stage IIIC cases. Time to progression was shorter in patients with Stage IIIC ovarian cancer (17±1 months than in those with Stage II1A disease (36±8 months. Five-year overall survival (OS improved from 41% in Stage IIIC patients to 60% in Stage IIIA patients treated at UKMCC and from 37% to 56% in patients treated at SEER institutions for a survival advantage of 19% in both data sets. 53% of Stage IIIA and 14% of Stage IIIC patients had NED at last followup. Conclusions. Decreasing stage at detection from Stage IIIC to stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer is associated with a 5-year survival advantage of nearly 20% in patients treated by surgical tumor cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy.

  1. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  2. Distribution pattern of lymph node metastases and its implication in individualized radiotherapeutic clinical target volume delineation of regional lymph nodes in patients with stage IA to IIA cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the distribution pattern of lymph node metastases of stage IA to IIA cervical cancer and to clarify the individualized clinical target volume delineation of regional lymph nodes (CTVn). A total of 665 cases with International Federation Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IA to IIA cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were retrospectively reviewed. The clinicopathological factors related to lymph node metastases were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Pelvic lymph node metastases were found in 168 of 665 patients resulting in a metastasis rate of 25.3%. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age, lymph vascular space involvement, and deep stromal invasion statistically influenced pelvic lymph node metastases (p = 0.017, < 0.001, < 0.001, respectively). Pathological morphology type, lymph node metastases of the obturator, the external iliac and internal iliac, and the para-aortic had a strong influence on lymph node metastases of the common iliac (p = 0.022, 0.003, < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Tumor size and lymph node metastases of the common iliac were significantly related to lymph node metastases of the para-aortic (p = 0.045, < 0.001, respectively). Lymph node metastases of the obturator, the external iliac and internal iliac were strongly correlated to lymph node metastases of the circumflex iliac node distal to the external iliac node (CINDEIN; p = 0.027, 0.024, respectively). Factors related to lymph node metastases should be comprehensively considered to design and tailor CTVn for radiotherapy of cervical cancer. Selective regional irradiation including the correlated lymphatic drainage regions should be performed

  3. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  4. Clinical Research on Breast Conserving Surgery for Early Stage Breast Cancer in 68 Cases%早期乳腺癌保乳手术治疗68例临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏艳华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical effect of breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer.MethodsA total of 100 patients with early stage breast cancer patients were treated and divided into study group(68 cases)and control group(34 cases),study group underwent breast-conserving surgery, the control group underwent a modified radical mastectomy were compared clinical outcomes and cosmetic results.Results The study group of the surgery were better than the control group,the incidence of postoperative complications(4.4%)than the control group(15.6%),beauty good rate (97.1%)higher(20/32),the difference between groups was significant(P< 0.05).Conclusion For patients with early stage breast cancer,the use of breast-conserving surgery can reduce the incidence of postoperative complications and improve the cosmetic results of breast surgery,clinical application of higher value.%目的:探究保乳手术治疗早期乳腺癌的临床效果。方法将100例早期乳腺癌患者根据治疗方法的不同分为研究组(68例)和对照组(34例),研究组行保乳手术,对照组行改良根治术,比较两组临床治疗效果及美容效果。结果研究组各项手术指标均优于对照组,术后并发症发生率(4.4%)低于对照组(15.6%),美容优良率(97.1%)高于对照组(20/32),组间比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论对于早期乳腺癌患者,采用保乳手术治疗可降低术后并发症发生率,提高术后乳房美容效果。

  5. Uterine cervical cancer. Preoperative staging with magnetic resonance imaging; Zervixkarzinom. Praeoperatives Staging mittels Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, F.; Hamm, B. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma is largely dependent on the tumor stage. Despite significant inaccuracies in the clinical examination, uterine cervical cancer remains the only gynecological form of cancer still largely staged according to clinical findings. Although imaging is still not included in the staging the recently published revised FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) system encourages the use of modern cross-sectional imaging (magnetic resonance imaging MRI and computed tomography CT). Due to its high soft tissue contrast MRI allows excellent non-invasive assessment of the cervix with direct tumor delineation as well as assessment of the prognosis based on morphological factors. Studies in the literature report an accuracy of 93% for MRI in the preoperative assessment of tumor size and in the differentiation of operable from advanced cervical cancer. Therefore MRI is considered to be the optimal modality for diagnostic evaluation starting from FIGO stage IB1, for radiation therapy planning, and for exclusion of recurrence in follow-up. In this paper we give an overview of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in preoperative staging of uterine cervical cancer. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieplanung beim Zervixkarzinom ist weitgehend von der Stadieneinteilung nach FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) abhaengig, die trotz erheblicher Ungenauigkeiten bei der klinischen Stadieneinteilung weiterhin aufgrund klinischer Untersuchungsbefunde erfolgt. Obwohl bildgebende Verfahren nach wie vor fuer die Stadieneinteilung nicht vorgesehen sind, wird im kuerzlich erschienen revidierten Stagingsystem der FIGO zum ersten Mal die Verwendung moderner Schnittbilddiagnostik (MRT und CT) befuerwortet. Die MRT ermoeglicht dank ihres hohen Weichteilkontrasts ein ausgezeichnetes nichtinvasives Staging des Zervixkarzinoms mit direkter Tumordarstellung sowie einer Prognoseabschaetzung anhand

  6. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  7. TNM staging update for lung cancer: Why is this important?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cancer staging characterises the extent of disease facilitating selection of the most appropriate management and therapy and providing prediction of prognosis. As understanding of lung cancer evolves the opportunities arises to adjust disease staging. The adoption of the 7th edition tumour, node, metastasis staging system should result in improved treatment selection and more accurate prognostic information for the individual patient.

  8. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  9. MR staging accuracy for endometrial cancer based on the new FIGO stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been frequently used to determine a preoperative treatment plan for gynecologic cancers. However, the MR accuracy for staging an endometrial cancer is not satisfactory based on the old FIGO staging system. Purpose: To evaluate MR accuracy for staging endometrial cancer using the new FIGO staging system. Material and Methods: Between January 2005 and May 2009, 199 women underwent surgery due to endometrial cancer. In each patient, an endometrial cancer was staged using MR findings based on the old FIGO staging system and then repeated according to the new FIGO staging system for comparison. Histopathologic findings were used as a standard of reference. Results: The accuracy of MRI in the staging of endometrial carcinoma stage I, II, III, and IV using the old FIGO staging system were 80% (159/199), 89% (178/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, compared to 87% (174/199), 97% (193/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, when using the new FIGO staging criteria. The overall MR accuracy of the old and new staging systems were 51% (101/199) and 81% (161/199), respectively. Conclusion: MRI has become a more useful tool in the preoperative staging of endometrial cancers using the new FIGO staging system compared to the old one with increased accuracy

  10. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Clinical factors are not the best predictors of quality of sexual life and sexual functioning in women with early stage breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L. den Oudsten; G.L. van Heck; A.F.W. van der Steeg; J.A. Roukema; J. de Vries

    2010-01-01

    Background: Few studies have prospectively assessed the impact of breast cancer (BC) on women's sexual lives. Therefore, this study examines the determinants of quality of sexual life (QOSL), sexual functioning (SF), and sexual enjoyment (SE) at 6 and 12 months after surgical treatment. Methods: All

  12. ACUTE TOXICITY PROFILE AND COMPLIANCE TO ACCELERATED RADIOTHERAPY PLUS CARBOGEN AND NICOTINAMIDE FOR CLINICAL STAGE T2-4 LARYNGEAL CANCER : RESULTS OF A PHASE III RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; van den Ende, Piet; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  13. Acute toxicity profile and compliance to accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Terhaard, C.H.J.; Doornaert, P.A.; Bijl, H.P.; Ende, P. van den; Chin, A.; Pop, L.A.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with

  14. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer ... factors affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  19. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Screening, Diagnosis, and Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J; Magalhães, M; Rocha, E; Marques, F

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Tobacco consumption is the primary cause of lung cancer, accounting for more than 85% 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers. Several studies have shown that low-dose helical CT of the lung detects more nodules and lung cancers, including early-stage cancers, than does chest radiography. The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial results show that three annual roun...

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common treatment for all stages of lip and oral cavity cancer. Surgery may include the following: Wide local excision : Removal ... cancer may have spread from the lip and oral cavity. Plastic surgery : An operation that restores or improves the appearance ...

  1. Clinical outcomes of extensive stage small cell lung cancer patients treated with intensive modified radiotherapy%广泛期SCLC化疗后IMRT的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文珏; 周宗玫; 陈东福; 肖泽芬; 冯勤付; 吕纪马; 梁军; 董昕; 惠周光

    2016-01-01

    目的 回顾研究广泛期SCLC化疗后IMRT的疗效及预后.方法 回顾分析2007-2012年在本院放疗科接受化疗+IMRT的130例初治广泛期SCLC患者,化疗方案以EP、CE方案为主,放疗剂量32 Gy~63 Gy,35例患者进行了PCI.Kaplan-Meier法计算生存率,Logrank法单因素预后分析,Cox模型多因素预后分析.结果 随访率96.1%.全组治疗毒性轻微,≥2级血液学毒性及放射性食管炎发生率分别为22.3%、12.2%,≥2级RP发生率7.7%.放疗后达CR、PR、SD、PD者分别占4.6%、72.3%、6.2%、13.1%,疗效未能评价5例,客观有效率76.9%.中位生存期18个月(4~66个月),1、2年OS率分别为72.3%、38.3%.30例(23.1%)患者放疗后发生局部区域失败,83例(63.8%)发生远处失败.26例放疗计划可恢复的局部区域失败患者中,22例单纯照射野内失败,2例单纯野外失败,2例野内野外同时失败.单因素分析中年龄、LDH水平、放疗剂量、PCI是影响预后因素(P=0.014、0.049、0.043、0.003),多因素分析中放疗剂量、PCI是影响预后因素(P=0.021、0.007).初诊无脑转移患者PCI明显改善生存(HR=2.318,95% CI为1.388~3.871;P=0.003)并降低累积脑转移率(18.4%:37.2%,P=0.038).胸部放疗EQD2剂量达54 Gy可改善OS(HR=1.615,95% CI为1.016~2.567;P=0.043),并有改善PFS趋势(HR=1.49,95% CI为0.965~ 2.299,P=0.072).结论 化疗有效的广泛期SCLC行胸部放疗可提高LC率及OS率,适当提高胸部剂量可改善患者预后.PCI可显著改善OS并降低脑转移发生率.%Objective To determine the effect and the patterns of failure in extensive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients treated with thoracic intensive modified radiotherapy (IMRT).Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 130 extensive stage SCLC patients received thoracic IMRT from January 2007 to December 2012.Most patients received initial chemotherapy with carboplatin plus etoposide or chemotherapy with cisplatin plus

  2. Clinical Assay Development Support - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

  3. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. Laparoscopic staging and surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruvengadam Muniraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the tenth most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Surgery remains a cornerstone in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Unfortunately, the percentage of patients presenting at the resectable stage is minimal. Although computed tomography (CT scan remains the best modality to stage the tumor for resectability, laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound offers its own advantages. Extended lymphadenectomy, portal vein resection, and arterial reconstruction have also been explored in multiple studies to enhance staging. The traditional pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple′s procedure with regional lymphadenectomy is still the standard of care in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Quality of Care in Women With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Joseph; Polissar, Lincoln; Tamimi, Hisham K.

    1982-01-01

    A study was done to assess the quality of care received by women with stage I cervical cancer. Through a population-based registry serving 13 counties of western Washington, including Seattle, we identified all women residents in whom local-stage cervical cancer developed between January 1974 and December 1978 (N=369). The cases were subdivided into stage IA (microinvasive) and stage IB (frankly invasive). Quality of care was defined as optimal or suboptimal at the outset of the study; this d...

  6. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Wielenga, V T;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  7. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Beyond Histologic Staging: Emerging Imaging Strategies in Colorectal Cancer with Special Focus on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraum, Tyler J; Owen, Joseph W; Fowler, Kathryn J

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the staging and management of colorectal cancer. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has supplanted transrectal ultrasound as the preferred modality for the locoregional staging of rectal cancer. Furthermore, the advent of both diffusion-weighted imaging and hepatobiliary contrast agents has significantly enhanced the ability of MRI to detect colorectal liver metastases. In clinical practice, MRI routinely provides prognostic information, helps to guide surgical strategy, and determines the need for neoadjuvant therapies related to both the primary tumor and metastatic disease. Expanding on these roles for MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI is the newest clinical hybrid imaging modality and combines the metabolic information of PET with the high soft tissue contrast of MRI. The addition of PET/MRI to the clinical staging armamentarium has the potential to provide comprehensive state-of-the-art colorectal cancer staging in a single examination. PMID:27582645

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  10. Applied Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Clinical Stage of Cervical Cancer%磁共振成像在宫颈癌临床分期中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敬民; 石红; 李冬梅; 江淑芬

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨磁共振成像(MRI)在宫颈癌临床分期中的应用价值.方法 收集2009年9月至2011年9月本院收治的临床资料完整的宫颈癌患者92例为研究对象,年龄为29~82岁,分析其术前MRI影像特点,对比其中73例行选择性广泛性子宫切除术+盆腔淋巴结清扫术患者的术后病理学检查结果(本研究遵循的程序符合大连医科大学附属第一医院人体试验委员会制定的伦理学标准,得到该委员会批准).结果 MRI检查显示,除2例ⅠA期患者外,90例异常宫颈均有提示,检出率为97.8%(90/92),T1WI多呈低或等低信号,T2WI为高信号,增强后81例表现不同程度强化,DWI上均呈高信号影,49例宫颈基质环显示不完整、43例显示完整,盆腔淋巴结增大显示为21例.MRI与临床分期总体一致性为85.9%,对宫旁浸润、累及阴道、淋巴结转移、累及颈管阴性预测值分别为95.3%,98.2%,93.1%,78.3%;特异度分别为93.8%,83.6%,84.4%,90.4%;灵敏度分别为62 5%,83 3%,55 6%,38 1%.结论 MRI能清楚显示宫颈癌病灶大小、宫旁、阴道、颈管受累程度及增大的盆腔淋巴结,在宫颈癌临床分期诊断上具有明显指导价值,可作为宫颈癌特别是浸润性宫颈癌的首选检查方法.%Objective To evaluate applied value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the clinical stage of cervical cancer. Methods From September 2009 to September 2011, a total of 92 cases (29- to 82-year-old) of cervical cancer with completely clinical data were included into this study. The results of MRI before surgery were analyzed. Among those 92 cases, 73 of them received selective radical hysterectomy + pelvic lymph node dissection. The pathological and MRI results were compared. Informed consent was obtained from all participates. Results MRI could show the cervical cancer in all cases with the exception of only 2 cases of I ,\\ stage. Positive rate was 97. 8%(90/92). The tumor was represented by isointensity and hypo

  11. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  12. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Cancer CAM Clinical Trials Introduction What are clinical trials? A clinical trial is one of the final ... and effective. What are the different types of clinical trials? Treatment trials test new treatments (like a new ...

  14. Clinical Diagnosis and Staging of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartella, Isabel; Dufour, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are the second most common primary liver malignancies with an increasing incidence over the past decades. Due to a lack of early symptoms and their aggressive oncobiological behavior, the diagnostic approach is challenging and the outcome remains unsatisfactory with a poor prognosis. Thus, a consistent staging system for a comparison between different therapeutic approaches is needed, but independent predictors for worse survival are still controversial. Currently, four different staging systems are primarily used, which differ in the way they determine the 'T' category. Furthermore, different nomograms and prognostic models have been recently proposed and may be helpful in providing additional information for predicting the prognosis and therefore be helpful in approaching an adequate treatment strategy. This review will discuss the diagnostic approach to intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma as well as compare and contrast the most current staging systems and prognostic models. PMID:26697575

  15. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer: Clinical Experience and Novel Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jill E.; Cascone, Tina; Gerber, David E.; Heymach, John V; Minna, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Although lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer in the United States, recently a number of developments indicate future clinical benefit. These include evidence that computed tomography–based screening decreases lung cancer mortality, the use of stereotactic radiation for early-stage tumors, the development of molecular methods to predict chemotherapy sensitivity, and genome-wide expression and mutation analysis data that have uncovered oncogene “addictions” as important therapeutic ta...

  16. Socioeconomic position and surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starr, Laila Kærgaard; Osler, Merete; Steding-Jessen, Marianne;

    2012-01-01

    explain the association with income or living alone for early-stage NSCLC patients. CONCLUSION: Early-stage NSCLC patients with low income or who live alone are less likely to undergo surgery than those with a high income or who live with a partner, even after control for possible explanatory factors......AIM: To examine possible associations between socioeconomic position and surgical treatment of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a register-based clinical cohort study, patients with early-stage (stages I-IIIa) NSCLC were identified in the Danish Lung Cancer...... and separately for stages I, II and IIIa. RESULTS: Of the 5538 eligible patients with stages I-IIIa NSCLC diagnosed 2001-2008, 53% underwent surgery. Higher stage, older age, being female and diagnosis early in the study period were associated with higher odds for not receiving surgery. Low disposable...

  17. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR 1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [Miletrie Hospital, DACTIM, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Roquancourt, Anne de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and {sup 18}F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV{sub max} values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV{sub max} and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and TLG significantly differed among the three

  18. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different 18F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline 18F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment 18F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUVmax, SUVmean, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and 18F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in 18F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUVmax and SUVmean. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUVmax values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUVmax and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUVmax, SUVmean and TLG significantly differed among the three phenotype subgroups (HER2-positive, triple-negative and ER-positive/HER2

  19. Drug therapy for advanced-stage liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Liver cancer was traditionally treated by surgery or interventional ablative treatments, or, if these options were not feasible, by best supportive care. Since 2008, systemic therapy with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib has become available worldwide and has become the standard of care for unresectable/non-ablatable or advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sorafenib is able to improve the median overall survival by approximately 3 months. Despite this significant advance in the non-surgical/non-interventional management of liver cancer, this improvement in overall survival is only a first step toward more potent, more targeted, and better tolerated oral antitumor treatments. Since the introduction of sorafenib into clinical practice, several attempts have been made to develop even more effective first-line treatments as well as an effective second-line treatment for HCC. None of these endeavors has been successful so far. The development of drug treatments for HCC has been particularly hampered by the unfortunate push to establish the diagnosis of liver cancer by non-invasive imaging alone, without requiring a liver biopsy for histologic confirmation: this precluded the very necessary search for informative biomarkers and the search for molecular targets for drug development in HCC. This important drawback is being increasingly recognized and corrected. Despite several obstacles remaining to be overcome, it seems reasonable to assume that using a rational, data-driven approach, we will be able to develop better drug treatments for liver cancer in the coming years. PMID:24945003

  20. Challenges in the management of stage II colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dotan, Efrat; Cohen, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately one-third of patients diagnosed with early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) will present with lymph node involvement (stage III) and about one-quarter with transmural bowel wall invasion but negative lymph nodes (stage II). Adjuvant chemotherapy targets micrometastatic disease to improve disease-free and overall survival. While beneficial for stage III patients, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy is unestablished in Stage II. This likely relates to the improved outcome of these pati...

  1. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  2. Tumour stage and implementation of standardised cancer patient pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henry; Tørring, Marie Louise; Fenger-Grøn, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some European countries have introduced standardised cancer patient pathways (CPPs), including urgent referrals, with the aim of diagnosing cancer at an earlier stage. This is despite a lack of evidence, particularly in patients with symptomatic cancer diagnosed via general practice....... AIM: To compare tumour stages in patients with incident cancer diagnosed via general practice before, during, and after CPP implementation in Denmark in 2008-2009. DESIGN AND SETTING: A comparative cohort study of data from GPs and registries on patients with incident cancer listed with a GP before (n...... = 1420), during (n = 5272), and after (n = 2988) CPP implementation. METHOD: χ(2) test was used to compare stage distributions and logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) of having local cancer after versus before CPP implementation. RESULTS: Distribution of tumour stages did not differ...

  3. Can Modified Dukes' Classification be Used in Gastric Cancer Staging?

    OpenAIRE

    Özgüç, Halil

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Dukes' staging system is a simple system used widely in the staging of colorectal cancer. This study was designed to analyze the applicability of the modified Dukes' classification system in gastric cancer cases. Methods: The prognostic factors affecting survival in 139 gastric cancer cases who had had at least 15 lymph nodes removed were analyzed. Modified Dukes' and TNM classifications were investigated to correlate statistically significant prognostic factors. The i...

  4. Resection of the primary tumor in stage IV breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shien, Tadahiko; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stage IV breast cancer refers to breast cancer that has already metastasized to distant regions when initially diagnosed. Treatment for stage IV is intended to “prolong survival and palliate symptoms”. Resection of a primary tumor is considered to be “effective only at alleviating chest symptoms and providing local control” in spite of the advances of imaging examination and medication for breast cancer. Molecular target and endocrine drugs are very effective and useful to tailor-make a treat...

  5. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    OpenAIRE

    Purandare, Nilendu C; Venkatesh Rangarajan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  6. Update in non small- cell lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, RA; Snoeckx, A.; Spinhoven, M; Beeck, B Op de; Corthouts, B; Parizel, PM

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made with the introduction of the TNM-7 staging system for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Constituting the first major revision in 12 years, the seventh edition of NSCLC TNM (TNM-7) is based on the recommendations from the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project of 2007. This new TNM iteration includes a subset analysis on SCLC and carcinoid tumors.A thorough understanding of its principles by the radiologis...

  7. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu C Purandare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  8. 乳腺癌保乳手术前应用TAC化疗方案59例%Clinical Efficacy of TAC Scheme of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy before Breast-Conserving Surgery in Patients with Stage Ⅱ,Ⅲ Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 赵倩; 朱丽萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the application of the TAC scheme of neoadjuvant chemotherapy before breast-conserving surgery in the patients with stage Ⅱ,Ⅲ breast cancer. Methods 118 female cases of breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy were divided into the treatment group and the control group. The treatment group received the TAC scheme and the control group was given the CEF scheme. The clinical efficacy and the cosmetic effects and side effects of breast-conserving surgery were observed. Results The clinical effective rate in the treatment group was 62. 71% , which was significantly higher than 44. 07% in the control group ( P﹤0. 05 );the satisfaction rate of the cosmetic effects after breast-conserving surgery in the treatment group was 88. 14%, which was significantly higher than 69. 49% in the control group ( P﹤0. 05 );the two groups had the good tolerance to the two chemotherapy regimens;the digestive system toxicity, neurotoxicity and reproductive toxicity had no statistically significant dif-ferences between the TAC group and the CEF group, but the toxic and side effects of hematologic toxicity, cardiac toxicity, skin and mucosal injury in the TAC group were higher than those in the CEF group, but which all were within the tolerable range ( P﹤0. 05 ) . Conclusion Two kinds of preoperative adjuvant chemotherapeutical schemes before surgery have good effects for stage Ⅱ, Ⅲ breast cancer, but the TAC scheme has better clinical efficacy and better long-term cosmetic effect relative to the CEF scheme, which is wor-thy of being widely used in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy.%目的:探讨TAC方案辅助化学治疗(简称化疗)在Ⅱ期、Ⅲ期乳腺癌患者保乳手术前的应用。方法选取在进行辅助化疗后进行保乳手术的乳腺癌女性患者118例,随机分为两组,各59例。治疗组应用TAC方案,对照组应用CEF方案,观察两组患者的临床疗效、保乳手术美容

  9. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan as preoperative diagnostic tool in cervical cancer stage Ib and IIa: comparison between the results of FDG-PET scan and operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan for routine preoperative diagnostic methods in cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed from March, 1999 to November, 1999. There were 6 stage Ib and 7 IIa patients and all patients were performed radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissections and were evaluated by FDG-PET scan before operation. The mean age of the patients were 50.3 years old. Six cases had lymph node metastases by pelvis MRI, and three cases by FDG-PET scan. We could not find any lymph node metastases at surgery in 3 patients (50.0%) among 6 patients who were diagnosed by nodal metastases by pelvis MRI. And we found 1 patients with nodal metastases who had negative findings by pelvis MRI. By FDG-PET scan, we could find metastases in all positive patients. But we also found 2 additional metastatic cases in the patients with negative findings. In this study, the comparison was very difficult due to the individual differences in the comparison would be made by site-specific not person. The sensitivity of MRI and FDG-PET scan were 50.0% and 30.0%. The specificity were 94.1 % and 95.6%. The positive predictive value were 55.6 % and 50.0 %. In conclusion, we could find any superiority of FDG-PET scan in the diagnosis of lymph node metastases the pelvis MRI. So there are limitations to use the FDG-PET scan in the routine preoperative diagnostic tools in cervical cancer. But if we have more experiences to use the FDG-PET scan such as precise cut-off value of SUV and combination of other imaging technique, the FDG-PET scan are still promising diagnostic tools in cervical cancer

  10. [Performing madness: the clinic as stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrn, Rainer; Friedland, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    In the second half of the nine- teenth century, clinical demonstrations became the dominant teaching method in psychiatry, playing a key role in medical-professional disputes, as well. This paper traces this widely used though historiographically neglected practice of knowledge implementation and mediation, as demonstrated in the psychiatric clinic of the Berlin Charité (Psychiatrische und Nervenklinik der Berliner Charité) from 1881 to 1927. Documentation of this practice, found within individual medical records, forms the basis of this research. The concept of 'theatricality' assists in uncovering the dramatic quality of the clinical demonstration: Psychiatric knowledge was not simply disseminated through such a practice; rather, such knowledge was first performatively created through the very logic of its presentation of exemplary patient histories, as well as through the examination and diagnostic positioning of its patients. The 'success' of such presentations depended on many variables, related to staff, time, place, and other situational factors. These include the presence of appropriate lecture halls, the availability and calculated selection of patients, and the employment of specific performative techniques by doctors for the sake of producing desired results. As one effect, clinical demonstrations also encouraged patients to both learn and rehearse behavior considered relevant to the particular diagnosis that was to be demonstrated. PMID:25671967

  11. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation. PMID:26272183

  12. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history can affect the risk of developing colon cancer. ... through. This procedure is called a colostomy. A bag is placed around the stoma to collect the ...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  15. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Paul D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy. The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. Methods We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Results Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17% contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Conclusion Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with

  16. Prostate cancer staging with extracapsular extension risk scoring using multiparametric MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Løgager, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    of ECE changed to 61 %-74 % and 77 %-88 % for the readers, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Multiparametric MRI with ECE risk-scoring is an accurate diagnostic technique in determining prostate cancer clinical tumour stage and ECE at final pathology. KEY POINTS: • Multiparametric MRI is an accurate...... diagnostic technique for preoperative prostate cancer staging • ECE risk scoring predicts extracapsular tumour extension at final pathology • ECE risk scoring shows an AUC of 0.86 on the ROC-curve • ECE risk scoring shows a moderate inter-reader agreement (K = 0.45) • Multiparametric MRI provides essential......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of preoperative multiparametric MRI with extracapsular extension (ECE) risk-scoring in the assessment of prostate cancer tumour stage (T-stage) and prediction of ECE at final pathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-seven patients with clinically...

  17. Role of 3-D CT reconstruction of laryngeal mucosal surface in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Yeon; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Byung Soo; Wang, Soo Guen [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sol, Chang Hyo [Hong-In Total Imaing Diagnostic Clinic, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    CT or MRT is performed in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer. These methods are used in assessment of the deep tissues and cartilage of the larynx, but cannot compete with laryngoscopy in the evaluation of the laryngeal surface. The purpose of this study is to evaluate feasibility and clinical value of the 3-D reconstruction of the mucosal surface in laryngeal cancer. Twenty two patients with laryngeal cancer proved by means of surgical exploration (pathologic) or clinical examinations including laryngoscope, imaging studies and biopsy underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography(CT) and three dimensional(3D) CT reconstruction. The TNM classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer was used to compare the imaging findings with pathologic or clinical staging. When the extension of primary tumor(T staging) was evaluated, the findings at only transaxial CT and those at pathologic or clinical examination were concordant in 8 of 14 cases(57.1%) of supraglottic tumor, and 3 of 6 cases(50%) of glottic tumor. The overall accuracy of CT with additional 3D-reconstruction was 85.7% for assessment of supraglottic tumor, and 66.6% for glottic tumor. 3D CT reconstruction after transaxial CT may improve outcome in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer and has a potential value in guiding management decisions.

  18. Role of 3-D CT reconstruction of laryngeal mucosal surface in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT or MRT is performed in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer. These methods are used in assessment of the deep tissues and cartilage of the larynx, but cannot compete with laryngoscopy in the evaluation of the laryngeal surface. The purpose of this study is to evaluate feasibility and clinical value of the 3-D reconstruction of the mucosal surface in laryngeal cancer. Twenty two patients with laryngeal cancer proved by means of surgical exploration (pathologic) or clinical examinations including laryngoscope, imaging studies and biopsy underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography(CT) and three dimensional(3D) CT reconstruction. The TNM classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer was used to compare the imaging findings with pathologic or clinical staging. When the extension of primary tumor(T staging) was evaluated, the findings at only transaxial CT and those at pathologic or clinical examination were concordant in 8 of 14 cases(57.1%) of supraglottic tumor, and 3 of 6 cases(50%) of glottic tumor. The overall accuracy of CT with additional 3D-reconstruction was 85.7% for assessment of supraglottic tumor, and 66.6% for glottic tumor. 3D CT reconstruction after transaxial CT may improve outcome in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer and has a potential value in guiding management decisions

  19. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Giovanni; Brown, David; Rees, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern) in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD) or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED) using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812). The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR = 0.032, TPR

  1. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Cosma

    Full Text Available The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC, with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812. The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR

  2. Second-line Treatment of Stage III/IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC with pemetrexed in routine clinical practice: Evaluation of performance status and health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuette Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC improves overall survival. There is a lack of data regarding the impact on patients' overall health condition. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated performance status (PS and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL during second-line pemetrexed treatment in routine clinical practice. Methods Stage III/IV NSCLC patients who initiated second-line pemetrexed (standard vitamin and dexamethasone supplementation were observed for a maximum of 9 treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving improvement of Karnofsky Index (KI of ≥ 10% (absolute or maintaining KI ≥ 80% after the second treatment cycle ("KI benefit response". HR-QoL was self-rated using the EuroQoL-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D. Factors potentially associated with KI benefit response were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results Of 521 eligible patients (73.5% Stage IV, median age 66.3 yrs, 36.1% ≥ 70 yrs, 62.0% with KI ≥ 80%, 471 (90.4% completed at least 2 treatment cycles. 58.0% (95%CI 53.6%;62.2% achieved KI benefit response after the second cycle. Patients with baseline KI ≥ 80%, no Grade 3/4 toxicities during the first 2 cycles, or combination regimen as prior first-line therapy were more likely to achieve a KI benefit response. EQ-5D scores improved over time. Grade 3/4 toxicities were reported in 23.8% of patients (mainly fatigue/asthenia 15.9%, neutropenia 8.7%. Conclusions In this large prospective, non-interventional study of second-line pemetrexed treatment in patients with advanced NSCLC, including 36% elderly patients ( ≥ 70 years, physician-rated PS and self-rated HR-QoL were maintained or improved in the majority of patients. Trial registration Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00540241 on October 4, 2007

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have a...... good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...

  4. Main clinical epidemiological features of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study of 95 patients with lung cancer, discharged from Neumology Service at 'Dr Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso' General Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, was carried out from January, 2008 to December, 2008 in order to identify the main clinical epidemiological features of the aforementioned disease. A malignancy predominance among men aged between 56 and 65 years old, belonging to urban areas and being heavy smoker (out of 30 cigarettes per day over 30 years ), was found. Those affected without a confirmed histological type and IV clinical stage epidermoid carcinoma were predominant. Most of them had the opportunity to be treated. Increasing and intensifying health promotion and disease prevention campaigns were recommended so as to achieve the population to avoid or quit the smoking habit. (author)

  5. Preoperative Imaging for Clinical Staging Prior to Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugen, Cory M; Duddalwar, Vinay; Daneshmand, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    The importance of patient selection for quality outcomes following radical cystectomy is critical. Clinical staging is one of the key elements necessary for patient selection, and staging relies on accurate preoperative imaging. Many imaging modalities are available and have been utilized for preoperative staging with published operating characteristics. In this update, we review recently published literature for advances in preoperative imaging prior to radical cystectomy. PMID:27432379

  6. Update on clinical trials: genetic targets in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bora; Cream, Leah V; Harvey, Harold A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in United States. From data of American Cancer Society from 2007 reported total of 178,480 women diagnosed with breast cancer. The death rate from breast cancer has decreased in North America over time, but still accounts for second highest cancer death, following lung cancer. Breast cancer is staged based on tumor size, nodal involvement, and distant metastasis like any other solid tumors. However clinical staging is not the only important factor in management of breast cancer. Various molecular features divides breast cancer into many subgroups - that act differently, and respond differently from therapy. Thus the focus of breast cancer treatment has evolved focusing on specific targets. The most important biologic markers in subtyping of breast cancer so far are hormone receptor positivity and HER2/neu protein expression. Five molecular subtypes using intrinsic gene set include Basal mRNA, HER2 + mRNA, Luminal AmRNA, Luminal B mRNA, and Normal-like mRNA. In addition, better understanding of genetic target of breast cancer has given us arsenal of personalized, and more effective treatment approach.This review will focus on examples that highlight several mechanism of tumorigenesis, giving us not just understanding of gene pathways and the molecular biology, that could lead us to therapeutic target. Several important molecular targets have been investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, others are yet to be explored. We will also describe genetic mechanisms discovery related to overcoming resistance to current targeted therapies in breast cancer, including hormone receptor expression and HER 2- neu amplification. We will also review other exciting developments in understanding of breast cancer, the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells, and targeting agents in that area. PMID:23288634

  7. Comorbidities and the Risk of Late-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Fleming

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The degree to which comorbidities affect the diagnosis of prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine how comorbidities affect the stage at which prostate cancer is diagnosed in elderly white and black men. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute merged with Medicare claims data. For each patient, we estimated associations between stage of disease at diagnosis and each of the 27 comorbidities. The sample included 2,489 black and 2,587 white men with staged prostate cancer. Coronary artery disease, benign hypertension, and dyslipidemia reduced the odds of late-stage prostate cancer. A prior diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease, severe renal disease, or substance abuse increased the odds of being diagnosed with late-stage disease. The study shows some effect modification by race, particularly among white men with substance abuse, cardiac conduction disorders, and other neurologic conditions. The strongest predictors of late-stage prostate cancer diagnosis for both white and black men were age at diagnosis of at least 80 years and lack of PSA screening. Comorbidities do affect stage at diagnosis, although in different ways. Four hypotheses are discussed to explain these findings.

  8. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  9. The correlation of preoperative CT, MR imaging, and clinical staging (FIGO) with histopathology findings in primary cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the preoperative findings of abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI with the preoperative clinical International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) staging and postoperative pathology report in patients with primary cancer of the cervix. Thirty-six patients with surgical-pathological proven primary cancer of the cervix were retrospectively studied for preoperative staging by clinical examination, CT, and MR imaging. Studied parameters for preoperative staging were the presence of tumor, tumor extension into the parametrial tissue, pelvic wall, adjacent organs, and lymph nodes. The CT was performed in 32 patients and MRI (T1- and T2-weighted images) in 29 patients. The CT and MR staging were based on the FIGO staging system. Results were compared with histological findings. The group is consisted of stage 0 (in situ):1, Ia:1, Ib:8, IIa:2, IIb:12, IIIa:4, IVa:6, and IVb:2 patients. The overall accuracy of staging for clinical examination, CT, and MRI was 47, 53, and 86%, respectively. The MRI incorrectly staged 2 patients and did not visualize only two tumors; one was an in situ (stage-0) and one stage-Ia (microscopic) disease. The MRI is more accurate than CT and they are both superior to clinical examination in evaluating the locoregional extension and preoperative staging of primary cancer of the cervix. (orig.)

  10. Non-surgical management of stage I lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gore, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Stage I lung cancer has a high cure rate with surgery, although many patients are not surgical candidates due to comorbid conditions. Historically, non-operative treatment has been disappointing. New and promising ablative therapies offer a curative option.

  11. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | About

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  12. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  13. Usefulness of transbronchial needle aspiration for initial lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Soja; Artur Szlubowski; Piotr Kocoń; Wojciech Czajkowski; Piotr Grzanka; Romana Tomaszewska; Adam Ćmiel; Jarosław Kużdżał

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Besides radio logical methods (especially positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography), endoscopic techniques including transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of mediastinal lymph nodes play an important role in lung cancer staging, thus having a significant effect on further patient management. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of blind TBNA in staging of lung cancer, using systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection (...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarriage (premature birth of a fetus that cannot survive). Women who were exposed to DES before birth ... to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life . Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Testicular Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and nonseminomas . These 2 types grow and spread differently and are treated differently. Nonseminomas tend to grow and spread more quickly ... trials is available from the NCI website . To Learn More About Testicular Cancer For more information from ...

  16. Contribution of MRI in lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    A. Khalil; Bouhela, T; Carette, MF

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in the WB-MRI in the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with lung cancer have been performed in recent years. Multicentric studies using different magnet systems are necessary to confirm these promising results.

  17. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ductal carcinoma in situ) Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is considered a pre-cancer because it has ... therapy to the remaining breast tissue. If the DCIS is estrogen receptor-positive, tamoxifen might be given ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Hypopharyngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and ...

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  1. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  2. Clinical profile of patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Based on T. N. M classification, this study was conducted to evaluate the clinical presentation of carcinoma of breast in central part of rural Sindh. Design: This is a 5-year combined study i.e. 3 years retrospective and 2 years prospective. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at People's Medical College Hospital (PMCH) Nawabshah from June 1995 to May, 2000 for a period of five years. Subjects and Methods: Fifty patients having carcinoma breast and admitted to surgical department ware included in study. Results: Eighty four percent of these patients presented in advanced stage of the disease. Well established predisposing factors like early menarche, age at first pregnancy, breast feeding and number of children did not contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer in our patients. Conclusion: Majority of breast cancer patients present in advance stage of the disease, hence can not be benefited from modern methods of treatment. The reasons for this delayed presentation are multi fold and are discussed here. (author)

  3. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...

  4. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed

  5. Staging and imaging of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has been primarily classified as limited or extensive, with limited stage confined to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes. In the future, the TNM staging system should be integrated into the classification of SCLC. The appropriate staging work-up for patients with SCLC has traditionally included contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest and abdomen, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or CT scan of the brain. Recent data ...

  6. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Peripheral Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Baba, Masayuki

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan (NIRS) has the highest number of patients with lung cancer treated with carbon ion beams in the world. This report describes the techniques and clinical trials that have been undertaken at NIRS and preliminary results of a current study on single-fraction irradiation. The data are compared to recent results for the treatment of peripheral stage I lung cancer from the literature.

  7. The Application of Mediastinoscopy in the Differential Diagnosis 
and Preoperative Staging on Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Feng MAO; Zhang, Liang; Minghui CAI; Zhengping DING; Yang SHEN-TU

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective To discuss the clinical application of mediastinoscopy in the differential diagnosis and preoperative staging on lung cancer. Methods A total of 361 cases of patients were included in the study, of which 162 cases were undiagnosed mediastinal tumor patients before operation, and 199 patients were suspected or diagnosed with lung cancer or mediastinal lymph nodes enlargment(short diameter ≥1.0 cm). All patients underwent surgery, including 308 cases standard cervical m...

  8. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m2/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3 N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Conclusions: Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further

  9. Preoperative thrombocytosis predicts prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sun; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thrombocytosis is known to be a poor prognostic factor in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in colorectal cancer remains limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic role of preoperative thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer. Methods Two hundred eighty-four patients with stage II colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between December 2003 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Thrombocytosis was defined as platelet > 450 × 109/L. We compared patients with thrombocytosis and those without thrombocytosis in terms of survival. Results The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were lower in patients with thrombocytosis compared to those without thrombocytosis in stage II colorectal cancer (73.3% vs. 89.6%, P = 0.021). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that thrombocytosis (hazard ratio, 2.945; 95% confidence interval, 1.127–7.697; P = 0.028) was independently associated with DFS in patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Conclusion This study showed that thrombocytosis is a prognostic factor predicting DFS in stage II colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27274508

  10. Intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yeo, Seung-Gu; KIM, EUN SEOK; MIN, CHUL KEE; SE AN, PYUNG

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A prospective database of 16 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for pathologically-proven and peripherally-located stage I NSCLC was reviewed. Fifteen patients were medically inoperable and one patient refused to undergo surgery. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 69–86). Tre...

  11. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  12. Sentinel node dissection is safe in the treatment of early-stage vulvar cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, A.G. Van der; Oonk, M.H.; Hullu, J.A. de; Ansink, A.C.; Vergote, I.; Verheijen, R.H.; Maggioni, A.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Baldwin, P.J.; Dorst, E.B. van; Velden, J. van der; Hermans, R.H.; Putten, H. van der; Drouin, P.; Schneider, A.; Sluiter, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the safety and clinical utility of the sentinel node procedure in early-stage vulvar cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A multicenter observational study on sentinel node detection using radioactive tracer and blue dye was performed in patients with T1/2 (< 4 cm) squamous

  13. MRI staging of low rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihab, Oliver C.; Heald, Richard J. [Pelican Cancer Foundation, North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke (United Kingdom); Moran, Brendan J. [Colorectal Research Unit, North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke (United Kingdom); Quirke, Philip [St James' s Hospital, Leeds Institute for Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Brown, Gina [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. (orig.)

  14. MRI staging of low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. (orig.)

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Patients with Stage B2- B Cervical Cancer%新辅助化疗对ⅠB2~ⅡB期宫颈癌的临床疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶磊; 朱建龙; 冯令达; 翁雷; 汪希鹏

    2014-01-01

    . Methods:A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data from 196 patients of stages ⅠB2-ⅡB cervical cancer admitted to First Maternity and Infant Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University during January 2003 to June 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: 71 cases received pre-surgical NACT based on platinum and taxol (NACT group) and 125 cases received primary surgical treatment (PST group) without pre-surgical NACT. Both groups received radical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy(age>45 years old) plus pelvic lymph node dissection with or without para-aortic lymphadenectomy. In the NACT group, reduction in tumor size was observed after chemotherapy. Pelvic lymph node metastasis, depth of myometral invasion, lympho-vascular space invasion, bulky tumor, parametrial invasion, positive vaginal resection margin and survival rates were compared between the two groups. Results:In NACT group, data missing were 15 cases, 4 cases (7.1%) had complete remission (CR), 27 cases (48.2%) had partial remission (PR), 18 cases (32.1%) were stable disease (SD) and 7 cases (12.5%) were progression of disease (PD). Compared with the PST group, patients in NACT group had greater reduction in the size of uterus and width of cervical lesion, more lymph nodes dissected, and fewer bulky tumors with≥50%thickness myometrial invasion (all P0.05). Conclusions:Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has certain recent clinical curative effects, however, did not improve the overall survival rate, therefore, doctors should carefully consider the clinical application of NACT. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has a certain effect on controling pathologic risk factors of the bulky cervical cancer after surgery. Accordingly, for massive type, surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy will be a safe treatment.

  16. Concordância entre os estadiamentos clínico e patológico em pacientes com câncer de pulmão não-pequenas células, estádios I e II, submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico Concordance between clinical and pathological staging in patients with stages I or II non-small cell lung cancer subjected to surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Augusto Reck dos Santos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os estadiamentos clínico e patológico em pacientes com câncer de pulmão não-pequenas células submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico e identificar as causas das discordâncias. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados, de forma retrospectiva, os dados de pacientes tratados no Serviço de Cirurgia Torácica do Hospital São Lucas da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, e foram calculados a sensibilidade, especificidade, valor preditivo positivo, valor preditivo negativo e acurácia para os estádios clínicos IA, IB e IIB. O índice kappa foi utilizado para determinar a concordância entre os estadiamentos clínico e patológico. RESULTADOS: Dentre os 92 pacientes estudados, 33,7% foram classificados como estádio clínico IA, 50% como IB e 16,3% como IIB. A concordância entre os estadiamentos clínico e patológico foi de 67,5% para IA, 54,3% para IB e 66,6% para IIB. O estadiamento clínico teve maior acurácia no estádio IA, e um kappa de 0,74 neste caso confirma uma substancial associação com o estadiamento patológico. A dificuldade em avaliar doença metastática linfonodal é responsável pela baixa concordância em pacientes com estádio clínico IB. CONCLUSÕES: A concordância entre os estadiamentos clínico e patológico é baixa, e, freqüentemente, os pacientes são subestadiados (no presente estudo, somente um caso foi superestadiado. São necessárias estratégias para melhorar o estadiamento clínico e, conseqüentemente, o tratamento e o prognóstico dos pacientes com câncer de pulmão não-pequenas células.OBJECTIVE: To compare clinical and pathological staging in patients with non-small cell lung cancer submitted to surgical treatment, as well as to identify the causes of discordance. METHODS: Data related to patients treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul São Lucas Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. Sensitivity, specificity

  17. Revising You the Staging for Pancreatic Cancer in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, there were an estimated 43,140 new cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and 36,800 deaths from pancreatic cancer in the United States [1]. This represents the 10th most common cancer diagnosis but the 4th most common cause of cancer-related death among men and women (6% of all cancer-related deaths), highlighting the disproportionate mortality associated with this diagnosis [2]. Why is Staging so Important? Sadly, only 20% patients are “resectable” at the time of diagnosis...

  18. Whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence for staging of patients with suspected ovarian cancer: a clinical feasibility study in comparison to CT and FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michielsen, Katrijn; Op de beeck, Katya; Dymarkowski, Steven; Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Leunen, Karin [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven (Belgium); Moerman, Philippe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, Christophe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Souverijns, Geert [Jessa Ziekenhuis - Campus Virga Jessa, Department of Radiology, Hasselt (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence (WB-DWI/MRI) for staging and assessing operability compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer. Thirty-two patients underwent 3-T WB-DWI/MRI, {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and CT before diagnostic open laparoscopy (DOL). Imaging findings for tumour characterisation, peritoneal and retroperitoneal staging were correlated with histopathology after DOL and/or open surgery. For distant metastases, FDG-PET/CT or image-guided biopsies were the reference standards. For tumour characterisation and peritoneal staging, WB-DWI/MRI was compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT. Interobserver agreement for WB-DWI/MRI was determined. WB-DWI/MRI showed 94 % accuracy for primary tumour characterisation compared with 88 % for CT and 94 % for FDG-PET/CT. WB-DWI/MRI showed higher accuracy of 91 % for peritoneal staging compared with CT (75 %) and FDG-PET/CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI and FDG-PET/CT showed higher accuracy of 87 % for detecting retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies compared with CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI showed excellent correlation with FDG-PET/CT (κ = 1.00) for detecting distant metastases compared with CT (κ = 0.34). Interobserver agreement was moderate to almost perfect (κ = 0.58-0.91). WB-DWI/MRI shows high accuracy for characterising primary tumours, peritoneal and distant staging compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT and may be valuable for assessing operability in ovarian cancer patients. (orig.)

  19. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  20. Optimization of the extent of surgical treatment in patients with stage I in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 26 patients with FIGO stage Ia1-Ib1 cervical cancer who underwent fertility-sparing surgery (transabdominaltrachelectomy). To visualize sentinel lymph nodes, lymphoscintigraphy with injection of 99mTc-labelled nanocolloid was performed the day before surgery. Intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes using hand-held gamma probe was carried out to determine the radioactive counts over the draining lymph node basin. The sentinel lymph node detection in cervical cancer patients contributes to the accurate clinical assessment of the pelvic lymph node status, precise staging of the disease and tailoring of surgical treatment to individual patient.

  1. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  2. Dissection of the sentry ganglion by laparoscopic boarding in patients with cervix uterine cancer clinical stages IA2 at IIB; Diseccion de ganglio centinela por abordaje laparoscopico en pacientes con cancer cervicouterino etapas clinicas IA2 a IIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez U, J.J.; Pichardo M, P.A.; Cortes M, G.; Escudero de los Rios, P. [Hospital de Oncologia. Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI. IMSS, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The obtained results in presently study demonstrate that the feasibility of the detection of the sentry ganglion in cervix uterine cancer using a boarding by laparoscopic via, being necessary the use of twice labelled as much with patent blue and radioisotope (colloid of labelled rhenium with {sup 99m}Tc, total dose of 3 MCi) to achieve the identification of the ganglion. (Author)

  3. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  4. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  5. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  6. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  7. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  8. Preoperative rectal cancer staging with phased-array MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed magnetic resonance (MR) images of 96 patients with diagnosis of rectal cancer to evaluate tumour stage (T stage), involvement of mesorectal fascia (MRF), and nodal metastasis (N stage). Our gold standard was histopathology. All studies were performed with 1.5-T MR system (Symphony; Siemens Medical System, Erlangen, Germany) by using a phased-array coil. Our population was subdivided into two groups: the first one, formed by patients at T1-T2-T3, N0, M0 stage, whose underwent MR before surgery; the second group included patients at Tx N1 M0 and T3-T4 Nx M0 stage, whose underwent preoperative MR before neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and again 4-6 wks after the end of the treatment for the re-staging of disease. Our gold standard was histopathology. MR showed 81% overall agreement with histological findings for T and N stage prediction; for T stage, this rate increased up to 95% for pts of group I (48/96), while for group II (48/96) it decreased to 75%. Preoperative MR prediction of histologically involved MRF resulted very accurate (sensitivity 100%; specificity 100%) also after chemoradiation (sensitivity 100%; specificity 67%). Phased-array MRI was able to clearly estimate the entire mesorectal fat and surrounding pelvic structures resulting the ideal technique for local preoperative rectal cancer staging

  9. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  10. Laser-radiation therapy failures in stage II laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed laser-radiation combined therapy for stage I and II laryngeal cancers in order to preserve the larynx. In the present study, we retrospectively investigate the factors affecting the preservation of the larynx in stage II laryngeal cancer. The subjects consisted of 34 patients with stage II laryngeal cancer treated between 1988 and 1996 and observed for more than 2 years. Cases with involvement of the ventricle or false cord and those with impaired vocal cord movement showed a tendency towards the loss of their larynx. Moreover, these failures required a longer period to irradiate 1 gray on average than cases which led to a successful preservation of the larynx. (author)

  11. Probability of a cure of cervical cancer with relation to its stage and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for calculation of sizes of lesions at different stages (T) of cervical cancer, their correlation and the comparison of 5-year survival rates after combined therapy was proposed. The above method based on the sizes of anatomical structures, proved to be very important for analysis of the efficacy of cervical cancer therapy. Substaging was clinically substantiated because it reflected some peculiarities in tumor spreading with relation to a tumor size. Tumor sizes could differ significantly within the same stage and coincide at different stages entailing a possible difference in therapeutic results. The 5-year survival rate of cervical cancer patients with a lesion size of 1 cm3 was over 80%, and with an increase in tumor sizes over 15 cm3 it was under 50%. When a tumor was 80 cm3 and more in size its cure was highly improbable

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT. PMID:27075745

  13. Lymphadenectomy in surgical stage I epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svolgaard, Olivia; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Nielsen, Marie Louise S; Nedergaard, Lotte; Mosgaard, Berit J; Lidang, Marianne; Mogensen, Ole; Kock, Kirsten Friis; Blaakaer, Jan; Staehr, Estrid; Søgaard-Andersen, Erik; Grove, Anni; Høgdall, Claus

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the extent of lymphadenectomy performed in women presenting with epithelial ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the ovary. Furthermore, the effect of lymphadenectomy on overall survival is evaluated. DESIGN: A prospective nationwide case-only study. SETTING: Denmark......: Descriptive and survival analyses of data from Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The annual proportion of women with surgical stage I disease who received lymphadenectomy and the survival in the two groups. RESULTS: Of 2361 women with epithelial ovarian cancer, 627 were identified...... 2005-2011. SAMPLE: All women registered in the nationwide Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database from 1 January 2005 to 1 May 2011, presenting with a tumor macroscopically confined to the ovary without visible evidence of abdominal spread at the time of the initial exploration (surgical stage I). METHOD...

  14. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  15. Unusual computed tomography findings of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Yuh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radionecrosis (post-radiotherapy laryngeal submucosal inflammation and necrosis is a complication of (chemo radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer that is difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. Case presentation A 67-year-old Japanese man presented with a condition extremely difficult to diagnose differentially as radionecrosis or tumor recurrence after radiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. Although tumor recurrence was suspected from clinical conditions and computed tomography findings, pathologic analysis revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence, and successful therapy with steroids and antibiotics reduced the mucosal edema. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the wide spectrum of radiographic presentation of radionecrosis after chemoradiation of stage IV hypopharyngeal cancer.

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Min Hee; Mok, Chi-Won; Chang, Kylie Hae-Jin; Sung, Ji-Hee; Oh, Soo-young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of women who were diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy at a tertiary academic hospital between 1995 and 2013. Maternal characteristics, gestational age at diagnosis, and type, stage, symptoms and signs of cancer for each patient were retrieved from the medical records. The cancer treatment, pregnancy management and the subsequent perinatal and maternal outcomes for each cancer were assessed. Results A total of 87 women were diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy (172.6 cases per 100,000 deliveries). The most common cancer was breast cancer (n=20), followed by gastrointestinal (n=17), hematologic (n=13), thyroid (n=11), central nervous system (n=7), cervical (n=7), ovarian (n=5), lung (n=3), and other cancers (n=4). Eighteen (20.7%) patients terminated their pregnancies. In the 69 (79.3%) patients who maintained their pregnancies, one patient miscarried and 34 patients delivered preterm. Of the preterm babies, 24 (70.6%) were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and 3 (8.8%) of those expired. The maternal mortality rate was 31.0%, with highest rate seen with lung cancers (66.7%), followed by gastrointestinal (50.0%), central nervous system (50.0%), hematologic (30.8%), breast (25.0%), ovarian (20.0%) cervical (14.3%), and thyroid cancers (0%). Conclusion The clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer during pregnancy were highly variable depending on the type of cancer. However, timely diagnosis and appropriate management of cancer during pregnancy may improve both maternal and neonatal outcome. PMID:26866029

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical stagin...

  18. Endobronchial ultrasound for mediastinal staging in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarize, Juliana; Pardolesi, Alessandro; Donghi, Stefano; Filippi, Niccolò; Casadio, Chiara; Midolo, Valeria; Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has changed the way mediastinal staging is performed in lung cancer patients. EBUS-TBNA is probably the most important non-invasive procedure for mediastinal staging and the currently preferred approach in many reference cancer centres worldwide. EBUS-TBNA is a less invasive technique than mediastinoscopy with low morbidity and no mortality and can be performed in an outpatient setting with excellent results. This study describes the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA and our personal experience with the procedure. PMID:25332380

  19. VALUE OF ULTRASONIC TOMOGRAPHY IN THE STAGING OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Chekalova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of preoperative examination in 180 patients, the investigators studied and analyzed the specific features of ultra- sonic images of endometrial cancer in detail. The comprehensive study comprising color Doppler and energy mapping, three-dimen- sional echography with standard and variable-frequency transducers was conducted using the expert-class ultrasound equipment. A close analysis revealed the high informative value of complex ultrasonic tomography in the preoperative staging of cancer of the cor- pus uteri, in its early stages in particular.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Early-Stage Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Sara Y; Ulrich, Uwe A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of cervical cancer has been a cornerstone in the management of this malignancy for more than 100 years. Today, for early-stage and low-risk cervical cancer, surgery is still considered the gold standard. If the preoperative assessment of the tumor reveals a situation prompting postoperative adjuvant radiochemotherapy, the latter should be planned as the primary treatment option, being preceded by staging laparoscopy including pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection. As an alternative to the open approach, the definitive surgical treatment should be either performed laparoscopically, or be laparoscopic-assisted, or laparoscopically robotic-assisted. PMID:27614875

  1. Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iglesias García

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 4%, without significant changes over the last 50 years. This poor survival rate and bad prognosis are associated with the diagnosis of advanced-stage disease, which precludes the only potential curative treatment - surgical resection. In this setting, the main objective in the management of pancreatic cancer is to perform an early diagnosis and a correct staging of the disease. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS appears to be an essential tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. EUS diagnostic accuracy for detecting pancreatic tumors ranges from 85 to 100%, clearly superior to other imaging techniques. EUS accuracy for the local staging of pancreatic cancer ranges from 70 to 90%, superior or equivalent to other imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration allows a cyto-histological diagnosis in nearly 90% of cases, with a very low complication rate. At present, the formal indications for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration are the necessity of palliative treatment or whenever the possibility of neoadjuvant treatment is present. It could be also indicated to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma from other pancreatic conditions, like lymphoma, metastasis, autoimmune pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis. We can conclude that EUS is an essential tool in the management of patients with pancreatic tumors.

  3. Fulvestrant With or Without Lapatinib in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Stage III or Stage IV Breast Cancer That is Hormone Receptor-Positive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, S. C.

    2006-01-01

    Staging of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) uses the TNM classification and is undertaken to identify those patients who are surgical candidates, either initially or after chemo-radiotherapy, and to differentiate patients who will be treated radically from those requiring palliation and to plan radiotherapy fields. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in staging and provide anatomical information but have well known limitations in differentiating reactive from malign...

  5. Ovarian cancer. The clinical role of US, CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all of the gynecologic malignancies in the USA. In Japan, both the mortality rate and the number of patients have been increasing. This article briefly introduces an overview of ovarian cancer, addressing the clinical roles of imaging studies including ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this serious disease. The content includes epidemiology, a treatment strategy that facilitates understanding of the general course of clinical processes, ovarian cancer screening, management of suspected adnexal masses including how to differentiate rare malignant from a large number of benign masses, and how to evaluate ovarian tumors further based on imaging findings, ovarian cancer staging, and recurrent tumor identification. (author)

  6. Prostate cancer risk and recurrence: the role of nutrition and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, D. E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in Western countries. Knowledge on prostate cancer aetiology is required for identification of high-risk groups, optimization of treatment strategies, and development of prevention programs. The aim of this thesis was toobtain insight into nutritional and clinical factors relevant to different stages of prostate cancer. Methods and results First, an inventory of potential risk factors for prostate cancer was made by asking 956 pat...

  7. FDG-PET for preoperative staging of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of lymph node involvement (N) and distant metastasis (M) in patients with invasive bladder carcinoma is a major determinant of survival and, therefore, a pivotal element in the therapeutic management. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the use of18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in this indication. Whole-body FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) were performed in 55 patients with non-metastatic invasive bladder cancer for preoperative staging. Correlative imaging of PET with CT was performed, leading to a PET(CT) result. The imaging results were compared with the gold standard, consisting of histopathology (lymphadenectomy, guided biopsy) or clinical follow-up for 12 months, and related to overall survival using the Kaplan-Meier method. The gold standard was available in 40 patients and indicated NM-positive disease in 15 patients (12 N lesions, 8 M lesions), and NM-negative disease in 25 patients. For the diagnosis of NM-positive disease, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET(CT) were 60%, 88% and 78%, respectively. Diagnostic discordances between PET(CT) and CT alone were found in 9/40 patients, among whom PET was correct in six (15%): three with true-positive and one with true-negative distant metastases, and two with true-negative lymph nodes. Median survival time of patients in whom PET(CT) indicated NM-positive disease was 13.5 months, compared with 32.0 months in the patients with a NM-negative PET(CT) (p=0.003). Addition of metabolism-based information provided by FDG-PET to CT in the preoperative staging of invasive bladder carcinoma yields a high diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. (orig.)

  8. Changes in Cognitive Status in COPD Patients Across Clinical Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Torres, Isabel; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Rodriguez-Torres, Jeanette; Moreno-Ramírez, M Paz

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease, its prevalence increases with age. COPD is frequently associated with co-morbidities such as cognitive impairment, and their clinical relevance has risen in the recent past. Cognitive function may fluctuate with the variable components of COPD like hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, lung function, exacerbations or severity of the disease. The objectives of this study were to examine whether the cognitive status of COPD patients is different across clinical stages (exacerbation, at discharge and stable COPD) and also if there are cognitive areas that have more potential to change than others. Prospective observational clinical study: 62 patients admitted to hospital due to acute exacerbation of COPD were evaluated at hospital admission; 61 at discharge; and finally, 48 patients with stable COPD completed the study and were included in the analysis. Cognitive status was assessed with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Our results show that all clinical variables improved from exacerbation to discharge COPD. MoCA total score, visuoconstructional, attention, language, abstraction, delayed recall and orientation subscores improved significantly from exacerbation to discharge COPD (p COPD (p COPD all the clinical variables improved; MoCA total score and naming, attention, language, abstraction and delayed recall subscores have shown significant differences (p COPD patients is different across clinical stages, and there are cognitive areas with more potential to change than others. PMID:26667660

  9. Socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer survival: relation to stage at diagnosis, treatment and race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have documented lower breast cancer survival among women with lower socioeconomic status (SES in the United States. In this study, I examined the extent to which socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival was explained by stage at diagnosis, treatment, race and rural/urban residence using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER data. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1998-2002 in the 13 SEER cancer registry areas were followed-up to the end of 2005. The association between an area-based measure of SES and cause-specific five-year survival was estimated using Cox regression models. Six models were used to assess the extent to which SES differences in survival were explained by clinical and demographical factors. The base model estimated the hazard ratio (HR by SES only and then additional adjustments were made sequentially for: 1 age and year of diagnosis; 2 stage at diagnosis; 3 first course treatment; 4 race; and 5 rural/urban residence. Results An inverse association was found between SES and risk of dying from breast cancer (p Conclusion Stage at diagnosis, first course treatment and race explained most of the socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival. Targeted interventions to increase breast cancer screening and treatment coverage in patients with lower SES could reduce much of socioeconomic disparity.

  10. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of pelvic and para-aortic nodal involvement in early stage and operable cervical cancer: comparison with surgicopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodal metastases in cervical cancer have prognostic implications. Imaging is used as an adjunct to clinical staging for evaluation of nodal metastases. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has an advantage of superior resolution of its CT component and detecting nodal disease based on increased glycolytic activity rather than node size. But there are limited studies describing its limitations in early stage cervical cancers. We have done meta-analysis with an objective to evaluate the efficacy of FDG PET/CT and its current clinical role in early stage and operable cervical cancer. Studies in which FDG PET/CT was performed before surgery in patients with early stage cervical cancers were included for analysis. PET findings were confirmed with histopathological diagnosis rather than clinical follow-up. The current data suggest that FDG PET/CT is suboptimal in nodal staging in early stage cervical cancer

  11. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  12. Tailoring Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Based on Tumor Biology or Tumor Burden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribnikar, Domen; Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether to offer adjuvant chemotherapy to patients with early-stage breast cancer has always been challenging to answer. It is well known that a substantial proportion of patients with early-stage breast cancer are over treated, especially when staging and hormonal and HER2 receptors are solely taken into consideration. The advances in our knowledge of breast cancer biology and its clinical implications were the basis for the discovery of additional reliable prognostic markers to aid decision making for adjuvant treatment. Gene expression profiling is a molecular tool that more precisely defines the intrinsic characteristics of each individual tumor. The application of this technology has led to the development of gene signatures/profiles with relevant prognostic-and some predictive-value that have become important tools in defining which patients with early-stage breast cancer can be safely spared from chemotherapy. However, the exact clinical utility of these tools will only be determined after the results of two large prospective randomized trials, MINDACT and TailorX, evaluating their role become available. Notwithstanding the existence of these genomic tools, tumor burden (defined as tumor size and nodal status) still has independent prognostic value and must be incorporated in decision making. In addition, these gene signatures have limited predictive value, and new biomarkers and new targets are needed. Therefore close collaboration between clinicians and scientists is crucial. Lastly, issues of cost-effectiveness, reimbursement, and availability are crucial and widely variable around the globe. PMID:27249737

  13. Lack of BRAFV600E mutation in stage I and II of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mahsa; Kishani Farahani, Roya; Maftouh, Mina; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Vahdatinia, Mahsa; Khatami, Fatemeh; Nazemalhosseini- Mojarad, Ehsan; Asadzadeh Aghdae, Hamid; Aboutorabi, Akram; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to explore the frequency of BRAFV600E mutation in Iranian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as its association with clinic pathological characteristic of patients. Background: CRC is the third leading cause of cancer related death. There is a growing body of data showing the association of BRAFV600E mutation with malignant transformation and clinical outcome of different tumors, including CRC. These findings suggest that BRAFV600E mutation can be used as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarker for management of cancer patients. Patients and methods: A total of 85 patients with sporadic tumor were recruited. BRAFV600E mutation was investigated using sequencing of extracted DNAs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues. Electropherograms were analyzed using Laser-gene 6 software. Results: More than 95% of patients were in stage I and II and none of them were in stage IV. Patients were mostly below 55 years old and tumors were dominantly located in the distal colon. Of note, no BRAFV600E mutations were detected in our population. Conclusion: Our results showed no V600E mutation in the BRAF gene in stage I and II of CRC patients. Further studies in multi-center settings are warranted to examine the prognostic and/or predictive value of this marker in different stages of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27099668

  14. Combined modality therapy for stage ⅠB cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiuan; Qian Shao; Yang Xingsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the current approaches for multimodality therapy for stage ⅠB cervical cancer. Methods:The relevant literature has served as a source for identified high or intermediate risks and management of stage ⅠB cervical cancer. Result:The high risks include pelvic lymph node metastasis (PLNM), positive resection margin (PRM), and the in-volvement of parametrium (IPM). The intermediate risks include deep stromal invasion (DSI), bulky tumor size ( BTS), lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI). Adeno-carcinomatous histo-type is the new risk feature relevant to poor prognoses. Both radical hysterectomy plus bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection(PLND) and radical radiotherapy have proven to be equally effec-tive. Surgery is more performed for stage ⅠB1 disease;radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is preferable for stage ⅠB2 disease. For patients with one high risk or two of intermediate risks, radical hysterectomy plus PLND followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy can improve overall survival(OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Conclusion:The management should be indi-vidualized for stage ⅠB cervical cancer. The optimized multidisciplinary therapy can benefit pa-tients with the best cure and minimum morbidity and complications.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Bipat, Shandra; Barbaro, Brunella; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luís; Fenlon, Helen M; Gollub, Marc J; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Halligan, Steve; Hoeffel, Christine; Kim, Seung Ho; Laghi, Andrea; Maier, Andrea; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Stoker, Jaap; Taylor, Stuart A; Torkzad, Michael R; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European...

  16. Prostate cancer staging with extracapsular extension risk scoring using multiparametric MRI: a correlation with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Lars; Mikines, Kari [Herlev University Hospital, Department of Urology, Herlev (Denmark); Chabanova, Elizaveta; Loegager, Vibeke; Thomsen, Henrik S. [Herlev University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd [Herlev University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Herlev (Denmark)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of preoperative multiparametric MRI with extracapsular extension (ECE) risk-scoring in the assessment of prostate cancer tumour stage (T-stage) and prediction of ECE at final pathology. Eighty-seven patients with clinically localised prostate cancer scheduled for radical prostatectomy were prospectively enrolled. Multiparametric MRI was performed prior to prostatectomy, and evaluated according to the ESUR MR prostate guidelines by two different readers. An MRI clinical T-stage (cT{sub MRI}), an ECE risk score, and suspicion of ECE based on tumour characteristics and personal opinion were assigned. Histopathological prostatectomy results were standard reference. Histopathology and cT{sub MRI} showed a spearman rho correlation of 0.658 (p < 0.001) and a weighted kappa = 0.585 [CI 0.44;0.73](reader A). ECE was present in 31/87 (36 %) patients. ECE risk-scoring showed an AUC of 0.65-0.86 on ROC-curve for both readers, with sensitivity and specificity of 81 % and 78 % at best cutoff level (reader A), respectively. When tumour characteristics were influenced by personal opinion, the sensitivity and specificity for prediction of ECE changed to 61 %-74 % and 77 %-88 % for the readers, respectively. Multiparametric MRI with ECE risk-scoring is an accurate diagnostic technique in determining prostate cancer clinical tumour stage and ECE at final pathology. (orig.)

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of End-stage Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is complicated by substantial adverse events. However, few studies have focused on electrocardiographic features and their prognostic values in HCM. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and prognostic value of electrocardiography in patients with end-stage HCM. Methods: End-stage HCM patients were enrolled from a total of 1844 consecutive HCM patients from April 2002 to November 2013 at Fuwai Hospital. Clinical data, including medical history, electrocardiography, and echocardiography, were analyzed. Cox hazards regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Results: End-stage HCM was identified in 99 (5.4% patients, averaged at 52 ± 16 years old at entry. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 53 patients and mural thrombus in 19 patients. During 3.9 ± 3.0 years of follow-up, embolic stroke, refractory heart failure, and death or transplantation were observed in 20, 39, and 51 patients, respectively. The incidence of annual mortality was 13.2%. Multivariate Cox hazards regression analysis identified New York Heart Association Class (NYHA III/IV at entry (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.80; P = 0.036, left bundle branch block (LBBB (HR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.47-5.31; P = 0.002, and an abnormal Q wave (HR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.16-4.23; P = 0.016 as independent predictors of cardiovascular death, in accordance with all-cause death and heart failure-related death. Conclusions: LBBB and an abnormal Q wave are risk factors of cardiovascular mortality in end-stage HCM and provide new evidence for early intervention. Susceptibility of end-stage HCM patients to mural thrombus and embolic events warrants further attention.

  18. Regulatory manual for staging of cancer by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exact level for staging and making decisions about therapy that will be applied to cancer patients at the Servicio de Radiologia e Imagenes Medicas has been important for the Hospital Calderon Guardia. A template of report or manual has been suggested, with the information necessary for staging a particular type of cancer by analyzing the tomography of the patient. The TNM International System has been used to design the template of report, with a specific technical language and terminology unified theme for the oncologist and radiologist. This system is abstracted in the sixth edition of oncological staging manual of the American Joint Committee and its atlas; resources already acquired, and the helical CT scanner. The experience of the radiologist is critical, because he will be responsible to fill the document.

  19. Stage of breast cancer at diagnosis in New Zealand: impacts of socio-demographic factors, breast cancer screening and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Lawrenson, Ross; Harvey, Vernon; Ramsaroop, Reena; Elwood, Mark; Scott, Nina; Sarfati, Diana; Campbell, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Examination of factors associated with late stage diagnosis of breast cancer is useful to identify areas which are amenable to intervention. This study analyses trends in cancer stage at diagnosis and impact of socio-demographic, cancer biological and screening characteristics on cancer stage in a population-based series of women with invasive breast cancer in New Zealand. Methods All women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2000 and 2013 were identified from two regiona...

  20. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer patients. Is there a relevant impact on treatment planning compared to conventional staging modalities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, J.; Schnitzer, A.; Kaiser, C.G.; Buesing, K.A.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Wasser, K. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Sperk, E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Brade, J. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Medical Statistics, Biomathematics and Data Processing, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Wasgindt, S.; Suetterlin, M. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Sutton, E.J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the impact of whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging of breast cancer in comparison to conventional staging modalities. This study included 102 breast cancer patients, 101 patients were eligible for evaluation. Preoperative whole-body staging with PET/CT was performed in patients with clinical stage ≥ T2 tumours or positive local lymph nodes (n = 91). Postoperative PET/CT was performed in patients without these criteria but positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (n = 10). All patients underwent PET/CT and a conventional staging algorithm, which included bone scan, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound. PET/CT findings were compared to conventional staging and the impact on therapeutic management was evaluated. PET/CT led to an upgrade of the N or M stage in overall 19 patients (19 %) and newly identified manifestation of breast cancer in two patients (2 %). PET/CT findings caused a change in treatment of 11 patients (11 %). This is within the range of recent studies, all applying conventional inclusion criteria based on the initial T and N status. PET/CT has a relevant impact on initial staging and treatment of breast cancer when compared to conventional modalities. Further studies should assess inclusion criteria beyond the conventional T and N status, e.g. tumour grading and receptor status. (orig.)

  1. Sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty of 34 stage C cases have been treated by sequential estrogen and radiation in our hospital between 1980 and 1989 and half of them had actually been done staging operation. An average age was 69.3. Tumor differentiations were distributed well in 5 cases, moderately in 5 and poorly in 9. The other unknown differentiation case was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology. Previously administered estrogens were diethylstilbestrol diphosphate in 15 cases and others in 5. Total doses of 70 Gy in 35 fractions were sequentially delivered to the prostate, involving if necessary the seminal vesicles over a seven-week period by bilateral 120deg pendel using linear accelerator. Radiation field was sized from 6 x 6 to 8 x 8 cm. Estrogens have been continuously administered following radiation in 11 cases. Therapeutic effects upon the prostate were evaluated by digital rectal palpation. Improvement rate and atrophy rate of the primary lesion were 94.4% and 50% respectively. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases and 3 of them recurred within 3 years after initiation of the treatment. Recurred sites were in primary lesion in 2 cases and in bone in two. Five year non-recurrence rate was 81% by Kaplan Meier's method. One of 3 who discontinued hormone administration during or immediately after radiotherapy had local recurrence after 65 months and the other 2 cases died of gastric cancer and unknown cause. Causes of 6 dead cases were one prostate cancer, one gastric cancer, one heart failure, one pneumonia and 2 unknown. The cancer death rate was 25% (1/4 cases). Five year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 59.0%. Our results support the view that the sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for the pathological stage C patients of the prostate cancer may be as preferable as radiation alone for the treatment of stage B prostate cancer. (J.P.N.)

  2. A microengineered pathophysiological model of early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonseok; Hyun, Eunjeh; Seo, Jeongyun; Blundell, Cassidy; Kim, Hee Chan; Lee, Eunhee; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Aree; Moon, Woo Kyung; Huh, Dongeun

    2015-08-21

    A mounting body of evidence in cancer research suggests that the local microenvironment of tumor cells has a profound influence on cancer progression and metastasis. In vitro studies on the tumor microenvironment and its pharmacological modulation, however, are often hampered by the technical challenges associated with creating physiological cell culture environments that integrate cancer cells with the key components of their native niche such as neighboring cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) to mimic complex microarchitecture of cancerous tissue. Using early-stage breast cancer as a model disease, here we describe a biomimetic microengineering strategy to reconstitute three-dimensional (3D) structural organization and microenvironment of breast tumors in human cell-based in vitro models. Specifically, we developed a microsystem that enabled co-culture of breast tumor spheroids with human mammary ductal epithelial cells and mammary fibroblasts in a compartmentalized 3D microfluidic device to replicate microarchitecture of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We also explored the potential of this breast cancer-on-a-chip system as a drug screening platform by evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of an anticancer drug (paclitaxel). Our microengineered disease model represents the first critical step towards recapitulating pathophysiological complexity of breast cancer, and may serve as an enabling tool to systematically examine the contribution of the breast cancer microenvironment to the progression of DCIS to an invasive form of the disease. PMID:26158500

  3. Clinical Implications of the Cancer Genome

    OpenAIRE

    MacConaill, Laura E; Garraway, Levi A

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome. Most tumors harbor a constellation of structural genomic alterations that may dictate their clinical behavior and treatment response. Whereas elucidating the nature and importance of these genomic alterations has been the goal of cancer biologists for several decades, ongoing global genome characterization efforts are revolutionizing both tumor biology and the optimal paradigm for cancer treatment at an unprecedented scope. The pace of advance has been empow...

  4. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...... study investigates the positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET-CT in stage I disease and the clinical impact of the scan results in all disease stages....

  5. Effects of repeated mammographic screening on breast cancer stage distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A randomised controlled trial of mass screening for breast cancer by single-view mammography was begun in Sweden in 1977. All women aged 40 and older and resident in the counties of Koppaberg and Oestergoetland were enrolled. The present report is confined to the Oestergoetland study, which started in 1978 and comprised 92934 women. After randomisation, which was done on the basis of communities rather than individuals, 47001 women were allocated to the study group and offered repeated mammographic screening; 45933 were allocated to the control group. As compliance among women over 74 years of age was poor these were excluded from the present report. The yearly incidence of stage II or more advanced breast cancers after the initial screening round up to and including the second was reduced by 40 per cent in the study group compared with the controls. This effect was less marked in the age group 40-49. After 5.5 years average from the date of entry the absolute number of women with stage II-IV disease in the control group exceeded that for the study group by 44, whereas there was a large excess of cancer in situ and stage I cancer in the study group. (orig.)

  6. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  7. The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics: A proposed clinical staging system for paediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Buchholz, Annick; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Jetha, Mary M; Gaboury, Laurie; Hamilton, Jill; Birken, Catherine; Morrison, Katherine M; Legault, Laurent; Bridger, Tracey; Cook, Stephen R; Lyons, John; Sharma, Arya M; Ball, Geoff Dc

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, clinical recommendations for assessing and managing paediatric obesity have relied on anthropometric measures, such as body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile and/or BMI z-score, to monitor health risks and determine weight management success. However, anthropometric measures do not always accurately and reliably identify children and youth with obesity-related health risks or comorbidities. The authors propose a new clinical staging system (the Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics, EOSS-P), adapted from the adult-oriented EOSS. The EOSS-P is used to stratify patients according to severity of obesity-related comorbidities and barriers to weight management into four graded categories (0 to 3) within four main health domains: metabolic, mechanical, mental health and social milieu (the 4Ms). The EOSS-P is based on common clinical assessments that are widely available and routinely completed by clinicians, and has the potential to provide clinical and prognostic information to help evaluate and inform the management of paediatric obesity. PMID:26941556

  8. Treatment of stage I and II ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    74 cases of primary ovarian cancer treated here previously were classified into three groups, no residual (corresponding to Stage Ia, Ib), cell residual (Ic-IIc) and mass residual (III,IV), and prognoses were compared. The 5 year survival rates were 83.3%, 29.4% and 12.6% respectively. In Stage I and II cases, almost all of the tumor mass would be removed by operation. Therefore the target of postoperative treatment should be the residual cancer as cell units spread widely throughout the abdominal cavity. For this purpose, IPCP. has been performed on 35 cases of Stage I and II since 1977. The 3 year survival rate for this series is as good as 88.6%, and the sites of recurrence were localized in the small pelvic cavity adjacent to the Douglas pouch in 5 out of 6 relapsed cases. This fact suggests that IPCP is capable of controlling the cancer cells in the upper abdominal cavity, but still insufficient to control them in the pelvic cavity where deeper invasion is suspected. In order to improve the local control ability, utilization of the uterus as the applicator for prophylactic intracavitary irradiation came to be considered. The spread of cancer to the uterus was found in 5 out of 38 cases in Stage I and II(13.2%), but silent invasion was found in only one case. These results suggests that the utilization of the uterus as the applicator for prophylactic intracavitary irradiation would be feasible if no macroscopical cancer extention to the uterus exists and the uterus is suitable for application. Several combinations with Tandem and Ovoid have been tested and an adequate method has been proposed. (author)

  9. Dutasteride May Slow the Growth of Early-Stage Prostate Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    For men who are undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer, the drug dutasteride (Avodart) could help control the disease and prevent the need for more aggressive treatments. |

  10. Clinical significance of PHPT1 protein expression in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU An-jian; XIA Xiang-hou; DU Song-tao; GU Jun-chao

    2010-01-01

    Background in our previous studies, we found the expression of 14-kD phosphohistidine phosphatase (PHPT1) was associated with lung cancer cells migration and invasion, and PHPT1 mRNA expression level in lung cancer tissues clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis. in the present study, we aimed to further investigate the expression of PHPT1 protein in lung cancer.Methods Expression of PHPT1 protein in tissue samples from 146 lung cancers and 30 normal tissues adjacent to lung cancers was assessed using immunohistochemical method. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze expression patterns of PHPT1 protein in these tissue types. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between expression of PHPT1 protein and clinicopathological features in lung cancer.Results Significantly higher expression levels of PHPT1 protein were found in lung cancer samples (53.42%) than in normal tissues adjacent to lung cancer (23.33%) (P=0.003). Fisher's exact test showed that lung cancer stage positively correlated with expression of PHPT1 protein (P=0.02), and lung cancer samples with lymph node metastasis showed higher PHPT1 protein expression (P=0.016) than the samples without lymph node metastasis.Conclusions The results of this study agree with findings from our previous study of PHPT1 mRNA expression in lung cancer tissues, and strongly suggest that PHPT1 protein is closely associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of lung cancer. Thus, therapy targeting PHPT1 (inhibition or silencing) could be potentially benefited for lung cancer patients.

  11. Impact of MRI in the management and staging of cancer of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstedt, Kristina (Centre of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Hellstroem, Ann-Cathrin (Dept. of Gynecological Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Fridsten, Susanne; Blomqvist, Lennart (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    Background. Cervical carcinoma is the only gynecological tumor still being staged mainly by clinical examination and only a limited use of diagnostic radiology. Cross sectional imaging is increasingly used as an aid in the staging procedure. We wanted to assess the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to the clinical staging of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Material and methods. A retrospective single-centre analysis of 183 women referred to a tertiary referral centre for gynecological tumors (<= 65 years old) with cervical cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 who have undergone an MRI investigation before start of treatment. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed and any change of the planned treatment after the MRI examination was noted. Results. In patients with cervical carcinoma FIGO stage Ia2-IIa treated surgically, the treatment plan was altered due to MRI results in 10/125 patients. In the smaller group of patients with clinically more advanced disease receiving radio-chemotherapy, the treatment plan was altered in 12/58 patients. Reasons for changing the treatment plan after MRI were findings indicating a higher (n = 8) or lower (n = 5) local tumor stage, findings of para aortic nodal disease (n = 4) or difficulty to clinically examine the patient due to obesity (n = 2). MRI was also an aid in deciding whether or not to offer fertility preserving treatment in three cases. Conclusion. The use of MRI affects treatment planning in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix. The impact is more obvious in more advanced stages of disease and in patients who are difficult to examine clinically due to, for example body constitution. The result of MRI is also an aid in deciding whether or not a fertility preserving operation is feasible

  12. Impact of MRI in the management and staging of cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Cervical carcinoma is the only gynecological tumor still being staged mainly by clinical examination and only a limited use of diagnostic radiology. Cross sectional imaging is increasingly used as an aid in the staging procedure. We wanted to assess the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to the clinical staging of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Material and methods. A retrospective single-centre analysis of 183 women referred to a tertiary referral centre for gynecological tumors (≤ 65 years old) with cervical cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 who have undergone an MRI investigation before start of treatment. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed and any change of the planned treatment after the MRI examination was noted. Results. In patients with cervical carcinoma FIGO stage Ia2-IIa treated surgically, the treatment plan was altered due to MRI results in 10/125 patients. In the smaller group of patients with clinically more advanced disease receiving radio-chemotherapy, the treatment plan was altered in 12/58 patients. Reasons for changing the treatment plan after MRI were findings indicating a higher (n = 8) or lower (n = 5) local tumor stage, findings of para aortic nodal disease (n = 4) or difficulty to clinically examine the patient due to obesity (n = 2). MRI was also an aid in deciding whether or not to offer fertility preserving treatment in three cases. Conclusion. The use of MRI affects treatment planning in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix. The impact is more obvious in more advanced stages of disease and in patients who are difficult to examine clinically due to, for example body constitution. The result of MRI is also an aid in deciding whether or not a fertility preserving operation is feasible

  13. The expression andprognostic value ofprotein tyrosine kinase 6 inearly-stage cervical squamous cell cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoJingWang; YingXiong; ZeBiaoMa; JianChuanXia; YanFangLi

    2016-01-01

    Background:Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) is overexpressed in many epithelial tumors and predicts poor progno‑sis. However, PTK6 expression status and its role in cervical squamous cell cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the expression level and clinical signiifcance of PTK6 in early‑stage cervical squamous cell cancer. Methods:Quantitative reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (qRT‑PCR) and western blotting analysis were performed to detect PTK6 mRNA and protein expression levels in 10 freshly frozen, early‑stage cervical squamous cell cancer specimens and adjacent non‑tumorous cervical tissues. The expression of PTK6 was detected using immuno‑histochemical staining in 150 formalin‑ifxed, paraffn‑embedded, early‑stage cervical squamous cell cancer sections and 10 normal cervical tissue sections. Results:The mRNA and protein levels of PTK6 in cancer tissues were higher than those in adjacent non‑tumorous cervical tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PTK6 was not expressed in normal cervical tissues but was overexpressed in the cytoplasm of cervical squamous cell cancer cells. The level of PTK6 expression was signiif‑cantly associated with tumor grade (P=0.020). The 5‑year overall survival rate of patients with high PTK6 expression was lower than that of patients with low PTK6 expression (81.3% vs. 96.2%,P=0.008). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the expression level of PTK6 in cervical squamous cell cancer was an independent prognostic factor for patient survival (hazard ratio=5.999, 95% conifdence interval 1.622–22.191,P Conclusions:PTK6 is overexpressed in cervical squamous cell cancer. Increased PTK6 expression is associated with reduced 5‑year overall survival. PTK6 expression is an independent prognostic predictor for cervical cancer.

  14. A Correlation of FTIR Spectra Derived from Prostate Cancer Biopsies with Gleason Grade and Tumour Stage.

    OpenAIRE

    Gazi, E

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We introduce biochemistry as a second dimension to Gleason grading, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. For the first time, we correlate FTIR spectra derived from prostate cancer (pCA) tissue with Gleason score and the clinical stage of the tumour at time of biopsy. METHODS: Serial sections from paraffin-embedded pCA tissue were collected. One was stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Gleason scored; FTIR spectra were collected from malignant locations usin...

  15. Analysis of surgical complications of primary tumor resection after neoadjuvant treatment in stage IV colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    J. Arredondo; Martinez, P; J. Baixauli; Pastor, C.; RODRIGUEZ J; Pardo, F.; F. Rotellar; Chopitea, A; Hernandez-Lizoain, J.L. (José Luis)

    2014-01-01

    Assess the surgical complications of primary tumor resection in stage IV colon cancer patients previously treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: Between July 2001 and September 2010, 67 consecutive patients received preoperative chemotherapy. Clinical and surgical complications were obtained from the medical records. This study was retrospective in design. RESULTS: All patients were affected with liver metastasis, and 29.8% had metastasis in additional organs. Three dif...

  16. A clinical analysis of cases with stage IV laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-four cases with stage IV laryngeal carcinoma treated in our department between 1991 and 2009 were clinically analyzed. The cases were equivalent to 16.8% of the total laryngeal cases, and 77.3% of the stage IV cases were of the supraglottic type. The disease-specific 5-year survival rate of all of the stage IV cases was 67.2%. Differences in the prognoses between under T3 and T4 were not statistically significant. Although the differences in the prognoses between surgical and nonsurgical treatment of the larynx were not statistically significant, neck dissection cases had a significantly better prognosis compared to cases without neck dissection. Neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy had any influence on the prognosis. Therefore, positive treatment is needed even though the stage of the cases is advanced, and especially in cases with neck lymph node metastasis, neck dissection is strongly recommended. For histopathologically high-risk cases in which radiotherapy and chemotherapy were indicated in this study, appropriate additional treatment will be effective in order to prevent prognostic deterioration. (author)

  17. The patient, disease status, and treatment options for prostate cancer: stages B1 and B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma palpably confined to the prostate is clinically defined as stage B. Although potentially curable in many, if not most, instances, there is no disputing that the optimal management of patients with stage B neoplasms is one of the most uncertain and controversial issues in modern urologic oncology. The present uncertainty can be related to three major factors: 1) competing causes of death in patients commonly older than 50 years of age; 2) the variable and unpredictable natural course of localized prostatic cancer as reflected by the three, at least in part, independent variables of growth rate, metastatic potential, and therapeutic responsiveness; and 3) the multiplicity and effectiveness of a variety of treatments in producing effects on the tumor favorable to the patient. The relative effectiveness of different treatments has been and remains clouded by a constantly changing array of clinical staging techniques, selection criteria for treatment, and definitions of response, and by the general absence of satisfactory control data. Experiences with patients receiving no treatment, various forms of irradiation, and radical excision have indicated a general similarity in at least 10-year survival rates and clinically manifest local failure rates among comparable substages of stage B prostatic cancer. Since suitable control data are lacking, one may conclude that a variety of treatments offer similar prospects of benefit or that none of the treatments is producing significant beneficial effect and that survivals are a consequence of the natural history of stage B disease. A Possibility that has yet to be evaluated is that different treatments produce benefit in different segments of the stage B prostatic cancer population, and the challenge today is to recognize and define such neoplasms that may respond most appropriately to one form of therapy or another

  18. Clinical Implications of Sarcopenic Obesity in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Isabella P; Mazurak, Vera C; Prado, Carla M

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenia has been associated with several negative clinical outcomes in cancer. However, the consequences of sarcopenic obesity, a condition of combined sarcopenia and obesity burden, have been less extensively investigated. The aim of this paper was to review the current evidence on the prevalence and clinical implications of sarcopenic obesity in cancer. A total of 14 studies linking sarcopenic obesity to a clinical outcome in cancer were included. There is considerable inconsistency in methods used to evaluate body composition as well as in the criteria used to define sarcopenic obesity, which limits comparison among studies. Therefore, the prevalence of sarcopenic obesity varied substantially: between 1 and 29 % in studies including individuals from all body mass index categories and between 15 and 36 % for those including obese individuals only. Negative clinical outcomes reported to be associated with sarcopenic obesity included higher risk of dose-limiting toxicity, surgical complications, physical disability, and shorter survival. PMID:27541923

  19. Biological and clinical significance of epigenetic silencing of MARVELD1 gene in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Shi; Shan Wang; Yuanfei Yao; Yiqun Li; Hao Zhang; Fang Han; Huan Nie; Jie Su; Zeyu Wang; Lei Yue; Jingyan Cao; Yu Li

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic silence in cancer frequently altered signal-transduction pathways during the early stages of tumor development. Recent progress in the field of cancer epigenetics has led to new opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. We previously demonstrated that novel identified nuclear factor MARVELD1 was widely expressed in human tissues, but down-regulated by promoter methylation in multiple cancers. This study was carried out to determine the biological and clinical significanc...

  20. Sociodemographic Characteristics, Distance to the Clinic, and Breast Cancer Screening Results

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seijeoung; Chukwudozie, Beverly; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Timely detection and follow-up of abnormal cellular changes can aid in early diagnosis of breast cancer, thus leading to better treatment outcomes. However, despite substantial breast cancer screening initiatives, the proportion of female breast cancer cases diagnosed at late stages remains high. Distance to screening clinics may affect access to care, particularly for women living in impoverished areas with limited means of reliable transportation. Utilizing breast cancer screening data coll...

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; S.S. Kobayashi; Costa, D B

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGF...

  2. Deformable image registration for multimodal lung-cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) serve as major diagnostic imaging modalities in the lung-cancer staging process. Modern scanners provide co-registered whole-body PET/CT studies, collected while the patient breathes freely, and high-resolution chest CT scans, collected under a brief patient breath hold. Unfortunately, no method exists for registering a PET/CT study into the space of a high-resolution chest CT scan. If this could be done, vital diagnostic information offered by the PET/CT study could be brought seamlessly into the procedure plan used during live cancer-staging bronchoscopy. We propose a method for the deformable registration of whole-body PET/CT data into the space of a high-resolution chest CT study. We then demonstrate its potential for procedure planning and subsequent use in multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy.

  3. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns

  4. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns.

  5. Cancer stage, comorbidity, and socioeconomic differences in the effect of cancer on labour market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielen, Karsten; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Andersen, Ingelise;

    2015-01-01

    Registry to follow 7372 women aged 30-60, who were in the labour force when diagnosed with breast cancer in 2000-06 and survived at least three years. Controls were 213,276 women without breast cancer. Inequalities in employment outlook were estimated as interaction effects in linear regression between...... educational attainment and disease on employment. RESULTS: There is significant interaction between education and breast cancer, but it is only marginally affected by including stage and comorbidity in the regression models. Education, breast cancer stage, and comorbidity all have strong effects on later...... employment, and a considerable amount of the educational effect is mediated by comorbidity and pre-cancer labour market participation and income. CONCLUSION: The result of the study is negative in the sense that the stronger effect of breast cancer on employment among low-educated compared to highly educated...

  6. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in blood samples of patients with stage I breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in carcinogenesis. We developed an accurate multiplex quantitative real-time PCR for synchronized determination of mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA). We sought to investigate whether mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients is associated with clinical and pathological parameters. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with breast cancer and 51 age-matched healthy individuals as control. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for the quantification of mtDNA and nDNA, using a one-step multiplex real-time PCR. A FAM labeled MGB probe and primers were used to amplify the mtDNA sequence of the ATP 8 gene, and a VIC labeled MGB probe and primers were employed to amplify the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase gene. mtDNA content was correlated with tumor stage, menstruation status, and age of patients as well as lymph node status and the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her-2/neu protein. The content of mtDNA in stage I breast cancer patients was significantly lower than in other stages (overall P = 0.023). Reduced mtDNA was found often in post menopausal cancer group (P = 0.024). No difference in mtDNA content, in regards to age (p = 0.564), lymph node involvement (p = 0.673), ER (p = 0.877), PR (p = 0.763), and Her-2/neu expression (p = 0.335), was observed. Early detection of breast cancer has proved difficult and current detection methods are inadequate. In the present study, decreased mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer was strongly associated with stage I. The use of mtDNA may have diagnostic value and further studies are required to validate it as a potential biomarker for early detection of breast cancer

  7. Brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatment choices of stage II (T2N0M0) tongue cancer, brachytherapy is less invasive and superior in function preservation, therefore its role is more important in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate treatment results and morbidity of brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. Between 1980 and 2001, 198 patients with stage II tongue cancer were treated with brachytherapy at Hiroshima University Hospital. Patient ages ranged from 21 to 89 years old (median: 62 years old). Patients were divided into three groups as follows: 119 patients younger than 65 years old (Non-Elderly group), 53 patients between 65 and 75 years old (Junior Elderly group), and 26 patients 75 years or older (Senior Elderly group). Radiotherapy was performed in 101 patients with brachytherapy alone, and in 97 patients with brachytherapy and external radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was also performed in 77 patients. Follow-up period ranged from 4 to 243 months (median: 55 months). The 5-year local control rate was 85% in the Non-Elderly group, 85% in the Junior Elderly group and 81% in the Senior Elderly group. There was no significant difference among these groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 85%, 81% and 70% respectively. The Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate than the other two groups (p=0.03). There was also a tendency of higher incidence of neck metastasis and low salvage rate by neck dissection in the Senior Elderly group. Although the Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate, the local control rate was similar to those of the other two groups. Brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. (author)

  8. Diagnosis and staging of testicular cancer; Diagnostik und Staging von malignen Hodentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiers, Michael; Bender, Karen; Hallscheidt, Peter J. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2010-03-15

    With an incidence of just 2 % of all maligne tumour diseases testicular cancer is a relative rare tumour disease. In comparison to other tumours, orchiectomy is performed as a first step therapy straight after primary staging which is performed by palpation, ultrasonography and evaluation of the tumour markers. In a second diagnostic step initial staging will be done by re-evaluation of the tumour markers, X-ray of the thorax in some cases also by CT, CT of the abdomen/pelvis or MRI of the abdomen, in progressive disease additional MRI of the head. Follow-up after curative therapy will be performed according to the histological type (seminoma - non-seminoma) and tumour staging. (orig.)

  9. Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed with Late-Stage Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed With Late-Stage Lung Cancer British study highlights the need for better early ... more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer than those who are slightly older, a new ...

  10. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  11. Clinical observation of combination of breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy for early stage of breast cancer%早期乳腺癌保乳手术联合放射治疗的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭梅花; 李殿祖; 乔丽

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察早期乳腺癌保乳手术联合放射治疗的近期疗效、美容效果及副反应.方法 42例早期乳腺癌行保乳手术,术后联合放射治疗,采用常规切线野照射46~50 Gy/23~25次,后瘤床补量10~14 Gy/5~7次.结果 随访12~48个月,1年生存率100%,3年生存率97.62%,3年局部复发率4.76%.近期美容效果满意和一般占92.86%.2例局部复发,2例远处转移,2例出现3级放射性肺炎,3例Ⅲ度放射性皮肤反应,无Ⅲ~Ⅳ度骨髓抑制.结论 早期乳腺癌行保乳手术联合放射治疗的近期生存率与乳腺癌根治术相同,近期美容效果满意,放射治疗的并发症可以接受.对符合条件的早期乳腺癌可推广此治疗方法.%Objective To observe the short effect, cosmetic effect and toxicity of combination of breastconserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy for early stage of breast cancer. Methods Forty-two patients with early stage of breast cancer received combination of breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy, whole breast received 46 to 50 Gy in 23 to 25 fractions delivered by conventional tangent field and boost to tumor bed with 10 to 14 Gy in 5 to 7 fractions was given after whole breast irradiation. Results Followed up for 12 to 48 months, 1-year survival rate was 100% ,3-year survival rate was 97.62% ,3-year local recurrent rate was 4. 76%, recent satisfaction rate of cosmetic result was 92. 86%. Local recurrence was found in 2 patients,distant metastasis was found in 2 patients. Two patients appeared 3 grade of radiation-induced pneumonitis and three patients appeared 3 grade of radiation-induced dermatitis. Conclusion Recent survival rate and cosmetic result is satisfactory for the patients with early stage of breast cancer treated with combination of breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy, the acute toxicity is acceptable.

  12. Clinical stage IEA-IIEA orbital lymphomas: outcomes in the era of modern staging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The present study examines outcomes in patients with primary orbital lymphomas who underwent complete staging. Materials and methods: From 1978 to 1997, 21 adult patients at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center had stage IEA-IIEA orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphomas based on staging that included computed tomography scans. Sixteen (76%) patients had working formulation low-grade lymphomas, and five (24%) had aggressive lymphomas. Fourteen of 16 (88%) patients with low-grade lymphomas were treated with radiotherapy alone, and four of five (80%) patients with aggressive lymphomas were treated using combination chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. Total radiotherapy doses ranged from 30.0 to 40.0 Gy using daily 1.5-2.0 Gy fractions. Results: The median follow-up was 84 months. For the low-grade lymphomas, the 5-year local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100, 100, and 92%, respectively. For the seven low-grade lymphomas treated with radiotherapy alone to 30.0 Gy in 20 fractions, the 5-year local control, progression-free, and overall survival rates were 100, 100, and 75%, respectively. The 5-year incidence of complications, which were typically mild, in eyes irradiated to 30 Gy in 20 fractions versus higher biologically effective doses were 25 and 38%, respectively (P=0.62). Of the five patients with aggressive lymphomas, none of the four who underwent chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy relapsed (all four remain alive), whereas the one treated with radiotherapy alone for stage IEA disease experienced a distant relapse. Conclusions: In patients with low-grade lymphomas, a good therapeutic ratio was obtained with low-dose radiotherapy alone. In patients with aggressive lymphomas, chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy resulted in excellent local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival; however, the statistical power was limited

  13. Impact of simultaneous assay, the PCNA, cyclinD1, and DNA content with specimens before and after preoperative radiotherapy on prognosis of esophageal cancer-possible incorporation into clinical TNM staging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Chai Zhu; Ren Li; Yu-Xiang Wang; Wei Feng; Juan Li; Rong Qiu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the present study is to use immunohistochemical methods to investigate the clinical implications of tumor markers in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and evaluate their impact on prognosis.METHODS: From November 1990 to December 1996, 47patients were treated with preoperative radiation followed by radical esophagectomy. All patients were confirmed pathologically as suffering from squamous cell carcinoma.Immunohistochemical stain was done for PCNA, cyclinD1 protein expression and DNA content analyzed by image cytometry. Kaplan-Meier method for single prognostic factor and log-rank test was used to test the significant difference. Cox stepwise regression model and prognosis index model were used for survival analysis with multiple prognostic factors.RESULTS: Radio-pathological change, T stage and N stage, as the traditional prognostic factors had statistical difference in 3-, 5- and 10-year survival rates. While, tumor cell proliferating marked PCNA, cyclinD1 and DNA content served as independent prognostic factors of esophageal carcinoma. There was definitely an identity between the single and multiple factor analyses. PI was more accurate to evaluate the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma.CONCLUSION: It is possible that tumor cell proliferating marked PCNA, cyclinD1 and DNA content would become the endpoints for evaluating the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma.

  14. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero;

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... of this cancer, but other factors potentially associated with advanced stages of cervical cancer at diagnosis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between age, marital status, ethnicity, health insurance coverage, residence in an urban vs a rural setting, and stage (at...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  15. Geographic disparities in late stage breast cancer incidence: results from eight states in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Tatalovich, Zaria; Zhu, Li; Rolin, Alicia; Lewis, Denise R.; Harlan, Linda C.; Winn, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Late stage of cancer at diagnosis is an important predictor of cancer mortality. In many areas worldwide, cancer registry systems, available data and mapping technologies can provide information about late stage cancer by geographical regions, offering valuable opportunities to identify areas where further investigation and interventions are needed. The current study examined geographical variation in late stage breast cancer incidence across eight states in the United States with ...

  16. Formalized prediction of clinically significant prostate cancer: is it possible?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carvell T Nguyen; Michael W Kattan

    2012-01-01

    Greater understanding of the biology and epidemiology of prostate cancer in the last several decades have led to significant advances in its management.Prostate cancer is now detected in greater numbers at lower stages of disease and is amenable to multiple forms of efficacious treatment.However,there is a lack of conclusive data demonstrating a definitive mortality benefit from this earlier diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.It is likely due to the treatment of a large proportion of indolent cancers that would have had little adverse impact on health or lifespan if left alone.Due to this overtreatment phenomenon,active surveillance with delayed intervention is gaining traction as a viable management approach in contemporary practice.The ability to distinguish clinically insignificant cancers from those with a high risk of progression and/or lethality is critical to the appropriate selection of patients for surveillance protocols versus immediate intervention.This chapter will review the ability of various prediction models,including risk groupings and nomograms,to predict indolent disease and determine their role in the contemporary management of clinically localized prostate cancer.

  17. Detection, staging and clinical implications of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the epidemiologic, clinical and pathologic characteristics of symptomatic and incidental renal cell carcinoma (RCC)in Jordan.Results were compared with published Western figure. Records of 119 patients with renal tumors diagnosed during the period January1992 to December 2001at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan were reviewed. Age,gender, radiologic and biologic workup, treatment,features of tumor were reviewed. The mean patient age was 54 and the male to female ratio was 3.4:1. 26% of tumors were discoverd accidentlly.The incidental detction group had significantly small size of tumor.,lower stage and lower histological grading.In symptomatic group woman have significantly lower mean size of tumor than men. A radical nephrectomy was performed in 92% of the cases, and in 8% of the cases, conservative mangement was adopted. The present study showed that the incidence rate of RCC in Jordan is less than Western countries. Significant number of RCC were detected incidently with lower pathological stage and grade. Subsequently these clinically and histologically less aggressive lesions lead to better survival. These data efforts should be directed to the devlopment of screening protocol to detect these lesions early. (author)

  18. The Effect of National Cancer Screening on Disparity Reduction in Cancer Stage at Diagnosis by Income Level

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Hye-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Lairson, David R.; Kim, Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Early detection of cancer is an effective and efficient cancer management strategy. In South Korea, the National Health Insurance administers the National Cancer Screening Program to its beneficiaries. We examined the impact of the National Cancer Screening Program on socioeconomic disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis. Methods Cancer patients registered in the Korean Central Cancer Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 with a diagnosis of gastric cancer (n = 22,470...

  19. Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer Are Not Associated with the Clinical Under- or Overstaging of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinola, Juliana Pinho; Peres, Raquel Mary Rodrigues; Serra, Kátia Piton; Derchain, Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Sarian, Luis Otávio

    2016-05-01

    Purpose to evaluate the agreement between the clinical and pathological stagings of breast cancer based on clinical and molecular features. Methods this was a cross-sectional study, in which clinical, epidemiological and pathological data were collected from 226 patients who underwent surgery at the Prof. Dr. José Aristodemo Pinotti Women's Hospital (CAISM/Unicamp) from January 2008 to September 2010. Patients were staged clinically and pathologically, and were classified as: understaged, when the clinical staging was lower than the pathological staging; correctly staged, when the clinical staging was the same as the pathological one; and overstaged, when the clinical staging was greater than the pathological staging. Results understaged patients were younger (52.2 years; p < 0.01) and more symptomatic at diagnosis (p = 0.04) when compared with correctly or overstaged patients. Clinicopathological surrogate subtype, menopausal status, parity, hormone replace therapy and histology were not associated with differences in staging. Women under 57 years of age were clinically understaged mainly due to underestimation of T (tumor staging) (p < 0.001), as were the premenopausal women (p < 0.01). Patients whose diagnosis was made due to clinical complaints, and not by screening, were clinically understaged due to underestimation of N (lymph nodes staging) (p < 0.001). Conclusion the study shows that the clinicopathological surrogate subtype is not associated with differences in staging, while younger women diagnosed because of clinical complaints tend to have their breast tumors understaged during clinical evaluation. PMID:27187929

  20. Results from phase III clinical trials with radachlorine for photodynamic therapy of pre-cancer and early cancer of cervix

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova; V. I. Ivanova-Radkevich

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical study for efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with radachlorine in patients with pre-cancer and cancer of cervix are represented. The study enrolled 30 patients including 4 patients with cervical erosion, 5 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia II, 13 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, 4 patients with carcinoma in situ and 4 patients with cervical cancer stage Ia. Radachlorine was administrated as single 30 minute intravenous injection ...

  1. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Penile Cancer: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter E.; Philippe E. Spiess; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations o...

  3. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  4. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  5. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  6. MicroRNA signatures as clinical biomarkers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markou A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Athina Markou, Martha Zavridou, Evi S Lianidou Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells, Lab of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Even if early lung cancer detection has been recently significantly improved, the invasive nature of current diagnostic procedures, and a relatively high percentage of false positives, is limiting the application of modern detection tools. The discovery and clinical evaluation of novel specific and robust non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of lung cancer at an early stage, as well as for better prognosis and prediction of therapy response, is very challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs can play an important role in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients, as important and reliable biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostic prediction, and even as promising as novel targets for cancer therapy. miRNAs are important in cancer pathogenesis, and deregulation of their expression levels has been detected not only in lung cancer but in many other human tumor types. Numerous studies strongly support the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer, and there is increasing evidence that altered miRNA expression is associated with tumor progression and survival. It is worth mentioning also that detection of miRNAs circulating in plasma or serum has enormous potential, because miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers not only for the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, but also as novel response and sensitivity predictors for cancer treatment. In this review, we summarize the current findings on the critical role of miRNAs in lung cancer tumorigenesis and highlight their potential as circulating biomarkers in lung cancer. Our review is based on papers that have been published after 2011, and includes the key words “miRNAs” and “lung cancer”. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, miRNAs, tumor biomarkers, circulating miRNAs, liquid

  7. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  8. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer. PMID:27342898

  9. Clinical studies of lung cancer of atomic bomb survivors, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study was made on complications of lung cancer in 188 A-bomb survivors (group 1) and 327 non-exposed patients (group 2) treated from 1972 through 1982. The incidence of complications was higher in group 1 (32 %) than in group 2 (20 %). Complications occurred most frequently in the respiratory system, followed by those in the circulatory system and diabetes mellitus in both groups. Patients with complications in the respiratory, circulatory, or nervous system tended to be inoperable. For patients with clinical stage I or II developing complications, the prognosis was worse as compared with those without complications. Long-term survival can be achieved in two patients with early stage lung cancer in whom surgical treatment was impossible because of the association of severe complications. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. [F-18]Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography can predict pathological tumor stage and proliferative activity determined by Ki-67 in clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to predict a malignant grade of lung cancer by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning, we investigated the correlation between FDG uptake and pathological tumor stage, proliferative activities determined by Ki-67 and cyclin D1, and an alteration of p53, in clinical stage (c-stage) IA lung adenocarcinomas. FDG-PET was performed for 71 patients with c-stage IA lung adenocarcinomas. FDG uptake was measured by a contrast ratio (CR) between the tumor and contralateral lung. Ki-67, cyclin D1 and p53 staining scores were examined by immunohistochemistry. The lesions with ground-glass opacity were found in 26 patients, and solid lesions in 45 by computed tomography. The pathological tumor stages (p-stage) were stage IA in 59 and more advanced stages in 12. The latter had significantly higher CR value than the former (P<0.001). Patients with CR≥0.55 could be predicted to be at advanced tumor stages, with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.82. The CR and staining scores of Ki-67 were significantly correlated with each other (P<0.0001), and both the values were significantly higher in advanced tumor stages than in p-stage IA, and were also significantly higher in tumors with intratumoral lymphatic, vascular and pleural involvements than in those without such features (P<0.05-0.0001). In c-stage IA lung adenocarcinomas, the FDG uptake can predict p-stage and tumor proliferative activity determined by Ki-67. For c-stage IA lung adenocarcinomas showing CR≥0.55, mediastinoscopy or neoadjuvant chemotherapy is indicated. (author)

  11. Differential oxidative status and immune characterization of the early and advanced stages of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Freitas, L F; De Rossi, T; Campos, F C; Simão, A N Colado; Barbosa, D S; Pinge-Filho, P; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in women worldwide. Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation have been indicated as major mediators during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Human studies have not considered the complexity of tumor biology during the stages of cancer advance, limiting their clinical application. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic oxidative stress and immune response parameters in early (ED; TNM I and II) and advanced disease (AD; TNM III and IV) of patients diagnosed with infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cancer. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by plasmatic lipoperoxidation, carbonyl content, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide levels (NO), total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP), superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities and GSH levels. Immune evaluation was determined by TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 levels and leukocytes oxidative burst evaluation by chemiluminescence. Tissue damage analysis included heart (total CK and CKMB), liver (AST, ALT, GGT), and renal (creatinine, urea, and uric acid) plasmatic markers. C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron metabolism were also evaluated. Analysis of the results verified different oxidative stress statuses occur at distinct cancer stages. ED was characterized by reduction in catalase, 8-isoprostanes, and GSH levels, with enhanced lipid peroxidation and TBARS levels. AD exhibited more pronounced oxidative status, with reduction in catalase activity and TRAP, intense lipid peroxidation and high levels of NO, TBARs, and carbonyl content. ED patients presented a Th2 immune pattern, while AD exhibited Th1 status. CRP levels and ferritin were increased in both stages of disease. Leukocytes burst impairment was observed in both the groups. Plasma iron levels were significantly elevated in AD. The data obtained indicated that oxidative stress enhancement and immune response impairment may be necessary to ensure

  12. Clinical Use of PPARγ Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Hatton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of PPARγ in adipocyte differentiation has fueled intense interest in the function of this steroid nuclear receptor for regulation of malignant cell growth and differentiation. Given the antiproliferative and differentiating effects of PPARγ ligands on liposarcoma cells, investigation of PPARγ expression and ligand activation in other solid tumors such as breast, colon, and prostate cancers ensued. The anticancer effects of PPARγ ligands in cell culture and rodent models of a multitude of tumor types suggest broad applicability of these agents to cancer therapy. This review focuses on the clinical use of PPARγ ligands, specifically the thiazolidinediones, for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  13. The development and validation of oral cancer staging using administrative health data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral cancer is a major global health problem. The complexity of histological prognosticators in oral cancer makes it difficult to compare the benefits of different treatment regimens. The Taiwanese National Health database provides an opportunity to assess correlations between outcome and treatment protocols and to compare the effects of different treatment regimens. However, the absence of indices of disease severity is a critical problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain how accurately we could assess the severity of oral cancer at the time of initial diagnosis on the basis of variables in a national database. In the cancer registry database of a medical center in Taiwan, we identified 1067 histologically confirmed cases of oral cancer (ICD9 codes 140, 141 and 143–145) that had been first diagnosed and subjected to initial treatment in this hospital. The clinical staging status was considered as the gold standard and we used concordance (C)-statistics to assess the model’s predictive performance. We added the predictors of treatment modality, cancer subsite, and age group to our models. Our final overall model included treatment regimen, site, age, and two interaction terms; namely, interactions between treatment regimen and age and those between treatment regimen, site, and age. In this model, the C-statistics were 0.82–0.84 in male subjects and 0.96–0.99 in female subjects. Of the models stratified by age, the model that considered treatment regimen and site had the highest C-statistics for the interaction term, this value being greater than 0.80 in male subjects and 0.9 in female subjects. In this study, we found that adjusting for sex, age at first diagnosis, oral cancer subsite, and therapy regimen provided the best indicator of severity of oral cancer. Our findings provide a method for assessing cancer severity when information about staging is not available from a national health-related database

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Stage II Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanli Song; Dong Wang

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in treatment of Stage II breast cancer.METHODS The data from 113 patients with breast cancer of the same pathologic type in Stage II, during the period of 1995 to 2001, were analyzed retrospectively. Among the patients, 47 were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and 66 received no adjuvant therapy before surgery (control group). After the patients of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group had received 2 courses of chemotherapy with the CMF regimen, the surgical procedure was conducted.RESULTS Complete remission (CR) was attained in 9 of the 47 cases receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and partial remission (PR) was reached for 22 cases. The rate of breast-conserving surgery was enhanced from 22.73% to 46.81% (P<0.05) in the neoadjuvant treatment group. There was no difference in the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rate between the two groups (P>0.05), but the 5-year OS and DFS of the cases with clinical tumor remission was higher compared to the control group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can enhance the rate of breast conservation for Stage II breast cancer and may improve the prognosis of the cases with clinical remission.

  15. Multidisciplinary management of stage III breast cancer: chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study, in which women with clinically stage III breast cancer underwent multidisciplinary therapy by using primary (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy, followed randomly by loco-regionally therapy, either with surgery or radiotherapy; and postoperative systemic chemotherapy, in both groups of treatment, was conduced at the Peruvian Institute of Neoplasic Diseases. This is a randomized, prospective, descriptive, interventionist and analytical clinical study. Clinical response to primary chemotherapy was positive in 80,23% of cases, complete resolution was observed in 18,60% of cases, partial resolution in 61,63% of cases and there was absolutely no response in 19,77% of cases. No residual neoplasm, pathologically proven, was observed in 8,33% of surgical cases. We demonstrated that high-dose primary chemotherapy, using only 2 drugs (cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil), used here because of its lower price, brought similar results compared to anthracycline-containing regimens. Recurrence rates were similar and showed no significative differences in both groups of treatment. Both, the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), were similar in both groups of treatment. We also demonstrated that in patients who underwent surgery, the lower the number of axillary lymph node metastases, the higher the overall survival (OS) time. Patients with clinically stage III (A or B) breast cancer, showed similar clinical responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, they also showed similar recurrence rates, DFS and OS, when treated with radical mastectomy or radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Phillip J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Chun Chieh; Jemal, Ahmedin [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fedewa, Stacey A. [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kibel, Adam S. [Division of Urology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenberg, Jonathan E. [Genitourinary Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kamat, Ashish M. [Division of Surgery, Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Virgo, Katherine S. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Blute, Michael L. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC.

  17. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC

  18. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Duffy, Michael J; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher; Verheijen, René H M; Tholander, Bengt; Bast, Robert C; Gaarenstroom, Katja N; Sturgeon, Catharine M; Bonfrer, Johannes M; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Troonen, Hugo; CarloTorre, Gian; Kanty Kulpa, Jan; Tuxen, Malgorzata K; Molina, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. RESULTS: Because of its low...... sensitivity (50-62% for early stage epithelial ovarian cancer) and limited specificity (94-98.5%), cancer antigen (CA) 125 (CA125) is not recommended as a screening test in asymptomatic women. The Risk of Malignancy Index, which includes CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, and menopausal status, is recommended...... candidate for secondary cytoreductive surgery. CONCLUSIONS: At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives...

  19. Accuracy of ultrasonography in the staging of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate staging of gastric cancer is imperative in the planning of treatment, assessing surgical resectability and prognosis. Forty patients with gastric carcinoma underwent preoperative staging with ultrasonography. Ultrasonogram was analysed in terms of tumor localization, direct invasion onto the adjacent organs and lymph node enlargement without knowing the stage of cancer. The criterion of the primary tumor was gastric wall thickening over 6mm; criterion of direct invasion was loss of fat plane in between the tumor and adjacent organs, criterion of lymph node metastasis was demonstration of enlarged lymph nodes over 10mm, Accuracy of ultrasonography was 97% in the diagnosis of primary tumor, 75% in the diagnosis of direct invasion onto the adjacent organs, and 88% in the diagnosis of lymph node enlargement, respectively. In conclusion, ultrasonography is valuable in the detection of the primary tumor and relatively valuable in the evaluation of enlarged lymph nodes but unreliable in the evaluation of enlarged lymph nodes but unreliable in the evaluation of direct invasion onto the adjacent organs

  20. Accuracy of ultrasonography in the staging of gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Lim, J. H.; Yoon, M. H.; Lee, D. H.; Ko, Y. T. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Accurate staging of gastric cancer is imperative in the planning of treatment, assessing surgical resectability and prognosis. Forty patients with gastric carcinoma underwent preoperative staging with ultrasonography. Ultrasonogram was analysed in terms of tumor localization, direct invasion onto the adjacent organs and lymph node enlargement without knowing the stage of cancer. The criterion of the primary tumor was gastric wall thickening over 6mm; criterion of direct invasion was loss of fat plane in between the tumor and adjacent organs, criterion of lymph node metastasis was demonstration of enlarged lymph nodes over 10mm, Accuracy of ultrasonography was 97% in the diagnosis of primary tumor, 75% in the diagnosis of direct invasion onto the adjacent organs, and 88% in the diagnosis of lymph node enlargement, respectively. In conclusion, ultrasonography is valuable in the detection of the primary tumor and relatively valuable in the evaluation of enlarged lymph nodes but unreliable in the evaluation of enlarged lymph nodes but unreliable in the evaluation of direct invasion onto the adjacent organs

  1. Breast conserving therapy for early stage invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To discuss a number of clinical, pathologic, and treatment related issues in the management of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. In the last 10 years, prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series have established the role of conservative surgery and radiation in the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer. This course will focus on some of the unresolved issues in breast conservation therapy including patient selection, the extent of surgery in the breast, and the importance of microscopic resection margins. The impact of adjuvant systemic therapy (chemotherapy or tamoxifen) on breast recurrence will be presented. Factors predicting for an increased risk of recurrence in the treated breast will be presented. Potential candidates for conservative surgery alone with minimally invasive breast cancer will be identified. The impact of improved local control on survival will be discussed. Treatment options for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) including observation, radiation and mastectomy. Results from prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series will be presented in an attempt to identify appropriate treatment strategies for the different clinical presentations and histologic subtypes of DCIS. As cost effective strategies are developed, the role of conservative surgery and radiation in minimally invasive breast cancer and DCIS must be defined

  2. High clusterin expression correlates with a poor outcome in stage II colorectal cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-02-01

    The role of clusterin in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. Overexpression of cytoplasmic clusterin has been studied in aggressive colon tumors; however, no correlation between clusterin expression and survival in colorectal cancer has been identified to date. We assessed levels of clusterin expression in a group of stage II colorectal cancer patients to assess its utility as a prognostic marker. The study included 251 patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry done and correlated with clinical features and long term outcome. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used with terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling probes and clusterin antibody to assess the degree of co localization. Percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining was higher in tumor compared with nonadjacent normal mucosa (P < 0.001). Within the stromal compartment, percentage cytoplamic staining and intensity was lower in tumor tissue compared with normal nonadjacent mucosa (P < or = 0.001). Survival was significantly associated with percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining (P < 0.001), epithelial cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001), percentage stromal cytoplasmic staining (P = 0.002), and stromal cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001). Clusterin levels are associated with poor survival in stage II colorectal cancer.

  3. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Staging the axilla in breast cancer patients with {sup 18}F-FDG PET: how small are the metastases that we can detect with new generation clinical PET systems?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellevre, Dimitri [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Cedex 5, Caen (France); Blanc Fournier, Cecile [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Pathology Department, Caen (France); Switsers, Odile [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Cedex 5, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Breast Cancer Unit, Caen (France); Dugue, Audrey Emmanuelle; Grellard, Jean-Michel [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Biostatistics and Clinical Research unit, Caen (France); Levy, Christelle [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Breast Cancer Unit, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Caen (France); Allouache, Djelila [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Breast Cancer Unit, Caen (France); Desmonts, Cedric [University Hospital, Medical Physics Department, Caen (France); Crouet, Hubert; Guilloit, Jean-Marc [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Surgical Oncology, Caen (France); Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Cedex 5, Caen (France); Normandie Universite, Caen (France)

    2014-06-15

    Point spread function (PSF) reconstruction improves spatial resolution throughout the entire field of view of a PET system and can detect smaller metastatic deposits than conventional algorithms such as OSEM. We assessed the impact of PSF reconstruction on quantitative values and diagnostic accuracy for axillary staging of breast cancer patients, compared with an OSEM reconstruction, with emphasis on the size of nodal metastases. This was a prospective study in a single referral centre in which 50 patients underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG PET examination before axillary lymph node dissection. PET data were reconstructed with an OSEM algorithm and PSF reconstruction, analysed blindly and validated by a pathologist who measured the largest nodal metastasis per axilla. This size was used to evaluate PET diagnostic performance. On pathology, 34 patients (68 %) had nodal involvement. Overall, the median size of the largest nodal metastasis per axilla was 7 mm (range 0.5 - 40 mm). PSF reconstruction detected more involved nodes than OSEM reconstruction (p = 0.003). The mean PSF to OSEM SUV{sub max} ratio was 1.66 (95 % CI 1.01 - 2.32). The sensitivities of PSF and OSEM reconstructions were, respectively, 96 % and 92 % in patients with a largest nodal metastasis of >7 mm, 60 % and 40 % in patients with a largest nodal metastasis of ≤7 mm, and 92 % and 69 % in patients with a primary tumour ≤30 mm. Biggerstaff graphical comparison showed that globally PSF reconstruction was superior to OSEM reconstruction. The median sizes of the largest nodal metastasis in patients with nodal involvement not detected by either PSF or OSEM reconstruction, detected by PSF but not by OSEM reconstruction and detected by both reconstructions were 3, 6 and 16 mm (p = 0.0064) respectively. In patients with nodal involvement detected by PSF reconstruction but not by OSEM reconstruction, the smallest detectable metastasis was 1.8 mm. As a result of better activity recovery, PET with PSF

  5. The 2-stage liver transplant: 3 clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ender; Bıçakçıoğlu, Murat; Otan, Emrah; İlksen Toprak, Hüseyin; Işık, Burak; Aydın, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cüneyt; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of 2-stage liver transplant is to provide time to obtain a new liver source. We describe our experience of 3 patients with 3 different clinical conditions. A 57-year-old man was retransplanted successfully with this technique due to hepatic artery thrombosis. However, a 38-year-old woman with fulminant toxic hepatitis and a 5-year-old-boy with abdominal trauma had poor outcome. This technique could serve as a rescue therapy for liver transplant patients who have toxic liver syndrome or abdominal trauma. These patients required intensive support during long anhepatic states. The transplant team should decide early whether to use this technique before irreversible conditions develop. PMID:25894175

  6. Early stage cervical cancer : quality of cancer care and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Quirine Dionne

    2007-01-01

    To improve quality of cancer care treatment-related information is needed. This could be acquired by registries. Since January 1984, the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) collects prospectively more than 200 relevant clinical and pathological parameters of women with cervical cancer treated in

  7. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  8. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. Single-stage osseointegrated implants for nasal prosthodontic rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Bruna M D F; Freitas-Pontes, Karina M; de Negreiros, Wagner A; Verde, Marcus A R L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors in the nasal region may be treated by means of invasive surgical procedures, with large facial losses. Nasal prostheses, retained by osseointegrated facial implants, instead of plastic surgery, will, in most patients, offer good biomechanical and cosmetic results. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with nasal cancer who had the entire nasal vestibule removed in a single-stage surgical procedure in order to shorten the rehabilitation time. The nasal prosthesis was built on a 3-magnet bar and was made of platinum silicone with intrinsic pigmentation, thereby restoring the patient's appearance and self-esteem. The authors concluded that single-stage implants may reduce the rehabilitation time to as little as 1 month, and the correct use of materials and techniques may significantly improve the nasal prosthesis. PMID:25976710

  10. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI En-xiao; LI Rong; ZHANG Zhen-hua; WANG Jian-bo

    1999-01-01

    Objective: to study the clinical significance of Pglycoprotein (P-gp) in breast cancer. Methods: Expression of P-gp in 60 cases of breast cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. P-gp expression and response to chemotherapy were comparatively investigated in 19 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Results: The P-gp was positive in 48.3% of the 60 cases of breast cancer. P-gp expression was not related to patients' age, menstruation status, number of axillary lymph nodes involved, clinical stage, histological type, and hormonal receptor status (P>0.05). The frequency of metastasis (62.1%) and mortality (51.7%) were higher in P-gp positive cases than in negative cases (16.1% vs 12.9%, P<0.005). The 5-year survival rate of P-gp positive cases (48.3%) was significantly lower than that of negative cases (87.1%) (P<0.05). In patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy distant metastasis occurred more frequently in the P-gp positive cases (94.7%) than in the P-gp negative cases (57.1%) (P=0.0468). More P-gp negative patients (7/9) than positive patients (1/10) were responsive to chemotherapy (P=0.0055).Conclusion: Immunohistochemical examination of P-gp expression is useful in predicting response to chemotherapy and prognosis in breast cancer patients. P-gp positivity is associated with poor prognosis.

  11. Clinically significant and non significant prostate cancer an ongoing question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becopoulos T.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems in urological practice is how to differentiate clinically significant and non significant prostate cancer (Pca i.e. how to avoid over treatment of tumors with low malignant potential in one hand, and inappropriate less aggressive treatment of significant tumors, on the other hand. At the first place, one should estimate precise local clinical stage and the grade of the disease. Transrectal ultrasound - guided prostate biopsy id the golden standard, but there are few dilemmas concerning prostate biopsy: the number of biopsy cores, inter and intra-observer variations in the grading, the significance of PIN, multifocal character of Pca etc. Our opinion is that sextant or octane biopsy is quite sufficient for the exact detection of clinically insignificant cancers. An additional problem is the discrepancy in grade between biopsy and radical prosatectomy specimen. Second, the treatment should not be the same for every patient and it is guided by the age and general condition of the patient. The aggressive treatment is recommendable for younger patients, younger than 70-72 years, even for tiny area of cancer in one of the biopsy samples. On the other hand, it is an ethical question, should we insist on detection of small cancer foci at older patients, and make them anxious and unhappy in their last years of life.

  12. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE BREAST CANCER IN FIRST CLINIC OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, IASI

    OpenAIRE

    Dragomir, D.; D. Nemescu; M. Onofriescu; Marie-Jeanne Aldea

    2006-01-01

    In this study we evaluate retrospectively the evolution of surgical treatment for breast cancer in last 10 years, in our clinic. We analyze time variation of incidence, operative technique and postoperative stage for breast cancer, especially for conservative therapy. Between 1995 and 2004 we treated 474 women with invasive ductal carcinoma (126 – 26.6% conservative approach vs. 259 – 69.4% modified mastectomy). Incidence of postoperative tumor stage was: 6% in situ, 39% T1, 37% T2 and 18% ...

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhu; QU Xiang; ZHANG Zhong-tao; WANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been used as a primary treatment for locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer, and recently extended to operable breast cancer. However, only a few studies have published data concerning the outcomes of patients with stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods This study retrospectively investigated the clinical value of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ breast cancer. The patients in Group 1 (n=54) were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by definitive surgery and adjuvant therapy. The patients in Group 2 (n=43) initially received definitive surgery, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and other therapies. The operability rates for breast conservation and dermatoplasty were observed in Group 1 after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After follow-up, the recurrence and overall and disease-free survival rates of the two groups were analyzed.Results Neoadjuvant chemotherapy increased the operability rates for breast conservation from 17.1% to 40.0% in stage Ⅱ (P=0.034) and 0% to 12.6% in stage Ⅲ (P=0.016), and decreased the dermatoplasty rates from 17.1% to 2.8% in stage Ⅱ (P=0.046) and 28.1% to 8.1% in stage Ⅲ (P=0.026). After a median follow-up of 46.8 months, there were 11 deaths and 13 recurrences in Group 1, and 15 deaths and 19 recurrences in Group 2. The overall and disease-free survival rates of stage Ⅲ disease were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (68.4% vs 31.2%, P=0.028, and 63.2% vs 25.0%, P=0.024, respectively). There were no significant differences in the overall and disease-free survival rates of stage Ⅱ disease for Group 1 compared with Group 2 (85.7% vs 85.2%, P=0.953, and 80.6% vs 74.1%, P=0.400, respectively).Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemotherapy resulted in increased operability for breast conservation and decreased dermatoplasty. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy exhibited better recurrence control, and overall and disease

  14. The prognostic importance of miR-21 in stage II colon cancer: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, S.; Hansen, T. F.; Nielsen, B. S.;

    2012-01-01

    R-21), quantified by in situ hybridisation, in a unique, large population-based cohort. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 764 patients diagnosed with stage II colon cancer in Denmark in the year 2003. One section from a representative paraffin-embedded tumour tissue specimen from each patient......BACKGROUND: Despite several years of research and attempts to develop prognostic models a considerable fraction of stage II colon cancer patients will experience relapse within few years from their operation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic importance of miRNA-21 (mi...... that increasing miR-21 expression levels were significantly correlated to decreasing RF-CSS. Further investigations of the clinical importance of miR-21 in the selection of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients are merited. British Journal of Cancer (2012) 107, 1169-1174. doi:10.1038/bjc.2012...

  15. Association between Metformin Use and Cancer Stage at Diagnosis among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries with Preexisting Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Incident Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association between metformin use and cancer stage at diagnosis among elderly men with preexisting diabetes mellitus and incident prostate cancer. Methods. This study used a population-based observational cohort of elderly men (≥66 years) with preexisting diabetes and incident prostate cancer between 2008 and 2009 (N = 2,652). Cancer stage at diagnosis (localized versus advanced) was based on the American Joint Cancer Committee classification. Metformin use and other independent variables were measured during the one year before cancer diagnosis. Logistic regressions with inverse probability treatment weights were used to control for the observed selection bias. Results. A significantly lower percentage of metformin users were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer as compared to nonusers (4.7% versus 6.7%, p < 0.03). After adjusting for the observed selection bias and other independent variables, metformin use was associated with a 32% reduction in the risk of advanced prostate cancer (adjusted odds ratio, AOR: 0.68, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.48, 0.97). Conclusions. This is the first epidemiological study to support the role of metformin in reducing the risk of advanced prostate cancer. Randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the causal link between metformin use and prostate cancer diagnosis stage. PMID:27547763

  16. Dynamic FDG PET in characterizing and staging lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT has proven inadequate for staging lung cancer. This study evaluates F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing mediastinal metastases of lung tumors, differentiating benign from malignant parenchymal masses, and complementing radiographic and laboratory findings in lymphoma. The authors of this paper examined 13 patients with pulmonary masses as determined by chest radiographs and CT scans. PET scans were obtained with 255.3-592 MBq FDG scanned in dynamic mode at 5 minutes per frame for 45 minutes and one 15 minutes per frame. Image analysis included visual inspection, time activity curves (TAC), and calculation of differential uptake ratio (DUR) in regions of interest versus normal tissue

  17. Chemotherapy for Late-Stage Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Complete Response Rates [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Ashdown

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Complete response (CR rates reported for cytotoxic chemotherapy for late-stage cancer patients are generally low, with few exceptions, regardless of the solid cancer type or drug regimen. We investigated CR rates reported in the literature for clinical trials using chemotherapy alone, across a wide range of tumour types and chemotherapeutic regimens, to determine an overall CR rate for late-stage cancers. A total of 141 reports were located using the PubMed database. A meta-analysis was performed of reported CR from 68 chemotherapy trials (total 2732 patients using standard agents across late-stage solid cancers—a binomial model with random effects was adopted. Mean CR rates were compared for different cancer types, and for chemotherapeutic agents with different mechanisms of action, using a logistic regression. Our results showed that the CR rates for chemotherapy treatment of late-stage cancer were generally low at 7.4%, regardless of the cancer type or drug regimen used. We found no evidence that CR rates differed between different chemotherapy drug types, but amongst different cancer types small CR differences were evident, although none exceeded a mean CR rate of 11%. This remarkable concordance of CR rates regardless of cancer or therapy type remains currently unexplained, and motivates further investigation.

  18. Surgical treatment of lung cancer. On the clinical guideline for the management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical treatments of lung cancer are discussed mainly on the evidence-based medicine (EBM)-based Clinical Guideline for the Management of Lung Cancer (revised 2005). Described items are application of surgical treatment, techniques, evidence bases for certain techniques, lymph node excision, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), postoperative therapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC), preoperative adjuvant therapy of NSCC, and present state and future of surgical treatment. Comments are mentioned in this order as follows. The operation can be only applicable on physiological and oncological (clinical stage) considerations. For respectable cancer, lobectomy is essentially recommendable. Recommended techniques like bronchoplasty are orderly described with their evidence. Evidence is said to be insufficient to excise lymph nodes and to perform VATS. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) of early stage NSCC is not a standard, but chemotherapy (CMT) is recommended because evidences have been accumulated until the revision of the guideline. Evidence is said not yet enough to recommend preoperative RT, CMT or RT+CMT as a standard. Studies of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer are now under remarkable progress as exemplified by 3D therapeutic plan by CT-simulation, heavy ion therapy, stereotactic RT and intra-cavitary RT, and surgery will be still one of multiple modalities. (R.T.)

  19. Clinical potential of gene mutations in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carper, Miranda B.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer type worldwide and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The majority of newly diagnosed patients present with late stage metastatic lung cancer that is inoperable and resistant to therapies. High-throughput genomic technologies have made the identification of genetic mutations that promote lung cancer progression possible. Identification of the mutations that drive lung cancer provided new targets for non-small cell lung cancer...

  20. Vasculogenic mimicry in non-small cell lung cancer and its relationship with tumor stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangqian Lu; Xiao Li; Fangzhen Shen; Wenjing Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of the study was to study the mechanism of vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and its relation-ship with tumor stage in non-smal celllung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:Forty-two patients with NSCLC were col ected, 19 belonged to the early stage (stages I+II) while 23 were late stage (stages III+IV). Moreover, 20 patients got surgical treat-ment and 22 got chemotherapy. We studied the relationship of VM with stage, chemotherapeutic ef ect, HIF-1α, microves-sel density (MVD) and clinicopathologic features. Results:VM in patients of early stages were significantly more than late stages (68.4%vs 26.1%, P=0.006), and the positive rate of VM was proportional to HIF-1α(P=0.034). But no correlation was found between VM and chemotherapeutic ef ect (14.3%vs 26.7%, P=1.00) or MVD (P>0.05). Furthermore, we found VM also showed a negative correlation with distant metastases and lymph nodes metastases (P<0.05) while no correlation was found with other clinicopathologic. Conclusion:VM was generated during the early stage in NSCLC and correlated with lymph nodes metastases. As the disease progressed, VM may be replaced by vascular endothelial cells, so the late-stage patients especial y people with distant metastases had fewer VM. As the main factor produced by hypoxia, HIF-1αmay make a dif erence in VM formation. Thus we inferred VM might be a new target for targeted therapy, and could provide help for clinical staging and treatment.

  1. TNM staging and classification (familial and nonfamilial of breast cancer in Jordanian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M F Atoum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Staging of breast tumor has important implications for treatment and prognosis. This study aims at pinpointing the frequency of each stage among familial and nonfamilial breast cancers. Materials and Methods : Ninety-nine Jordanian females diagnosed with familial and nonfamilial breast cancer between 2000 and 2002 were enrolled in this study All breast cancer cases were staged according to the TNM classification into in situ, early invasive, advanced invasive and metastatic. Results : Forty-three cases were familial breast cancer and 56 were nonfamilial. One female breast cancer was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS cancer. Fifty cases were diagnosed in early stages of invasive breast cancer, of which 31 cases were familial, 29 cases were classified as advanced invasive, where 21 cases were nonfamilial and 19 cases were metastatic stage of breast cancer, with 16 nonfamilial cases. Stage 2b was the most common stage of early invasive cases and represented 48% of the early stage of breast cancer. On the other hand, among cases diagnosed with advanced invasive breast cancer, stage 3a was the most common stage and represented 89.6% of the advanced stage. Interestingly, all cases of stage 3a belonged to TNM stages of T2N2M0 and T3N1M0. The tumor size in all cases of Jordanian females diagnosed with advanced invasive breast cancer exceeded 2 cm in size due to selection bias from symptomatic women in our study. Conclusion : The incidence of nonfamilial breast cancer was slightly higher than that of the familial type amongst studied the Jordanian females studied. The early invasive stage of breast cancer was more common in the familial while the advanced invasive and metastatic breast cancer cases were encountered more often in the nonfamilial type. Our study was based on a small sample and symptomatic women. Therefore, more research with larger population samples is needed to confirm this conclusion.

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer staging: proposed revisions to the TNM system

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Bryan J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) require careful staging at the time of diagnosis to determine prognosis and guide treatment recommendations. The seventh edition of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors is scheduled to be published in 2009 and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) created the Lung Cancer Staging Project (LCSP) to guide revisions to the current lung cancer staging system. These recommendations will be submitted to the ...

  3. Intraoperative radiation therapy delivered prior to lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer: a single institution study

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Wei; Lin, Zhi; Ju, Zhong-Jian; Li, Xi-Ru; ZHANG, YAN-JUN; Kong, Qing-Long; Gong, Han-Shun; Wang, Jian-Dong; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, cosmesis, and clinical outcome of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) delivered prior to lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods: From December 2008 to March 2012, 75 breast cancer patients (ages 34-66 years) were treated with IOERT during breast conservative surgery. IOERT was delivered using a mobile linear accelerator. Suitable energy and applicator size were chosen to ensure coverage of the tumor with anterior and posterior margin...

  4. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Staging and Treatment of Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was intended to determine the role of PET/CT in the staging of anal cancer as a supplement to three-dimensional transanal ultrasound (TAUS) and inguinal ultrasound (US). The impact of the PET/CT on the initial stage and treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US was assessed. Methods and Materials: Ninety-five (95) patients referred to our clinic between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had biopsy-proven primary squamous cell cancer of the anal canal. There were 65 females (68%) and 30 males (32%), and the median age was 58 years (range, 35–88 years). Six (6%) of the patients were HIV positive. All patients were staged with TAUS/US and PET/CT. Results: Twenty-eight (28) patients were diagnosed with suspicious perirectal node metastases. TAUS visualized 24 of these, whereas PET/CT detected 15. Suspicious inguinal nodes were visualized on either US or PET/CT in 41 patients. Seventeen (17) of these had confirmed malignant disease on biopsy, and 15 had confirmed benign disease. All 17 patients (100%) with malignant inguinal nodes were diagnosed by PET/CT, whereas US identified 16 (94%). Ten patients were diagnosed with suspicious inguinal nodes on PET/CT that had not been seen on US. One of these was malignant, three were benign, and six were not biopsied. PET/CT diagnosed eight metastatic sites, whereas TAUS/US diagnosed three. PET/CT discovered three of the five synchronous cancers seen in this study. PET/CT upstaged the disease in 14% of the cases and changed the treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US in 17%. Conclusion: PET/CT has great potential influence on the staging and treatment of anal cancer. TAUS is important in the staging of the primary tumor and N1-stage, whereas PET/CT seems necessary for the N2/3-stage, the M-stage and synchronous cancers.

  5. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  6. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skirnisdottir Ingiridur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Methods Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. Results The most significant differences (p  Conclusions The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome.

  7. Clinical Significance of Mammography, Ultrasound Combined with MRI Examination in Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer%钼靶、超声联合MRI检查对早期乳腺癌诊断的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗凤莲; 漆赤; 何莎莎; 郑婷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the mammography, ultrasonography and MRI examination in the clinical application value of early diagnosis of breast cancer patients. Methods 46 cases with breast cancer confirmed by surgery and pathology as the research object, underwent X-ray mammography, color Doppler ultrasound, MRI examination, to observe the performance of three methods of imaging, and check method to compare different mass, calcification, the internal structure of mass sensitivity of small lesions, compared the diagnostic rate.Results of three methods of the masses, no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity of two two small lesions (P>0.05); mammography and ultrasonography were higher than MRI on calcification of sensitivity, color Doppler ultrasound and MRI were higher than that of X-ray mammography is sensitive to the internal structure of the masses, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). X-ray mammography, ultrasound and MRI diagnosis coincidence rate was 89.1%,82.6%,78.3%, the combined diagnosis with rate was 97.8%.Conclusions mammography, color Doppler ultrasound, MRI examination method for early breast cancer showed that each has its advantages and disadvantages, diagnostic accuracy is limited, and take the joint inspection can maximize to avoid misdiagnosis and improve the diagnostic accuracy.%目的:探讨钼靶、超声联合MRI检查在早期乳腺癌患者临床诊断中的应用价值。方法收集经手术和病理证实的46例乳腺癌病例作为研究对象,均行X线钼靶、彩色多普勒超声、MRI检查,观察三种检查方法的影像学表现,并比较不同检查方法对肿块、钙化、肿块内部结构、微小病灶等方面的敏感性,比较诊断符合率。结果三种检查方法对肿块、微小病灶敏感性的两两差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);X线钼靶与彩超对钙化敏感性均高于MRI,彩超与MRI对肿块内部结构的敏感性均高于X线钼靶

  8. Letter from the Director - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative is focused on developing a better understanding of cancer biology through the proteomic interrogation of genomically characterized tumors from sources such as The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  9. Prognostic impact of clinicopathologic parameters in stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin chemotherapy: paradoxical features of the triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy differ from those of early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of potential predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A total of 145 stage II and III breast cancer patients received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. We examined the clinical and biological factors (ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, and Ki-67 by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed clinical outcome and their correlation with clinicopathologic parameters. Results Among the clinicopathologic parameters investigated, none of the marker was correlated with response rate (RR except triple negative phenotype. Patients with triple negative phenotype showed higher RR (83.0% in triple negative vs. 62.2% in non-triple negative, p = 0.012 and pathologic complete RR (17.0% in triple negative vs. 3.1% in non-triple negative, p = 0.005. However, relapse free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS were significantly shorter in triple negative breast cancer patients (p p = 0.021, respectively. Low histologic grade, positive hormone receptors, positive bcl-2 and low level of Ki-67 were associated with prolonged RFS. In addition, positive ER and positive bcl-2 were associated with prolonged OS. In our homogeneous patient population, initial clinical stage reflects RFS and OS more precisely than pathologic stage. In multivariate analysis, initial clinical stage was the only significant independent prognostic factor to impact on OS (hazard ratio 3.597, p = 0.044. Conclusion Several molecular markers provided useful predictive and prognostic information in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy. Triple negative phenotype was associated with shorter survival, even though it was associated

  10. African American women's perceptions of cancer clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Godley, Paul; DiMartino, Lisa; White, Brandolyn; Odom, Janice; Richmond, Alan; Carpenter, William

    2014-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials are important for resolving cancer health disparities for several reasons; however, clinical trial participation among African Americans is significantly lower than Caucasians. This study engaged focus groups of 82 female African American cancer survivors or cancer caregivers, including those in better resourced, more urban areas and less resourced, more rural areas. Informed by an integrated conceptual model, the focus groups examined perceptions of cancer clinical tri...

  11. Barrett’s Esophagus and Cancer Risk: How Research Advances Can Impact Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Alzoubaidi, Durayd; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), whose incidence has increased sharply in the last 4 decades. The annual conversion rate of BE to cancer is significant, but small. The identification of patients at a higher risk of cancer therefore poses a clinical conundrum. Currently, endoscopic surveillance is recommended in BE patients, with the aim of diagnosing either dysplasia or cancer at early stages, both of which are curable with minimally inv...

  12. Integrating Genomics with Proteomics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 60 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer present as early stage disease (Stage I and II). Despite the favorable prognosis associated with treatment intervention of such early stage disease (typically surgical excision), there are a small, but significant, fraction of these cancers that appear to be hardwired for aggressive metastatic behavior and ultimately lethal outcome.

  13. Ovarian cancer: the clinical role of US, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents an overview of ovarian cancer, which addresses the clinical roles of imaging studies, including US, CT, and MR imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this important disease. US is the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected adnexal masses. Although its accuracy is not sufficient to avert surgery, morphological analysis of adnexal masses with US helps narrow the differential diagnosis, determining the degree of suspicion for malignancy, usually in concert with a serum CA-125 level. Combined morphological and vascular imaging obtained by US appear to further improve the preoperative assessment of adnexal masses. For uncertain or problematic cases, MR imaging helps to distinguish benign from malignant, with an overall accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy of 93%. The accuracy of MR imaging in the confident diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma, endometrial cysts, and leiomayomas is very high. CT is not indicated for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses because of poor soft tissue discrimination, except for fatty tissue and for calcification, and the disadvantages of irradiation. In the staging of ovarian cancer, CT, US, and MR imaging all have a similarly high accuracy. Although it is difficult to suggest a simple algorithm for evaluating the state of women with adnexal masses, the correct preoperative diagnosis and staging of ovarian cancer with the use of any of these imaging studies will lead to an appropriate referral to a specialist in gynecologic oncology and offer a significant survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  14. Clinical prediction rule for nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Nova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin cancer is the most frequent neoplasia in the world. Even though ultraviolet radiation is the main cause, established prevention campaigns have not proved to be effective for controlling the incidence of this disease. Objective: To develop clinical prediction rules based on medical consultation and a questionnaire to estimate the risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer. Methods: This study was developed in several steps. They were: Identifying risk factors that could be possible predictors of nonmelanoma skin cancer; their clinical validation; developing a prediction rule using logistic regression; and collecting information from 962 patients in a case and control design (481 cases and 481 controls. We developed independent prediction rules for basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Finally, we evaluated reliability for each of the variables. Results: The variables that made up the final prediction rule were: Family history of skin cancer, history of outdoor work, age, phototypes 1-3 and the presence of poikiloderma of civatte, actinic keratosis and conjunctivitis in band. Prediction rules specificity was 87% for basal cell carcinomas and 92% for squamous cell carcinomas. Inter- and intra-observer reliability was good except for the conjunctivitis in band variable. Conclusions: The prediction rules let us calculate the individual risk of developing basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. This is an economic easy-to-apply tool that could be useful in primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer.

  15. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Cancer diagnostics: decision criteria for marker utilization in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Sheila E; Jacobson, James W; Lively, Tracy G

    2005-01-01

    A new diagnostic tool must pass three major tests before it is adopted for routine clinical use. First, the tool must be robust and reproducible; second, the clinical value of the tool must be proven, i.e. the tool should reliably trigger a clinical decision that results in patient benefit; and, third, the clinical community has to be convinced of the need for this tool and the benefits it affords. Another factor that can influence the adoption of new tools relates to the cost and the vagaries of insurance reimbursement. The Cancer Diagnosis Program (CDP) of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched the Program for the Assessment of Clinical Cancer Tests (PACCT) in 2000 to develop a process for moving the results of new technologies and new understanding of cancer biology more efficiently and effectively into clinical practice. PACCT has developed an algorithm that incorporates the iterative nature of assay development into an evaluation process that includes developers and end users. The effective introduction of new tests into clinical practice has been hampered by a series of common problems that are best described using examples of successes and failures. The successful application of the PACCT algorithm is described in the discussion of the recent development of the OncotypeDX assay and plan for a prospective trial of this assay by the NCI-supported Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups. The assay uses reverse transcription (RT)-PCR evaluation of a set of 16 genes that were shown to strongly associate with the risk of recurrence of breast cancer in women who presented with early stage disease (hormone responsive, and no involvement of the auxiliary lymph nodes). The test is highly reproducible. It provides information to aid the physician and patient in making important clinical decisions, including the aggressiveness of the therapy that should be recommended. A trial is planned to test whether OncotypeDX can be used as a standalone trigger for specific

  17. Staging N0 Oral Cancer: Lymphoscintigraphy and Conventional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, J.B.; Soerensen, J.A.; Grupe, P.; Karstoft, J.; Krogdahl, A. [Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Depts. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, and Pathology

    2005-08-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1 and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by a gamma probe and Patent Blue. Palpation, Doppler ultrasonography, MRI, and sentinel lymph node biopsy were compared to a combination of histopathology and follow-up. Diagnostic testing was performed using the x2 test. RESULTS: Histopathological examination revealed metastatic spread to the neck in 14 of 40 patients. One patient had bilateral neck disease. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography were performed in 80 neck sides of 40 patients and MRI in 70 neck sides (5 patients were claustrophobic). SN revealed suspicious lymph nodes in 12 necks, ultrasonography in 23 necks, and MRI in 9 necks. The positive predictive value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 100%, ultrasonography 57%, and MRI 56%. The respective negative predictive values were 96%, 96%, and 85%. The sensitivity of sentinel lymph node biopsy 80% was comparable to ultrasonography 87%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and Doppler ultrasonography may further improve staging. MRI and simple palpation results were poor.

  18. Staging N0 Oral Cancer: Lymphoscintigraphy and Conventional Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1 and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by a gamma probe and Patent Blue. Palpation, Doppler ultrasonography, MRI, and sentinel lymph node biopsy were compared to a combination of histopathology and follow-up. Diagnostic testing was performed using the x2 test. RESULTS: Histopathological examination revealed metastatic spread to the neck in 14 of 40 patients. One patient had bilateral neck disease. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography were performed in 80 neck sides of 40 patients and MRI in 70 neck sides (5 patients were claustrophobic). SN revealed suspicious lymph nodes in 12 necks, ultrasonography in 23 necks, and MRI in 9 necks. The positive predictive value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 100%, ultrasonography 57%, and MRI 56%. The respective negative predictive values were 96%, 96%, and 85%. The sensitivity of sentinel lymph node biopsy 80% was comparable to ultrasonography 87%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and Doppler ultrasonography may further improve staging. MRI and simple palpation results were poor

  19. Prevalence of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells correlates with recurrence in early-stage ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Alvero, Ayesha B; Yang, Yingkui;

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells (EOC stem cells) have been associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. CD44 and CK18 are highly expressed in cancer stem cells and function as tools for their identification and characterization. We investigated the association between the number of CD44......+ EOC stem cells in ovarian cancer tumors and progression-free survival. EOC stem cells exist as clusters located close to the stroma forming the cancer stem cell "niche". 17.1% of the samples reveled high number of CD44+ EOC stem cells (>20% positive cells). In addition, the number of CD44+ EOC stem...... cells was significantly higher in patients with early-stage ovarian cancer (FIGO I/II), and it was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = 0.026). This study suggests that quantification of the number of EOC stem cells in the tumor can be used as a predictor of disease and could be...

  20. Clinical, tomographic and pathological consistency in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 55 patients admitted to the Internal Medicine Service of 'Conrado Benitez Garcia' University Oncology Hospital in Santiago de Cuba with clinical diagnosis of lung cancer, from December 2008 to November 2009, to characterize them according to variables of interest for research. Among the main results were predominance of male sex, age group between 60-69 years, smoking habit, and chronic bronchitis as past medical history, and acute bronchopneumonia as clinical form, lung infiltrative peripheral image as tomographic finding and adenocarcinoma in stages IIIa and IIIb as tissue confirmation, among others. There was an excellent consistency among clinical, imagenological and pathological findings.(author)

  1. Stage-specific survival of epithelial cancers in North-Holland/Flevoland, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, O.; Leeuwen, van F.E.

    2005-01-01

    While stage is the most important factor for determining cancer survival, population-based survival data according to stage are rarely presented. We present such data for a large population diagnosed with cancer in the area covered by the Amsterdam Cancer Registry for the period 1989-2001 (n=108,251

  2. Centralized treatment of advanced stages of ovarian cancer improves survival: a nationwide Danish survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Høgdall, Claus; Kehlet, Henrik; Christensen, Ib J; Ottesen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Denmark, involving a total of 1,160 patients with stage IIIC or IV ovarian cancer. Data were extracted for 2,024 patients with all stages of ovarian cancer recorded in the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2008. The main outcome measure was overall survival...

  3. Consensus conference: multimodality management of early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Rodolfo

    2008-09-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment in early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), yet recurrences are frequent. Studies have documented the benefits of chemotherapy administered after resection, but a number of questions remain regarding how overall outcomes can be further improved. To provide the oncology community with direction on these issues, a consensus conference of leading experts in the NSCLC field was held at the Fifth Annual Atlanta Lung Cancer Symposium on October 25-27, 2007. The available scientific literature is presented and when such literature is lacking, clinical experience is provided to support the following conclusions. Preoperative staging should be done in accordance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, but endoscopic fine needle aspiration of enlarged mediastinal nodes can be used, and if histology is positive for malignancy, mediastinoscopy can be avoided. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is not generally recommended but can be considered to downstage an unresectable patient. There is currently no role for preoperative radiation or chemoradiation. Adjuvant systemic therapy is not recommended for stage IA and IB patients; however, adverse prognostic factors are acceptable reasons to consider adjuvant systemic therapy in the latter. Adjuvant systemic therapy is recommended for stage IIA, IIB, and IIIA patients, consistent with recent American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines. A cisplatin-based regimen should be started within 60 days after surgery, but if relatively contraindicated, carboplatin is an acceptable alternative. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for N0 and N1 patients, but is used in N2 patients to decrease local recurrence. PMID:18779538

  4. A germline mutation in the BRCA1 3’UTR predicts Stage IV breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A germline, variant in the BRCA1 3’UTR (rs8176318) was previously shown to predict breast and ovarian cancer risk in women from high-risk families, as well as increased risk of triple negative breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this variant predicts tumor biology, like other 3’UTR mutations in cancer. The impact of the BRCA1-3’UTR-variant on BRCA1 gene expression, and altered response to external stimuli was tested in vitro using a luciferase reporter assay. Gene expression was further tested in vivo by immunoflourescence staining on breast tumor tissue, comparing triple negative patient samples with the variant (TG or TT) or non-variant (GG) BRCA1 3’UTR. To determine the significance of the variant on clinically relevant endpoints, a comprehensive collection of West-Irish breast cancer patients were tested for the variant. Finally, an association of the variant with breast screening clinical phenotypes was evaluated using a cohort of women from the High Risk Breast Program at the University of Vermont. Luciferase reporters with the BRCA1-3’UTR-variant (T allele) displayed significantly lower gene expression, as well as altered response to external hormonal stimuli, compared to the non-variant 3’UTR (G allele) in breast cancer cell lines. This was confirmed clinically by the finding of reduced BRCA1 gene expression in triple negative samples from patients carrying the homozygous TT variant, compared to non-variant patients. The BRCA1-3’UTR-variant (TG or TT) also associated with a modest increased risk for developing breast cancer in the West-Irish cohort (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, p = 0.033). More importantly, patients with the BRCA1-3’UTR-variant had a 4-fold increased risk of presenting with Stage IV disease (p = 0.018, OR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.3-11.0). Supporting that this finding is due to tumor biology, and not difficulty screening, obese women with the BRCA1-3’UTR-variant had significantly less dense breasts (p = 0.0398) in the

  5. Clinical analysis of 21-gene recurrence score assay applied in early-stage breast cancer patients%21基因检测复发风险评分在早期乳腺癌中的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文彦; 王昕; 王阳; 高纪东; 王靖; 宣立学; 方仪; 王翔

    2015-01-01

    目的探讨ER阳性、淋巴结无转移的早期乳腺癌患者21基因检测复发风险评分与临床病理特征的相关性。方法2011年12月至2014年5月在本院接受21基因检测复发风险评分共86例早期乳腺癌患者,回顾性分析其临床病理资料。根据复发分数分为低复发风险组61例(70.93%),中/高复发风险组25例(29.07%,包括中复发风险23例及高复发风险2例)。计数资料比较采用χ2检验、Fisher精确概率法及连续性校正χ2检验。非参数检验采用独立样本Mann-Whitney U检验。多因素分析采用Logistic回归分析。结果两组在肿瘤直径、Ki67、PR表达上差异有统计学意义(χ2=3.167、8.167, P=0.075、0.004,P=0.022)。差异性检验结果显示以PR、Ki67、p53蛋白表达情况进行分组时,复发分数分布差异有统计学意义(Z=-2.671、-2.814、-2.168,P=0.004、0.005、0.030)。多因素分析得出肿瘤直径(P=0.032,OR=3.834,95%CI=1.121~13.134)、Ki67(P=0.023,OR=4.598,95%CI=1.231~17.170)、p53蛋白表达情况(P=0.006,OR=5.390,95%CI=1.635~17.167)是复发分数的独立影响因素。19例患者接受术后辅助化疗(22.1%,19/86),其中低风险组3例(4.9%,3/61),中/高风险组16例(60.9%,16/25)。中位随访15.5个月,1例患者出现局部复发,无远处转移或死亡事件。结论在早期乳腺癌患者中,21基因复发风险评分与肿瘤直径、Ki67、p53等临床病理指标关系密切。%Objective To explore the correlation of 21-gene recurrence score assay with the clinicopathological characteristics in early-stage breast cancer patients with ER positive and axillary lymph node negative. Methods This study enrolled 81 early breast cancer patients who underwent 21-gene recurrence score assay in our hospital from December 2011 to May 2014,and their clinicopathological data were analyzed. According to their recurrence score,they were classified into low recurrence risk group (61 cases,70. 93%) and moderate/high risk

  6. Clinical implication of HLA class I expression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class I molecules on tumor cells have been regarded as crucial sites where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can recognize tumor-specific antigens and are strongly associated with anti-tumor activity. However, the clinical impact of HLA class I expression in breast cancer has not been clarified. A total of 212 breast cancer patients who received curative surgery from 1993 to 2003 were enrolled in the current study. HLA class I expression was examined immunohistochemically using an anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibody. The correlation between HLA class I positivity and clinical factors was analyzed. The downregulation of HLA class I expression in breast cancer was observed in 69 patients (32.5%). HLA class I downregulation was significantly associated with nodal involvement (p < 0.05), TNM stage (p < 0.05), lymphatic invasion (p < 0.01), and venous invasion (p < 0.05). Patients with preserved HLA class I had significantly better disease-free interval (DFI) than those with loss of HLA class I (p < 0.05). However, in multivariable analysis, HLA class I was not selected as one of the independent prognostic factors of disease-free interval. The examination of HLA class I expression is useful for the prediction of tumor progression and recurrent risk of breast cancer via the antitumor immune system

  7. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were ≥55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity

  8. LIM only 4 is overexpressed in late stage pancreas cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Hayato

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM-only 4 (LMO4, a member of the LIM-only (LMO subfamily of LIM domain-containing transcription factors, was initially reported to have an oncogenic role in breast cancer. We hypothesized that LMO4 may be related to pancreatic carcinogenesis as it is in breast carcinogenesis. If so, this could result in a better understanding of tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer. Methods We measured LMO4 mRNA levels in cultured cells, pancreatic bulk tissues and microdissected target cells (normal ductal cells; pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1B [PanIN-1B] cells; PanIN-2 cells; invasive ductal carcinoma [IDC] cells; intraductal papillary-mucinous adenoma [IPMA] cells; IPM borderline [IPMB] cells; and invasive and non-invasive IPM carcinoma [IPMC] by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results 9 of 14 pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed higher levels of LMO4 mRNA than did the human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line (HPDE. In bulk tissue samples, expression of LMO4 was higher in pancreatic carcinoma than in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm (IPMN or non-neoplastic pancreas (p LMO4 than did normal ductal epithelia or PanIN-1B cells (p p = 0.014. IPMC cells expressed significantly higher levels of LMO4 than did normal ductal epithelia (p p p = 0.003. Conclusion Pancreatic carcinomas (both IDC and IPMC expressed significantly higher levels of LMO4 mRNA than did normal ductal epithelia, PanIN-1B, PanIN-2, IPMA and IPMB. These results suggested that LMO4 is overexpressed at late stages in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in different stages of cervical cancer: Prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free radical Injury is associated with cancer, but how the extent of oxidative stress correlates with the FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage in Carcinoma Cervix (Ca Cx, and its significance as a prognostic marker, is not clear and needs an in-depth study. Aim: To correlate the blood levels of Lipid Peroxidation (LPO, Reduced Glutathione (GSH, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, and Vitamin A and E levels with the clinical stage in Ca Cx. Settings and Design: This is a Prospective Case Control Study. Materials and Methods: LPO, SOD, reduced GSH were estimated by Bio Chemical Assays and Vitamins by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Statistical Analysis: The cases and controls were compared using One Way ANOVA and different stages over different time periods were individually compared by Repeated Measure Analysis of Variance. Results: The results indicated a statistically significant increase of LPO vis-a-vis the FIGO stage of Ca Cx and control, while the antioxidant status as depicted by GSH and SOD decreased. Vitamin A and E levels were significantly lower in cancer cases as compared to the control. Conclusion: Increased LPO and reduced antioxidant levels may be taken as associated predictive markers, thus suggesting that Ca Cx cases should get nutritive supplements to contain the blood LPO level and maintain a positive balance of antioxidants for a better outcome in terms of delayed recurrence and better Quality of Life (QOL.

  10. Some Results on Two-stage Clinical Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ming Chen; Gui-jing Chen; Zhi-dong Bai; Fei-fang Hu

    2003-01-01

    Among a variety of adaptive designs, stage-wise design, especially, two-stage design is an important one because patient responses are not available immediately but are available in batches or intermittently in some situations. In this paper, by Bayesian method, the general formula of asymptotical optimal worth is given,meanwhile the length of some optimal designs at first stage concerning two-stage trials in several important cases has been obtained.

  11. The clinical value of serum PSA and PAP determinations in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of serum PSA and PAP determinations in diagnosis of prostate cancer patients. Methods: The serum PSA and PAP levels of 98 prostate cancer patients, 45 prostate benign disease patients and 40 normal subjects were tested by IRMA. Results: The serum PSA and PAP levels of prostate cancer patients were significantly higher than those in prostate benign disease patients and normal controls (P < 0.01). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serum PSA for prostate cancer were 93.9% and 93.3% respectively. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serum PAP for prostate cancer were 71.4% and 91.1% respectively. Conclusion: The determination of serum PSA and PAP was of high clinical value for diagnosis of early prostate cancer. It could be used as an important reference parameter for the clinical staging, follow-up of treatment result and prediction of prognosis

  12. Outcome of fertility preserving surgery in early stage ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the role of fertility preserving surgery in treatment of patients with stage I A, G1 or G2 ovarian carcinoma without adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: From 2006 to 2008, a prospective non-randomized study recruited 150 women, with suspicious early malignant ovarian mass. Results: Among the 150 explored patients, only 43 (28.6%) patients underwent exploration. Only 32/150 (21.3%) patients had proven stage IA, either G1 or G2, epithelial ovarian cancer. Among the 32 patients, 22 (68.7%) patients were nullipara while 10 (32.1%) had one child. All patients had unilateral tumors; 26 (81.25%) patients had G1 and 6 (18.75%) patients had G2 tumors; 24/32 (75.0%) tumors were serous, 6/32 (18.7%) were mucinous and 2/32 (6.2%) were endometrioid, and none was clear cell type. The median follow up period was 58.5 months (ranged: 48- 72 months). Two patients (6.7%) were lost during follow up; data will be presented for the remaining 30 patients. One patient, at 27th month of follow up, had open abdominal exploration to investigate abnormal pelvic mass on routine ultrasound follow up examination. Frozen section revealed recurrent invasive mucinous tumor. She underwent radical surgery with pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, and remained free of disease, for the remaining 29 months of the follow up period. Neither distant metastases nor mortality were reported among our patients.Conclusion: Fertility preserving surgery can be considered a safe treatment strategy in patients with stage IA, G1 of (32 ovarian carcinoma Conclusion: Fertility preserving surgery can be considered a safe treatment strategy in patients with stage IA, G1 of G2 ovarian carcinoma

  13. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  14. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yao

    Full Text Available The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV from early stage (stages I-II cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests.

  15. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Impact of lymphatic and/or blood vessel invasion in stage II gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yan Du

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the prognostic value of lymphatic and/or blood vessel invasion (LBVI in patients with stage II gastric cancer. METHODS: From January 2001 to December 2006, 487 patients with histologically confirmed primary gastric adenocarcinoma were diagnosed with stage II gastric cancer according to the new 7th edition American Joint Committee on Cancer stage classification at the Department of Gastric Cancer and Soft Tissue Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. All patients underwent curative gastrectomy with standard lymph node (LN dissection. Fifty-one patients who died in the postoperative period, due to various complications or other conditions, were excluded. Clinicopathological findings and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Patients were subdivided into four groups according to the status of LBVI and LN metastases. These four patient groups were characterized with regard to age, sex, tumor site, pT category, tumor grading and surgical procedure (subtotal resection vs total resection, and compared for 5-year overall survival by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: The study was composed of 320 men and 116 women aged 58.9 ± 11.5 years (range: 23-88 years. The 5-year overall survival rates were 50.7% and the median survival time was 62 mo. Stage IIa cancer was observed in 334 patients, including 268 T3N0, 63 T2N1, and three T1N2, and stage IIb was observed in 102 patients, including 49 patients T3N1, 51 T2N2, one T1N3, and one T4aN0. The incidence of LBVI was 28.0% in stage II gastric cancer with 19.0% (51/269 and 42.5% (71/167 in LN-negative and LN-positive patients, respectively. In 218 patients (50.0%, there was neither a histopathologically detectable LBVI nor LN metastases (LBVI−/LN−, group I; in 51 patients (11.7%, LBVI with no evidence of LN metastases was detected (LBVI+/LN−, group II. In 167 patients (38.3%, LN metastases were found. Among those patients, LBVI was not determined in 96 patients (22

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  18. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, autoimmune disease, and neuromuscular dysfunction among large populations. A considerable number of in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the most active metabolite of vitamin D – 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol – has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, pro-differentiating, and anti-angiogenic properties. Combined treatment of calcitriol and many types of cytotoxic agents has synergistic or at least additive effects. However, clinical trials testing these hypotheses have been less encouraging, though a number of methodological, pharmacological, and pharmaceutical issues confound all trials ever conducted. In order to properly assess the clinical value of vitamin D, its metabolites and analogs in cancer prevention and treatment, more studies are needed. PMID:21872802

  19. Oral cancer or periimplantitis: A clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sudhir; Rattan, Vidya; Panda, Naresh; Vaiphei, Kim; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to draw attention to a periimplantitis-like clinical presentation of oral malignancy around dental implants, a phenomenon that may develop without any associated risk factors for oral cancer. Such a benign appearance of oral malignancy may lead to delay in the diagnosis and initiation of ensuing treatment. Therefore, chronic nonhealing inflammatory lesions around dental implants should be considered as highly suspicious. PMID:26803178

  20. Therapeutic regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and immune response to cancer vaccine in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Iclozan, Cristina; Antonia, Scott; Chiappori, Alberto; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major factors limiting the efficacy of immune therapy. In a clinical trial of patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) we tested the possibility that targeting MDSC can improve the induction of immune responses by a cancer vaccine. Forty-one patients with extensive stage SCLC were randomized into three arms: arm A - control, arm B - vaccination with dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53, and arm C – vaccination ...

  1. Immune checkpoints in cancer clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elad Sharon; Howard Streicher; Priscila Goncalves; Helen XChen

    2014-01-01

    Immunology-based therapy is rapidly developing into an effective treatment option for a surprising range of cancers. We have learned over the last decade that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called“immune checkpoints.” These checkpoints serve to control or turn off the immune response when it is no longer needed to prevent tissue injury and autoimmunity. Cancer cells have learned or evolved to use these mechanisms to evade immune control and elimination. The development of a new therapeutic class of drugs that inhibit these inhibitory pathways has recently emerged as a potent strategy in oncology. Three sets of agents have emerged in clinical trials exploiting this strategy. These agents are antibody-based therapies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death1 (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). These inhibitors of immune inhibition have demonstrated extensive activity as single agents and in combinations. Clinical responses have been seen in melanoma, renal cellcarcinoma, non-smal celllung cancer, and several other tumor types. Despite the autoimmune or inflammatory immune-mediated adverse effects which have been seen, the responses and overall survival benefits exhibited thus far warrant further clinical development.

  2. Stage-to-Stage Comparison of Preoperative and Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for T3 Mid or Distal Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate, in a comparative analysis, the prognostic implications of postchemoradiotherapy (post-CRT) pathologic stage (ypStage) vs. postoperative pathologic stage (pStage) in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2006, 487 patients with T3 mid or distal rectal cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Concurrent CRT was administered preoperatively (n = 364, 74.7%) or postoperatively (n = 123, 25.3%). The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. All patients underwent a total mesorectal excision and received adjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in DFS, stratified by ypStage and pStage, were compared using the log–rank test. Results: For surviving patients, the median follow-up period was 68 months (range, 12–105 months). The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was not different, at 95.3% and 92.1% in preoperative and postoperative CRT groups, respectively (p = 0.402), but the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was significantly different, at 81.6% (preoperative CRT) vs. 65.4% (postoperative CRT; p = 0.001). The 5-year DFS rate of 78.8% in the preoperative CRT group was significantly better than the 63.0% rate in the postoperative CRT group (p = 0.002). Post-CRT pathologic Stage 0–I occurred in 42.6% (155 of 364) of the patients with preoperative CRT. The 5–year DFS rates were 90.2% (ypStage 0–I), 83.5% (ypStage II), 77.3% (pStage II), 58.6% (ypStage III), and 54.7% (pStage III). The DFS rate of ypStage 0–I was significantly better than that of ypStage II or pStage II. Post-CRT pathologic Stage II and III had similar DFS, compared with pStage II and III, respectively. Conclusions: Disease-free survival predicted by each ypStage was similar to that predicted by the respective pStage. Improved DFS with preoperative vs. postoperative CRT was associated with the ypStage 0–I group that showed a similarly favorable outcome to pStage

  3. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  4. Dependence of therapeutic gain factor on stage of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve therapeutic gain, unconventional dose per fraction has been employed in radiotherapy, in addition to the conventional dose per fraction of 2 Gy. Dose fractionation factor (DFF) and therapeutic gain factor (TGF) have been utilised to test the efficiency of such unconventional fractionation schedules. In this study, isoeffective dose for 100% tumour regression and mucosal and skin reactions were estimated. CRE, TDF and ERD values for tumour and normal tissue reactions were evaluated. DEF and TGF values have been determined on the basis of dose, CRE, TDF and ERD, in order to understand the influence of these bioeffect models and stage of cancer on TGF associated with differing fractionation schedules. There was a noticeable difference in TGF values determined on the basis of four criteria, which is in agreement with radiobiological phenomenon, that tissues with different α/β values differ in their responsiveness. (author)

  5. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Santos Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  6. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  7. Clinical and prognostic significance of plasma fibrinogen in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hyperfibrinogenemia is a common problem associated with various carcinomas. The recent studies have shown that high plasma fibrinogen concentration is associated with invasion, growth and metastases of cancer. Furthermore, the recent studies focus on the prognostic significance of fibrinogen in the patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IIIB -IV. However, the prognostic significance of the plasma fibrinogen levels in early stage NSCLC patients (stage I -IIIA still remains unclear. In addition, it remains unclear whether or not chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen level relate to the prognosis. The aims of this study were to 1 further explore the relationship between the plasma fibrinogen concentration and the stage and metastases of lung cancer 2 evaluate the prognostic significance of the basal plasma fibrinogen level in patients with lung cancer 3 explore the prognostic value of the change in fibrinogen levels between pre and post-chemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, the data from 370 patients with lung cancer were enrolled into this study. The plasma fibrinogen levels were compared with the clinical and prognostic significance of lung cancer. The association between the plasma fibrinogen level and clinical-prognostic characteristics were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 software. Results: 1 The median pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels were 4.20g/L. Pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels correlated significantly with gender (p = 0.013. A higher plasma fibrinogen concentration was associated with squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma (4.83±1.50 g/L versus 4.15±1.30 g/L; P<0.001, there was a significant association between plasma fibrinogen level and metastases of lung cancer, pointing a higher plasma fibrinogen level in lymph nodes or distant organ metastases (p < 0.001. 2 Patients with low plasma fibrinogen concentration demonstrates higher overall survival compared with those with high plasma fibrinogen

  8. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in blood samples of patients with stage I breast cancer

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    Fokas Emmanouil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been implicated in carcinogenesis. We developed an accurate multiplex quantitative real-time PCR for synchronized determination of mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA. We sought to investigate whether mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients is associated with clinical and pathological parameters. Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with breast cancer and 51 age-matched healthy individuals as control. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for the quantification of mtDNA and nDNA, using a one-step multiplex real-time PCR. A FAM labeled MGB probe and primers were used to amplify the mtDNA sequence of the ATP 8 gene, and a VIC labeled MGB probe and primers were employed to amplify the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase gene. mtDNA content was correlated with tumor stage, menstruation status, and age of patients as well as lymph node status and the expression of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and Her-2/neu protein. Results The content of mtDNA in stage I breast cancer patients was significantly lower than in other stages (overall P = 0.023. Reduced mtDNA was found often in post menopausal cancer group (P = 0.024. No difference in mtDNA content, in regards to age (p = 0.564, lymph node involvement (p = 0.673, ER (p = 0.877, PR (p = 0.763, and Her-2/neu expression (p = 0.335, was observed. Conclusion Early detection of breast cancer has proved difficult and current detection methods are inadequate. In the present study, decreased mtDNA content in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer was strongly associated with stage I. The use of mtDNA may have diagnostic value and further studies are required to validate it as a potential biomarker for early detection of breast cancer.

  9. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    OpenAIRE

    Sroufe, Rameses; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternativ...

  10. A comparison of endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy and positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography in lung cancer staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S S; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...... had both procedures performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 27 patients considered to be potential candidates for resection of NSCLC underwent PET/CT and EUS-FNA. Diagnoses were confirmed either by open thoracotomy, mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up. Advanced lung cancer was defined as tumour...

  11. Prediction of survival in patients with Stage IV kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Mirilenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment was evaluated and the predictors of adjusted survival (AS were identified in patients with disseminated kidney cancer treated at the Republican Research and Practical Center for Oncology and Medical Radiology in 1999 to 2011 (A.E. Okeanov, P.I. Moiseev, L.F. Levin. Malignant tumors in Belarus, 2001–2012. Edited by O.G. Sukonko. Seven factors (regional lymph node metastases; distant bone metastases; a high-grade tumor; sarcomatous tumor differentiation; hemoglobin levels of < 125 g/l in women and < 150 g/l in men; an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 40 mm/h; palliative surgery were found to have an independent, unfavorable impact on AS. A multidimensional model was built to define what risk group low (no more than 2 poor factors, moderate (3–4 poor factors, and high (more than 4 poor factors the patients with Stage IV kidney cancer belonged to. In these groups, the median survival was 34.7, 17.2, and 4.0 months and 3-year AS rates were 48.6, 24.6, and 3.2 %, respectively. 

  12. Clinical Study on Thyroid Cancer (The 3rd Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical features of 406 patients with histologically verified thyroid carcinomas were investigated from May, 1978 to April, 1985 at the Seoul National University Hospital with the following results. 1) The incidence of thyroid cancer according to their histological classification was 79. 8% of papillary carcinoma, 14.5% of follicular carcinoma, 1.5% of medullary carcinoma, 2.2% of anaplastic carcinoma, 2 cases of squamous carcinoma and 3 cases of lymphoma. 2) The age distribution showed the peak incidence in the fourth decade (25.1%), followed by the fifth and the third decade. 3) The ratio of male to female patients was 1:6.1. The ratio is 1:5.9 in papillary carcinoma and 1:8.8 in follicular carcinoma. 4) The mean age was 40.2 year in papillary carcinoma, 37.4 year in follicular carcinoma, 36.5 year in medullary carcinoma, 60.3 year in anaplastic carcinoma, 62.0 year in squamous carcinoma, 59.7 year in lymphoma. 5) The diameter of the thyroid masses was smaller than 1.5 cm in 19.9% of the patients, from 1.5 cm to 5 cm in 50.5%, from 5 cm to 10 cm in 25.4% and larger than 10 cm in 25.4%. 6) Metastasis to the regional lymph nodes at diagnosis was noted in 44.2% of total patients, and distant metastasis was 5%, and local infiltration was 44.2%. 7) The clinical staging was revealed 42.1% of the patients in stage I, 9.1% in stage II, 35.7% in stage III, 5.2% in stage IV, and 7.9% in undetermined stage.

  13. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Mediastinal lymph nodes staging by 18F-FDG PET/CT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer: A multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accurate staging of mediastinal lymph nodes metastases is critical for determining the application of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this multicenter study the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT to detect lymph node metastases was evaluated for early stage NSCLC. Materials and methods: The data from the patients with stage1 NSCLC who received preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT staging and radical surgery was retrospectively reviewed of five centers from February 2004 to August 2010. The lymph node metastases were confirmed histopathologically after radical surgery. And the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for PET/CT staging. Results: Two hundred patients were enrolled. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV for lymph node metastases on PET/CT were 44%, 83%, 78%, 29% and 91%, respectively. There were eight and 19 cases positive for lymph node metastases with central (n = 62) and peripheral (n = 138) NSCLC (P > 0.05), respectively. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT was specific in N0 staging for T1–2 NSCLC. The NPV was about 91% in clinical N0 patients, suggested that 18F-FDG PET/CT may help to accurately stage N0 patients and thus identify patients for SBRT.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  17. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m2) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  18. Are Early Relapses in Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer Doomed to a Poor Prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Fabien; Guerby, Paul; Luyckx, Mathieu; Haddad, Pascale; Stoeckle, Eberhard; Morice, Philippe; Leblanc, Eric; Lecuru, Fabrice; Daraï, Emile; Classe, Jean Marc; Pomel, Christophe; Filleron, Thomas; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early recurrence (ER) after completion of therapeutic regimen in advanced-stage ovarian cancer is a challenging clinical situation. Patients are perceived as invariably having a poor prognosis. We investigated the possibility of defining different prognostic subgroups and the parameters implicated in prognosis of ER patients. Study Design We analyzed a multi-centric database of 527 FIGO stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer patients. We defined patients relapsing within 12 months as ER and investigated using Cox logistic regression the prognostic factors in ER group. We subsequently divided ER patients into good and poor prognosis groups according to a lower or higher overall survival (OS) at 12 months after relapse and determined parameters associated to poor prognosis. Results The median follow up was 49 months. One hundred and thirty eight patients recurred within 12 months. OS and Disease Free Survival (DFS) were 24.6 and 8.6 months, respectively, in this group of patients. Among the ER patients, 73 had a poor prognosis with an OS after relapse below 12 months (mean OS = 5.2 months) and 65 survived after one year (mean OS = 26.9 months). Residual disease (RD) after debulking surgery and mucinous histological subtype negatively impacted prognosis (HR = 1.758, p = 0.017 and HR = 8.641, p = 0.001 respectively). The relative risk of death within 12 months following relapse in ER patients was 1.61 according to RD status. However, RD did not affect DFS (HR = 0.889, p = 0.5). Conclusion ER in advanced-stage ovarian cancer does not inevitably portend a short-term poor prognosis. RD status after initial cytoreduction strongly modulates OS, that gives additional support to the concept of maximum surgical effort even in patients who will experience early recurrence. The heterogeneity in outcomes within the ER group suggests a role for tumor biology in addition to classical clinical parameters. PMID:26820579

  19. Mechanistic basis and clinical relevance of the role of transforming growth factor-βin cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-Long Lin; Lu-Jun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) is a key factor in cancer development and progression. TGF-βcan suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting cell cycle progression and stimulating apoptosis in early stages of cancer progression. However, TGF-βcan modulate cancer-related processes, such as cell invasion, distant metastasis, and microenvironment modiifcation that may be used by cancer cells to their advantage in late stages. Corresponding mechanisms include angiogenesis promotion, anti-tumor immunity suppression, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. hTe correlation between TGF-βexpression and cancer prognosis has also been extensively investigated. Results suggest that TGF-βpathway can be targeted to treat cancer;as such, the feasibility of this treatment is investigated in clinical trials.

  20. Epidemiological and clinical profile of triple negative breast cancer at a cancer hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recent concept and the burning topic of research today. Various studies have been reported in western literature on TNBCs or the similar group of basal like cancers, all highlighting the poor prognostic features of this molecular subtype in comparison to the other types of breast cancers. However extensive data from India is lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical profile of TNBcs at our institute. Materials and Methods: Data on 171 patients of TNBCs registered at this hospital between 2005 and 2008 and followed up until December 2010 was collected and reviewed for epidemiological and clinical features. Results: The median age at presentation was 49 years (22-75 years. Sixty eight patients (40% had lump in the breast of less than 1 month duration. Fourteen (8% were nulliparous and 10 (7% patients had crossed the age of 30 years at first full-term pregnancy, 89 (52% were pre or peri-menopausal at presentation. Only 8 (5% patients had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. One hundred and six (62% patients were stage II, 26 (15% stage III, 21 (12% stage I and 18 (10% stage IV at presentation. One hundred and twenty eight patients (75% had early breast cancer eligible for surgery at presentation, 25 (15% were locally advanced and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT and 18 (10% were found to be metastatic. Modified radical mastectomy was the preferred surgical option by most patients (76% who underwent upfront surgery in our study. The pathological overall response rates (complete and partial response after NACT was 75% with complete response rate of 25% and there were no relapses in the complete responders. The median follow-up was 30 months (9-70 months. One hundred and twenty two patients (71% were alive at last follow-up, 34 (22% had relapsed, 18 (11% had died due to progressive disease. Thirty one patients (18% were lost to follow-up. Most of